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Posts tagged “Olivia Giovetti

From Cued Up at Q2: “Millennial Mavericks”

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Cued Up On Q2 streams Sundays at 2PM on Q2; encores Tuesdays at 8PM and Thursdays at 4PM on Q2

Live performances by NOW Ensemble, Victoire, the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and More

“As Q2 Music prepares to go all-American Mavericks all the time next month, we’ve been doing a lot of listening to Varèse, Copland, Harrison, Cage, Monk and more. But while we’ve been excited to see the return of a concert series given in 2000 by Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony, we can’t help but think of the new mavericks.

So taking as a springboard the styles of our 20th-century Mavericks, we’re looking today at in-concert recordings from composers who in this century challenge and redefine the way music is created and consumed.

There are nods to the greats of the past (such as Sergei Prokofiev’s grandson, Gabriel Prokofiev), but the present has a mightily different face. We’ll hear from Missy Mazzoli’s rockstar quintet Victoire live at Chelesea’s Look and Listen Festival, blending the lines between rock and classical (we’ll hear more to that end with music from Radiohead’s Johnny Greenwood). And we’ll hit up the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center for a trio by juggernaut composer Kevin Puts.

There will also be hints of social consciousness in by the NOW Ensemble of Judd Greenstein’s Change and Ensemble 212 of Tahrir by Mohammed Fairouz, and selections from concert series like the Ecstatic Music Festival and SONiC. All told, various threads of the contemporary zeitgeist will weave together in two hours of musical bliss.”

This edition of Cued Up is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

I wish to again remind readers that rthey can still access, enjoy and learn from the original American Public Media radio project American Mavericks.

While Minnesota Public Radio has taken down most of the audio, you can still access the text materials.


From The New Canon at Q2: “Maverick Roll with Jennifer Koh “

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The New Canon streams Fridays at 1PM on Q2 Music; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Bringing the “M” Word Back to Music

“On The New Canon this week, we gear up for American Mavericks with the festival’s featured violinist Jennifer Koh, asking: What makes a maverick?

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Jennifer Koh

Twelve years ago, Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony presented twelve concerts honoring American composers who pushed the boundaries of classical music in the 20th Century, redefining the parameters of American sound and our contribution to a European-born genre. Twelve years later, as the SFS celebrates its own centennial, American Mavericks is back with a vivacious vengeance starting in the Bay Area before docking at Carnegie Hall.

We welcome to The New Canon Maverick violinist Jennifer Koh, who has no small relationship to some of the featured composers (from Adams to Cage), indulging in a sonic star-spangled banner of daring musicians that have forged our national sonic identity. As we listen to some of these composers in action, we invite you to join us in asking Koh, What makes a maverick? And who are our 21st-century mavericks?”

See the full article here, complete with some interactive utilities.

Q2 did not mention the American Public Media project inspired by MTT’s SFS and also named American Mavericks, a 13 week radio project guided by MTT and hosted by Suzanne Vega. While some of the audio features are no longer available, there is a vast treasure trove of material still available. Pease visit the site to learn more.The thirteen essays by Kyle Gann give quite a history of all of American music.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From Cued Up at Q2: “Acoustic Music That Sounds Like Electronic Music”

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Cued Up On Q2 streams Sundays at 2PM on Q2; encores Tuesdays at 8PM and Thursdays at 4PM on Q2

Works by Tristan Perich, Michael Gordon, Ingram Marshall, and more.

“It’s the 21st Century and it’s pretty safe to say that there’s no shortage of composers today who have been inspired by the sounds of electronic music, whether through the tape collages of Stockhausen and Xenakis, the electroacoustic manipulations of Pauline Oliveros, or the beat-driven textural experiments of lap-top sample-ists like Flying Lotus and DJ Shadow.

This week on Cued Up, we’ll be exploring live performances of acoustic and electroacoustic music that take on the sonic quality of electronic music. We’ll hear works by Tristan Perich and Todd Reynolds that pair live strings with electronics, and Ingram Marshall’s seminal Fog Tropes II. Alarm Will Sound offers a startlingly fresh take on The Beatles’ Revolution #9 and the Young People’s Chorus of New York and Kronos Quartet accent the other-worldly textures of Michael Gordon’s Exalted.

The program will also feature two brand-new live recordings that blur the lines between acoustic and electronic from So Percussion’s Jason Treuting (taken from a live show at The Greene Space in February 2012) and composer/Slow Six bandmember Christopher Tignor, recorded at this year’s Ecstatic Music Festival.

This week Cued Up is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Cage Match with Randy Gibson”

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The New Canon streams Fridays at 1PM on Q2 Music; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

“On The New Canon this week, we look to another centennial with the 100th birthday of John Cage, asking disciple, composer and Avant Music Festival curator Randy Gibson: Where do we see the influences of Cage today?

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Randy Gibson

Even more than last week’s birthday boy Philip Glass, John Cage is one of those composers whose influence is undeniable—just as undeniable as how heatedly he divides fans and detractors. And as the composer’s centennial approaches, we have more than 4’33 of silence to pour out in his memory. In fact, Glass and the minimalists can owe their reputation to Cage, who once quipped, ‘If something is boring after two minutes, try it for four. If still boring, then eight. Then sixteen. Then thirty-two. Eventually one discovers that it is not boring at all.’

First stop is the third annual Avant Music Festival, which opens on the Feb. 10, features an evening-long Cage marathon, and is co-curated by composer Randy Gibson. Randy takes brand loyalty to a whole new level with his tattoo, the opening to Cage’s iconic Winter Music, and makes the perfect person to break down Cage’s lasting influence.”

See the full post here, with some interactive utilities.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Lunaire Eclipse with Steven Mackey”

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The New Canon streams Fridays at 1PM on Q2 Music; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Celebrating 100 Years of Schoenberg’s Game-Changer
Friday, February 03, 2012

“On The New Canon this week, we celebrate the centennial of Schoenberg’s revolutionary Pierrot Lunaire with composer Steven Mackey, asking him on the eve of his own Pierrot homage: How much did one work rock the classical world?


Steve Mackey

Even if the world doesn’t end, 2012 is set to be a pretty banner year with a number of benchmarks to celebrate—including the 100th year of Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire, a landmark that our parent station WQXR deemed one of the year’s top five special anniversaries. There’s a lot being done to fête the forever-young work by everyone from Pierre Boulez to eighth blackbird.

Getting a head-start on the work’s October birthday is Philly-based Dolce Suono Ensemble, which makes its New York debut with newly-commissioned works celebrating Schoenberg (and Mahler!). With so much still owed to one work, we talk with one of these commissioned composers—Steven Mackey—about how the face of music was changed in the scope of 40 minutes. We’ll also hear from Mackey’s own Grammy-nominated work against sections from Pierrot as we explore this lasting legacy.”

See the full post here, with some neat interactive utilities.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From Cued Up at Q2: “Philip Glass at 75″

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Cued Up On Q2 streams Sundays at 2PM on Q2; encores Tuesdays at 8PM and Thursdays at 4PM on Q2

Live Performances by Wordless Music Orchestra, Brooklyn Rider, JACK Quartet, and More
Sunday, January 29, 2012

“There’ll be no shortage of Philip Glass news in 2012. This year will feature the touring revival of his seminal opera Einstein on the Beach. And on January 31, the game-changing American music icon will celebrate his 75th birthday with the U.S. premiere of his Symphony No. 9 by the American Composers Orchestra at Carnegie Hall.

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Philip Glass

This week’s Cued Up features in-concert recordings of Glass’s work taken from the last two years. We’ll open with a mesmerizing 2010 performance of his Two Etudes by pianist Bruce Brubaker, and hear energetic live takes of his Suite from Bent by string quartet Brooklyn Rider (chosen by (Le) Poisson Rouge as one of the venue’s favorite live performance of 2011) and String Quartet No. 5 by the JACK Quartet.

In addition, the program features the New York-premiere of Glass’s homage to David Bowie—Symphony No. 4 Heroes—as performed by Brad Lubman and the Wordless Music Orchestra at the New York Society of Ethical Culture in May 2011.

We’ll also hear two pieces by Glass’s disciple Nico Muhly: Brubaker’s 2011 performance of Drones and Piano at the Gilmore International Keyboard Festival and Wish You Were Here from the 2011 Ecstatic Music Festival (on a related note, remember to check out Q2 Music’s Ecstatic Music 2012 Preview this Wednesday, February 1 at 7 pm).”

See the full article here.

This week, Cued Up on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

Gity Razaz


From The New Canon at Q2: “Ecstatic Electricity with Christopher Tignor”

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Straddling the Divide between Indie Rock and Indie Classical

“On The New Canon this week, we chat with composer and Slow Six bandleader Christopher Tignor in advance of his performance with the genre-bending Ecstatic Music Festival, begging the question: Do we really need to distinguish between Indie Rock and Indie Classical?

Last year’s Ecstatic Music Festival was the bee’s knees and the dog’s bollocks, combining music from the independently-fueled classical and rock spheres and creating a veritable who’s who of the New York music scene. The idea was simple: Showing the connective tissue between these two seemingly disparate genres, but when you really chewed on all that was on offer, you started to wonder if there was more tissue than negative space and whether or not we really needed to distinguish between the two forms.

One of the champions of such world-rocking questions is Christopher Tignor, a composer and bandleader of Slow Six who rocks out classical and brings some epic symphonic measures to rock. With the return of EMF (including a show on Feb 9 with string orchestra A Far Cry and post-rock powerhouse This Will Destroy You), we pull Christopher into the Canon.”

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Riverrun”

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

“While I’m out of town this week, I thought it would be only apt to aim the Canon at composer Eve Beglarian. In a ridiculously cool project a few years in the making, Eve has taken one of her own recent trips—a four-month journey down the Mississippi River from Lake Itasca, Minnesota, to New Orleans—and turned it into a sprawling musical work entitled River Project. The composition will be presented at Abrons Art Center this month, and brings everyone from violinist Mary Rowell to Newspeak to Taylor Levine into the water.

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Eve Beglarian

In celebration of that and to cure your mid-January blahs with a bit of wanderlust, we’ll set sonic sail with Eve this week moving from chilly, northern works down to more balmy and heady music.”

See the full article here.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon @Q2: “Dual Nature with Rachel Barton Pine and Mohammed Fairouz”

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The New Canon streams Fridays at 1PM on Q2 Music; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Keeping a foot in both worlds

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Rachel Barton Pine and Mohammed Fairouz (Andrew Eccles (Pine), Samantha West (Fairouz)

“This week on The New Canon, we tango with violinist Rachel Barton Pine and composer Mohammed Fairouz to talk about a preponderance of pairs in music from composer and soloist to birth and death, all while wondering: Why does even great solo music demand at least two participants?

Maybe it’s the cold weather, but it’s easy to get philosophical this time of year, and lately I’ve been thinking a lot about duality. In the music world we suffer no shortage of potent pairings: Bell and Denk, itsnotyouitsme, David Finckel and Wu Han… But beyond the people we see onstage, there are other doubling-ups. Programming themes love to balance opposing ideals, and even in a solo setting there’s still the combination of composer and performer or performer and audience (does that give us two pair?).

With that in mind, we catch up this week with violinist Rachel Barton Pine, whose solo recital at the Rubin Museum this week touches on the themes of birth and death and features, in addition to music by Beethoven, Schubert and Prokofiev, a work written specifically for Pine by composer Mohammed Fairouz. We talk to both Rachel and Mohammed about the collaborative effort at work here, and about balance and dichotomy, this week while hearing their music in action.

See the full post here, complete with some interactive features.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon @Q2: “When the Clock Strikes ’12”

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Looking at the Potential Best of the New Year
Friday, December 30, 2011

“I’m sad to bid farewell to 2011 but, as ever, have a boatload of things to look forward to in 2012—Quetzalcoatl notwithstanding. Philip Glass turns 75 (insert obvious repetition joke here), Huang Ruo brings excerpts from his controversial-in-China opera Dr. Sun Yat-sen to (Le) Poisson Rouge, Kaija Saariaho continues her residency at Carnegie Hall, it’s the John Cage centennial (insert obvious moment of silence joke here) and we already have events at the Miller Theatre, New York Philharmonic, Met Museum and Merkin Concert Hall on our dance cards.

So since last week we took a look at the best of 2011, we now turn around and look forward. With the ball ready to drop in Times Square, we have our own music to lay on you in anticipation of the year ahead.”

See the full article here.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2


From The New Canon at Q2: “This One Went to ’11”

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Naming the Best of the Year in New Music
Friday, December 23, 2011

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eighth blackbird (Luke Ratray)

“Okay, first off—it’s December. How did that happen?! Yet despite the shock that another year has passed, we’ve had a lot to love about new music in New York and beyond this year. Jeremy Denk played the bejeezus out of Ligeti; festivals galore thanks to Ecstatic and Tune In and SONiC and countless others; John Zorn made it to City Opera and John Adams made it to the (orchestral pit of) the Met; and in Minnesota a new work by Kevin Puts completely restored my faith in…everything.

So as we ring out 2011 and welcome in 2012, join us in counting down some of the best events by some sharp composers and performers, and tell us: What was your favorite musical moment of 2011?”

Leave a Comment on the article page here.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Hebrew Hammers with Judd Greenstein “

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Exploring the Semitic soundscape

Friday, December 16, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, we get a head-start on the Jewish holidays by examining the disproportionate number of tribe members in the music scene. Listening and chatting with composer Judd Greenstein, we ask: What is it that has led to so many Jewish composers and performers?

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Judd Greenstein

The list of Jewish composers is endless (as I wrote for WQXR’s Operavore last month, “There are enough Jewish classical composers and performers to make up for another sequel to Adam Sandler’s name-dropping Hanukkah Song”), but why is it endless?

This week, with Chanukah just a few days away, we take a look at some contemporary Jewish composers, hearing the roots of traditional Hebrew tunes in modern contexts, while discussing as much with composer and New Amsterdam Records co-founder Judd Greenstein who—like Bernstein and other before him—seamlessly blends the two for some delicious hearing experiences.”

See the full post, with some interactive features, here
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The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Road to Joy with Jeremy Denk”

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Finding Ludwig van Beethoven in the 21st Century
Friday, November 04, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, we celebrate Beethoven Awareness Month with multi-talented pianist Jeremy Denk. A ferocious and forward-thinking composer, Beethoven was writing new music when it was still new, and with Denk we delve into the revolutionary nature of his works while also asking—who are the modern-day Beethovens? And is such a comparison still relevant?

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Jeremy Denk

Just as Beethoven caused a stir as a composer, Denk has galvanized listeners as a performer—including a program that paired Ludwig’s fiendishly difficult Hammerklavier Sonata with Charles Ives’s equally virtuosic Concord Sonata. Such pairings are the stuff vibrant music is made of (earlier this year Denk did the same with Ligeti’s Études Books I and II and Bach’s Goldberg Variations). We’ll hear some performances of Denk’s on all sides of the spectrum while we place Beethoven in a Q2 Music context.

See the full article here, with some interactive features.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2


From The New Canon at Q2: “Brooklyn Rider: Four Play”

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Composing and Concertizing with the Adventurous
Friday, October 21, 2011 1:00PM Eastern Time

“This week on The New Canon, we move into our new date and time with Brooklyn Rider’s Johnny Gandelsman and Nicholas Cords. They’ll talk about collaborating as both instrumentalists and composers.

There are some ensembles that have the uncanny ability to seamlessly move from one genre to the next without any hint of effort or strain, and these four adventurous stringers from Kings County form one of them.

But how does that balance work? How does that balance shift when you’re not only playing music, but—as this foursome does on Halloween at Carnegie Hall—composing it as well? One member writing is one thing, but all four Brooklyn Rider players are on board for their new work, Seven Steps. In advance of that, we continue our discussion of a string quartet’s dynamic and composer-performer relationship with Brooklyn Rider violinist Johnny Gandelsman and violist Nicholas Cords, and gain some insight as to how four musicians write one single piece. We’ll also cover a swath of their performances on recording, including some old school tunes from Debussy, a riveting take on Philip Glass and a work by the quartet’s own Colin Jacobsen.”

Visit the web page here, there are some interactive features.

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Brooklyn Rider (L to R: Nicholas Cords, Johnny Gandelsman, Colin Jacobsen, Eric Jacobsen)

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2 [This is what is still posted. I hope that we get that changed very soon to give accurate information.]


Porter Anderson’s Challenge Grant for Q2

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The great, mighty and awe inspiring Q2 New Music web stream is participating in the WQXR fund drive.


Second year, second fund drive. Happy birthday Q2.

Q2 has a great friend in Porter Anderson
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Porter has issued Q2’s first challenge grant. Here is what Porter has to say:

On Q2 Music and writing
The living composers of WQXR’s Q2 Music play an eloquent role in a writer’s creative process. Their work functions as collaborative leverage. Their music is made from the same day-to-day stimuli in which our writers live and work. And yet it’s not pop: it doesn’t tell you how to feel or what to think. Contemporary classical music paces a writer’s own impulses. Our composers are fortunate to have Q2. Imagine Mozart able to have his live concerts heard by a worldwide audience in real time. And writers are lucky to have Q2 as a vehicle with which to scale up our own creative efforts alongside the global reach of this 24-hour stream.

Q2’s benefits to me as a writer, journalist, and critic have been enormous. I hope to use this challenge grant to draw more of my writing colleagues to this resource, unique in the family of NPR affiliates and in the world.”

Here is a story Porter sent me about one writer friend’s experience of Q2.
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Roz Morris

Scoring the novel as it unfolds – the undercover soundtrack, by Roz Morris

Pledge your support for Q2 Music right now and every dollar you give will be doubled, thanks to Porter Anderson, who’s generously offered to match donations (up to $5000).

To take Porter up on his generous offer to match your donation, just click here .
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Here is a direct link to the Q2 Pledge page

And please let Porter know on Twitter — @Porter_Anderson — about your contribution. The team at Q2 is tweeting, too, as @Q2music.


From Nadia Sirota at Q2: “SONiC Portrait: Andrew Norman”

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Nadia Sirota on Q2 streams weekdays at 12:00 noon and midnight at Q2

This Member of the Composer Collective, Sleeping Giant, on Churches in Rome and Video Games

This interview airs at the top of Monday’s show (October 10, 2011). Olivia Giovetti fills in for Nadia from 1-4.
Monday, October 10, 2011


O.G.

“Featuring over 100 composers under the ago of 40, the American Composers Orchestra’s SONiC (Sounds of a New Century) Festival is energizing New York with a stellar kickoff to the season – eight days of amazing new work performed by 16 extraordinary ensembles. Yay!

Here at Q2 we’ve got all kinds of exclusive SONiC-related goodies for you, from concert coverage to ensemble portraits, and, of course, you can always rely on Q2 to provide a direct line from composer to listener — five composers whose work is being featured on the festival stopped by the Q2 studios to talk chat about their lives, their work, and the classical landscape.

Composer Andrew Norman uses his intimate knowledge of string instruments to write music that bubbles and pulses with propulsive energy. An avid orchestral composer, Andrew shared only his chamber music with us here at Q2 Music, due to airing restrictions associated with recording symphony orchestras (a topic eloquently blogged about by composer Nico Muhly). Using exclusively acoustic instruments as his palate, Andrew manages to create very innovative, almost electronic-sounding sonorities with decidedly un-modern equipment.”

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A.N.
See the full article here.


Nadia Sirota


From Nadia Sirota at Q2: “SONiC Portrait: Marcos Balter”

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Nadia Sirota on Q2 streams weekdays at 12:00 noon and midnight at Q2

Sidestepping Folk Elements and Tailoring Writing to the Unique Talents of Friends

This interview airs at the top of Tuesday’s show (October 11, 2011). Olivia Giovetti fills in for Nadia from 1-4.
Wednesday, October 19, 2011
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O.G.

“Featuring over 100 composers under the ago of 40, the American Composers Orchestra’s SONiC (Sounds of a New Century) Festival is energizing New York with a stellar kickoff to the season – eight days of amazing new work performed by 16 extraordinary ensembles. Yay!

Here at Q2 we’ve got all kinds of exclusive SONiC-related goodies for you, from concert coverage to ensemble portraits, and, of course, you can always rely on Q2 to provide a direct line from composer to listener — five composers whose work is being featured on the festival stopped by the Q2 studios to talk chat about their lives, their work, and the classical landscape.

Known for conjuring an unique sound world which the Boston Globe has described as “a virtuosic equilibrium of colliding particles [with] both intricate clarity and convincing trajectory,” Marcos Balter’s music somehow manages to be at once understated and supremely energetic. Marcos loves working with close collaborators, whose personalities unfailingly become imprinted on the scores. A native of Rio de Janero Brazil, Marcos hates being pigeon-holed as a Brazilian composer, recently tweeting ‘I’ll only use ‘Brazilian elements’ in my music when all of my American friends feel they should compose works with cowboy themes #titfortat.’”

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M.B.
See the full article here. *The dating is a wee touch confusing, so check into the stream both days. You will always be happy with what you hear at Q2.


Nadia Sirota


From The New Canon at Q2: “Dance to the Music”

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

What Happens When Music and Movement Collide
Monday, October 10, 2011

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Music by Daniel Bernard Roumain (DBR)
Directed by D.J. Mendel

“This week on The New Canon, we tango with composer-violinist Daniel Bernard Roumain (aka DBR) and director D.J. Mendel about the collision of music and dance.

If you’ve ever seen violinist DBR in performance…you know that he plays with a fluidity of movement entirely his own and utterly captivating. Music demands a certain level of movement, whether you’re performing or listening (head-bobbers of the world unite!). And sometimes that gets taken to the next level with deliberate compositions and choreography. It’s happening for everyone from Radiohead to Gorecki at BAM this season.

Included in that mix is Symphony for the Dance Floor, a brainchild of DBR and a slew of artists just as likely to dally with four-on-the-floor house music as they are to be found two-on-the-aisle at the opera house. With DBR and Symphony director D.J. Mendel in the chat this week, we go further into this balance, asking: What happens when music and movement collide? And, in that partnership, who leads?

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DBR

See the full article, complete with interactive features, here.

[I was fortunate to meet DBR last Summer, when he visited Princeton's own New Music Black Belt, Dr Marvin Rosen, at WPRB Radio. He was generous with his time and with his talent. We in the studio - Philip Blackburn of Innova Records and the American Composers'Forum was also present and listeners at WPRB-FM and wprb.com were all treated to a live concert by DBR. He was spectacular.]

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Super SONiC”

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

“This week on The New Canon, we welcome back composer/clarinetist Derek Bermel and composer Kenji Bunch to talk about the American Composers Orchestra’s SONiC: Sounds of a New Century Festival.

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Derek Bermel

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Kenji Bunch

The period of 1900-1910 saw an enormous outpouring of compositions, including all of Berg’s Jugendlieder, Stravinsky’s The Firebird, Prokofiev’s Sinfonietta in A major, Strauss’s Salome, Schoenberg’s Pelleas und Melisande, five Mahler symphonies, Sibelius’s Valse Triste, Debussy’s La Mer, Ives’s The Unanswered Question and Ravel’s Shéhérazade (and that’s just the tip of the iceberg). One hundred years later and one-tenth of the way through the 21st Century, we’re experiencing a similar outpouring of works.

Which is why I hate the term “contemporary classical.” Because contemporary is a mercurial term designed to be applied fleetingly without ever sticking. Look at some of the names above and then try to go a week without hearing someone refer to Ives as “contemporary.”

Enter SONiC (Sounds of a New Century): A festival celebrating composers under 40 and offering dozens of works all written within the 21st Century. Now that’s contemporary—for now, at least. This week, we’ll chat with composer and SONiC co-curator Derek Bermel about the genesis of this city-wide takeover of honest-to-goodness living composers, along with one of those featured composers, Kenji Bunch, and ask them both: What will set this century apart from the last?”

See the full article here, including some interactive features.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “The Place Where You Go to Compose”

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2

Looking at influence and progression with itsnotyouitsme
Monday, September 26, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, we chat up itsnotyouitsme about their newest album and the evolution of an ensemble’s sound…We swim in a wide Sargasso sea of musical influences, and if you can’t constantly adapt to the varying temperatures as more tantalizing drops are added to the mix, you’re inevitably going to drown. That’s what I love about many of Q2 Music’s favorite musicians working today: Not only do they swim rather than sink, they make Michael Phelps look like a dog-paddler.

Exemplifying these skills and talents is itsnotyouitsme, a.k.a. Caleb Burhans and Grey McMurray. They’ve just released their third studio album for New Amsterdam Records (out 9/27) and are feting it with a set at (Le) Poisson Rouge on Monday the 26 (for those of you not going to the Met to see Anna Netrebko lose her head). Before they head into their sound check, we check out itsnotyouitsme’s sounds today, pitting some new tracks off of Everybody’s Pain is Magnificent against the music of John Luther Adams and Gavin Bryars as a mean of exploring similarities, differences, and — perhaps the million dollar question — Where is the balance between influence and individuality?”

The full article is here,

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From the New Canon at Q2: “Balancing Acts ” Jeffrey Zeigler and Paola Prestini

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2

Jeffrey Zeigler and Paola Prestini talk about restoring “equilibrium in the midst of imbalance.”

“It’s a first for the New Canon: A husband-wife chat with Kronos Quartet cellist Jeffrey Zeigler and composer Paola Prestini, both of whom are featured in the group’s Awakening at BAM.

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Jeffrey Zeigler

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Paola Prestini

There’s something really compelling about the new Kronos Quartet collaboration for BAM’s Next Wave Festival, and it’s not just their subtitle—’a musical meditation on the anniversary of 9/11,’ or their aim to combine music from several cultures—including those of the Floodplain. What grips me most is the idea of using music as a substitute for spoken language, to restore in Kronos violinist David Harrington’s words, equilibrium in the midst of imbalance.

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In the last few weeks, we’ve turned to music a lot for that equilibrium. And when it comes to communication, that word gets a fair amount of use among couples. So with that in mind, why stop at talking to friend of the show Jeffrey Zeigler about the communicative power of music when we can talk to both Zeigler and his wife, the luminous Paola Prestini, whose music will be featured in Awakening? We’ll fire them up with the Canon and ask: Where does music pick up where words fail?

And if you loved our last Kronos show, you won’t want to miss more from our fav fab four, plus works by Prestini and a few other composers featured in this BAMtacular.”

See the full article here, also with interactive utilities.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


The New Canon From Q2: “From Bach to Bali”

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2

Rendering time and space with Vivian Fung and Ray Lustig
Monday, September 12, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, we explore how music forms time and space with composers Ray Lustig and Vivian Fung.

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Vivian Fung and Ray Lustig (Metropolis Ensemble)

I love the gamelan (Lou Harrison is my homeboy), and I love Baroque music (Bach is also my homeboy…it’s a pretty awesome list). So when I heard that the Metropolis Ensemble was opening its season with works that feature a re-purposing of a Bach cantata courtesy of Ray Lustig and a violin concerto inspired by the gamelan and landscape of Bali by Vivian Fung, I was all. Over. That. Skit.

But it got me thinking about an element of music that is both mesmerizing and mysterious to me: How do you take sound and shape it into time and space? How is Ray going to evoke Bach? And how will Vivian transport us to Southeast Asia? What exactly goes on in a composer’s head during that type of process?

We’ll grill them on Monday to find out, while also hearing some of their works—and a Grammy-nominated recording by Metropolis themselves—in the process. Join in on the fun and let me know what you’ve always wanted to ask a composer about their process below.”

See the full post, with some interactive utilities here.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Crouching Composer, Hidden Dragon”

Walking Tan Dun’s fine line between film and classical
Monday, August 22, 2011

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Tan Dun

“Last week on The New Canon, we took a cool dip into the music of Finland. This week, we go into the hot hot hot world of Tan Dun’s Martial Arts Trilogy, speaking with violinist Ryu Goto, cellist Dane Johansen and the Metropolis Ensemble’s Andrew Cyr about their recent work with the composer. Join the conversation via Twitter with the hashtag #q2new.

Tan Dun! Remember the first time you saw—or even just heard—Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon? Or the excitement surrounding the Metropolitan Opera’s production of The First Emperor? Or the YouTube Symphony Orchestra coming together for Eroica? The violin and cello solos! The melodies! The percussion! I turn into a grinning fool whenever I hear a Tan Dun score—such as the works that were played recently at Lincoln Center Out of Doors or the same pieces that can be heard on a recent Sony recording of The Martial Arts Trilogy.

That is why we’re catching the Metropolis Ensemble’s Andrew Cyr, cellist Dane Johansen and violinist Ryu Goto, shortly after their tour with Tan to talk about the composer’s insanely beautiful work for both the silver screen and concert hall. He’s not the first to do both (Korngold, anyone?), but as the two genres have progressed over the last century and continue to cross pollinate, we’ll ask: Where does the line between film score end and classical work begin? And, naturally, we’ll have a program of more Tan Dun music than anyone should be allowed to hear in a span of 60 minutes.”

See the full article here.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2


From the New Canon at Q2: “Finn-tasia”

Going into the wild with a century of Finnish composers
Monday, August 15, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, we delve into a century of new Finnish music with composer Markku Klami and scholar Daniel Grimley. Join the conversation via Twitter with the hashtag #q2new.

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Markku Klami

“Finland, Finland, Finland, the country where I want to be,” sang Monty Python. But why exactly is it that Finland has, over the last century been a hotbed for composers? With the Bard Music Festival exploring Sibelius and his world this month and contemporary composers like Magnus Lindberg, Esa Pekka Salonen and Kaija Saariaho taking Manhattan, we investigate the fabulous Finns with Helsinkian composer Markku Klami and Bard Music Festival’s scholar-in-residence (and Sibelius biographer) Daniel Grimley.

We also go on a mega-packed odyssey across the Finnish soundscape, starting with one of the last works Sibelius ever wrote and moving through the years to include music from Rautavaara, Sallinen, Salonen, Saariaho and Markku himself. Can’t take the waning summer heat? We got you covered.”

See the full article here. You can leave comments and sign up for a program reminder.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2


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