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Posts tagged “The New Canon

From The New Canon at Q2: “Maverick Roll with Jennifer Koh “

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The New Canon streams Fridays at 1PM on Q2 Music; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Bringing the “M” Word Back to Music

“On The New Canon this week, we gear up for American Mavericks with the festival’s featured violinist Jennifer Koh, asking: What makes a maverick?

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Jennifer Koh

Twelve years ago, Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony presented twelve concerts honoring American composers who pushed the boundaries of classical music in the 20th Century, redefining the parameters of American sound and our contribution to a European-born genre. Twelve years later, as the SFS celebrates its own centennial, American Mavericks is back with a vivacious vengeance starting in the Bay Area before docking at Carnegie Hall.

We welcome to The New Canon Maverick violinist Jennifer Koh, who has no small relationship to some of the featured composers (from Adams to Cage), indulging in a sonic star-spangled banner of daring musicians that have forged our national sonic identity. As we listen to some of these composers in action, we invite you to join us in asking Koh, What makes a maverick? And who are our 21st-century mavericks?”

See the full article here, complete with some interactive utilities.

Q2 did not mention the American Public Media project inspired by MTT’s SFS and also named American Mavericks, a 13 week radio project guided by MTT and hosted by Suzanne Vega. While some of the audio features are no longer available, there is a vast treasure trove of material still available. Pease visit the site to learn more.The thirteen essays by Kyle Gann give quite a history of all of American music.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Cage Match with Randy Gibson”

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The New Canon streams Fridays at 1PM on Q2 Music; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

“On The New Canon this week, we look to another centennial with the 100th birthday of John Cage, asking disciple, composer and Avant Music Festival curator Randy Gibson: Where do we see the influences of Cage today?

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Randy Gibson

Even more than last week’s birthday boy Philip Glass, John Cage is one of those composers whose influence is undeniable—just as undeniable as how heatedly he divides fans and detractors. And as the composer’s centennial approaches, we have more than 4’33 of silence to pour out in his memory. In fact, Glass and the minimalists can owe their reputation to Cage, who once quipped, ‘If something is boring after two minutes, try it for four. If still boring, then eight. Then sixteen. Then thirty-two. Eventually one discovers that it is not boring at all.’

First stop is the third annual Avant Music Festival, which opens on the Feb. 10, features an evening-long Cage marathon, and is co-curated by composer Randy Gibson. Randy takes brand loyalty to a whole new level with his tattoo, the opening to Cage’s iconic Winter Music, and makes the perfect person to break down Cage’s lasting influence.”

See the full post here, with some interactive utilities.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Lunaire Eclipse with Steven Mackey”

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The New Canon streams Fridays at 1PM on Q2 Music; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Celebrating 100 Years of Schoenberg’s Game-Changer
Friday, February 03, 2012

“On The New Canon this week, we celebrate the centennial of Schoenberg’s revolutionary Pierrot Lunaire with composer Steven Mackey, asking him on the eve of his own Pierrot homage: How much did one work rock the classical world?


Steve Mackey

Even if the world doesn’t end, 2012 is set to be a pretty banner year with a number of benchmarks to celebrate—including the 100th year of Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire, a landmark that our parent station WQXR deemed one of the year’s top five special anniversaries. There’s a lot being done to fête the forever-young work by everyone from Pierre Boulez to eighth blackbird.

Getting a head-start on the work’s October birthday is Philly-based Dolce Suono Ensemble, which makes its New York debut with newly-commissioned works celebrating Schoenberg (and Mahler!). With so much still owed to one work, we talk with one of these commissioned composers—Steven Mackey—about how the face of music was changed in the scope of 40 minutes. We’ll also hear from Mackey’s own Grammy-nominated work against sections from Pierrot as we explore this lasting legacy.”

See the full post here, with some neat interactive utilities.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Ecstatic Electricity with Christopher Tignor”

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Straddling the Divide between Indie Rock and Indie Classical

“On The New Canon this week, we chat with composer and Slow Six bandleader Christopher Tignor in advance of his performance with the genre-bending Ecstatic Music Festival, begging the question: Do we really need to distinguish between Indie Rock and Indie Classical?

Last year’s Ecstatic Music Festival was the bee’s knees and the dog’s bollocks, combining music from the independently-fueled classical and rock spheres and creating a veritable who’s who of the New York music scene. The idea was simple: Showing the connective tissue between these two seemingly disparate genres, but when you really chewed on all that was on offer, you started to wonder if there was more tissue than negative space and whether or not we really needed to distinguish between the two forms.

One of the champions of such world-rocking questions is Christopher Tignor, a composer and bandleader of Slow Six who rocks out classical and brings some epic symphonic measures to rock. With the return of EMF (including a show on Feb 9 with string orchestra A Far Cry and post-rock powerhouse This Will Destroy You), we pull Christopher into the Canon.”

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Riverrun”

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

“While I’m out of town this week, I thought it would be only apt to aim the Canon at composer Eve Beglarian. In a ridiculously cool project a few years in the making, Eve has taken one of her own recent trips—a four-month journey down the Mississippi River from Lake Itasca, Minnesota, to New Orleans—and turned it into a sprawling musical work entitled River Project. The composition will be presented at Abrons Art Center this month, and brings everyone from violinist Mary Rowell to Newspeak to Taylor Levine into the water.

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Eve Beglarian

In celebration of that and to cure your mid-January blahs with a bit of wanderlust, we’ll set sonic sail with Eve this week moving from chilly, northern works down to more balmy and heady music.”

See the full article here.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon @Q2: “Dual Nature with Rachel Barton Pine and Mohammed Fairouz”

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The New Canon streams Fridays at 1PM on Q2 Music; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Keeping a foot in both worlds

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Rachel Barton Pine and Mohammed Fairouz (Andrew Eccles (Pine), Samantha West (Fairouz)

“This week on The New Canon, we tango with violinist Rachel Barton Pine and composer Mohammed Fairouz to talk about a preponderance of pairs in music from composer and soloist to birth and death, all while wondering: Why does even great solo music demand at least two participants?

Maybe it’s the cold weather, but it’s easy to get philosophical this time of year, and lately I’ve been thinking a lot about duality. In the music world we suffer no shortage of potent pairings: Bell and Denk, itsnotyouitsme, David Finckel and Wu Han… But beyond the people we see onstage, there are other doubling-ups. Programming themes love to balance opposing ideals, and even in a solo setting there’s still the combination of composer and performer or performer and audience (does that give us two pair?).

With that in mind, we catch up this week with violinist Rachel Barton Pine, whose solo recital at the Rubin Museum this week touches on the themes of birth and death and features, in addition to music by Beethoven, Schubert and Prokofiev, a work written specifically for Pine by composer Mohammed Fairouz. We talk to both Rachel and Mohammed about the collaborative effort at work here, and about balance and dichotomy, this week while hearing their music in action.

See the full post here, complete with some interactive features.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon @Q2: “Harp and Altar with Bridget Kibbey “

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Placing an ancient instrument in a modern context.
Friday, January 06, 2012

“This week on The New Canon, we pull some strings to talk about the harp with composer Kati Agócs and harpist Bridget Kibbey, asking the question: How does this ancient instrument thrive in a modern context?

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Bridget Kibbey (Lisa Marie Mazzucco)

The harp has existed in some form since roughly 500 BC, though the argument can be made that its history stretches back even further. Its family of instruments is associated with Orpheus and over the last several hundred years has never slacked off in the “making gorgeous music” department.

So what happens to an instrument over the course of 2500+ years to keep it sustainable, vital and viable? We ask that question of harpist Bridget Kibbey, who takes to (Le) Poisson Rouge with the Metropolis Ensemble this month to perform an evening of new music written for the harp. Additionally, we’ll get a composer’s perspective on making modern sounds with an ancient instrument thanks to Kati Agócs, while hearing works that Agócs has written for Kibbey herself. Get ready for a blissful hour punctuated by plucky conversation.”

See the full article here, complete with some interactive utilities.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon @Q2: “When the Clock Strikes ’12″

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Looking at the Potential Best of the New Year
Friday, December 30, 2011

“I’m sad to bid farewell to 2011 but, as ever, have a boatload of things to look forward to in 2012—Quetzalcoatl notwithstanding. Philip Glass turns 75 (insert obvious repetition joke here), Huang Ruo brings excerpts from his controversial-in-China opera Dr. Sun Yat-sen to (Le) Poisson Rouge, Kaija Saariaho continues her residency at Carnegie Hall, it’s the John Cage centennial (insert obvious moment of silence joke here) and we already have events at the Miller Theatre, New York Philharmonic, Met Museum and Merkin Concert Hall on our dance cards.

So since last week we took a look at the best of 2011, we now turn around and look forward. With the ball ready to drop in Times Square, we have our own music to lay on you in anticipation of the year ahead.”

See the full article here.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2


From The New Canon at Q2: “This One Went to ’11″

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Naming the Best of the Year in New Music
Friday, December 23, 2011

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eighth blackbird (Luke Ratray)

“Okay, first off—it’s December. How did that happen?! Yet despite the shock that another year has passed, we’ve had a lot to love about new music in New York and beyond this year. Jeremy Denk played the bejeezus out of Ligeti; festivals galore thanks to Ecstatic and Tune In and SONiC and countless others; John Zorn made it to City Opera and John Adams made it to the (orchestral pit of) the Met; and in Minnesota a new work by Kevin Puts completely restored my faith in…everything.

So as we ring out 2011 and welcome in 2012, join us in counting down some of the best events by some sharp composers and performers, and tell us: What was your favorite musical moment of 2011?”

Leave a Comment on the article page here.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Hebrew Hammers with Judd Greenstein “

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

Exploring the Semitic soundscape

Friday, December 16, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, we get a head-start on the Jewish holidays by examining the disproportionate number of tribe members in the music scene. Listening and chatting with composer Judd Greenstein, we ask: What is it that has led to so many Jewish composers and performers?

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Judd Greenstein

The list of Jewish composers is endless (as I wrote for WQXR’s Operavore last month, “There are enough Jewish classical composers and performers to make up for another sequel to Adam Sandler’s name-dropping Hanukkah Song”), but why is it endless?

This week, with Chanukah just a few days away, we take a look at some contemporary Jewish composers, hearing the roots of traditional Hebrew tunes in modern contexts, while discussing as much with composer and New Amsterdam Records co-founder Judd Greenstein who—like Bernstein and other before him—seamlessly blends the two for some delicious hearing experiences.”

See the full post, with some interactive features, here
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The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Brooklyn Rider: Four Play”

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Composing and Concertizing with the Adventurous
Friday, October 21, 2011 1:00PM Eastern Time

“This week on The New Canon, we move into our new date and time with Brooklyn Rider’s Johnny Gandelsman and Nicholas Cords. They’ll talk about collaborating as both instrumentalists and composers.

There are some ensembles that have the uncanny ability to seamlessly move from one genre to the next without any hint of effort or strain, and these four adventurous stringers from Kings County form one of them.

But how does that balance work? How does that balance shift when you’re not only playing music, but—as this foursome does on Halloween at Carnegie Hall—composing it as well? One member writing is one thing, but all four Brooklyn Rider players are on board for their new work, Seven Steps. In advance of that, we continue our discussion of a string quartet’s dynamic and composer-performer relationship with Brooklyn Rider violinist Johnny Gandelsman and violist Nicholas Cords, and gain some insight as to how four musicians write one single piece. We’ll also cover a swath of their performances on recording, including some old school tunes from Debussy, a riveting take on Philip Glass and a work by the quartet’s own Colin Jacobsen.”

Visit the web page here, there are some interactive features.

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Brooklyn Rider (L to R: Nicholas Cords, Johnny Gandelsman, Colin Jacobsen, Eric Jacobsen)

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2 [This is what is still posted. I hope that we get that changed very soon to give accurate information.]


From The New Canon at Q2: “Dance to the Music”

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

What Happens When Music and Movement Collide
Monday, October 10, 2011

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Music by Daniel Bernard Roumain (DBR)
Directed by D.J. Mendel

“This week on The New Canon, we tango with composer-violinist Daniel Bernard Roumain (aka DBR) and director D.J. Mendel about the collision of music and dance.

If you’ve ever seen violinist DBR in performance…you know that he plays with a fluidity of movement entirely his own and utterly captivating. Music demands a certain level of movement, whether you’re performing or listening (head-bobbers of the world unite!). And sometimes that gets taken to the next level with deliberate compositions and choreography. It’s happening for everyone from Radiohead to Gorecki at BAM this season.

Included in that mix is Symphony for the Dance Floor, a brainchild of DBR and a slew of artists just as likely to dally with four-on-the-floor house music as they are to be found two-on-the-aisle at the opera house. With DBR and Symphony director D.J. Mendel in the chat this week, we go further into this balance, asking: What happens when music and movement collide? And, in that partnership, who leads?

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DBR

See the full article, complete with interactive features, here.

[I was fortunate to meet DBR last Summer, when he visited Princeton's own New Music Black Belt, Dr Marvin Rosen, at WPRB Radio. He was generous with his time and with his talent. We in the studio - Philip Blackburn of Innova Records and the American Composers'Forum was also present and listeners at WPRB-FM and wprb.com were all treated to a live concert by DBR. He was spectacular.]

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Super SONiC”

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The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2.

“This week on The New Canon, we welcome back composer/clarinetist Derek Bermel and composer Kenji Bunch to talk about the American Composers Orchestra’s SONiC: Sounds of a New Century Festival.

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Derek Bermel

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Kenji Bunch

The period of 1900-1910 saw an enormous outpouring of compositions, including all of Berg’s Jugendlieder, Stravinsky’s The Firebird, Prokofiev’s Sinfonietta in A major, Strauss’s Salome, Schoenberg’s Pelleas und Melisande, five Mahler symphonies, Sibelius’s Valse Triste, Debussy’s La Mer, Ives’s The Unanswered Question and Ravel’s Shéhérazade (and that’s just the tip of the iceberg). One hundred years later and one-tenth of the way through the 21st Century, we’re experiencing a similar outpouring of works.

Which is why I hate the term “contemporary classical.” Because contemporary is a mercurial term designed to be applied fleetingly without ever sticking. Look at some of the names above and then try to go a week without hearing someone refer to Ives as “contemporary.”

Enter SONiC (Sounds of a New Century): A festival celebrating composers under 40 and offering dozens of works all written within the 21st Century. Now that’s contemporary—for now, at least. This week, we’ll chat with composer and SONiC co-curator Derek Bermel about the genesis of this city-wide takeover of honest-to-goodness living composers, along with one of those featured composers, Kenji Bunch, and ask them both: What will set this century apart from the last?”

See the full article here, including some interactive features.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “The Place Where You Go to Compose”

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2

Looking at influence and progression with itsnotyouitsme
Monday, September 26, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, we chat up itsnotyouitsme about their newest album and the evolution of an ensemble’s sound…We swim in a wide Sargasso sea of musical influences, and if you can’t constantly adapt to the varying temperatures as more tantalizing drops are added to the mix, you’re inevitably going to drown. That’s what I love about many of Q2 Music’s favorite musicians working today: Not only do they swim rather than sink, they make Michael Phelps look like a dog-paddler.

Exemplifying these skills and talents is itsnotyouitsme, a.k.a. Caleb Burhans and Grey McMurray. They’ve just released their third studio album for New Amsterdam Records (out 9/27) and are feting it with a set at (Le) Poisson Rouge on Monday the 26 (for those of you not going to the Met to see Anna Netrebko lose her head). Before they head into their sound check, we check out itsnotyouitsme’s sounds today, pitting some new tracks off of Everybody’s Pain is Magnificent against the music of John Luther Adams and Gavin Bryars as a mean of exploring similarities, differences, and — perhaps the million dollar question — Where is the balance between influence and individuality?”

The full article is here,

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From the New Canon at Q2: “Balancing Acts ” Jeffrey Zeigler and Paola Prestini

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2

Jeffrey Zeigler and Paola Prestini talk about restoring “equilibrium in the midst of imbalance.”

“It’s a first for the New Canon: A husband-wife chat with Kronos Quartet cellist Jeffrey Zeigler and composer Paola Prestini, both of whom are featured in the group’s Awakening at BAM.

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Jeffrey Zeigler

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Paola Prestini

There’s something really compelling about the new Kronos Quartet collaboration for BAM’s Next Wave Festival, and it’s not just their subtitle—’a musical meditation on the anniversary of 9/11,’ or their aim to combine music from several cultures—including those of the Floodplain. What grips me most is the idea of using music as a substitute for spoken language, to restore in Kronos violinist David Harrington’s words, equilibrium in the midst of imbalance.

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In the last few weeks, we’ve turned to music a lot for that equilibrium. And when it comes to communication, that word gets a fair amount of use among couples. So with that in mind, why stop at talking to friend of the show Jeffrey Zeigler about the communicative power of music when we can talk to both Zeigler and his wife, the luminous Paola Prestini, whose music will be featured in Awakening? We’ll fire them up with the Canon and ask: Where does music pick up where words fail?

And if you loved our last Kronos show, you won’t want to miss more from our fav fab four, plus works by Prestini and a few other composers featured in this BAMtacular.”

See the full article here, also with interactive utilities.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti


From The New Canon at Q2: “Crouching Composer, Hidden Dragon”

Walking Tan Dun’s fine line between film and classical
Monday, August 22, 2011

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Tan Dun

“Last week on The New Canon, we took a cool dip into the music of Finland. This week, we go into the hot hot hot world of Tan Dun’s Martial Arts Trilogy, speaking with violinist Ryu Goto, cellist Dane Johansen and the Metropolis Ensemble’s Andrew Cyr about their recent work with the composer. Join the conversation via Twitter with the hashtag #q2new.

Tan Dun! Remember the first time you saw—or even just heard—Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon? Or the excitement surrounding the Metropolitan Opera’s production of The First Emperor? Or the YouTube Symphony Orchestra coming together for Eroica? The violin and cello solos! The melodies! The percussion! I turn into a grinning fool whenever I hear a Tan Dun score—such as the works that were played recently at Lincoln Center Out of Doors or the same pieces that can be heard on a recent Sony recording of The Martial Arts Trilogy.

That is why we’re catching the Metropolis Ensemble’s Andrew Cyr, cellist Dane Johansen and violinist Ryu Goto, shortly after their tour with Tan to talk about the composer’s insanely beautiful work for both the silver screen and concert hall. He’s not the first to do both (Korngold, anyone?), but as the two genres have progressed over the last century and continue to cross pollinate, we’ll ask: Where does the line between film score end and classical work begin? And, naturally, we’ll have a program of more Tan Dun music than anyone should be allowed to hear in a span of 60 minutes.”

See the full article here.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2


From the New Canon at Q2: “Finn-tasia”

Going into the wild with a century of Finnish composers
Monday, August 15, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, we delve into a century of new Finnish music with composer Markku Klami and scholar Daniel Grimley. Join the conversation via Twitter with the hashtag #q2new.

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Markku Klami

“Finland, Finland, Finland, the country where I want to be,” sang Monty Python. But why exactly is it that Finland has, over the last century been a hotbed for composers? With the Bard Music Festival exploring Sibelius and his world this month and contemporary composers like Magnus Lindberg, Esa Pekka Salonen and Kaija Saariaho taking Manhattan, we investigate the fabulous Finns with Helsinkian composer Markku Klami and Bard Music Festival’s scholar-in-residence (and Sibelius biographer) Daniel Grimley.

We also go on a mega-packed odyssey across the Finnish soundscape, starting with one of the last works Sibelius ever wrote and moving through the years to include music from Rautavaara, Sallinen, Salonen, Saariaho and Markku himself. Can’t take the waning summer heat? We got you covered.”

See the full article here. You can leave comments and sign up for a program reminder.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2


From the New Canon at Q2: “No Sleep Till Brooklyn”



Launching Alan Pierson into his first season with the Brooklyn Phil

Monday, August 08, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, help Alan Pierson launch his inaugural season at the helm of the Brooklyn Philharmonic.

In the never-ending battle between Manhattan and Brooklyn, the former island has a lot to recommend it in terms of music—especially in the form of Alan Gilbert leading the New York Philharmonic into a brave new (music) world. But the Borough of Kings now has its own Alan: Alarm Will Sound’s Alan Pierson takes over the Brooklyn Phil this fall, bringing with him a mix of composers and guest artists that includes Mos Def, the Brooklyn Youth Chorus, Mellissa Hughes, Alfred Schnittke, Arvo Pärt, David T. Little, Otis Redding and Duke Ellington. (Phew.)

See the full article here, with also some interactive utilities.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2


From The New Canon at Q2: “The ICE Storm”

Cooling down with some of Mostly Mozart’s hottest musicians
Monday, August 01, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, we chat with the ICEicles of the International Contemporary Ensemble, Claire Chase and Josh Rubin.

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Claire Chase

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Josh Rubin

Mozart and Stravinsky were both pretty badass. Forgetting even the latter for a minute (and the riotous Rite of Spring), the former revolutionized music in so many ways—from developing the piano to unabashedly writing a hugely class-conscious opera at a time when the waves of French Revolution were already approaching shore. In tandem with Haydn, Mozart created the classical music language.

That’s why we’re so excited to see the International Contemporary Ensemble continue to play a major part in Lincoln Center’s annual Mostly Mozart Festival. This year they play three concerts, including one all-Stravinsky program and another program that pairs Mozart with contemporary composers. They emphasize size and scope, old and new, grand and delicate and in doing so ask audiences with each piece they play: What makes it revolutionary?

We ask that question of Claire Chase (ICE’s fearless flutist) and Josh Rubin (its cutting edge clarinetist) while hearing some of ICE’s latest works in tandem with pieces by Stravinsky and based on Mozart. While we only have Claire and Josh for half an hour—they’re joining us from rehearsal!—we’ll hear a full hour of music with additional music by Matthias Pintscher and Michael Finnissy, both of whom are featured in ICE’s Mostly Mozart programs.

See the full article, with some interactive features here.

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM.


From The New Canon at Q2: “Prizing the Pulitzer”

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

Your chat with Michael Barrett, Derek Bermel and Michael Boriskin begins Monday at 4 pm. Sign up for a reminder now!

This week on The New Canon, we chat with Caramoor’s Michael Barrett plus Music of Copland House’s Derek Bermel and Michael Boriskin.

The Pulitzer Prize carries as much prestige as it does controversy, from journalism to drama to literature. The award for music has also earned its share of outcry, particularly when the non-classical compositions of Wynton Marsalis and Ornette Coleman took home the honor in 1997 and 2007, respectively. At this year’s Caramoor Festival, the Music from Copland House ensemble explores this further playing works by Pulitzer laureates and nominees, with the festival’s chief executive and general director Michael Barrett also performing.

With one performance down on Friday, Aug. 22 and one to go on Sunday, Aug. 31, we catch Barrett along with Music from Copland members Derek Bermel and Michael Boriskin to pose the question: What makes a work of music great? And are awards like the Pulitzer a barometer of that greatness? In addition to hearing a work written by Bermel that harkens in no small part to Copland, we’ll hear the most recent Pulitzer winning work to be recorded (Jennifer Higdon’s Violin Concerto) and also hear the Music from Copland House play a work by Pulitzer nominee John Musto.”

See the full article with some interactive links here.

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2


From The New Canon at Q2: “Ethel Central”

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

FOR MONDAY, JULY 18, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, we chat with Ethel’s newest member Jennifer Choi along with fellow Ethel violinist and composer Cornelius Dufallo.

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Jennifer Choi

String quartets are a continual source of fascination for classical music fans. Four is the magic number, it seems, with the balance that comes between two violins, a viola and cello. So when one musician moves on and another comes in, how does the foursome’s dynamic change?

This week on the New Canon, we catch the ever-adventurous and always ebullient Ethel string quartet in the middle of such a shift. And while we were sad to see founding member Mary Rowell retire after 13 years, they couldn’t have asked for a better-experienced replacement in Jennifer Choi, who has both the solo and quartet chops to blow the roof off whatever joint is next on Ethel’s roster (this week, it’s Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, though the next time they come together it will be with the Rite of Summer Festival on August 13). While hearing some of Ethel’s recent work and Choi’s solo and ensemble performances, we get a head start on her New York-debut with the quartet next month to talk about the new era of Ethel.”

See the full article here, including some interactive features.


Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2


From The New Canon at Q2: July 11 – “John Adams’s Rib “

Getting to the bones of this Summer’s Hottest Composer
Monday, July 11, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, soprano Jessica Rivera and flutist Eric Lamb enter the ring to talk about the Summer of John Adams.

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John Adams

Writing for The New York Times last month, classical critic Steve Smith asked “Has the time come at last for The Death of Klinghoffer…?” I’d take it one step further: Even with his extensive popularity over the last few decades, has the time now come for John Adams? Earlier this year, his breakthrough first opera, Nixon in China received its long overdue Metropolitan Opera premiere with Adams making his debut with the company as a conductor. This summer has seen productions of Klinghoffer in Missouri and A Flowering Tree in Ohio. And this week, the Cleveland Orchestra takes to Avery Fisher as part of the Lincoln Center Festival, pitting orchestral works of Adams against those of Bruckner.

On hand to talk further about this are soprano Jessica Rivera, who has appeared in several Adams works including A Flowering Tree in Cincinnati last month (and its world premiere in Austria) and flutist Eric Lamb, who appears with the International Contemporary Ensemble on the newest Adams disc for Nonesuch, which features his Son of Chamber Symphony. We’ll hear that, plus excerpts from Tree and more as we get to the nitty gritty of this founding father of 20th- and 21st-century music.

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The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM.


From The New Canon at Q2: “Three for the Fourth”

Sampling a trio of new releases full of fireworks
Monday, July 04, 2011

“There’s a stack of new releases sitting on my desk and, with only an hour each week, I often have to make gut-wrenching decisions about the New Canon playlist. This week, we’re bringing you some of the most recent albums to have hit my mailbox, all of which I can’t wait to share with you in a first listen. Spank them, they’re new!

We kick off with Q2′s Album of the Week, Joseph Schwantner’s American-made Chasing Light… that includes the world premiere recording of Morning’s Embrace, a stunning feat of orchestral color and eclecticism originally written for the National Symphony Orchestra’s 75th anniversary. We get a brief interlude (and a small taste of our original ruling country, Great Britain) from one of my favorite living composers, Gabriel Prokofiev, and his label Nonclassical with vocal ensemble Juice.

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Juice Vocal Ensemble

Finally, we visit last week’s Album of the Week for Q2 with another world premiere recording of Christopher Theofanidis’s Symphony No. 1, recorded by the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra for its in-house label, ASO Media. If you can’t wait until dark for the fireworks to begin, here’s an amazingly energetic prelude that goes perfectly with your barbecue fare and red-white-and-blue cocktails”

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM.


The New Canon at Q2: “Seaside In C”

The New Canon on Q2 is hosted by Olivia Giovetti

Olivia Giovetti

The New Canon streams Mondays at 4PM on Q2; encore presentations Wednesdays at 10AM and Sundays at 8PM on Q2

The Rite of Summer Festival kicks off on Governors Island
Monday, June 27, 2011

“This week on The New Canon, violist Ljova, soprano Mellissa Hughes and flutist Jessica Schmitz join us for a chat about the upcoming concert of Terry Riley’s In C on Governors Island. Join the conversation in the window below or via Twitter with the hashtag #q2new [sorry, the link is not as of today live for me to give the link].

Terry Riley has a knack for bringing people together. His music is so warm, uplifting and life-affirming as to be addictive to both performers and listeners. Kronos Quartet sounds most at home with him. Steve Reich and Bang on a Can trace their roots back to his early minimalist works. And one of Paul Hiller’s finest recordings may be his own rendition of In C. Couple his affability with an instrumental flexibility—In C can be played by any combination of performers, leaving the work fluid and mercurial with each performance—and you can see why Riley has so many fans.

An army of such fans (and a veritable who’s who of the New York new music scene) are expected to descend on Governors Island on July 2 to kick off Pam Goldberg and Blair McMillen’s newly-minted Rite of Summer Festival, a season-long offering of free performances just a ferry ride away from Manhattan.

We’ll hear some great (and recent) tunes—all perfect for beach blankets and extended daylight hours—as we talk with violist, composer and bandleader Ljova, multitalented Hughes and Schmitz about performing in this festival and making music for the first time on Governors Island. It’s a particularly auspicious time to do it, and I can’t help but wonder—given the scaling-back of more mainstream institutions when it comes to free summer concerts, is new music primed for a major tipping point?

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