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  • richardmitnick 4:04 PM on June 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: alt.Classical, , Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, , Folk-Rock,   

    From LPR: “LPR X: Clap Your Hands Say Yeah with Ensemble LPR (String Quartet)” 

    From LPR

    1
    Wed June 27th, 2018

    8:00PM

    Main Space

    Minimum Age: 18+

    Doors Open: 7:00PM

    Show Time: 8:00PM

    Event Ticket: $20

    Day of Show: $25
    Tickets

    2
    Clap Your Hands Say Yeah

    Like previous Clap Your Hands Say Yeah records, The Tourist nods to Ounsworth’s musical heroes—a group that includes artists such as John Cale, Robert Wyatt, Tom Waits and Nick Cave. However, this album also shows a natural progression from previous records. Better Off and The Vanity Of Trying are lush, keyboard-augmented songs, while A Chance To Cure and Ambulance Chaser are rhythmically askew, and the sighing Loose Ends is delicate, acoustic-based folk-rock.

    The Tourist emerged from a period where Ounsworth was doing a lot of intense soul-searching, and processing personal events that irrevocably shaped his life and future. But although most of these songs came together during this time of reflection, he considers the record to be cathartic—an exhale of sorts, rather than a collection of songs where he was indulging in self-pity or letting things stagnate or fester.

    Appropriately, The Tourist’s lyrics reflect how complex upheaval can be (“We can beat around this bush together/Sometimes it’s all I think of/Other times I can forget”) and explore the imperfect nature of blame (“The car left the road and was found without its mirrors/You play the victim/And I’ll play the blind man”). Other songs try to make sense of the present time (“Now that the past is on fire/How can I look around and find I can’t remember who I was”) or employ clever wordplay— “Black cat let’s not split hairs/I’m tethered to the weather/I assure I don’t care about no lucky streak”—for effect.

    Ounsworth spent about a week recording The Tourist at Dr. Dog’s Philadelphia-based studio with a drummer and bassist. After that, he and engineer Nick Krill spent a few months “tidying things up” and recording additional embellishments: backup vocals, keyboards, guitars and more percussion. That gives The Tourist more of a band feel than the last album, and contributes to why the record possesses a musical lightness. The dreamy opening track The Pilot especially has a lilting edge, courtesy of Smiths-reminiscent acoustic guitars strums and Ounsworth’s hiccupping, conspiratorial vocals.

    The Tourist was then mixed by Dave Fridmann, who also worked on two previous Clap Your Hands Say Yeah albums, 2007’s Some Loud Thunder and 2014’s Only Run. Ounsworth says he and Fridmann are on the same musical wavelength, which makes their long-time working relationship an anchor of sorts. “Dave and I don’t necessarily stick with what’s easiest which is fine and anxiety-inducing, in a good way,” he says. “He challenges me to do something a little bit different.”

    “I am a relatively solitary person and seem to work best alone,” he says. “I do count on others to help the project as the process of making and releasing an album moves forward, but if it doesn’t match what I have in mind, it’s hard for me to really be there for it. I guess this is one reason why the project has been independent all this time. Trust me, I understand that thinking this way is both an asset and a liability.”

    3
    Ensemble LPR

    Named after and headquartered at the acclaimed New York City venue Le Poisson Rouge, Ensemble LPR is an assemblage of New York’s finest musicians. The group personifies the venue’s commitment to aesthetic diversity and artistic excellence.

    Ensemble LPR performs an eclectic spectrum of music—from works by the finest living composers, to compelling interpretations of the standard repertoire—and collaborates with distinguished artists from classical and non-classical backgrounds: Timo Andres, Simone Dinnerstein, San Fermin, Daniel Hope, Taka Kigawa, Jennifer Koh, Mica Levi, David Longstreth (of Dirty Projectors), John Lurie, Ursula Oppens, Max Richter, André de Ridder, Christopher Rountree and Fred Sherry, to name a few.

    In January 2015 Ensemble LPR made its Deutsche Grammophon debut with Follow, Poet, featuring the music of Mohammed Fairouz and the words of Seamus Heaney and John F. Kennedy. Ensemble LPR’s acclaimed Central Park performance last June, part of the 110th Anniversary of the Naumburg Orchestral Concerts.

    In 2008 Le Poisson Rouge changed the classical music landscape, creating a new environment in which to experience art music. In doing so, Le Poisson Rouge expanded classical music listenership. The New York Times has heralded Le Poisson Rouge as “[a] forward-thinking venue that seeks to showcase disparate musical styles under one roof” and “[the] coolest place to hear contemporary music.” The Los Angeles Times raves, “[The] place isn’t merely cool…the venue is a downright musical marvel.” Le Poisson Rouge Co-Founder David Handler brings this same ethos to Ensemble LPR, of which he is Founding Executive & Artistic Director.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings


    Stem Education Coalition

    (le) poisson rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    LPR

    LPR is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of LPR

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 11:06 AM on May 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: alt.Classical, , , , , The Line Up at Gallagher Way – Wrigley Field,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “The Line Up at Gallagher Way – Wrigley Field” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    Sunday, July 15, 2018
    at 6:30 PM

    The Line Up at Gallagher Way – The Park at Wrigley Field
    3637 N. Clark Street
    Chicago, IL 60613

    Free Event

    1

    Grab your blanket and come enjoy a free immersive musical performance at Gallagher Way! Third Coast Percussion will perform pieces from their Grammy award-winning album of Steve Reich’s music, as well as music written for Third Coast Percussion by Glenn Kotche of Wilco and Ryan Lott of indie rock band Son Lux. The program also features the music of iconic American composers Philip Glass and John Cage, and original music by ensemble members.

    With multiple stages throughout Gallagher Way, guests will experience a dynamic yet intimate outdoor experience that combines music and visual elements. Video art and live projections of the performance will enhance the experience throughout.

    The Line Up is free to attend. Please arrive early, as space is limited. Food and beverage will be available for purchase.

    In the event of inclement weather, Gallagher Way will decide by 12:00pm if the concert will go on as scheduled.

    PHILIP GLASS Madeira River
    GLENN KOTCHE Wild Sound, mvt. iv, arr. TCP
    JOHN CAGE Third Construction
    PHILIP GLASS Xingu River
    THIRD COAST PERCUSSION Paddle to the Sea: “Flow,” “Niagara”
    STEVE REICH Music for Drums
    RYAN LOTT Quartered: Planks & Sixxens, Coda
    ROBERT DILLON Ordering-Instincts
    STEVE REICH Mallet Quartet, mvt. iii
    DAVID SKIDMORE Aliens with Extraordinary Abilities

    THIRD COAST PERCUSSION
    Sean Connors Robert Dillon Peter Martin David Skidmore

    Hailed by The New Yorker as “vibrant” and “superb,” Third Coast Percussion explores and expands the extraordinary sonic possibilities of the percussion repertoire, delivering exciting performances for audiences of all kinds. Since its formation in 2005, Third Coast Percussion has gained national attention with concerts and recordings that meld the energy of rock music with the precision and nuance of classical chamber works.

    These “hard-grooving” musicians (New York Times) have become known for ground-breaking collaborations across a wide range of disciplines, including concerts and residency projects with engineers at the University of Notre Dame, architects at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture, astronomers at the Adler Planetarium, and more. The ensemble enhances the performances it offers with cutting edge new media, including free iPhone and iPad apps that allow audience members to create their own musical performances and take a deeper look at the music performed by Third Coast Percussion.

    Third Coast Percussion is the Ensemble-in-Residence at the University of Notre Dame’s DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. They have the honor of being the first ensemble at the University of Notre Dame to create a permanent and progressive ensemble residency program at the center. The ensemble performs multiple recitals annually as part of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center’s Presenting Series season. Third Coast Percussion assumed the position of ensemble-in-residence at Notre Dame in 2013. The ensemble champions the awe-inspiring music of John Cage, Steve Reich, George Crumb, Arvo Pärt, Gérard Grisey, Philippe Manoury, Wolfgang Rihm, Louis Andriessen, Toru Takemitsu, and Tan Dun, among others. Third Coast has also commissioned and performed world premieres by many of today’s leading composers, including Augusta Read Thomas, Timothy Andres, Glenn Kotche, David T. Little, Marcos Balter, Ted Hearne, and ensemble member David Skidmore.

    Third Coast’s recent and upcoming concerts and residencies include the University of Chicago Presents, Atlas Performing Arts Center (Washington, D.C), Ensemble Music Society of Indianapolis, the Museum of Modern Art (New York), the Austin Chamber Music Festival, Millennium Park “Loops and Variations,” the Kennedy Center’s Millennium Stage, and more. Third Coast has introduced percussion to chamber music audiences in Texas, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Illinois, securing invitations to return to many of these series.

    Third Coast’s passion for community outreach includes a wide range of residency offerings while on tour, in addition to a long-term residency with the Davis Square Park Community Band on Chicago’s South Side. In addition to its national performances, Third Coast Percussion’s hometown presence includes an annual Chicago series, with four to five concerts in locations around the city. The ensemble has collaborated in concert with acclaimed ensembles Eighth Blackbird, Signal, and the Garth Newel Piano Quartet, pianists Amy Briggs and Lisa Moore, cellists Nicholas Photinos and Tobias Werner, flautist Tim Munro, vocalist Ted Hearne, and video artists Luftwerk.

    The members of Third Coast Percussion —Sean Connors, Robert Dillon, Peter Martin, and David Skidmore— hold degrees in music performance from Northwestern University, the Yale School of Music, the Eastman School of Music, the New England Conservatory, and Rutgers University. Third Coast Percussion performs exclusively with Pearl/Adams Musical Instruments, Zildjian Cymbals, Remo Drumheads, and Vic Firth sticks andmallets.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem
    Stem Education Coalition

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:35 AM on May 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , alt.Classical, , ,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “Helix! with Michel van der Aa’s ‘Hysteresis'” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    From (le) poisson rouge

    Sunday, November 4, 2018
    at 8:00 PM

    (le) poisson rouge
    158 Bleecker Street
    New York, NY 10012

    $20—30
    Tickets

    Le Poisson Rouge Presents: Helix! with Michel van der Aa’s Hysteresis

    1

    2
    HELIX! directed by Kynan Johns is the resident new music ensemble at Rutgers.

    A modular group, highly adept and versatile, with a Pierrot ensemble at it’s core, HELIX! focuses solely on the music of living composers. From solo works to works for 16 players, HELIX! can adapt to the needs of almost any piece. World premieres by Rutgers faculty and students, along with works by leading composers worldwide who are defining new trends in composition are the ensemble’s staple.

    Kynan Johns
    Hailed by the New York Times as ‘Incisive…first rate…brilliant’, protégé of Lorin Maazel, Johns served four seasons at the Palau de les Arts (opera house), Valencia, two seasons at the New York City Opera and has conducted the Israel Philharmonic, Rotterdam Philharmonic, Cleveland Orchestra, Philharmonica della Scala, Netherlands Radio Symphony Orchestra, Vienna Chamber Orchestra, Sydney and New Zealand Symphony Orchestras amongst many others. A passionate devotee of new music, holding a composition degree from his native Australia, Johns has premiered countless symphonic and small ensemble works throughout the world, primarily in Spain, Israel and the USA. Awarded the inaugural ‘Centenary Medal’ from the Australian Government for his services to music and prize-winner in the Mitropoulos, Maazel/ Vilar and Besancon conducting competitions, Johns is Principal Guest Conductor of the Orquesta Clasica Santa Cecilia, Spain, frequent conductor at MSM and serves as Director of Orchestras and Associate Professor
    of Conducting at Rutgers.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem
    Stem Education Coalition

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    (le) poisson rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    (le) poisson rouge

    (le) poisson rouge is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of (Le) Poisson Rouge.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:27 PM on May 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , alt.Classical, , Donny McCaslin Group, , , , ,   

    From Le Poisson Rouge: LPR X at SummerStage: “Bowie Symphonic: Ensemble LPR performs David Bowie’s ‘Blackstar’ with Evan Ziporyn, cello soloist Maya Beiser & Donny McCaslin Group” 

    From (Le) Poisson Rouge

    1

    LPR X at SummerStage: Bowie Symphonic: Ensemble LPR performs David Bowie’s ‘Blackstar’
    with Evan Ziporyn, cello soloist Maya Beiser & Donny McCaslin Group

    Sat June 9th, 2018

    7:00PM

    SummerStage in Central Park

    Minimum Age: All Ages

    Doors Open: 6:00PM

    Show Time: 7:00PM

    Free

    Bowie Symphonic: Ensemble LPR performs David Bowie’s Blackstar led by Evan Ziporyn with cello soloist Maya Beiser / Donny McCaslin Group

    This is a free LPR X event at SummerStage in Central Park: Rumsey Playfield, Manhattan, 10021 – Click here for more info

    The cultural influence that the late musician, iconoclast, and actor David Bowie had on millions of people can’t be overstated. The late British star, who called New York his home, recorded his final album Blackstar in secret. A star-studded orchestra arranged by Evan Ziporyn will perform the album in full with cello soloist Maya Beiser, along with a special performance by the Donny McCaslin Group, whose ensemble worked with Bowie on Blackstar.

    3
    Named after and headquartered at the acclaimed New York City venue Le Poisson Rouge, Ensemble LPR is an assemblage of New York’s finest musicians. The group personifies the venue’s commitment to aesthetic diversity and artistic excellence.

    Ensemble LPR performs an eclectic spectrum of music—from works by the finest living composers, to compelling interpretations of the standard repertoire—and collaborates with distinguished artists from classical and non-classical backgrounds: Timo Andres, Simone Dinnerstein, San Fermin, Daniel Hope, Taka Kigawa, Jennifer Koh, Mica Levi, David Longstreth (of Dirty Projectors), John Lurie, Ursula Oppens, Max Richter, André de Ridder, Christopher Rountree and Fred Sherry, to name a few.

    In January 2015 Ensemble LPR made its Deutsche Grammophon debut with Follow, Poet, featuring the music of Mohammed Fairouz and the words of Seamus Heaney and John F. Kennedy. Ensemble LPR’s acclaimed Central Park performance last June, part of the 110th Anniversary of the Naumburg Orchestral Concerts.

    In 2008 Le Poisson Rouge changed the classical music landscape, creating a new environment in which to experience art music. In doing so, Le Poisson Rouge expanded classical music listenership. The New York Times has heralded Le Poisson Rouge as “[a] forward-thinking venue that seeks to showcase disparate musical styles under one roof” and “[the] coolest place to hear contemporary music.” The Los Angeles Times raves, “[The] place isn’t merely cool…the venue is a downright musical marvel.” Le Poisson Rouge Co-Founder David Handler brings this same ethos to Ensemble LPR, of which he is Founding Executive & Artistic Director.

    6
    Avant-garde cellist and multifaceted artist Maya Beiser defies categories. Passionately forging a career path through uncharted territories, she has captivated audiences worldwide with her virtuosity, eclectic repertoire, and relentless quest to redefine her instrument’s boundaries. The Boston Globe praises her “virtuoso chops and rock-star charisma,” describing her as, “a force of nature,” while Rolling Stone calls her a “cello rock star.” Raised in the Galilee Mountains in Israel, surrounded by the music and rituals of Jews, Muslims, and Christians while studying classical cello repertoire, Maya is dedicated to reinventing solo cello performance in the mainstream arena. A featured performer on the world’s most prestigious stages including Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall, BAM Next Wave Festival, Kennedy Center, London’s Southbank Centre and the Barbican, Sydney Opera House, Beijing Festival, and the Big Ears Festival, she has collaborated with a wide range of artists including Tan Dun, Brian Eno, Philip Glass, Steve Reich, Louis Andriessen, Shirin Neshat, Robert Woodruff, and Bill Morrison, among many others. Her discography includes ten solo albums; her 2016 album TranceClassical debuted at No. 1 on the Apple Music classical chart and her acclaimed album Uncovered also topped the classical music charts making the number one spot on both Amazon and Apple Music in 2014. Her latest album, David Lang’s the day and world to come, was released in January 2018 on Cantaloupe Music. Maya Beiser is a 2015 United States Artists (USA) Distinguished Fellow and a 2017 Mellon Distinguished Visiting Artist at MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology; her 2011 TED Talk has been watched by over one million people, and she was recently a Presenting Artist at the inaugural CultureSummit in Abu Dhabi. Maya was a founding member of the Bang on a Can All-Stars and is a graduate of Yale University.

    4
    Evan Ziporyn (b. 1959, Chicago) makes music at the crossroads between genres and cultures, east and west. He studied at Eastman, Yale & UC Berkeley with Joseph Schwantner, Martin Bresnick, & Gerard Grisey. He first traveled to Bali in 1981, studying with Madé Lebah, Colin McPhee’s 1930s musical informant. He returned on a Fulbright in 1987.

    Earlier that year, he performed a clarinet solo at the First Bang on a Can Marathon in New York. His involvement with BOAC continued for 25 years: in 1992 he co-founded the Bang on a Can All-stars (Musical America’s 2005 Ensemble of the Year), with whom he toured the globe and premiered over 100 commissioned works, collaborating with Nik Bartsch, Iva Bittova, Don Byron, Ornette Coleman, Brian Eno, Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Thurston Moore, Terry Riley and Tan Dun. He co-produced their seminal 1996 recording of Brian Eno’s Music for Airports, as well as their most recent CD, Big Beautiful Dark & Scary (2012).

    Ziporyn joined the MIT faculty in 1990, founding Gamelan Galak Tika there in 1993, and beginning a series of groundbreaking compositions for gamelan & western instruments. These include three evening-length works, 2001’s ShadowBang, 2004’s Oedipus Rex (Robert Woodruff, director), and 2009’s A House in Bali, an opera which joins western singers with Balinese traditional performers, and the All-stars with a full gamelan. It received its world premiere in Bali that summer and its New York premiere at BAM Next Wave in October 2010.

    As a clarinetist, Ziporyn recorded the definitive version of Steve Reich’s multi-clarinet NY Counterpoint in 1996, sharing in that ensemble’s Grammy in 1998. In 2001 his solo clarinet CD, This is Not A Clarinet, made Top Ten lists across the country. His compositions have been commissioned by Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road, Kronos Quartet, American Composers Orchestra, Maya Beiser, So Percussion, Wu Man, and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project, with whom he recorded his most recent CD, Big Grenadilla/Mumbai (2012). His honors include awards from the Massachusetts Cultural Council (2011), The Herb Alpert Foundation (2011), USA Artists Walker Fellowship (2007), MIT’s Kepes Prize (2006), the American Academy of Arts and Letters Goddard Lieberson Fellowship (2004), as well as commissions from Meet the Composer/Commissioning Music USA and the Rockefeller MAP Fund. Recordings of his works have been been released on Cantaloupe, Sony Classical, New Albion, New World, Koch, Naxos, Innova, and CRI.

    He is Kenan Sahin Distinguished Professor of Music at MIT. He also serves as Head of Music and Theater Arts, and this year was appointed Inaugural Director of MIT’s new Center for Art Science and Technology. He lives in Lexington, Massachusetts with Christine Southworth, and has two children, Leonardo (19) and Ava (12).

    5
    Saxophonist Donny McCaslin and his band, featured on David Bowie’s Blackstar, will make their Motéma Music debut with the October 14, 2016 release of Beyond Now, a highly anticipated album dedicated to Bowie. Recorded nearly three months after Bowie’s passing, the project is deeply influenced by their extraordinary experience collaborating with one of the greatest artists of all-time on his final album.

    “It was like a dream except it was something I never could have dreamed of,” reflects McCaslin on working hand-in-hand with Bowie on Blackstar. “David Bowie was a visionary artist whose generosity, creative spirit, and fearlessness will stay with me the rest of my days. Beyond Now is dedicated to him and to all who loved him.”

    Comprised of core Blackstar personnel, bassist Tim Lefebvre (Tedeschi Trucks Band, Saturday Night Live), drummer Mark Guiliana (Meshell Ndegeocello, Brad Mehldau), and Jason Lindner(Now Vs Now) along with guitarist Nate Wood and producer David Binney, Beyond Now’s repertoire is expansive, comprised of two Bowie songs, covers of Deadmau5, MUTEMATH, and the Chainsmokers, as well as compelling McCaslin originals including the title composition, inspired by a track inspired by a song McCaslin recorded for Blackstar that didn’t make the album.

    With three GRAMMY® nominations and 11 albums to his name, McCaslin’s path to Bowie and Beyond Now can be traced back to 2011 with the release of his album Perpetual Motion, taking on an electric direction for the first time in contrast to his previous acoustic projects. Two subsequent albums Casting for Gravity (2012) and Fast Future (2015) released with his working band were directly influenced by electronica artists (covering groups such as Aphex Twin, Boards of Canada, and Baths), which netted McCaslin a 2013 GRAMMY® nomination for “Best Improvised Jazz Solo.”

    The once in a lifetime opportunity to work with David Bowie came after composer Maria Schneider, a longtime collaborator, recommended McCaslin and his group to Bowie. Schneider and Bowie were collaborating on the track Sue (Or in a Season of Crime), which featured McCaslin as a soloist. In June 2014, Bowie heeded Schneider’s advice and made a visit to hear McCaslin and company at the 55 Bar in Greenwich Village. Soon after, Bowie began corresponding with McCaslin over email and sending music, forming a new collaboration and friendship that transpired through the recording of Blackstar until Bowie’s passing. The result is Beyond Now, which documents “David Bowie’s Last Band” as they were processing both their grief and Bowie’s distinctive impact.

    “This new album is an expression of that journey for all of us,” says McCaslin. “David allowed Blackstar to be what it was going to be regardless of how people might have categorized it. More than anything, it was his fearlessness in crossing musical boundaries and genres in his music and life that inspired the approach I’m taking in Beyond Now. I am indebted to Bowie for showing me the risks and rewards of going for your uncompromising musical vision.”

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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    Stem Education Coalition

    (Le) Poisson Rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    (Le) Poisson Rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of (Le) Poisson Rouge.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:49 PM on May 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , alt.Classical, , , , , , , , The New York Times   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Uncomfortably Serious and Disarmingly Fun: The Irreplaceable Matt Marks” 

    New Music USA


    From NEWMUSICBOX

    1
    All images courtesy Tina Tallon/SALT Arts Documentation

    Ed note: On May 11, 2018, the composer, performer, and new music organizer Matt Marks, 38, died unexpectedly in St. Louis. Testimonials from friends and colleagues sharing reflections on his humor, candor, and inspiring work as a music maker have poured in across social media where Matt was a vibrant, pull-no-punches presence. Perhaps illustrating the far reach of his impact, many of these messages were prefaced with variations of “I only met him IRL once, but our friendship here meant so much to me.” Online and off, Matt Marks was a point of community connection, and the absence of his voice—especially in the days leading up to the annual New Music Gathering he helped to found—has been difficult for many. Reflecting on this vital role he played in the field, Will Robin offered to share this interview he conducted with Marks in 2015. Spending a bit more time in the company of Matt’s conversation seemed a perfect way to celebrate him. Acknowledgments to Ted Hearne for the title inspiration.—MS]

    2
    Matt Marks, a founding member of the contemporary chamber orchestra Alarm Will Sound.CreditTaylor Dixson/Alarm Will Sound

    From The New York Times

    May 15, 2018
    Steve Smith

    Matt Marks, a composer and musician who was at the epicenter of a diverse community of open-minded artists as a founding member of the contemporary chamber orchestra Alarm Will Sound, died on Friday in St. Louis. He was 38.

    The cause was heart failure, said Mary Kouyoumdjian, a composer and Mr. Marks’s fiancée.

    Mr. Marks, who lived in Brooklyn, had just performed in St. Louis with Alarm Will Sound, she said.

    As a performer, Mr. Marks was known best as a French horn player for Alarm Will Sound, of which he was an integral member. The ensemble has been critically praised and is known for its unusual stylistic breadth and commitment to innovation.

    When the group ventured further into theatrical concerts and multimedia events, he rose to the occasion as a singer, an actor and a keyboardist. He also contributed one of the group’s signature pieces: an eerily accurate arrangement for live performers of Revolution 9, the notorious 1968 musique concrète sound collage recorded by the Beatles.

    Alarm Will Sound’s versatility and commitment to stylistic diversity ideally suited Mr. Marks, whose work as a composer showed similar range. In both concise concert pieces and sizable stage creations, like the operas The Little Death, Vol. 1 (2010) and Mata Hari (2016), he demonstrated a knack for crafting works of substantial appeal and subversive cheek, generously endowed with sharp wit and relatable pathos.

    His compositions demonstrated his compatibility with pop music’s stylistic palette, production effects and emotional affect.

    Mr. Marks was also known as a community organizer. In 2009, he was among the founders of New Music Bake Sale, a fund-raiser, concert and social mixer. The event proceeded from the notion that rather than competing for limited funds and audience, New York’s independent new-music ensembles could band together to emphasize common bonds and goals, while increasing visibility for the entire scene.

    Motivated by similar notions of mutual regard and strength in numbers, Mr. Marks was among the founding organizers of New Music Gathering, a festival and conference that brings together performers, composers, academics, journalists and others from around the world for concerts, lectures, topical discussions and networking.

    4

    In addition to matters of aesthetics and economics, the event was conceived to address social and political issues, such as access and inclusiveness. First presented in San Francisco in January 2015, the New Music Gathering has recurred annually in a new city each year; the 2018 event will begin on Thursday in Boston.

    3
    Mr. Marks, center, performing with Michael Clayville, left, and Jason Price of Alarm Will Sound at a music festival in Krakow, Poland, in 2013. CreditMichal Ramus/Alarm Will Sound

    Mr. Marks’s death, announced by Ms. Kouyoumdjian on Facebook on Friday, touched off a flurry of social-media posts that continued throughout the weekend, attesting to the art he made, the organizations he helped to establish and the values he championed.

    The tide of posts was also a reflection of the oversize personality he cultivated online, particularly on Twitter: goofy, gregarious, provocative, self-deprecating and equally happy to discuss powerful musical experiences and trashy horror films.

    In his online commentary, Mr. Marks confronted instances of institutionalized discrimination or aesthetic snobbery with caustic wit; mostly, though, he espoused a worldview animated by optimism, generosity and boundless curiosity.

    Matthew Colin Marks was born on Jan. 23, 1980, in Downey, Calif., a small town in Los Angeles County. At age 9 he was found to have HHT, or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, a genetic disorder that leads to abnormal blood-vessel formation. His condition forced him to avoid physical exertion — a limitation that sparked his intellectual curiosity, his sister, Suzanne Marques, a Los Angeles television journalist, said.

    A diligent musician from 9 years old onward, Mr. Marks excelled in high school bands. His passion for the Beatles, Ms. Marques said, bordered on fanatical.

    Mr. Marks pursued his formal education at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, the Royal Academy of Music in London and Stony Brook University on Long Island. He became a founding member of Alarm Will Sound in 2001, while he was at Eastman.

    Less than a year later, he was the featured soloist in the New York premiere of György Ligeti’s Hamburg Concerto, performed by that ensemble in one of its numerous early appearances at Miller Theater, at Columbia University.

    Other ensembles with which Mr. Marks performed included the International Contemporary Ensemble, Wordless Music Orchestra, the Argento Chamber Ensemble and the Brooklyn Brass Quintet. He was featured as a soloist in the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s 2013 presentation of Frank Zappa’s 200 Motels.

    With Hotel Elefant, a group founded by Ms. Kouyoumdjian, he performed Songs of Love and Violence, a cycle of his pieces for voice and chamber ensemble.

    Beyond The Little Death, Vol. 1, an exuberant showcase for Mr. Marks’s longtime creative partnership with the soprano Mellissa Hughes, and Mata Hari, a new production of which was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts grant last week, Mr. Marks’s stage works include a setting of Berthold Brecht’s Mother Courage and Her Children; The House of Von Macramé, a low-budget slasher musical; and Headphone Splitter, a pop-horror theater work left incomplete.

    In addition to Ms. Kouyoumdjian and Ms. Marques, Mr. Marks is survived by his parents, Jerry and Henrietta Marks; an older brother, Jerry Marks Jr.; three nieces, and two nephews.

    May 16, 2018
    Will Robin

    As a historian of the recent past, I am in the incredibly fortunate position of being able to speak with the musicians whom I study. Most of the composers and performers I interviewed for my dissertation on the so-called “indie classical” scene were in their late twenties to early forties; I never thought to worry that a subject might pass away before we could talk. That one of them died last week is an unfathomable tragedy, from which the world of new music is still reeling. Matt Marks seemed like the kind of composer who would simply exist forever, whose presence would always be palpable. From his work as a founding member of Alarm Will Sound, to his heartfelt and hilarious compositions, to his organizational efforts with New Music Gathering, to his sardonically prolific Twitter account, it was impossible to overlook Matt or his essential role in the new music community.

    In September 2015, I spoke with Matt in the sunny Brooklyn apartment that he shared with Mary Kouyoumdjian, a fellow composer who would become his fiancée, and their menagerie of adorable pets. I was primarily interested in his role in the scene around New Amsterdam Records, the label that released his first album, which was a main subject of my dissertation.

    4

    The condensed interview transcript that you read below thus focuses primarily on Matt’s life, and less on his music; I hope that the many tributes that we will surely be reading in the coming weeks equally emphasize his compelling artistry. But what I think it does address, importantly, is that community doesn’t just “happen”: it requires the tireless labor of people like Matt to make it happen.

    For me, despite—or perhaps because of—the incisive humor and postmodern irony that swirled through his music and writing, at the core of Matt’s work was a willingness to be publicly vulnerable, and to provide his listeners and readers with a sense of his entire self. This is maybe why it’s so hard to feel his absence, especially for those of us who primarily knew him virtually. His sometimes-insightful, sometimes-stupid, always-entertaining tweets are all still there; his music is so insistently written in his own voice, with his own voice. All you have to do is check your timeline and cue up his Soundcloud, and there he is again. On our screens, in our ears, in our presence.

    Here is our conversation.

    Will Robin: Could you tell me a little bit about your musical background, up until college?

    Matt Marks: I don’t come from a musical background. My dad owned an auto place and my mom worked with him. It was very much a car family: my brother was into cars, worked with them, my dad raced cars, all of that. I’m from Downey, California, so like L.A. I started taking piano lessons in second grade and got pretty into that but was never really a pianist-pianist, just played and had a good facility for it. And then in sixth grade I started French horn. When I got into high school I started getting more serious with horn, and actually the first big thing I did was—kind of out of the blue—auditioned for the LA Philharmonic High School Honor Orchestra, the first year they did that. I won first chair French horn. That kind of gave me a big ego boost, to “Oh, maybe this is something serious.” I joined more orchestras around there and did a bunch of playing: it was very much horn, horn, horn, classical music, Mahler, everything like that. In high school, I had my Stravinsky thing; I listened to The Rite of Spring and had my mind blown. That was a big thing for me, hearing The Rite of Spring. At this point, I was still pretty ignorant of new music or new music groups, or whether that could be a thing.

    I went to Eastman. I did my undergrad there in horn. Like a lot of classical musicians, I started off trying to be really good at my instrument, and not necessary being like, “I’m going to win a job,” but just like, “I guess that’s what I’m supposed to do.” Practicing horn a lot, playing horn a lot, and trying to win auditions and placements at Eastman, stuff like that. My sophomore or junior year, I played the Ligeti Piano Concerto and that kind of blew my mind, and that was this thing for me of like, “Holy shit, this is a new type of music that I don’t even understand yet.” I did a rare thing for me, which was I took the score to the library and was like, “I’m going to sit down and listen to this because it looks really hard.” And then I got lost on the first page. I was like, “What the fuck is going on?” Which is funny, now, because I listen to it and I’m like, “This is such an easy piece,” [hums and snaps the rhythms] but for some reason there was so much going on in the 12/8 and 4/4 stuff that I couldn’t follow it. I practiced it and learned it: in the horn part there are a lot of microtonal partials and stuff like that, which is something I eventually got kind of into. Within two to three years, I went from “Holy shit. What the fuck is Ligeti? How do I do this?” to then soloing on the Ligeti horn concerto at Miller Theatre for the New York premiere of that, and that was one of Alarm Will Sound’s first gigs. That was my senior year, so that would have been 2002.

    WR: What was your involvement at the beginning of Alarm Will Sound, which developed out of Ossia, the student new music ensemble at Eastman?

    MM: We came to New York, did that [Miller Theatre concert], and it was a success. I think we got a good review. So that was the first kind of like, “Oh, man, maybe we can actually be a thing.” At that point, there was Kronos Quartet, there was Eighth Blackbird, there was California Ear Unit, and a bunch of string quartets. And from my perspective, all the other chamber groups were people who tried to play CMA [Chamber Music America], and tried to just be a chamber group and play colleges, and play hard music or whatever, or French wind quintets or whatever, or brass quintets—I was very plugged into brass quintets, and that was pretty bro-y. What’s your instrument?

    WR: Saxophone.

    MM: Oh yeah, sax quartets, you know, all that shit. And there’s something really beautiful, but also kinda bro-y about traditional chamber groups—I don’t know, whatever, there’s probably something bro-y about new music groups. When we started, Alan [Pierson] and Gavin [Chuck] were like, “We want to make this a real thing, an actual group with members.” And I was like, “Sure!” But I also had no idea whether that would stick or what. I graduated and then went to London to study at the Royal Academy of Music for a year, so I was like, “Sure, if you want to fly me down to play some gigs, okay,” and they did. And that was our first year where we had somewhat of a season, and it was weird because I was in London the whole time so I would just periodically fly back. I left and moved back to the states, first to New Haven and then to New York. I moved to New York in 2004, and from then on it was kind of like, “Okay, now I’m here” and it was actually a pretty interesting time to be in New York for new music groups and shit like that.

    You know, I’m your typical composer narcissist so I can just keep talking about myself: feel free to stop me.

    WR: What was it like starting out in New York?

    MM: It was pretty shitty for a few years. I knew just a few people in the city, and I was like, “I guess what I’m supposed to do is try to hound gigs, just make friends with horn players and brass players and bro out, and try to get gigs.” And I did that to a certain extent, but it was never really my thing. I wasn’t really particularly interested in playing random orchestral gigs, and eventually working my way up to getting a Broadway show and playing Mama Mia or whatever. So I pretty soon off decided that wasn’t the track for me, or at least I tried for a while and was like “I don’t have the heart for this. This is not my thing.” It took me a couple years, but I started meeting more people who were involved in new music. I eventually went to Stony Brook for a master’s in horn. At that time, I was starting to write music more—mainly electronic music and weird noise music on my sampler, and building my confidence for like, “Maybe eventually this will be something that’s not just on my headphones.”

    At that point, there were maybe about seven Alarm Will Sounders living in the city. We started playing together and doing our own things. I started playing with Caleb [Burhans] and stuff. [Soprano Mellissa Hughes] was like, “Oh, you’re making music. You should keep doing that, and I’ll sing on some of it.” So we started working together. And after a few years, we had A Little Death, Vol. 1, my weird pop opera. That just came out of my weird sample pieces and pop pieces, and having an actual good singer to sing on it. I had that and recorded it and didn’t really know what I was going to do with all that material. Around that that time I started writing more for instruments—Mellissa, myself, and James Moore started this weird chamber group called Ensemble de Sade. It was basically this S&M-themed chamber ensemble, but it was also kind of satirical and making fun of itself. This was at that time when – I guess we’re still in that time – when classical music was all about tearing down the borders between audience and performers. Performers were trying to dress more casually, inviting people from the audience to join them. And we were generally into the idea, but we had this idea of being this satirical ensemble that was the opposite of that, like “Fuck that, there should be more distance! The audience is beneath us and we’re the top, and they’re lucky to be here!” So we put on a couple performances where we all dressed in tuxes and we were all super slick looking. We came out and we would be mean looking, play shit and finish and just leave, and not even acknowledge the audience. We had this dominatrix who would instruct the audience when to clap, and they weren’t allowed to clap unless she told them. We had all these restrictions on them—they had assigned seating, they couldn’t sit near their friends, they were really far from each other. I had been reading a bunch of Marquis de Sade at the time, and so this idea came from 120 Days of Sodom. The audience was seated, and they were super restricted and couldn’t talk, and if they did she would yell at them—she had a switch and shit. And then we had this separate section that was a VIP section with friends of ours. We let them sit there and we let them talk, and gave them food and wine. Some of the people who came were pissed about it, but some were like, “OK, I’m in a theatrical thing.” We did a few of those and that was pretty fun, and through that, basically, Ensemble de Sade and Newspeak, the two of us formed the New Music Bake Sale.

    5
    Marks on stage with Mary Kouyoumdjian (left) and Lainie Fefferman. Photo by Tina Tallon.

    WR: What appealed to you about New Amsterdam Records—which released The Little Death, Vol 1.—and its scene?

    MM: It’s less of a scene as in like, everybody’s going to the same concerts all the time and hanging out, and bro-ing out. It’s more that they tapped into something interesting that was happening in the mid/late 2000s that seemed pretty cool. And it’s funny, because we talk about it in the past tense because maybe it’s not as much of a thing anymore? But I am interested in this idea of classical music that is appealing to people who weren’t bred to appreciate it. I like this idea of classical music, or pop music written by classical musicians, that is a little bit more immediately appealing to people who aren’t trained to understand how classical music works. That doesn’t mean I think that that’s the only music there should be or anything like that, but I think that the people involved in New Amsterdam are all people who are very interested in pop and involve it in their work in some way. Some people more explicitly than others, I think. Some people take ideas from pop music and involve them in music that’s clearly written in a modernist tradition, or in a classical tradition. And some people like me are more explicit with it, where it’s like, “We’re going to make music that’s pretty much like pop, but with influences from outside of pop.” I think that’s interesting, and it was a unique movement or scene or whatever for a while. I think it got pigeonholed by a lot of people outside of New York and also in New York as being like, “Oh, we’re going to make classical music more fun – or more accessible.” I think a lot of people think that it was really focused on accessibility, or trying to be hip.

    WR: What were the early New Amsterdam shows you performed in like?

    MM: The vibe at that time at a lot of these things was playing for people or going to their shows to support them, but also, “Oh, this will be genuinely good so I’m going to go check this out.” With Little Death, when we did it and I had the small choir, I think I paid them $100 or something like that. I don’t know if that’d be possible now. That was 2010, and those people are now touring all over the world and shit, or teaching at USC. There was something kind of special about that. We got like a hundred bucks for it, but it was a day’s work and it was fine. I do feel a little bit like it’s gotten a bit spread out though: there’s not the same feeling of everybody’s going to come to everybody’s show and everybody’s going to play on everybody’s show.

    WR: How has the new music scene changed since you’ve been active in it?

    MM: I’ve been in New York eleven years as of September. It’s funny. I feel like I’ve gotten a bit disconnected from it, mainly because I’ve become more involved in my own things, and I’m also kind of a horrible homebody. It’s hard to get me to go out. In the event I have children of my own, I’m a little worried, because I won’t go to any shows. I always find a reason to miss shows. What are the scenes right now that I think are cool? I really dig the vibe of Hotel Elefant, Mary [Kouyoumdjian]’s scene.It’s a good mix. They tend to be younger—late 20s, early 30s. I guess I like that vibe a lot because, similarly to how I was maybe five years ago or whatever, people are just willing to try shit out and do things, and they aren’t necessarily worried about like, “Okay, this many rehearsals means I need to get paid this much and blah blah blah.” There’s a lot of vitality with younger people, because even though they have less economic freedom, they’re just down to do weird shit.

    WR: What are the most interesting things you’re seeing these days?

    MM: I think San Francisco will be seeing more cool stuff. The fact that we did New Music Gathering there was really interesting. There’s a ton of stuff happening in San Francisco, and when we were there, a lot of it came on our radar and we were like, “Oh wow, this is great.” We’ll see what happens in Baltimore, but I know that there’s a lot happening there. Part of what we’re trying to do with New Music Gathering is to be like, “Hey, there are all these really great scenes. Let’s go to these places.” Rather than just be like, “Let’s do it in New York where we live.” Let’s go to these places that have these interesting scenes and shine the light on them and let them show the world what they’ve got, and also have other people there too.

    WR: What do you think is the significance of the entrepreneurship rhetoric that’s become a significant part of the discussion in classical and new music?


    MM: It’s a tricky thing, because I do think that it’s really important to think creatively about how you’re going to run the business that is either yourself or your ensemble or your label or whatever it is, and I think people are getting better at doing that. And I think that’s something that sadly hasn’t been really taught at schools at a practical level. Schools have their entrepreneurship program or arts leadership program which, if you’re a horn player and you’re there to play the horn, you just don’t engage with. I would have gladly foregone taking the mandatory humanities class that I didn’t care about at all to take a class on how to put on a show, how to program a concert, how to schedule rehearsals. That could be a fucking semester class, just scheduling rehearsals. The most stress in my life is about scheduling rehearsals, promoting things. That’s terrifying, and I just learned it from being in New York and doing it the wrong way for ten years. That said, I don’t think you can think too capitalistically with it. Classical music, I don’t know how well it would ever survive as something that is purely capitalistic, purely something people just spend money on.

    WR: Those are all my questions. Is there anything else you wanted to add?

    MM: Who do you want me to talk shit about?

    6
    The New Music Gathering Co-Founders: Matt Marks, Mary Kouyoumdjian, Daniel Felsenfeld, Lainie Fefferman, and Jascha Narveson. Photo by Tina Tallon.

    See the full article here.

    At NewMusicUSA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    stem

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:04 PM on May 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: alt.Classical, Bearthoven and Shelley Washington, , , ,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: Bearthoven and Shelley Washington 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1

    Friday, May 25, 2018
    at 8:00 PM

    Areté Venue and Gallery
    67 West St #103
    Brooklyn, NY 11222

    $15

    Bearthoven and Shelley Washington
    Friday, May 25th
    7pm
    $15

    Bearthoven presents the New York premiere of 5 new works by Princeton Graduate composers.

    Department of Music at Princeton

    Jenny Beck: SleepChains
    Matt McBane: Submerged
    Molly Herron: Ebb Tide
    Anna Meadors: Mini Ipulses
    Florent Ghys: Des Mots Superficiels

    Shelley Washington presents original compositions accompanied by Ken Thomson and other pals.

    Bearthoven [ \’bâr-toh-vən\ ] is a piano trio creating a new repertoire for a familiar instrumentation by commissioning works from leading young composers. Karl Larson (piano), Pat Swoboda (bass), and Matt Evans (percussion) have combined their individual voices and diverse musical backgrounds, coming together to create a versatile trio focused on frequent and innovative commissioning of up-and-coming composers. Bearthoven is rapidly building a diverse repertoire by challenging composers to apply their own voice to an instrumentation that, while common amongst jazz and pop idioms, is currently foreign in the contemporary classical world.

    Formed in 2013, Bearthoven has quickly established themselves as a forerunner in the New York City contemporary music scene. Commissioning over 20 new works in their first four seasons, the trio has created its own diverse repertoire ranging from the driving, post-minimal voices of Ken Thomson, Brooks Frederickson, and Shelley Washington to the atmospheric and abstracted offerings of Fjola Evans, Scott Wollschleger, and Anthony Vine. Bearthoven’s commitment to collaboration and innovation has garnered both critical and peer acclaim and has led to featured performances on notable stages including the MATA Festival, the Bang On a Can Marathon, and the Music/Sound Series at EMPAC. The group’s debut album Trios was released on Cantaloupe Music in May of 2017. Bearthoven was recently selected as 1 of 24 ensembles to be a part of the inaugural New Music USA Impact Fund cohort (along with So Percussion, JACK Quartet, and Talea Ensemble).

    Participants: Melinda Faylor, Bearthoven, Shelley Washington, Karl Larson, Ken Thomson

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    stem

    Stem Education Coalition

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:56 PM on May 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: alt.Classical, , , , New Music Gathering 2018,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “New Music Gathering 2018” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1

    2
    2017 New Music Gathering at Bowling Green

    This week from May 17 to 19, New Music Gathering takes over Boston Conservatory at Berklee. New Music Gathering is a three-day event combining concerts, discussions, and presentations about the world of new music. New Music Gathering 2018 features vocalist, performance artist, and New Sounds Music host Helga Davis as keynote speaker; her keynote address will focus on the conference’s theme of “Accessibility.” Headlining performers include the string quartet JACK Quartet on May 17, composer/performer and media artist Pamela Z on May 18, and the Boston-based Dinosaur Annex Music Ensemble on May 19. Learn more about New Music Gathering and check out all of the slated concerts, panel discussions, and more.

    3

    Get to know some of the presenters and performers at the 2018 Gathering and listen to some of their music:

    New Music Gathering is an annual three-day conference dedicated to the performance, production, promotion, support and creation of new concert music.

    Hailed as “more than just another new music festival” (Wall Street Journal) and “a joyous celebration of the art and craft, and yes, even the business, of making contemporary music,” (I Care If You Listen), conference New Music Gathering heads to Boston Conservatory at Berklee on May 17-19, 2018.

    New Music Gathering brings contemporary musicians, artists, administrators, and musicologists together to meet, talk, and foster relationships in the new music community.

    Our 2018 conference proudly features vocalist, performance artist, and New Sounds Music host Helga Davis as keynote speaker; her keynote address will focus on the conference’s theme of “Accessibility.” Headlining performers include the boundary-breaking string quartet JACK Quartet on May 17, composer/performer and media artist Pamela Z on May 18, and the Boston-based Dinosaur Annex Music Ensemble on May 19.

    “We are thrilled to be hosting the New Music Gathering in May of 2018,” says Jonathan Bailey Holland, Chair of Contemporary Music and Core Studies at Boston Conservatory at Berklee. “The new music community in Boston is, and has been for many years, a thriving and significant component of the rich Boston musical landscape. Students at Boston Conservatory at Berklee premiere hundreds of new works every year, making us an ideal institution to host the gathering. This year’s theme of accessibility, with it’s numerous interpretations, is both timely and needed, and promises a stimulating and broad conversation.”

    With concerts, lecture recitals, roundtable discussions, talks, and everything from composer-performer “speed dating,” to one-on-one consultations with industry professionals. #NMG2018 aims to be both a conference in the traditional sense but also quite literally a collective place for things to grow, improve, solidify and above all get personal.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    stem

    Stem Education Coalition

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:43 PM on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 27th Annual Underwood New Music Readings, alt.Classical, , , ,   

    From American Composers Orchestra: American Composers Orchestra’s 27th Annual Underwood New Music Readings 

    From American Composers Orchestra


    Featuring six composers selected from over 250 submissions:
    Carlos Bandera, Lily Chen, Scott Lee, Ryan Lindveit, Tomas Peire Serrate, and Liliya Ugay

    Thursday, June 21, 2018 at 10:30am (open rehearsal; free admission with advance reservation)
    Friday, June 22, 2018 at 10am (career development workshop; $10 admission)
    Friday, June 22, 2018 at 7:30pm (run-through performance; $10 admission)
    NYU’s Loewe Theater | 35 West 4th Street | New York, NY 10012
    Tickets and more information: http://bit.ly/ACOUnderwood2018

    American Composers Orchestra continues its commitment to the creation and development of new orchestral music with the 27th Annual Underwood New Music Readings on June 21-22, 2018 at NYU’s Loewe Theater (35 West 4th Street).
    ACO’s Underwood New Music Readings give audiences a chance to look behind the scenes of bringing new, diverse orchestral music to life. The first day of Readings, an open rehearsal, is Thursday, June 21, 2018 at 10:30am; the second day of Readings is Friday, June 22, at 7:30pm, during which the new works will be polished and performed in their entirety. ACO Artistic Director Derek Bermel directs the Readings; ACO Music Director George Manahan conducts.

    This year, six of the nation’s most promising composers in the early stages of their professional careers are selected from over 250 submissions. Carlos Bandera, Lily Chen, Scott Lee, Ryan Lindveit, Tomas Peire Serrate, and Liliya Ugay represent a broad spectrum of musical backgrounds and sound worlds. One composer will receive a $15,000 commission for a new piece to be performed by ACO during an upcoming season. Additionally, one composer will receive the Audience Choice Award with an associated commission.

    Each composer participating in the Underwood New Music Readings receives rehearsals, a reading, and a digital recording of his or her work. Feedback sessions with ACO principal players, mentor composers, and ACO’s artistic and music directors provide crucial artistic, technical, and conceptual assistance. This year’s mentor composers are Derek Bermel, ACO Artistic Director; Gabriela Ortiz; John Corigliano; and Robert Beaser, ACO Artistic Director Laureate.

    In addition, the Readings offer a Career Development Workshop for composers, students, or anyone interested in exploring the business and realities of being a professional composer on Thursday, June 22 from 10am-3pm. These invaluable talks, led by leaders in the industry, present topics ranging from copyright and commission agreements to music preparation, from promotion to fundraising. This year’s schedule, topics, and speakers include:
    10:00am – 11:00am – Be Prepared: Introduction to professional score and parts production
    Bill Holab (Bill Holab Music)

    11:00am – 11:30am – Bang on a Can: A Case Study on Entrepreneurship
    Moderator: Frank J. Oteri, Composer Advocate (New Music USA)
    Panelists: Tim Thomas, Michael Gordon and David Lang (Bang on a Can)
    Astrid Baumgardner, President (Astrid Baumgardner Coaching + Training)

    1:15pm – 2:00pm – Everything You Wanted to Know About Copyright
    James Kendrick, Esq., Partner (Alter and Kendrick)

    2:00pm – 3:00pm – Getting Your Music Programmed
    Moderator: Ed Yim, President (American Composers Orchestra)
    Panelists: Kathy Schuman, Vice President, Artistic Programming and Executive Producer (Caramoor); Beth Helgeson, Director of Artistic Planning and Administration (Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center); and Isaac Thompson, Vice President, Artistic Planning (New York Philharmonic)
    The cost for the Workshop is $10; reservations can be made at http://bit.ly/ACOUnderwood2018.
    For over a generation, ACO’s Underwood New Music Readings have provided all-important career development and public exposure to the country’s most promising emerging composers, with over 150 composers participating. Readings alumni have won every major composition award, including the Pulitzer, Grammy, Grawemeyer, American Academy of Arts & Letters, and Rome Prizes. Orchestras around the globe have commissioned ACO Readings alumni.
    The New Music Readings have launched many of today’s top composers, such as ACO’s own Artistic Director Derek Bermel, Lisa Bielawa, Anthony Cheung, Anna Clyne, Cindy Cox, Sebastian Currier, Jennifer Higdon, Pierre Jalbert, Aaron Jay Kernis, Hannah Lash, Carter Pann, P.Q. Phan, Tobias Picker, Narong Prangcharoen, Paola Prestini, Daniel Bernard Roumain, Huang Ruo, Eric Samuelson, Carlos Sanchez-Guiterrez, Kate Soper, Gregory Spears, Joan Tower, Ken Ueno, Dan Visconti, Wang Jie, Dalit Warshaw, Randall Woolf, Nina Young, and Roger Zare.

    About the Selected Composers and Their Music

    Carlos Bandera (Lux in Tebebris)

    Carlos Bandera (b. 1993) is fascinated by musical architecture and by the music of the past. His recent music explores these fascinations, often by placing a musical quotation, be it a phrase, scale, or sonority, within dense microtonal textures.

    Carlos’ music has been performed in the Faroe Islands, Scotland, Uzbekistan, China, and several spaces in the US, including Stern Auditorium, Carnegie Hall. He has attended the Fresh Inc Music Festival where he studied composition with Dan Visconti and the Wintergreen Summer Music Academy where he studied with Daron Hagen and Gylda Lyons and had his Florestan premiered by members of the Wintergreen Festival Orchestra.

    Carlos earned his Bachelor of Music degree in Music Theory and Composition from the John J. Cali School of Music at Montclair State University, where he studied with Elizabeth Brown, Dean Drummond, and Marcos Balter. Carlos recently received his Master of Music degree in Composition from The Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University, where he participated in masterclasses with Christopher Rouse and Georg Friedrich Haas and studied privately with Kevin Puts.

    Carlos notes about his piece, “Upon first hearing the music of Anton Bruckner, I felt deeply connected to the composer and his work. His Eighth Symphony in particular, with its immense harmonic landscapes, devastating silences, and profound ‘darkness-to-light’ narrative, continues to be one of my greatest influences – no doubt, in more ways than I am even aware of. Lux in Tenebris explores these elements of the Eighth Symphony by allowing Brucknerian light to pierce through a dense micropolyphonic fabric.” For more information, visit http://www.carlosbandera.com.

    Lily Chen (A Leaf Falls After)

    Taiwanese-born Lily Chen (b. 1985) is a composer exploring timbral materials with subtle theatrical potentials in both acoustic and electronic music. Lily has received first Prize of Asian Composers League Young Composers Award, first and second Prizes of Nicola de Lorenzo Prize in Music Composition, among others. Her music has been performed at June in Buffalo, Mise-en Festival, International Computer Music Conference, SEAMUS, New York City Electroacoustic Music Festival, and Asian Composers League Conference and Festival. Lily has collaborated with St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, Eco Ensemble, Ensemble Signal, Mivos Quartet, Ensemble Mise-en, and National Taiwan Symphony Orchestra.

    In December 2017, she received her Ph.D. in music composition from the University of California at Berkeley, where she studied with Ken Ueno, Franck Bedrossian, Edmund Campion, and Cindy Cox. She also holds M.M. (2009) and B.F.A. (2007) from Taipei National University of the Arts in Taiwan, under the instruction of Chung-Kun Hung. For more information, visit http://www.chenlily.com.

    Of her piece, Chen notes, “A Leaf Falls After is inspired by my recent memories of living in Europe. In the fall of 2015, I received the Ladd Prize funded by UC Berkeley and had the great opportunity to live in Paris for ten months. This was my first time in Paris as well as in Europe; I experienced intimate incidents of fragile beauty that touched me, but also shocking and terrifying ones during my residence there. Based on such images, I created a constantly flowing process of different kinds of vibrations along with air sounds to represent falling leaves, fallen leaves, and flaps of rising butterflies’ wings. Besides this, metallic sounds/noises either with pure resonances or with intense pressure make up another important element, which is associated with my memories of the ringing bells and the metal ‘fallen leaves.’”

    Scott Lee (Anadyr)

    Composer Scott Lee (b. 1988) writes concert music infused with the visceral sounds of popular music. Lee has worked with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the North Carolina Symphony, the Portland Symphony Orchestra, Winston-Salem Symphony members, Symphony In C, and the Peabody Symphony Orchestra, chamber groups such as the Jack Quartet, yMusic, the Da Capo Chamber Players, Deviant Septet, chatterbird, and ShoutHouse, as well as multi-platinum pop artist Ben Folds. He has received commissions from the Aspen Music Festival, the Baltimore Classical Guitar Society, loadbang, the Raleigh Civic Symphony, and the American Craft Council.

    Notable honors include a Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, two ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards, winner of the Symphony In C Young Composers Composition, the grand prize in the PARMA Student Composer Competition, and the Gustav Klemm Award in Composition from the Peabody Institute. Lee has also received fellowships to attend the Tanglewood and Aspen Music Festivals.

    As a James B. Duke Fellow, Lee recently earned a PhD in Composition at Duke University, mentored by Scott Lindroth and Steve Jaffe. He earned the Master of Music degree at the Peabody institute, where he was the recipient of the Philip D. Glass Endowed Scholarship in Composition and studied with Michael Hersch. He received his Bachelor of Music degree from the Blair School of Music at Vanderbilt University, where he studied with Michael Rose, Michael Slayton, Stan Link, and Michael Kurek. For more information, visit http://www.scottlee.net.

    Of his piece, Lee says, “Anadyr refers both to a remote port town in Northeastern Russia and to the secret 1962 operation (‘Operation Anadyr’) in which Soviets deployed missiles and supporting forces to Cuba, prompting the Cuban missile crisis. The mission involved a complex campaign of deception, and was shrouded in secrecy. This work aims to evoke the deception and subterfuge that characterized this period in international dealings with Russia.”

    Ryan Lindviet (Like an Altar with 9,000 Robot Attendants)

    Ryan Lindveit’s (b. 1994) works have been performed across the United States and abroad by Alarm Will Sound, “The President’s Own” United States Marine Band, Orkest de Ereprijs, the USC Thornton Symphony, the Donald Sinta Quartet, FearNoMusic, and the City of Tomorrow, among others. His music has received recognition from BMI, ASCAP, SCI, the American Modern Ensemble, the National Band Association, Tribeca New Music, and the Texas Music Educators Association. Ryan grew up in Texas and is a graduate of the University of Southern California, where he was selected as Salutatorian for the class of 2016 and named the Thornton School of Music’s Outstanding Graduate. He is currently a master’s student at the Yale School of Music. His past teachers include Aaron Jay Kernis, Christopher Theofanidis, Andrew Norman, Ted Hearne, Frank Ticheli, and Donald Crockett. Recent and upcoming projects include Mysterious Butterflies for chamber ensemble and eight voices, a wind ensemble version of Like an Altar with 9,000 Robot Attendants commissioned by a consortium of 30 university wind ensembles organized by conductor H. Robert Reynolds, a commission for the Big 12 Band Directors Association, and pieces for chamber ensemble and orchestra to be premiered at the Aspen Music Festival in the summer of 2018. For more information, visit http://www.ryanlindviet.com.

    Lindviet notes, “Like an Altar with 9,000 Robot Attendants was inspire¬¬d by Ray Bradbury’s short story There Will Come Soft Rains (1950). The futuristic story describes a computer-controlled house, in which robots perform a myriad of tasks such as cooking breakfast, cleaning house, and telling time. Bradbury’s futurist prose remains characteristically exuberant in describing these household robots—a tension which calls to mind the satirical ebullience of Stanley Kubrick’s Cold War satire Dr. Strangelove. My piece lives in the same brazenly ecstatic spirit as Bradbury’s story and Kubrick’s film. Sometimes the only response to misfortune is a wild, full-teeth smile.”

    Tomas Peire Serrate (Rauxa)

    Barcelona-born Tomas Peire Serrate (b. 1979) studied piano at the Sant Cugat del Vallès conservatory and composition at the Escola Superior de Música de Catalunya (Barcelona) with Salvador Brotons andthe Sibelius Academy (Helsinki) with Tapio Tuomela and Risto Väisänen. In 2013 he graduated from New York University with a Master´s in Scoring for Film and Multimedia. That year he moved to Los Angeles to explore the film music industry and participate as a composer in different projects including writing the music for the films The Anushree Experiements and Prism, and orchestrating and arranging music for If I Stay, Minions or Love and Friendship.

    In the fall of 2015, Tomàs initiated his PhD studies at UCLA, where studies with Bruce Broughton, Richard Danielpour, Ian Krouse, Mark Carlson, Peter Golub and David S. Lefkowitz. His research at UCLA is about music, space and media, with particular interest in new technologies and virtual reality. His concert works have been performed in Europe, US and Asia, and is currently working on a short opera-monologue that will be premiered at the Off-Liceu series in Barcelona in June 2018. For more information, visit http://www.tomaspeire.com.

    Of his piece, Serrate notes, “Rauxa is a sudden determination, like the impulse I had to write this piece, or an outburst, which actually is how this work begins. It is a Catalan word that has been used in pair with another one, Seny, meaning balance and sensibleness, to describe or refer to the Catalan people and their character. This duality, like in other cultures and traditions, is essential, indivisible, and necessary to understand each part separately, which is what I tried to explore here. I worked on sketches and sections of Rauxa in different moments and places, always away from my home country, Catalonia, and I kept coming back to it looking to improve it as well as to learn more about myself and about music.”

    Liliya Ugay (Rhapsody in Color)

    Music by the award-winning composer and pianist Liliya Ugay (b. 1990) has been performed in many countries around the globe. Recipient of a 2016 Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a 2017 Horatio Parker Memorial prize from the Yale School of Music, Ugay has collaborated with the Nashville Symphony, Albany Symphony, New England Philharmonic, Yale Philharmonia, Raleigh Civic Symphony, Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, Molinari Quartet, Antico Moderno, Omnibus ensemble, and Paul Neubauer among others. Her music has been featured at the Aspen, American Composers, New York Electroacoustic Music, June in Buffalo, and Darmstadt New Music festivals, as well as the 52nd Venice Biennale. During 2017-2018 season Ugay has worked on a new opera as a Resident Composer at the American Lyric Theater.

    Originally from Uzbekistan, Liliya is currently a Doctor of Musical Arts candidate at the Yale School of Music studying with Aaron Kernis and David Lang. Besides new music, Liliya is passionate about the music of the repressed composers from the Soviet era. She regularly presents a series of the lecture-recitals on this topic with guidance of Boris Berman. For more information, visit htp://www.liliyaugay.com.

    Of her piece, Ugay notes, “I chose the title Rhapsody in Color to evoke two musical associations: Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsodies and Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. The idea of Rhapsody in Color is similar to the process of reproduction of old sepia photographs or films into color with individual, unrealistic to the time of the original, touch. Rather a simple, and, in a sense, traditional, motive and harmonic progression are taken through the contemporary lens by coloring it out with the sporadic and often unpredictable formal and orchestral realization. Similarly, in the second half of the piece, the idea of the ostinato dance is approached from modern perspective, transforming it into what sounds more like an electronic dance loop track with constantly adding/changing shades and timbral colors.”

    About American Composers Orchestra

    Founded in 1977, American Composers Orchestra is the only orchestra in the world dedicated to the creation, performance, preservation, and promotion of music by American composers. ACO makes the creation of new opportunities for American composers and new American orchestral music its central purpose. Through concerts at Carnegie Hall and other venues, recordings, internet and radio broadcasts, educational programs, New Music Readings, and commissions, ACO identifies today’s brightest emerging composers, champions prominent established composers as well as those lesser-known, and increases regional, national, and international awareness of the infinite variety of American orchestral music, reflecting geographic, stylistic, and temporal diversity. ACO also serves as an incubator of ideas, research, and talent, as a catalyst for growth and change among orchestras, and as an advocate for American composers and their music. ACO programs seek to innovate and experiment, educate students and the public, and open the orchestra to diverse new influences and audiences. For more information, visit http://www.americancomposers.org.

    About American Composers Forum

    The American Composers Forum is committed to supporting composers and developing new markets for their music. Through granting, commissioning, and performance programs, the Forum provides composers at all stages of their careers with valuable resources for professional and artistic development. By linking communities with composers and performers, the Forum fosters a demand for new music, enriches communities, and helps develop the next generation of composers, musicians, and music patrons. For more information, visit http://www.composersforum.org.

    About the League of American Orchestras

    The League of American Orchestras leads, supports, and champions America’s orchestras and the vitality of the music they perform. Its diverse membership of more than 2,000 organizations and individuals across North America runs the gamut from world-renowned orchestras to community groups, from summer festivals to student and youth ensembles, from conservatories to libraries, from businesses serving orchestras to individuals who love symphonic music. The only national organization dedicated solely to the orchestral experience, the League is a nexus of knowledge and innovation, advocacy, and leadership advancement. Its conferences and events, award-winning Symphony magazine, website, and other publications inform people around the world about orchestral activity and developments. Founded in 1942 and chartered by Congress in 1962, the League links a national network of thousands of instrumentalists, conductors, managers and administrators, board members, volunteers, and business partners. For more information, visit htp://www.americanorchestras.org.

    About New Music USA

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States using the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators. New Music USA engages with a broad constituency of artists and audiences with our programs and editorial work, providing in-depth coverage of the field through http://www.NewMusicBox.org and Counterstream Radio and supporting the field with around one million dollars in grants annually. Through membership in networks such as the International Society for Contemporary Music and the International Association of Music Information Centers. New Music USA represents the United States new music scene around the world. For more information, visit http://www.newmusicusa.org.

    1. # #

    American Composers Orchestra (ACO) is the only orchestra in the world dedicated to the creation, performance, preservation and promotion of music by American composers. Founded in 1977, ACO pursues a singular mission by maintaining an unparalleled range of activities:

    Concerts
    Commissions
    Recordings
    Educational programs
    New music reading sessions

    Creating new opportunities for American Composers

    ACO makes the creation of new opportunities for American composers and new American orchestral music its central purpose. ACO programs increase opportunities for American composers and generate broader awareness of their work. ACO’s new approach generates further interest and programming by other music organizations. It also increases the audience for contemporary American orchestral music by influencing music decision makers.

    We start by identifying today’s brightest emerging composers and championing prominent established artists. To increase international awareness of the variety of American orchestral music, we incubate new ideas, develop talent, and serves as a catalyst and advocate for American composers and their music.

    Now in its 40th season, ACO has performed music by over 800 composers, including more than 350 world premieres and commissioned works. Many ACO-commissioned composers have gone on to win important prizes such as the Pulitzer, Guggenheim Fellowship and Prix de Rome.

    Honors

    A special award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters
    A proclamation from the New York City Council
    The inaugural MetLife Award for excellence in community engagement
    BMI has honored ACO for its outstanding contribution to American music
    The League of American Orchestras has awarded the ASCAP annual prize for adventurous programming 35 times
    ASCAP has singled-out ACO as “the orchestra that has done the most for new American music in the United States”

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:50 PM on May 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: alt.Classical, , , , , THE BANG ON A CAN MARATHON   

    From Bang On a Can: “THE BANG ON A CAN MARATHON” 

    From Bang On a Can is the original DIY New Music Organization

    Do you like music? Of course you do! Do you like concerts? Yep! Do you prefer not to pay for those concerts? Absolutely. Do you like Sundays? Sure, great day! Do you like Washington Square Park? Lovely in the Spring! Do you like Festivals where you can come and go freely? Check! Do you like it when the music on the concert is exciting, unusual, challenging and brilliantly played? Ah! If that last one applies to you, you must not miss:

    THE BANG ON A CAN MARATHON
    May 13: NYU Skirball
    12-10pm
    Schedule: https://bangonacan.org/

    MUSIC BY Jeffrey Brooks, Tom Chiu, Fjóla Evans, Michael Gordon, David Lang, Nicole Lizée, Dylan Mattingly, Jessie Montgomery, Brendon Randall-Myers, Terry Riley, Frederic Rzewski, Gabriella Smith, Galina Ustvolskaya, Aleksandra Vrebalov, Alex Weiser, Julia Wolfe, and MORE!

    PERFORMANCES BY Terry Riley, Bang on a Can All-Stars with special guests Eric Berryman, Todd Reynolds, and Gyan Riley, Contemporaneous, Eliza Bagg, David Friend, ETHEL, Flux Quartet, Maya Beiser and Kate Valk, Mazz Swift and Therese Workman, NYU Contemporary Ensemble/Jonathan Haas, Robert Osborne, So Percussion,
    Stephin Merritt (Magnetic Fields) and Sam Davol, Val Jeanty and Ravish Momin, Vicky Chow, Xenia Rubinos and Marco Buccelli

    3

    See the full article here.

    Bang On A Can David Lang- Michael Gordon- Julia Wolfe © Peter Serling

    Bang On A Can All-Stars Members Ashley Bathgate, cello
    Robert Black, bass
    Vicky Chow, piano
    David Cossin, percussion
    Mark Stewart, guitars
    Ken Thomson, clarinet

    Formed in 1992, the Bang on a Can All-Stars are recognized worldwide for their ultra-dynamic live performances and recordings of today’s most innovative music. Freely crossing the boundaries between classical, jazz, rock, world and experimental music, this six-member amplified ensemble has consistently forged a distinct category-defying identity, taking music into uncharted territories. Performing each year throughout the U.S. and internationally, the All-Stars have shattered the definition of what concert music is today.

    Together, the All-Stars have worked in unprecedented close collaboration with some of the most important and inspiring musicians of our time, including Steve Reich, Ornette Coleman, Burmese circle drum master Kyaw Kyaw Naing, Tan Dun, DJ Spooky, and many more. The group’s celebrated projects include their landmark recordings of Brian Eno’s ambient classic Music for Airports and Terry Riley’s In C, as well as live performances with Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Don Byron, Iva Bittova, Thurston Moore, Owen Pallett and others. The All-Stars were awarded Musical America’s Ensemble of the Year and have been heralded as “the country’s most important vehicle for contemporary music” by the San Francisco Chronicle.

    Current and recent project highlights include the touring performances and recording of Julia Wolfe’s Pulitzer Prize winning Anthracite Fields for the All-Stars and guest choir, the record release of Wolfe’s acclaimed Steel Hammer, featuring Trio Mediaeval, plus a moving theatrically staged collaboration with SITI Company and director Anne Bogart; Field Recordings, a major multi-media project and CD/DVD now featuring 30 commissioned works by Tyondai Braxton, Mira Calix, Anna Clyne, Bryce Dessner, Florent Ghys, Michael Gordon, Jóhann Jóhannsson, David Lang, Christian Marclay, Steve Reich, Todd Reynolds, Julia Wolfe, and more; the Lincoln Center Festival 2017 world premiere of Cloud River Mountain, a new collaboration featuring Chinese superstar singer Gong Linna; the world premiere performance and recording of Steve Reich’s 2×5 including a sold-out performance at Carnegie Hall, and much more. With a massive repertoire of works written specifically for the group’s distinctive instrumentation and style of performance, the All-Stars have become a genre in their own right. The All-Stars record on Cantaloupe Music and have released past recordings on Sony, Universal and Nonesuch.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:53 PM on May 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: alt.Classical, , , ,   

    From yMusic It’s our Anniversary Ten years ago… 

    From yMusic

    1
    It’s our Anniversary! Ten years ago to the day, we had our first meeting to discuss our wild dreams for starting a new group together. We sit now and reflect on our shared history, how much we truly cherish each other, and what a crazy and beautiful journey it has been – and we hope it continues to be. The cinco de mayo is our favorite holiday. ¡Felicidades!

    2
    yMusic bowls!

    See the full article here .


    Alex Sopp
    C.J. Camerieri
    Gabriel Cabezas
    Hideaki Aomori
    Nadia Sirota
    Rob Moose

    Hailed by Performance Today’s Fred Child as “one of the groups that has really helped to shape the future of classical music,” yMusic is a group of six New York City instrumentalists flourishing in the overlap between the pop and classical worlds. Their virtuosic execution and unique configuration (string trio, flute, clarinet, and trumpet) has attracted the attention of high profile collaborators—from Paul Simon to Ben Folds to Jose Gonzalez—and inspired an expanding repertoire of original works by some of today’s foremost composers, including Nico Muhly and Andrew Norman.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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