dedicated to the support of living musicians and composers

Posts tagged “Olivia Giovetti

From Cued Up at Q2: “Millennial Mavericks”

i1

Cued Up On Q2 streams Sundays at 2PM on Q2; encores Tuesdays at 8PM and Thursdays at 4PM on Q2

Live performances by NOW Ensemble, Victoire, the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and More

“As Q2 Music prepares to go all-American Mavericks all the time next month, we’ve been doing a lot of listening to Varèse, Copland, Harrison, Cage, Monk and more. But while we’ve been excited to see the return of a concert series given in 2000 by Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony, we can’t help but think of the new mavericks.

So taking as a springboard the styles of our 20th-century Mavericks, we’re looking today at in-concert recordings from composers who in this century challenge and redefine the way music is created and consumed.

There are nods to the greats of the past (such as Sergei Prokofiev’s grandson, Gabriel Prokofiev), but the present has a mightily different face. We’ll hear from Missy Mazzoli’s rockstar quintet Victoire live at Chelesea’s Look and Listen Festival, blending the lines between rock and classical (we’ll hear more to that end with music from Radiohead’s Johnny Greenwood). And we’ll hit up the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center for a trio by juggernaut composer Kevin Puts.

There will also be hints of social consciousness in by the NOW Ensemble of Judd Greenstein’s Change and Ensemble 212 of Tahrir by Mohammed Fairouz, and selections from concert series like the Ecstatic Music Festival and SONiC. All told, various threads of the contemporary zeitgeist will weave together in two hours of musical bliss.”

This edition of Cued Up is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

I wish to again remind readers that rthey can still access, enjoy and learn from the original American Public Media radio project American Mavericks.

While Minnesota Public Radio has taken down most of the audio, you can still access the text materials.


From The New Canon at Q2: “Maverick Roll with Jennifer Koh “

i1

The New Canon streams Fridays at 1PM on Q2 Music; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Bringing the “M” Word Back to Music

“On The New Canon this week, we gear up for American Mavericks with the festival’s featured violinist Jennifer Koh, asking: What makes a maverick?

jk
Jennifer Koh

Twelve years ago, Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony presented twelve concerts honoring American composers who pushed the boundaries of classical music in the 20th Century, redefining the parameters of American sound and our contribution to a European-born genre. Twelve years later, as the SFS celebrates its own centennial, American Mavericks is back with a vivacious vengeance starting in the Bay Area before docking at Carnegie Hall.

We welcome to The New Canon Maverick violinist Jennifer Koh, who has no small relationship to some of the featured composers (from Adams to Cage), indulging in a sonic star-spangled banner of daring musicians that have forged our national sonic identity. As we listen to some of these composers in action, we invite you to join us in asking Koh, What makes a maverick? And who are our 21st-century mavericks?”

See the full article here, complete with some interactive utilities.

Q2 did not mention the American Public Media project inspired by MTT’s SFS and also named American Mavericks, a 13 week radio project guided by MTT and hosted by Suzanne Vega. While some of the audio features are no longer available, there is a vast treasure trove of material still available. Pease visit the site to learn more.The thirteen essays by Kyle Gann give quite a history of all of American music.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From Cued Up at Q2: “Acoustic Music That Sounds Like Electronic Music”

i1

Cued Up On Q2 streams Sundays at 2PM on Q2; encores Tuesdays at 8PM and Thursdays at 4PM on Q2

Works by Tristan Perich, Michael Gordon, Ingram Marshall, and more.

“It’s the 21st Century and it’s pretty safe to say that there’s no shortage of composers today who have been inspired by the sounds of electronic music, whether through the tape collages of Stockhausen and Xenakis, the electroacoustic manipulations of Pauline Oliveros, or the beat-driven textural experiments of lap-top sample-ists like Flying Lotus and DJ Shadow.

This week on Cued Up, we’ll be exploring live performances of acoustic and electroacoustic music that take on the sonic quality of electronic music. We’ll hear works by Tristan Perich and Todd Reynolds that pair live strings with electronics, and Ingram Marshall’s seminal Fog Tropes II. Alarm Will Sound offers a startlingly fresh take on The Beatles’ Revolution #9 and the Young People’s Chorus of New York and Kronos Quartet accent the other-worldly textures of Michael Gordon’s Exalted.

The program will also feature two brand-new live recordings that blur the lines between acoustic and electronic from So Percussion’s Jason Treuting (taken from a live show at The Greene Space in February 2012) and composer/Slow Six bandmember Christopher Tignor, recorded at this year’s Ecstatic Music Festival.

This week Cued Up is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Cage Match with Randy Gibson”

i1

The New Canon streams Fridays at 1PM on Q2 Music; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

“On The New Canon this week, we look to another centennial with the 100th birthday of John Cage, asking disciple, composer and Avant Music Festival curator Randy Gibson: Where do we see the influences of Cage today?

rg
Randy Gibson

Even more than last week’s birthday boy Philip Glass, John Cage is one of those composers whose influence is undeniable—just as undeniable as how heatedly he divides fans and detractors. And as the composer’s centennial approaches, we have more than 4’33 of silence to pour out in his memory. In fact, Glass and the minimalists can owe their reputation to Cage, who once quipped, ‘If something is boring after two minutes, try it for four. If still boring, then eight. Then sixteen. Then thirty-two. Eventually one discovers that it is not boring at all.’

First stop is the third annual Avant Music Festival, which opens on the Feb. 10, features an evening-long Cage marathon, and is co-curated by composer Randy Gibson. Randy takes brand loyalty to a whole new level with his tattoo, the opening to Cage’s iconic Winter Music, and makes the perfect person to break down Cage’s lasting influence.”

See the full post here, with some interactive utilities.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Lunaire Eclipse with Steven Mackey”

i1

The New Canon streams Fridays at 1PM on Q2 Music; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Celebrating 100 Years of Schoenberg’s Game-Changer
Friday, February 03, 2012

“On The New Canon this week, we celebrate the centennial of Schoenberg’s revolutionary Pierrot Lunaire with composer Steven Mackey, asking him on the eve of his own Pierrot homage: How much did one work rock the classical world?


Steve Mackey

Even if the world doesn’t end, 2012 is set to be a pretty banner year with a number of benchmarks to celebrate—including the 100th year of Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire, a landmark that our parent station WQXR deemed one of the year’s top five special anniversaries. There’s a lot being done to fête the forever-young work by everyone from Pierre Boulez to eighth blackbird.

Getting a head-start on the work’s October birthday is Philly-based Dolce Suono Ensemble, which makes its New York debut with newly-commissioned works celebrating Schoenberg (and Mahler!). With so much still owed to one work, we talk with one of these commissioned composers—Steven Mackey—about how the face of music was changed in the scope of 40 minutes. We’ll also hear from Mackey’s own Grammy-nominated work against sections from Pierrot as we explore this lasting legacy.”

See the full post here, with some neat interactive utilities.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From Cued Up at Q2: “Philip Glass at 75″

i1

Cued Up On Q2 streams Sundays at 2PM on Q2; encores Tuesdays at 8PM and Thursdays at 4PM on Q2

Live Performances by Wordless Music Orchestra, Brooklyn Rider, JACK Quartet, and More
Sunday, January 29, 2012

“There’ll be no shortage of Philip Glass news in 2012. This year will feature the touring revival of his seminal opera Einstein on the Beach. And on January 31, the game-changing American music icon will celebrate his 75th birthday with the U.S. premiere of his Symphony No. 9 by the American Composers Orchestra at Carnegie Hall.

pg
Philip Glass

This week’s Cued Up features in-concert recordings of Glass’s work taken from the last two years. We’ll open with a mesmerizing 2010 performance of his Two Etudes by pianist Bruce Brubaker, and hear energetic live takes of his Suite from Bent by string quartet Brooklyn Rider (chosen by (Le) Poisson Rouge as one of the venue’s favorite live performance of 2011) and String Quartet No. 5 by the JACK Quartet.

In addition, the program features the New York-premiere of Glass’s homage to David Bowie—Symphony No. 4 Heroes—as performed by Brad Lubman and the Wordless Music Orchestra at the New York Society of Ethical Culture in May 2011.

We’ll also hear two pieces by Glass’s disciple Nico Muhly: Brubaker’s 2011 performance of Drones and Piano at the Gilmore International Keyboard Festival and Wish You Were Here from the 2011 Ecstatic Music Festival (on a related note, remember to check out Q2 Music’s Ecstatic Music 2012 Preview this Wednesday, February 1 at 7 pm).”

See the full article here.

This week, Cued Up on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

Gity Razaz


From The New Canon at Q2: “Ecstatic Electricity with Christopher Tignor”

i1

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Straddling the Divide between Indie Rock and Indie Classical

“On The New Canon this week, we chat with composer and Slow Six bandleader Christopher Tignor in advance of his performance with the genre-bending Ecstatic Music Festival, begging the question: Do we really need to distinguish between Indie Rock and Indie Classical?

Last year’s Ecstatic Music Festival was the bee’s knees and the dog’s bollocks, combining music from the independently-fueled classical and rock spheres and creating a veritable who’s who of the New York music scene. The idea was simple: Showing the connective tissue between these two seemingly disparate genres, but when you really chewed on all that was on offer, you started to wonder if there was more tissue than negative space and whether or not we really needed to distinguish between the two forms.

One of the champions of such world-rocking questions is Christopher Tignor, a composer and bandleader of Slow Six who rocks out classical and brings some epic symphonic measures to rock. With the return of EMF (including a show on Feb 9 with string orchestra A Far Cry and post-rock powerhouse This Will Destroy You), we pull Christopher into the Canon.”

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 33 other followers