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  • richardmitnick 4:13 PM on May 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , The Morgan Library and Museum, Brahms - The Search   

    From The Morgan Library and Museum: “MUSIC AT THE MORGAN” Brahms 


    The Morgan Library and Museum

    Orchestra of St. Luke’s

    Seasons of Brahms

    Series tickets:
    $120; $112.50 for members.
    Order series tickets
    Tickets:
    $50; $40 for members.
    Order tickets

    To order tickets by telephone call the Orchestra of St. Luke’s at 212.594.6100 ext 2.
    Please call (212) 685-0008 ext. 560 or e-mail tickets@themorgan.org for information.

    St. Luke’s Chamber Ensemble
    1
    Photography by Matt Dine.

    Brahms Chamber Music Festival
    Three intimate perspectives on the musical life of the Romantic-era master, featuring readings and special guests.

    Seasons of Brahms

    Brahms, Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115
    Brahms, String Sextet in B-flat Major, Op. 18, No. 1*


    *From the Morgan’s collection: Autograph manuscript of Brahms’s Sextet for strings in B-flat Major, Op. 18, No. 1, arranged for Four Hands

    A 6:30 pm pre-concert discussion with OSL Clarinetist Jon Manasse will introduce the range of Brahms’s style that you will hear on the program, as well as the singular influence a performer can have on a musical artist, as was the case with the creation of Brahms’s Clarinet Quintet.

    Wednesday, June 6, 2018, 7:30 pm

    Brahms and the Schumanns

    St. Luke’s Chamber Ensemble
    Brahms Chamber Music Festival
    Three intimate perspectives on the musical life of the Romantic-era master, featuring readings and special guests.

    Pedja Muzijevic, piano

    Brahms, Scherzo from Sonatensatz in C minor, WoO2
    Robert Schumann, Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 63, No. 1
    Clara Schumann, Romances for violin and piano, Op. 22
    Brahms, Horn Trio in E-flat Major, Op. 40

    A 6:30 pm pre-concert discussion, led by Deborah L. Cabaniss, M.D. (Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Columbia University) and Thomas Cabaniss (composer and faculty member, The Juilliard School), will explore the composers’ intricate, psychologically-charged relationship.

    Brahms and the Search for a Symphony

    Beethoven, Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 36, arranged by Andy Stein
    Brahms, Serenade No. 1 in D Major, Op. 11, reconstructed by Alan Boustead
    Spoken word to be announced.

    A 6:30 pm pre-concert discussion with Stanford University musicologist and program annotator James Steichen will address the questions: what did Brahms learn from Beethoven, why did he destroy his first version of the Serenade, and what can we learn from the creation of new versions of the works that you will hear on the program.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem
    Stem Education Coalition

    The Morgan Library & Museum – formerly the Pierpont Morgan Library – is a museum and research library located at 225 Madison Avenue at East 36th Street in the Murray Hill neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was founded to house the private library of J. P. Morgan in 1906, which included manuscripts and printed books, some of them in rare bindings, as well as his collection of prints and drawings. The library was designed by Charles McKim of the firm of McKim, Mead and White and cost $1.2 million. It was made a public institution in 1924 by J. P. Morgan’s son John Pierpont Morgan, Jr., in accordance with his father’s will.

    The building was designated a New York City landmark in 1966[4] and was declared a National Historic Landmark later that same year.

    Today the library is a complex of buildings which serve as a museum and scholarly research center. The scope of the collection was shaped in its early years as a private collection by Belle da Costa Greene, J.P. Morgan’s personal librarian, who became the library’s first director and served from the time that it became public until her retirement in 1948. Her successor Frederick Baldwin Adams, Jr. managed the Library until 1969 and was also world-renowned for his own personal collections. The most internationally significant part of the collection is its relatively small but very select collection of illuminated manuscripts, and medieval artworks such as the Stavelot Triptych and the metalwork covers of the Lindau Gospels. Among the more famous manuscripts are the Morgan Bible, Morgan Beatus, Hours of Catherine of Cleves, Farnese Hours, Morgan Black Hours, and Codex Glazier. The manuscript collection also includes authors’ original manuscripts, including some by Sir Walter Scott and Honoré de Balzac, as well as the scraps of paper on which Bob Dylan jotted down “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “It Ain’t Me Babe”.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 4:23 PM on May 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Corigliano @ 80", ,   

    From National Sawdust: “Corigliano @ 80” 

    From National Sawdust

    Jeffrey Zeigler (cello), Ursula Oppens (piano), Lara St. John (violin), and Martin Kennedy (piano).

    Wednesday, May 23rd – 7pm

    About the Show

    John Corigliano by J. Henry Fair

    National Sawdust continues its year-long celebration of famed composer John Corigliano’s 80th birthday with a concert highlighting his chamber works. One of his most famous students, Nico Muhly, will host and moderate the evening.

    Nico Muhly by Samantha West

    Muhly, whose collaborations span from Glen Hansard to Björk and Philip Glass, has emerged as one of the most vital composers since the turn of the millennium.

    This final performance, exclusively at National Sawdust, features some of Corigliano’s most notable collaborators over his career: Jeffrey Zeigler (cello), Ursula Oppens (piano), Lara St. John (violin), and Martin Kennedy (piano). [See the full article for images and biographical material on these artists.]

    Program:
    Fancy on a Bach Air
    Violin Sonata
    Phatasmagoria
    Fantasia on an Ostinato
    Chiaroscuro

    Ticketing available only at the full article.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem
    Stem Education Coalition

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Space waiting

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:50 PM on May 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Lincoln Center, Music, The Mostly Mozart Extravaganza, Theatre   

    From Lincoln Center: The Mostly Mozart Festival 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    From Lincoln Center

    Join us for the newly expanded Mostly Mozart Festival featuring a thrilling slate of international dance, theater, and classical music.

    1

    May 22, 2018
    Pia Catton

    Music Dance Film Theater

    The Mostly Mozart Festival is growing in every possible direction.

    The 52nd edition of this beloved summer event now runs five weeks—July 12 to August 12—up from four, and will present the mix of classical and contemporary work for which it has become known. But the 2018 festival will extend further into immersive experiences, performances in Brooklyn and Central Park, and, for the first time, theater. (Who better to start with than Shakespeare?)

    “We have diversified Mostly Mozart over the years,” Ehrenkranz Artistic Director Jane Moss explains, “and we are diversifying it further, but Mozart does remain at the center.”

    Devotees of Mozart can hear their favorite composer performed by artists ranging from celebrated pianist Emanuel Ax (July 24 and 25) to 16-year-old violin prodigy Daniel Lozakovich (August 1, 7, and 8)—and, of course, the renowned Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra led by exuberant Renée and Robert Belfer Music Director Louis Langrée.

    But Mozart’s masterpieces, like his final Symphony No. 41 (“Jupiter”), conducted by Thomas Dausgaard (July 20 and 21), are complemented by groundbreaking productions that represent innovation in eras long after that of the festival’s namesake composer.

    The 2018 festival opens on July 12 and 13 with Available Light, a work that combines music, dance, and design by, respectively, composer John Adams, choreographer Lucinda Childs, and architect Frank Gehry.

    Returning to New York for the first time since 1983, Available Light explores modern expressions of each discipline. Even so, they can all be seen as a distillation of classical purity. That is particularly visible in the linear clarity of Childs’s ballet steps—stripped of frills and repeated to express Adams’s score Light Over Water, for synthesizer and recorded brass.

    If Available Light seems atypical for Mostly Mozart, its inaugural theater production—Shakespeare’s Macbeth interpreted by the late Japanese director Yukio Ninagawa—pushes the envelope even further. But the 1980 NINAGAWA Macbeth (July 21–25) is a balance of tradition and innovation. While rooted in the original text and employing music by Samuel Barber and Franz Schubert, the production transports the setting from Scotland in the Middle Ages to feudal-era Japan. And Ninagawa has created a staging beautiful enough to count as visual art.

    Theater
    NINAGAWA Macbeth

    1

    Saturday, July 21, 2018 at 7:30 pm
    Sunday, July 22, 2018 at 5:00 pm
    Tuesday, July 24, 2018 at 7:30 pm
    Wednesday, July 25, 2018 at 7:30 pm

    By William Shakespeare
    Translated by Yushi Odashima
    Masachika Ichimura, Macbeth (Mostly Mozart Festival debut)
    Yuko Tanaka, Lady Macbeth (Mostly Mozart Festival debut)
    Yukio Ninagawa, director

    Performed in Japanese with English supertitles
    Performance length: 2 hours and 45 minutes, including intermission

    The 1980 premiere of Yukio Ninagawa’s “legendarily beautiful” Japanese-language production of Macbeth (Independent, U.K.) was a watershed moment in global theater. Transposing Shakespeare’s tragedy from medieval Scotland to feudal Japan, Ninagawa created a breathtaking world filled with samurai, kabuki witches, a highly expressive cherry tree, and a moving musical score of Buddhist chant and western classical music. This revival, the last production overseen by Ninagawa before his death in 2016, transforms the Bard’s brutal tale of greed, ambition, and revenge into a poetic meditation on the ephemeral nature of existence.

    “Achingly beautiful.”

    Guardian (U.K.)

    “What makes this Macbeth so powerful is that Ninagawa’s gift for painterly spectacle is accompanied by a sense of sadness at mankind’s folly and impermanence.”

    Guardian (U.K.)

    “The most beautiful Macbeth you will ever see.”

    Telegraph (U.K.)

    The festival’s expansion is part of an evolution that has been ongoing for several years, allowing ever wider room for interpreting the classical canon. And a key participant all along has been the Mark Morris Dance Group.

    3
    3
    DanceMotion USA

    A festival regular, choreographer Mark Morris is a musician himself and hews closely to classical music when designing movement. This year, he brings a world premiere set to Schubert’s Trout Quintet, as well as dances using Monteverdi and Brahms, to the Rose Theater (August 9–12).

    Performances in which the audience and performers share exceptional settings are popular in New York, and Mostly Mozart rises to the occasion with the wordless drama The Force of Things, an immersive installation and musical landscape set up at Brooklyn’s Gelsey Kirkland Arts Center (August 6–8). Composed by Ashley Fure, the work includes 24 subwoofers and live music played by the International Contemporary Ensemble, now in its eighth season as the festival’s artists-in-residence.

    4
    Ashley Fure. Photo by Matt Zugale

    In a space designed by Fure’s architect brother Adam, this music-theater experience is designed to make objects and materials part of the drama. “It functions equally as an art installation and a performance,” Moss says.

    But you don’t have to go to Brooklyn to have an immersive Mostly Mozart experience, as the festival presents the world premiere of John Luther Adams’s In the Name of the Earth, a massive choral work commissioned by Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, on August 11. For this free performance near Central Park’s Harlem Meer, guests will walk into the northeast portion of the park to hear some 800 singers perform a new work that honors nature.

    The immersive trend also continues with La Fura dels Baus’s innovative production of Haydn’s The Creation, which features period-instrument ensemble Insula Orchestra and accentus choir. On July 19 and 20, the Rose Theater will be transformed with a 250-gallon water tank, a 20-foot crane, and an assortment of helium balloons, with which performers relate the Biblical story of creation.

    5
    A scene from La Fura dels Baus’s production of Haydn’s The Creation. No image credit.

    But for the new concepts that today’s artists introduce onto the stage, and for the new journeys that immersive productions take audiences on, it’s hard not to feel that Leonard Bernstein got there first. As part of the celebration of Bernstein’s centenary, Mostly Mozart is presenting the landmark Bernstein MASS, directed by SF Opera Lab curator Elkhanah Pulitzer, and featuring over 200 singers, dancers, and musicians on July 17 and 18.

    6
    Bernstein MASS. Photo by Mathew Imaging.

    MASS, originally created for the 1971 opening of the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., is already a multilayered work. Subtitled A Theater Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers, it’s a unique take on the liturgical form, incorporating theater, dance, jazz, and popular music. Pulitzer adds even more by creating a fully staged theater piece, which in fact, notes Moss, is as Bernstein originally intended it. The large-scale MASS will include the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra, Concert Chorale of New York, Young People’s Chorus of New York City, both a marching band and a rock band, dancers, and—making his Mostly Mozart debut—bass-baritone Davóne Tines as the Celebrant.

    In the context of the Mostly Mozart Festival, “Mozart” has come to represent not just a single composer and his era but the entire genre of classical music. Today, we can consider the festival “mostly classical music,” but that leaves room for plenty more—beyond classical and often beyond music itself.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem
    Stem Education Coalition

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:25 PM on May 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Gianandrea Noseda- Conductor, James Ehnes- Violin, The Met Orchestra   

    From Carnegie Hall: “The MET Orchestra – Gianandrea Noseda, Conductor with James Ehnes, Violin” 


    From Carnegie Hall

    The Met Orchestra by Chris Lee

    Gianandrea Noseda – Conductor http://www.gianandreanoseda.com

    James Ehnes- Violin courtesy of the artist

    The MET Orchestra
    Wednesday, May 30, 2018 8 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    Tickets

    Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 5 is an elegant work with an abundance of beautiful melodies that also shows a fascination with all things Turkish, including a section where cellos and basses slap the wooden side of their bows on the strings to create an exotic percussive sound. Mahler’s Symphony No. 5 has its own share of melodic splendor, particularly in the fourth-movement Adagietto—the gorgeous love letter he wrote to his wife, featuring strings and harp. The symphony is also dramatic with a powerful opening Funeral March and roof-raising jubilant finale.

    The MET Orchestra
    Gianandrea Noseda, Conductor
    James Ehnes, Violin
    Program
    MOZART Violin Concerto No. 5, “Turkish”
    MAHLER Symphony No. 5
    Event Duration
    The printed program will last approximately two hours, including one 20-minute intermission.

    WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART
    Violin Concerto No. 5 in A Major, K. 219, “Turkish”

    From an early age, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart studied both violin and piano with his father, Leopold, a respected composer, violinist, and pedagogue whose famous textbook Versuch einer gründlichen Violinschule (A Treatise on the Fundamental Principals of Violin Playing) was tremendously influential in his time and remains so today. Under Leopold’s tutelage, Wolfgang developed into a fine violinist, and, during his travels throughout Europe during the 1760s and early 1770s, performed often as a violin soloist in addition to giving concerts on the harpsichord, piano, and organ.

    In 1769, at age 13, Mozart was appointed Konzertmeister (concertmaster) to the Salzburg court by Prince-Archbishop Schrattenbach. His duties included playing in and leading the orchestra, and composing Masses and other works for performances at the cathedral as well as at Salzburg University. Schrattenbach died in 1771, but his replacement, Hieronymus Colloredo, re-appointed Mozart and offered him a small salary. Despite feeling restless and mistreated under Colloredo—the new prince-archbishop was reluctant to continue letting the Mozart family travel for extended periods, for example—Mozart composed prolifically and in a variety of genres during this period; in addition to Masses, his works included symphonies, string quartets, and serenades, as well as the operas Il re pastore and La finta giardiniera.

    With the exception of the First Violin Concerto, which recent scholarship suggests Mozart composed in 1773 following a tour of Italy, all of Mozart’s violin concertos were written in late 1775 (his keyboard concertos, by contrast, span his entire career), and the latter three in particular represent a major leap forward in Mozart’s musical maturity. The violin concertos probably were written for Mozart to perform himself while leading the Salzburg court orchestra; they also may have been performed by Italian virtuoso Antonio Brunetti, who played in the orchestra and later succeeded Mozart as concertmaster. Regardless, Mozart never returned to the genre, performing for the remainder of his life as a keyboard virtuoso.

    The first movement of the Concerto No. 5 (marked Allegro aperto, or “open”) begins with a cheerful theme in the orchestra; when the violin enters after a pause, however, it does not restate the theme as expected, but instead plays an adagio, quasi-recitative passage. When the allegro tempo resumes, the soloist plays a new melody, for which the original main theme becomes the accompaniment. A second theme is expanded upon by the violin, and the movement comes to a spirited close following a vivacious development section and cadenza. The lovely Adagio, which is slightly longer than either of the outer movements, features a songlike melody for the violin, with the orchestra supplying an aching accompaniment steadied by a pulsing bass line. (Brunetti apparently asked Mozart to supply an alternate Adagio, for some reason finding the original too mannered.)

    The third-movement Rondo opens as a triple-meter minuet; midway through, however, a duple-meter dance—featuring a melody derived from a ballet sequence in Mozart’s early opera Lucio Silla—interrupts the proceedings. In this section, the key shifts from A major to A minor, and the violins play col legno, slapping the wooden sides of their bows on the strings to create a percussive sound that evokes janissary, or Turkish military, music—a fashionably “exotic” reference for composers in the 17th and 18th centuries. After a restatement of the minuet theme, the concerto ends not with a climax, coda, or brilliant final statement of any kind, but with a simple, quiet cadence—a final twist in a work of true invention and originality.

    —J. Adams Holman

    GUSTAV MAHLER
    Symphony No. 5 in C-sharp Minor

    With his Fifth Symphony, composed during the years 1901–1902, Mahler set out to free his music from the bonds of extramusical narrative content. After his four previous symphonies—all of which possessed programmatic elements, and either included sung text (nos. 2, 3, and 4) or contained overt allusions to music and verse previously used in a song cycle (No. 1)—the Fifth is a long stride toward the Romantic concept of absolute music, or music that attempts to convey nothing but itself. Mahler struggled with these two opposed paradigms of composition throughout his career, and after the completion of the Fifth, he worried about the reception of his vast, turbulent score without the aid of a program to help the audience make sense of it all. In a letter sent to his wife, Alma, while preparing for the symphony’s premiere in 1904, Mahler wrote: “And the public—heavens!—how should they react to this chaos, which is constantly giving birth to new worlds and promptly destroying them again? What should they make of these primeval noises, this rushing, roaring, raging sea, these dancing stars, these ebbing, shimmering, gleaming waves?”

    Mahler’s “primeval noises” are broken into five movements, which the composer then grouped more broadly into three basic segments, with the Scherzo standing alone in the middle and the two movements on either side acting together to form one section each. From the outset, musical themes constantly recur and are transformed, creating a sense of unity and fluid forward motion despite the drastic differences in style and mood between the three sections. The mournful theme following the trumpet fanfare in the opening funeral march also permeates the second movement; the main melody from the Adagietto is sped up and used as a theme in the final movement; the brass chorale from the second movement makes a curtain call in the coda of the finale, just before the very end. Despite the movements’ thematic interdependence, however, this symphony is ultimately a work of contrast, of darkness and light.

    That Mahler opens the symphony with a funeral march is not particularly shocking. Funeral marches, in style if not always in name, are so abundant in Mahler’s work that they could be considered a morbid trademark. Neither is it surprising autobiographically. In February 1901, the year Mahler began work on the Fifth, he suffered an internal abdominal hemorrhage, lost a third of his blood, and nearly died. It would not be a stretch to imagine that the composer had his own mortality in mind for some time afterward. This particular funeral march, introduced by a trumpet fanfare that stands as one of the most unmistakable symphonic openings in music history, is a savage beast, merciless in its pessimism. The militant atmosphere present from the outset is interrupted only by a recurring, anguished dirge in the strings. The second movement, very similar in atmosphere and outlook, is even more manic, sometimes surging forward with violent brass and pounding timpani, sometimes softly weeping with strings and woodwinds. Just before the end, the music suddenly veers into the major mode, and we get a glimpse of the triumphant brass chorale that will eventually bring the symphony to a close. Then, as quickly as it appeared, the chorale is gone, dissolving into a formless mass of wispy instrumental lines that haltingly brings the movement—and the first part of the symphony—to a close.

    The Scherzo at the heart of the Fifth is a very strange creation, and Mahler himself realized that it could be easily misunderstood. In the same letter previously mentioned, he wrote to Alma: “That Scherzo is an accursed movement! It will have a long tale of woe! For the next 50 years conductors will take it too fast and make nonsense of it.” It belongs neither to the despair that has preceded it nor to the tranquility and triumph that will follow; it seems instead like a fever dream, a hallucinogenic journey through a world apart from our own. Lurching in triple time, it sounds like something between a deranged waltz and a whirling carnival ride. It stops and starts, sputters and roars, and one never knows whether to be excited or alarmed. Virtuosic in the extreme, it contains some of Mahler’s most brilliant flights of orchestral fancy, scintillating with color and throbbing with life.

    What follows is something entirely different. The Adagietto, at first inspection, would appear to be completely out of place—a page from a different piece of music that fell into this score by mistake. In the midst of a symphony for massive orchestra, it calls only for strings and harp. Situated between two enormously long movements, it comes and goes in just 103 measures. Most of all, amid furor and frenzy, the Adagietto jolts the listener with quiet, understated elegance. The surreal, trance-inducing sense of the otherworldly achieved here is matched in only two other places in Mahler’s work: the Urlicht movement of the Second Symphony and the closing pages of the Ninth. So, how to explain this brief, sheltering tranquility in the eye of such a storm? To understand the Adagietto, one must remember Alma.

    The young, gorgeous, and musically talented Alma Schindler, whom Mahler married in 1902 while in the midst of writing the Fifth, became the composer’s muse and occasional assistant, even helping with the orchestration and copying of this symphony while on retreat at Mahler’s villa in Maiernigg, Austria, during their first summer together in 1902. And if, against Mahler’s stated desire to the contrary, there are any nonmusical messages to be found in this symphony, the influence of the composer’s feelings for his new wife are the best place to look. Gilbert Kaplan—businessman, amateur conductor, and Mahler scholar—assembled a convincing argument that the Adagietto, which was written during the short, secretive courtship and engagement between 41-year-old Gustav and 22-year-old Alma, was intended by the composer as a musical love letter to his new bride. Into Mahler’s taxing, tempestuous life came the beauty and charm of Alma; into the Fifth Symphony came the Adagietto.

    Emerging without pause from the barely audible final chord of the Adagietto comes a single note for principal horn, suddenly breaking the trance like a child’s finger popping a soap-bubble. Slowly gaining speed and coalescing from snippets of sound and motivic fragments, the Rondo-Finale eventually develops into a high-spirited, lighthearted romp, finally twisting the symphony a full 180 degrees from where it began. This movement exults, laughing at all the preceding struggle and angst. In its masterfully inventive use of complex counterpoint, it also laughs at Mahler’s critics, who had long accused him of being unable to master true polyphony. Finally, rising up from racing 16th-notes and frolicking strings, the victorious brass chorale from the second movement again bursts forth, this time in its full glory. As if realizing that to end with such pomp would be to take itself too seriously, the chorale dies away and the symphony races to a close with a final, boisterous yelp.

    —Jay Goodwin

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem
    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:07 PM on May 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , The Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine   

    From New York Philharmonic: “Annual Free Memorial Day Concert – The Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine” 


    From New York Philharmonic

    The Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine

    1
    https://www.thousandwonders.net/Cathedral+of+Saint+John+the+Divine

    Monday May 28, 2018 8:00 PM

    Free
    Duration 1 hour
    no intermission

    “Now and then something happens that makes you feel proud of institutions and the music-loving public. One such event is the New York Philharmonic’s Annual Free Memorial Day concert,” raved The New York Times. Join us at The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine, where you’ll be surrounded by the sounds of Vaughan Williams’s Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis and Saint-Saëns’s Organ Symphony.

    Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis on the day of the performance; ticket distribution will begin at 6:00 PM. The audio of the performance will be broadcast onto the adjacent Pulpit Green, weather permitting.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem
    Stem Education Coalition


    by Chris Lee

    Founded in 1842, the New York Philharmonic is the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States. Read a complete historical overview, visit the New York Philharmonic Leon Levy Digital Archives, or explore our history below.

    The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc.,globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra (NYPO) or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra based in New York City in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the “Big Five”. The Philharmonic’s home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York’s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

    Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the “Big Five” orchestras. Its record-setting 14,000th concert was given in December 2004.

    The New York Philharmonic was founded in 1842 by the American conductor Ureli Corelli Hill, with the aid of the Irish composer William Vincent Wallace. The orchestra was then called the Philharmonic Society of New York. It was the third Philharmonic on American soil since 1799, and had as its intended purpose, “the advancement of instrumental music.” The first concert of the Philharmonic Society took place on December 7, 1842 in the Apollo Rooms on lower Broadway before an audience of 600. The concert opened with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, led by Hill himself. Two other conductors, German-born Henry Christian Timm and French-born Denis Etienne, led parts of the eclectic, three-hour program, which included chamber music and several operatic selections with a leading singer of the day, as was the custom. The musicians operated as a cooperative society, deciding by a majority vote such issues as who would become a member, which music would be performed and who among them would conduct. At the end of the season, the players would divide any proceeds among themselves.

    After only a dozen public performances and barely four years old, the Philharmonic organized a concert to raise funds to build a new music hall. The centerpiece was the American premiere of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, to take place at Castle Garden on the southern tip of Manhattan. About 400 instrumental and vocal performers gathered for this premiere, which was conducted by George Loder. The chorals were translated into what would be the first English performance anywhere in the world. However, with the expensive US$2.00 ticket price and a war rally uptown, the hoped-for audience was kept away and the new hall would have to wait. Although judged by some as an odd work with all those singers kept at bay until the end, the Ninth soon became the work performed most often when a grand gesture was required.

    During the Philharmonic’s first seven seasons, seven musicians alternated the conducting duties. In addition to Hill, Timm and Étienne, these were William Alpers, George Loder, Louis Wiegers and Alfred Boucher. This changed in 1849 when Theodore Eisfeld was installed as sole conductor for the season. Eisfeld, later along with Carl Bergmann, would be the conductor until 1865. That year, Eisfeld conducted the Orchestra’s memorial concert for the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln, but in a peculiar turn of events which were criticized in the New York press, the Philharmonic omitted the last movement, Ode to Joy, as being inappropriate for the occasion. That year Eisfeld returned to Europe, and Bergmann continued to conduct the Society until his death in 1876.

    Leopold Damrosch, Franz Liszt’s former concertmaster at Weimar, served as conductor of the Philharmonic for the 1876/77 season. But failing to win support from the Philharmonic’s public, he left to create the rival Symphony Society of New York in 1878. Upon his death in 1885, his 23-year-old son Walter took over and continued the competition with the old Philharmonic. It was Walter who would convince Andrew Carnegie that New York needed a first-class concert hall and on May 5, 1891, both Walter and Russian composer Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky conducted at the inaugural concert of the city’s new Music Hall, which in a few years would be renamed for its primary benefactor, Andrew Carnegie. Carnegie Hall would remain the orchestra’s home until 1962.

    The Philharmonic in 1877 was in desperate financial condition, caused by the paltry income from five concerts in the 1876/77 season that brought in an average of only $168 per concert. Representatives of the Philharmonic wished to attract the German-born, American-trained conductor Theodore Thomas, whose own Theodore Thomas Orchestra had competed directly with the Philharmonic for over a decade and which had brought him fame and great success. At first the Philharmonic’s suggestion offended Thomas because he was unwilling to disband his own orchestra. Because of the desperate financial circumstances, the Philharmonic offered Theodore Thomas the conductorship without conditions, and he began conducting the orchestra in the autumn of 1877. With the exception of the 1878/79 season – when he was in Cincinnati and Adolph Neuendorff led the group – Thomas conducted every season for fourteen years, vastly improving the orchestra’s financial health while creating a polished and virtuosic ensemble. He left in 1891 to found the Chicago Symphony, taking thirteen Philharmonic musicians with him.

    Another celebrated conductor, Anton Seidl, followed Thomas on the Philharmonic podium, serving until 1898. Seidl, who had served as Wagner’s assistant, was a renowned conductor of the composer’s works; Seidl’s romantic interpretations inspired both adulation and controversy. During his tenure, the Philharmonic enjoyed a period of unprecedented success and prosperity and performed its first world premiere written by a world-renowned composer in the United States – Antonín Dvořák’s Ninth Symphony From the New World. Seidl’s sudden death in 1898 from food poisoning at the age of 47 was widely mourned. Twelve thousand people applied for tickets to his funeral at the Metropolitan Opera House at 39th Street and Broadway and the streets were jammed for blocks with a “surging mass” of his admirers.

    According to Joseph Horowitz, Seidl’s death was followed by “five unsuccessful seasons” under Emil Paur [music director from 1898 to 1902] and Walter Damrosch [who served for only one season, 1902/03].” After this, he says, for several seasons [1903–1906] the orchestra employed guest conductors, including Victor Herbert, Édouard Colonne, Willem Mengelberg, Fritz Steinbach, Richard Strauss, Felix Weingartner, and Henry Wood.

    In 1909, to ensure the financial stability of the Philharmonic, a group of wealthy New Yorkers led by two women, Mary Seney Sheldon and Minnie Untermyer, formed the Guarantors Committee and changed the Orchestra’s organization from a musician-operated cooperative to a corporate management structure. The Guarantors were responsible for bringing Gustav Mahler to the Philharmonic as principal conductor and expanding the season from 18 concerts to 54, which included a tour of New England. The Philharmonic was the only symphonic orchestra where Mahler worked as music director without any opera responsibilities, freeing him to explore the symphonic literature more deeply. In New York, he conducted several works for the first time in his career and introduced audiences to his own compositions. Under Mahler, a controversial figure both as a composer and conductor, the season expanded, musicians’ salaries were guaranteed, the scope of operations broadened, and the 20th-century orchestra was created.

    In 1911 Mahler died unexpectedly, and the Philharmonic appointed Josef Stránský as his replacement. Many commentators were surprised by the choice of Stránský, whom they did not see as a worthy successor to Mahler. Stránský led all of the orchestra’s concerts until 1920, and also made the first recordings with the orchestra in 1917.

    In 1921 the Philharmonic merged with New York’s National Symphony Orchestra (no relation to the present Washington, D.C. ensemble). With this merger it also acquired the imposing Dutch conductor Willem Mengelberg. For the 1922/23 season Stránský and Mengelberg shared the conducting duties, but Stránský left after the one shared season. For nine years Mengelberg dominated the scene, although other conductors, among them Bruno Walter, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Igor Stravinsky, and Arturo Toscanini, led about half of each season’s concerts. During this period, the Philharmonic became one of the first American orchestras to boast an outdoor symphony series when it began playing low-priced summer concerts at Lewisohn Stadium in upper Manhattan. In 1920 the orchestra hired Henry Hadley as “associate conductor” given specific responsibility for the “Americanization” of the orchestra: each of Hadley’s concerts featured at least one work by an American-born composer.

    In 1924, the Young People’s Concerts were expanded into a substantial series of children’s concerts under the direction of American pianist-composer-conductor Ernest Schelling. This series became the prototype for concerts of its kind around the country and grew by popular demand to 15 concerts per season by the end of the decade.

    Mengelberg and Toscanini both led the Philharmonic in recording sessions for the Victor Talking Machine Company and Brunswick Records, initially in a recording studio (for the acoustically-recorded Victors, all under Mengelberg) and eventually in Carnegie Hall as electrical recording was developed. All of the early electrical recordings for Victor were made with a single microphone, usually placed near or above the conductor, a process Victor called “Orthophonic”; the Brunswick electricals used the company’s proprietary non-microphone “Light-Ray” selenium-cell system, which was much more prone to sonic distortion than Victor’s. Mengelberg’s first records for Victor were acousticals made in 1922; Toscanini’s recordings with the Philharmonic actually began with a single disc for Brunswick in 1926, recorded in a rehearsal hall at Carnegie Hall. Mengelberg’s most successful recording with the Philharmonic was a 1927 performance in Carnegie Hall of Richard Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben. Additional Toscanini recordings with the Philharmonic, all for Victor, took place on Carnegie Hall’s stage in 1929 and 1936. By the 1936 sessions Victor, now owned by RCA, began to experiment with multiple microphones to achieve more comprehensive reproductions of the orchestra.

    The year 1928 marked the New York Philharmonic’s last and most important merger: with the New York Symphony Society. The Symphony had been quite innovative in its 50 years prior to the merger. It made its first domestic tour in 1882, introduced educational concerts for young people in 1891, and gave the premieres of works such as Gershwin’s Concerto in F and Holst’s Egdon Heath. The merger of these two venerable institutions consolidated extraordinary financial and musical resources. Of the new Philharmonic Symphony Society of New York, Clarence Hungerford Mackay, chairman of the Philharmonic Society, will be chairman. President Harry H. Flagler, of the Symphony Society, will be president of the merger. At the first joint board meeting in 1928, the chairman, Clarence Mackay, expressed the opinion that “with the forces of the two Societies now united… the Philharmonic-Symphony Society could build up the greatest orchestra in this country if not in the world.”

    Of course, the merger had ramifications for the musicians of both orchestras. Winthrop Sargeant, a violinist with the Symphony Society and later a writer for The New Yorker, recalled the merger as “a sort of surgical operation in which twenty musicians were removed from the Philharmonic and their places taken by a small surviving band of twenty legionnaires from the New York Symphony”. This operation was performed by Arturo Toscanini himself. Fifty-seventh Street wallowed in panic and recrimination.” Toscanini, who had guest-conducted for several seasons, became the sole conductor and in 1930 led the group on a European tour that brought immediate international fame to the orchestra. Toscanini remained music director until the spring of 1936, then returned several times as a guest conductor until 1945.

    That same year nationwide radio broadcasts began. The orchestra was first heard on CBS directly from Carnegie Hall. To broadcast the Sunday afternoon concerts, CBS paid $15,000 for the entire season. The radio broadcasts continued without interruption for 38 years. A legend in his own time, Toscanini would prove to be a tough act to follow as the country headed into war.

    After an unsuccessful attempt to hire the German conductor, Wilhelm Furtwängler, the English conductor John Barbirolli and the Polish conductor Artur Rodziński were joint replacements for Toscanini in 1936. The following year Barbirolli was given the full conductorship, a post he held until the spring of 1941. In December, 1942, Bruno Walter was offered the music directorship, but declined, citing his age (he was 67 years old).[20] In 1943, Rodziński, who had conducted the orchestra’s centennial concert at Carnegie Hall in the preceding year, was appointed Musical Director. He had also conducted the Sunday afternoon radio broadcast when CBS listeners around the country heard the announcer break in on Arthur Rubinstein’s performance of Brahms’s Second Piano Concerto to update them about the attack on Pearl Harbor. (The initial word of the attack was forwarded by CBS News Correspondent John Charles Daly on his own show before the Philharmonic broadcast.) Soon after the United States entered World War II, Aaron Copland wrote A Lincoln Portrait for the Philharmonic at the request of conductor Andre Kostelanetz as a tribute to and expression of the “magnificent spirit of our country.”

    Artur Rodziński, Bruno Walter, and Sir Thomas Beecham made a series of recordings with the Philharmonic for Columbia Records during the 1940s. Many of the sessions were held in Liederkranz Hall, on East 58th Street in New York City, a building formerly belonging to a German cultural and musical society, and used as a recording studio by Columbia Records. Sony Records later digitally remastered the Beecham recordings for reissue on CD.

    In February, 1947, Artur Rodziński resigned; Bruno Walter was once again approached, and this time he accepted the position but only if the title was reduced to “Music Adviser”; he resigned in 1949. Leopold Stokowski and Dimitri Mitropoulos were appointed co-principal conductors in 1949, with Mitropoulos becoming Musical Director in 1951. Mitropoulos, known for championing new composers and obscure operas-in-concert, pioneered in other ways; adding live Philharmonic performances between movies at the Roxy Theatre and taking Edward R. Murrow and the See It Now television audience on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Orchestra. Mitropoulos made a series of recordings for Columbia Records, mostly in mono; near the end of his tenure, he recorded excerpts from Prokofiev’s ballet Romeo and Juliet in stereo. In 1957, Mitropoulos and Leonard Bernstein served together as Principal Conductors until, in the course of the season, Bernstein was appointed Music Director, becoming the first American-born-and-trained conductor to head the Philharmonic.

    Leonard Bernstein, who had made his historic, unrehearsed and spectacularly successful debut with the Philharmonic in 1943, was Music Director for 11 seasons, a time of significant change and growth. Two television series were initiated on CBS: the Young People’s Concerts and Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic. The former program, launched in 1958, made television history, winning every award in the field of educational television. Bernstein continued the orchestra’s recordings with Columbia Records until he retired as Music Director in 1969. Although Bernstein made a few recordings for Columbia after 1969, most of his later recordings were for Deutsche Grammophon. Sony has digitally remastered Bernstein’s numerous Columbia recordings and released them on CD as a part of its extensive Bernstein Century series. Although the Philharmonic performed primarily in Carnegie Hall until 1962, Bernstein preferred to record in the Manhattan Center. His later recordings were made in Philharmonic Hall. In 1960, the centennial of the birth of Gustav Mahler, Bernstein and the Philharmonic began a historic cycle of recordings of eight of Mahler’s nine symphonies for Columbia Records. (Symphony No. 8 was recorded by Bernstein with the London Symphony.) In 1962 Bernstein caused controversy with his comments before a performance by Glenn Gould of the First Piano Concerto of Johannes Brahms.

    Bernstein, a lifelong advocate of living composers, oversaw the beginning of the Orchestra’s largest commissioning project, resulting in the creation of 109 new works for orchestra. In September 1962, the Philharmonic commissioned Aaron Copland to write a new work, Connotations for Orchestra, for the opening concert of the new Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. The move to Philharmonic Hall in Lincoln Center brought about an expansion of concerts into the spring and summer. Among the many series that have taken place during the off-season have been the French-American and Stravinsky Festivals (1960s), Pierre Boulez’s “Rug Concerts” in the 1970s, and composer, Jacob Druckman’s Horizon’s Festivals in the 1980s.

    In 1971, Pierre Boulez became the first Frenchman to hold the post of Philharmonic Music Director. Boulez’s years with the Orchestra were notable for expanded repertoire and innovative concert approaches, such as the Prospective Encounters which explored new works along with the composer in alternative venues. During his tenure, the Philharmonic inaugurated the Live From Lincoln Center television series in 1976, and the Orchestra continues to appear on the Emmy Award-winning program to the present day. Boulez made a series of quadraphonic recordings for Columbia, including an extensive series of the orchestral music of Maurice Ravel.

    Members of the New York Philharmonic string section are heard on the 1971 John Lennon album Imagine, credited as The Flux Fiddlers.

    Zubin Mehta, then one of the youngest of a new generation of internationally known conductors, became Music Director in 1978. His tenure was the longest in Philharmonic history, lasting until 1991. Throughout his time on the podium, Mehta showed a strong commitment to contemporary music, presenting 52 works for the first time. In 1980 the Philharmonic, always known as a touring orchestra, embarked on a European tour marking the 50th anniversary of Toscanini’s trip to Europe.

    Kurt Masur, who had been conducting the Philharmonic frequently since his debut in 1981, became Music Director in 1991. Notable aspects of his tenure included a series of free Memorial Day Concerts at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and annual concert tours abroad, including the orchestra’s first trip to mainland China. He presided over the 150th Anniversary celebrations during the 1992–1993 season. His tenure concluded in 2002, and he was named Music Director Emeritus of the Philharmonic.

    In 2000, Lorin Maazel made a guest-conducting appearance with the New York Philharmonic in two weeks of subscription concerts after an absence of over twenty years, which was met with a positive reaction from the orchestra musicians. This engagement led to his appointment in January 2001 as the orchestra’s next Music Director. He assumed the post in September 2002, 60 years after making his debut with the Orchestra at the age of twelve at Lewisohn Stadium. In his first subscription week he led the world premiere of John Adams’ On the Transmigration of Souls commissioned in memory of those who died on September 11, 2001. Maazel concluded his tenure as the Philharmonic’s Music Director at the end of the 2008/09 season.

    In 2003, due to ongoing concerns with the acoustics of Avery Fisher Hall, there was a proposal to move the New York Philharmonic back to Carnegie Hall and merge the two organizations, but this proposal did not come to fruition. On May 5, 2010, the New York Philharmonic performed its 15,000th concert, a milestone unmatched by any other symphony orchestra in the world.

    On July 18, 2007, the Philharmonic named Alan Gilbert as its next music director, effective with the 2009/10 season, with an initial contract of five years. In October 2012, the orchestra extended Gilbert’s contract through the 2016/17 season. In February 2015, the orchestra announced the scheduled conclusion of Gilbert’s tenure its music director after the close of the 2016/17 season.

    In January 2016, the orchestra announced the appointment of Jaap van Zweden as its next Music Director, effective with the 2018/19 season, with an initial contract of five years. van Zweden is scheduled to serve as Music Director Designate for the 2017/18 season.

    The current president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the orchestra is Deborah Borda. Borda had previously held the same posts, as well as the post of managing director, with the orchestra.
    (So, Wikipedia)

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:53 PM on May 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Florent Ghys, NakedEye Ensemble, , New Music Gathering 2018 in Boston, , Richard Belcastro, The National Watch and Clock Museum, Time’s Illusion: stories in sound   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: Time’s Illusion: stories in sound 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    A collaborative commissioning project in partnership with The National Watch and Clock Museum

    The Latest Update
    NakedEye Premieres Preview of Time’s Illusion at New Music Gathering in Boston

    Posted on May 20, 2018 by NakedEye Ensemble


    30 minutes

    What a blast we had at NMG2018! Amazing tech and stage crew, the best audience ever, and sharing the stage with Pamela Z and Angélica Negrón were highlights that made for an unforgettable experience! We’re looking forward to giving the full premiere at The Watch and Clock Museum on June 9!

    OVERVIEW

    Time’s Illusion is a collaborative commissioning project between NakedEye and The National Watch and Clock Museum (the largest specialized museum of horology in the U.S.). Both are based in Pennsylvania. The museum contains not only a plethora of physical time pieces, but an incredible richness in the variety of sounds used to keep time over the centuries. As you enter the museum, you are greeted by the sound of a huge time machine, even before you see it around the corner. Making use of the natural sound habitat of the world’s clocks is an appealing idea that has triggered the imagination of new music composers we have worked with in the past and who we think would be a natural fit.

    We’re excited to create an evening-length theatrical music work in 6 parts. Six composers active on the East Coast new music scene – Stefanie Lubkowski, Florent Ghys, Richard Belcastro, Monica Pearce, Rusty Banks, and Whitney George – are being commissioned to each write a work of 10 to15 minutes in length, using recorded live sounds from the time machines in the museum, electro-acoustic instruments, video, text, and narration. These composers have been specifically chosen for their explorations into extra-musical expressions and their curiosities in expanding acoustic, electroacoustic, and interactive video possibilities. Each one brings something a little bizarre and unconventional to the experience of story-telling. NakedEye has previously worked with most of them, so we know that the collaborations will be exciting and successful.

    The premiere will take place at the museum in May 2018, after which, NakedEye will go on tour and prepare to make a recording of the project.

    Project Media
    NakedEye Montage

    Features: NakedEye Ensemble, Florent Ghys, Richard Belcastro

    Stefanie Lubkowski: Vassal of the Sun


    27 minutes

    Features: Stefanie Lubkowski

    Florent Ghys: No Lemon No Melon

    Features: Florent Ghys


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem
    Stem Education Coalition

    See the full article here .

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 6:20 PM on May 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Sir Simon Rattle,   

    From The New Yorker: “The Conductor Intensifying Mahler Through Restraint” 

    new-yorker-bloc-rea-irvin
    Rea Irvin

    The New Yorker

    May 28, 2018
    Alex Ross

    Sir Simon Rattle by Urs Flueeler-AP

    On June 20th, Simon Rattle will end a sixteen-year tenure as the principal conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic—a post of quasi-papal authority in the classical-music world.

    How Rattle should be judged against predecessors on the order of Hans von Bülow, Arthur Nikisch, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Herbert von Karajan, and Claudio Abbado is for the musical sages of Berlin to decide. From a distance, Rattle appears to have left a distinctive stamp on the institution. He has promoted contemporary music with unprecedented vigor; he has given new prominence to French, British, and American fare; he has presided over such staggering spectacles as Stockhausen’s “Gruppen,” presented at Tempelhof Airport, and the Bach Passions, as staged by Peter Sellars. If any question mark hovers over his legacy, it has to do with his handling of mainstream nineteenth-century repertory, where his quest for fresh-scrubbed renditions has sometimes worked wonders—a darkly radiant “Parsifal can be seen at the Philharmonic’s Digital Concert Hall—and sometimes had inconclusive results. Kirill Petrenko, Rattle’s successor, is a conductor of more traditional cast: that turn will please some and disappoint others.

    Berlin Philharmonic©Stefan Hoederath

    Now sixty-three, Rattle is still a young gazelle in conductor years—the Swedish maestro Herbert Blomstedt is giving revelatory performances at the age of ninety—and the close of Rattle’s Berlin tenure will almost certainly not mark the end of the major phase of his career. Indeed, a series of Mahler concerts that Rattle gave with the London Symphony in early May made me wonder whether he is arriving at a new level of mastery.

    London Symphony Orchestra ©-Gautier-Deblonde

    He became the music director of the L.S.O. last September, and the orchestra is playing sensationally well for him. You have the sense of a conductor and an ensemble in near-perfect alignment. The Berlin Philharmonic would undoubtedly prefer not to be considered a stepping stone to greater things, but this may turn out to be its role in the arc of Rattle’s career—as was true for Abbado, who hit his peak in his final decade, when he was based at the Lucerne Festival.

    Each of the L.S.O. concerts consisted of a single late-period Mahler work: the Ninth Symphony, Das Lied von der Erde, and the unfinished Tenth Symphony, in the realization by Deryck Cooke. (I heard the Ninth at MJPAC, in Newark, the others at David Geffen Hall.) Rattle, a veteran Mahlerian, has offered this trio of colossal valedictions before, in concerts with the Berliners at Carnegie, in 2007. His ideas about Mahler have not changed dramatically in the interim. He avoids the sweaty transfigurations that Leonard Bernstein established as common practice for Mahler. Where other conductors emphasize voluptuous, post-Wagnerian sonorities, Rattle prefers a leaner, tighter sound; where others indulge in flamboyant ritardandos, he keeps to a steadier tempo.

    Rattle’s aversion to cliché can lead to performances that seem like arrays of contrarian insights rather than fully integrated interpretations. The 2007 Mahler concerts never quite rose above the level of the impressive. Eleven years on, Rattle has found an ideal balance of precision and intensity. The opening section of the first movement of the Ninth unfolded in one great Proustian paragraph, lucid yet impassioned. The music wasn’t smoothed over or rendered inert: isolated details—stray harp notes, scuttling low-wind figures, a repeated two-note signal in the horns—pierced the murk with unsettling potency. (A horn-playing friend who joined me at NJPAC marvelled at the musicians’ tonal control.) Adam Walker, the co-principal flute, brought an otherworldly sound to his meandering solo at the end of the first movement; Gareth Davies, the other principal flutist and the orchestra’s chairman, was equally transfixing in the Tenth.

    Not all of Rattle’s interventions were successful. In the savage Rondo-Burleske of the Ninth Symphony, he refused to linger over the aching phrases in the movement’s contrasting lyric episode. (He did the same in 2007.) As a result, the return of the slashing main theme didn’t induce a shiver of terror, as the score all but requires. Wildness is not Rattle’s way, though. His strategy of intensification through restraint paid off in the final pages, when the string section achieved an uncanny, hovering stillness. The strings played at times with little or no vibrato, producing an eerie “white” sound. Usually, the piece ends with a feeling of agonized farewell; here, the music seemed to emanate from the other side of the line between life and death.

    Rattle is the world’s leading proponent of the Mahler Tenth, having first recorded the Cooke edition of the work back in 1980, when he was twenty-five. That version, with the Bournemouth Symphony, is more vivid than a subsequent account with the Berliners. Let’s hope that the L.S.O. rendition appears on disk in due course: the performance at Geffen combined a monumental architectural shape—no other work by Mahler comes as close to Bruckner—with moments of unchecked emotional ferocity. The final bars radiated an almost shocking sweetness, as if to suggest that Mahler, at the end of his life, were reliving scenes from childhood.

    The vocalists in Das Lied were the robust Wagner tenor Stuart Skelton and the wizardly baritone Christian Gerhaher. In the opening movement, Skelton battled an overbearing orchestra, as the tenor invariably must in this piece, yet he nobly held his ground. Gerhaher, a singer-poet out of Caspar David Friedrich, shone through the far more transparent textures of Der Abschied, the half-hour finale. Listeners accustomed to the autumnal warmth of a mezzo-soprano in Der Abschied might have found Gerhaher too cool and reserved, but for me the inward, confiding quality of his vocalism gave human focus to Mahler’s sprawling landscape. His closing repetitions of ewigforever—were like distant figures disappearing into mist.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem

    Stem Education Coalition

    See the full article here .

     
  • richardmitnick 12:10 PM on May 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Misfits and Geniuses", Music Education,   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Misfits and Geniuses” 



    From NEWMUSICBOX

    1
    Image: Annie Spratt

    May 21, 2018
    Daniel Kellogg

    The success of my course Tragedy and Inspiration spurred me to think of other meaningful ways to group contemporary music in a compelling music appreciation-style class. Misfits and Geniuses became my next course. I started with the attractive idea of creative rebels who bucked traditional boundaries and existed on the fringe. Which composers wrote new rules, expanded the space for music, and crossed dividing lines? This course includes Charles Ives, John Cage, George Crumb, John Luther Adams, Philip Glass (focusing on Koyaanisqatsi and Einstein on the Beach), Meredith Monk, Morton Subotnick, Pamela Z, and Frank Zappa. Undergraduates love the idea of a rebel genius. That simple premise invites meaningful discussion of Cage’s ideas on silence, Zappa’s absurd plurality of styles, and Meredith Monk’s use of the human voice as an expressive instrument separate from the restrictions of language. The variety of styles and artistic approaches again makes for a rich menu of great but challenging contemporary music. We get to discuss spatialization, silence, recreating an imagined ancient musical language, the blurred lines between rock and classical music, extended techniques, deep listening, and the Buchla synthesizer.

    The course features nine primary composers. The material begins with some introductory lectures I created and continues with video interviews (available for everyone but Charles Ives), articles, and some critical material. We then focus on three important pieces for each composer representing different aspects of their musical language. A trio of pieces gives a solid overview of their work and generates discussion on the many creative threads that make the composer unconventional.

    I wanted to increase the level of student engagement as I developed this second music appreciation course. Current ideas about student learning encourage a steady stream of low level “tasks” that should be completed immediately after absorbing material. I created a “listening assessment” that asks each student to answer eight brief questions. They do this for all 27 pieces featured in the course and get full credit for completing the task. The questions ask simple facts about the music (length, instruments), and they require the students to list some descriptive adjectives and offer a short personal response.

    Listening Assessment:

    List the performing forces used in this piece. What instruments are voices are used? What non-musical elements are included? Include what you think is most essential to the piece.
    How long is the piece?
    Under 10 minutes
    10-30 minutes
    30-40 minutes
    Longer than 60 minutes
    The length is variable (not specifically set from performance to performance)
    How would you describe the rhythmic language of this piece? Please check all options that apply:
    Fast
    Slow
    Mid tempo
    With an active pulse
    Without an active pulse
    Complex
    Simple
    Repetitive
    Constantly changing or evolving
    How would you describe the harmonic language of this piece? Please check all options that apply:
    Complex
    Simple
    Beautiful and consonant
    Harshly dissonant
    Moderately dissonant
    Organically unified
    Disjunctive or fragmented
    Familiar
    Abstract or unfamiliar
    Slow to change
    Actively changing
    Pick three to five good descriptive words for this piece. Avoid weak words or vague words like nice, attractive, good, and ugly. Find strong words that offer your unique and specific observations.
    What personal responses do you have to this piece? Offer a few sentences to describe your unique perspective. There is no right or wrong answer, but listen with attentive ears and offer meaningful insight. What emotions does the music elicit? What aspects of the music are most compelling? Least compelling?
    Was this an easy or difficult piece to listen to? Why? Get specific with reasons to support your answer.
    Offer one other thought in response to this piece. Possible items to address: What was most surprising or unusual? What moment moved you? What other artist or genre of music might you connect with this piece? If you had to convince a friend to listen to this piece, what might you say?

    In this new course, I often ask the students for their opinions about the music, their opinions about the ideas of the composers, and then ask them to decide which of the three pieces are more compelling. While I often tell my first-year composition majors that they should be sponges and suspend judgment on important composers till further in their education, I encourage strong opinions in music appreciation courses. When the student has to offer a judgment-style opinion, they will listen more closely and seek out the ideas that support their argument. I make it clear that it is fine to dislike a piece of music, but they must know why and be able to support their opinion with detailed observation. I may gently push back on a poorly formed opinion, but I find that even a strong negative reaction paves the way for a growing appreciation of the music. That is my goal.

    John Cage generates intense discussion. His ideas are easy to grasp and challenge presuppositions held by most people in the class. We begin with Living Room Music, which suggests that anything can be used to make music or serve as an instrument. (It’s also great fun.) We continue with Sonatas and Interludes and end with 4’33”. The discussion of silence, noise, and “what is music?” is exciting. A good portion of the class embraces Cage’s ideas and examines their own favorite music in a new light. Others dismiss the ideas as nonsense. I’m happy with this disagreement so long as everyone knows why they arrived at their conclusions.

    I teach Meredith Monk and Pamela Z side by side. Their highly developed and unique vocal technique has shaped the fabric of their musical language. They are performing composers who embody their music with powerful visual and dramatic components. But their music is quite different: Pamela Z often uses technology and words as a jumping off point. Meredith Monk finds the meaning of words too limiting and wants to create beyond the cultural baggage found in words. We look at Hocket, Dolmen Music, and Songs of Ascension for Meredith Monk, and Bone Music, Gaijin, and Baggage Allowance for Pamela Z. YouTube offers great live performances that allow the students to absorb the important visual components of these pieces.

    Morton Subotnick and his early work pioneering live composition with synthesizers resonates strongly with the students. Most of the students either embrace EDM (Electronic Dance Music) or some other music heavily dependent on electronics and looping. None of them know of Morton Subotnick’s work, and they quickly appreciate his essential innovations, which made all current mainstream electronic music possible. We listen to Silver Apples of the Moon, The Last Dream of the Beast, and watch excerpts from Jacob’s Room.

    There will always be excellent composers and pieces that won’t find room in a semester-length class. For a final project, I require the students to create a short, NPR-style podcast featuring a composer not included in the main lessons. I recommend they consider Pauline Oliveros, Conlon Nancarrow, Harry Partch, John Coltrane, Joan La Barbara, Wendy Carlos, Alvin Lucier, Terry Riley, Ornette Coleman, Laurie Anderson, or John Zorn, among others. They can also seek permission for a composer of their own choosing. I only require that the composer chosen has a connection to North America and is someone who has worked primarily in the 20th or 21st century. The podcast format allows them to include musical excerpts, which require description and context.
    When I talk to my colleagues about Misfits and Geniuses, their eyes light up. They each have their own ideas about which great artists could fit into such a class. The pairing of composers and styles is rich with possibilities, and it is exciting to revel in the work of artists who break rules and redefine the musical landscape.

    See the full article here.

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:11 PM on May 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , The Studio,   

    From WPRB: The Studio 

    From WPRB 103.3FM or wprb.com

    1
    The Studio at 30 Bloomberg Hall

    Thanks, Jerry Gordon.
    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    stem

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:53 PM on May 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    From Blue Note: “Detroit saxophonist Dave McMurray” 

    From Blue Note

    1
    Photo Credit: Paul Moore

    Detroit saxophonist Dave McMurray has played with a vast array of musicians including B.B. King, The Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Iggy Pop, Patti Smith, Bonnie Raitt, Johnny Hallyday, Gladys Knight, Albert King, Nancy Wilson, KEM, Bootsy Collins, Herbie Hancock, & Geri Allen. Now McMurray makes his Blue Note debut with “Music Is Life” out now: https://DaveMcMurray.lnk.to/MusicIsLife

    Dave McMurray’s Blue Note Records debut, Music Is Life, is a reunion of sorts, given the long history the saxophonist shares with the label’s president, and fellow Detroit native, Don Was. McMurray was a member of Was’ genre-defying unit Was (Not Was), first working together on the band’s self-titled 1981 debut. He’s played on all of the band’s albums and many other Was produced projects in the years since.

    When Was signed McMurray to Blue Note, the saxophonist says that he gave him no imperatives as to which artistic paths to take. “It was one of those situations in which he just said, ‘Do it,’” McMurray explains.

    McMurray proceeded by gathering a batch of strong originals and well-chosen rock and R&B staples then recruited musicians – bassist Ibrahim Jones and drummers Ron Otis and Jeff Canady – with whom he’s forged longstanding rapports. With minimum keyboard and string accompaniments on a few tunes, the music boasts an open, rugged sensibility that optimizes the leader’s burly tone and swaggering lyricism.

    McMurray has cemented his reputation for versatility by playing with a vast array of musicians that include B.B. King, The Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Iggy Pop, Patti Smith, Bonnie Raitt, Johnny Hallyday, Gladys Knight, Albert King, Nancy Wilson, KEM, Bootsy Collins, Herbie Hancock, Geri Allen, and Bob James. McMurray sounds as assured and inspired in a rock, R&B, funk, pop or folk setting as he does playing hard bop.

    McMurray consolidates all of those aforementioned idioms on Music Is Life, creating a cohesive program of groove-based modern jazz that bristles with unalloyed soul. “I wanted it to have the spirit of a funk record,” he says, before rejoicing in the freedom afforded by having minimum chordal support. “I can just hold the melody down or go anywhere else in these songs.” Case in point, the joyous title track “Music Is Life (Live It),” which serves as his personal mantra.

    McMurray attributes his saxophone sound and improvisational approach to growing up in Detroit. “Every time I hear an instrumentalist from Detroit play, it feels like they are singing. I don’t care if it’s Yusef Lateef, James Carter or Kenny Garrett. All of those saxophonists incorporated incredible technique too. But they had this singing quality in their playing. I think people hear that and connect with that aspect of it,” McMurray says.

    “Dave absorbed a wide range of musical styles, which I think is something that’s consistent with Detroit musicians,” Was says. “You can trace it back to the boom of the auto industry after World War II. Workers not only from all over the country but from all over the world came to work in the auto plants. And they brought their cultures with them. There were so many different styles of music that you could hear; Detroit has such an eclectic blend of influences that I think what you find in music that comes out of Detroit is this genre-busting type music.”

    For sure, McMurray stands on Detroit’s mighty music legacy that includes the influential Motown sound, P-Funk, numerous rock acts such as Stooges and the MC5, electronica-music pioneers Carl Craig, Moodymann and Theo Parrish; and hip-hop icons – J Dilla, Eminem and Slum Village. And let’s not forget the legion of jazz artists from Detroit that include Elvin Jones, Betty Carter, Milt Jackson, Regina Carter and Geri Allen.

    McMurray’s journey into music began when he started playing clarinet as kid, and inspired by his older brother’s interest in the saxophone he decided he wanted to learn that instrument, too. He counts seeing Cannonball Adderley perform on The Steve Allen Show as a defining moment in his childhood. While in high school, McMurray attended Cranbook Academy of Arts’ noted summer program, Horizons Upward Bound. He eventually got a scholarship to attend the private school. McMurray furthered his education by attending Wayne State University, where he earned degrees in psychology and urban studies.

    While making his way on Detroit’s bustling music scene, McMurray played with the avant-garde jazz ensemble, Griot Galaxy, founded in 1972 by saxophonist Faruq Z. Bey. But McMurray’s catholic taste in music opened the doors for him to explore beyond the realms of jazz. “Any music that I heard – and continue to hear – I can see myself playing it,” McMurray asserts. “It could be rock, jazz, R&B, whatever.” And that’s a good explanation for his multifaceted career.

    Blue Note Records is an American jazz record label, owned by Universal Music Group and currently operated in conjunction with Decca Records. Established in 1939 by Alfred Lion and Max Margulis, it derives its name from the characteristic “blue notes” of jazz and the blues. Originally dedicated to recording traditional jazz and small group swing, from 1947 the label began to switch its attention to modern jazz. While the original company did not itself record many of the pioneers of bebop, significant exceptions are Thelonious Monk, Fats Navarro and Bud Powell.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    stem

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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