From Rutgers University: “Americans in Rome: Rutgers at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall”


Carnegie Hall

Rutgers University
Rutgers University

7:30 p.m. Monday, May 7, 2018


Min Kwon, pianist and curator
Featuring faculty, students, and alumni.

This program, with Mason Gross pianists and vocalists, celebrates the work of three 20th-century American composers, with Leonard Bernstein’s Songs from Candide and Symphonic Dances from West Side Story, Samuel Barber’s Four Songs (Op. 13), and Aaron Copland’s Simple Gifts, among others. In addition, the concert will present the world premieres of works by two recent fellows at the American Academy in Rome: Jonathan Berger and Vittorio Montalti.

Presented by Mason Gross School of the Arts and the Douglas and Inyoung Boyd Foundation.

Performers

Warren Jones, piano
Min Kwon, piano
Enriqueta Somarriba, piano

Kaitlyn Davis, vocals
Sonya Headlam, vocals
Andrew Moore, vocals

Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall
154 W. 57th Street
New York City

$30 for general public; $20 for seniors and RU employees, alumni, and students in person with proper ID; online and via telephone, use discount code RUT28518. Ticket fees may apply.

http://www.carnegiehall.org | CarnegieCharge (212) 247-7800 | Box office at 57th and Seventh

Catch a free preview concert Monday, April 30, at 5 p.m. at Schare Recital Hall (Marryott Music Building).

See the full article here .

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Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

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Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
Zankel Hall
Weill Recital Hall
The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

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For new music by living composers

newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


https://www.wnyc.org/
93.9FM
https://www.wqxr.org/
105.9FM
http://www.thegreenespace.org/

For great Jazz

88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

WPRB 103.3FM

Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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