From Department of Music at Princeton: “Ambrose Akinmusire & Jazz Small Group I”

Department of Music at Princeton


From Department of Music at Princeton

Ambrose Akinmusire by Eva Hambach AFP Getty
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Jazz at Princeton University
Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018 8:00 pm
Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

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Blue Note Records trumpet star Ambrose Akinmusire joins Jazz at Princeton University’s Small Group I in a program including a commissioned suite in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of W. E. Du Bois’ birth.

About the Artist:

Born and raised in Oakland, California, Ambrose Akinmusire (pronounced ah-kin-MOO-sir-ee) was a member of the Berkeley High School Jazz Ensemble when he caught the attention of saxophonist Steve Coleman. Akinmusire was asked to join Coleman’s Five Elements, embarking on a European tour when he was just a 19-year-old student at the Manhattan School of Music. After returning to the West Coast to pursue a master’s degree at the University of Southern California, Akinmusire went on to attend the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz in Los Angeles, where he studied with Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter and Terence Blanchard.

In 2007 Akinmusire won the prestigious Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition, decided by a panel of judges that included Blanchard, Quincy Jones, Herb Alpert, Hugh Masekela, Clark Terry and Roy Hargrove. That year Akinmusire also won the Carmine Caruso International Jazz Trumpet Solo Competition and released his debut album Prelude…To Cora on the Fresh Sound label. He moved back to New York and began performing with the likes of Vijay Iyer, Aaron Parks, Esperanza Spalding and Jason Moran. It was also during this time that he first caught the attention of another discerning listener, Bruce Lundvall, President of Blue Note Records.

Akinmusire’s Blue Note debut When The Heart Emerges Glistening was released in 2011 to rave reviews. The Los Angeles Times praised his “chameleonic tone that can sigh, flutter or soar,” adding that “Akinmusire sounds less like a rising star than one that was already at great heights and just waiting to be discovered.” DownBeat described his playing as “spectacular and not at all shy — muscular, driving, with a forward sound, pliant phrasing and a penchant for intervallic leaps,” concluding that “clearly something very special and personal is at work here, a vision of jazz that’s bigger than camps, broader and more intellectually restless than blowing sessions.”

See the full article here .

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Stem Education Coalition

Princeton’s Department of Music is at the epicenter of a musical culture that is broad and deep, reaching from edge to edge of the campus, from the classroom to the concert hall, and from faculty-led groups to those run exclusively by students.

There are several levels of involvement that students can have with the Department of Music: Graduate students can earn a Ph.D. in one of the two main areas of our Graduate program – composition or musicology – including opportunities to focus on theory or ethnomusicology. Undergraduate students can major in music, in a program with emphasis on writing music or writing about music. Undergraduates can also earn certificates in the Program in Musical Performance, both as Music Majors and as majors of other departments. Those who do not plan to pursue a degree or certificate in music are of course welcome to take courses with world-renowned composers and music historians, take instrumental or voice lessons in the private studios of top professionals, and audition to perform with our many ensembles: six jazz groups, three choruses, two orchestras, a wind ensemble, an opera theater, a musical comedy troupe, at least a dozen chamber music ensembles, a laptop orchestra, and almost twenty small a cappella singing groups.

Community members can attend numerous concerts throughout the academic year. In addition to student performances, world-renowned artists appear on the Princeton University Concerts series; leading performers of contemporary music showcase compositions by faculty and graduate composers through the Princeton Sound Kitchen; Sō Percussion, the Edward T. Cone Artists-in-Residence, perform and engage with the community. The student-run radio station WPRB: 103.3 FM broadcasts many styles of music, often featuring Princeton student performances.

An important feature hard to discern from a list of courses and ensembles is the Music Department’s emphasis on collaboration. This manifests not only within the department (graduate composers composing for the undergraduate orchestra, graduate musicologists making a performance edition for an undergraduate opera production), but in collaboration with other departments as well. Frequent interdisciplinary collaborators with the music department include students and faculty from Architecture, African American Studies, Computer Science, Irish Studies, and the programs in Theater, Dance, Visual Art, Music Theater, and Creative Writing all housed within the Lewis Center for Arts.

John Schaefer


For new music by living composers

newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


https://www.wnyc.org/
93.9FM
https://www.wqxr.org/
105.9FM
http://www.thegreenespace.org/

For great Jazz

88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

WPRB 103.3FM


Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio