Tagged: Carnegie Hall Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 11:24 AM on November 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Carnegie Hall, Chris Thile, ,   

    From Carnegie Hall: Events 


    From Carnegie Hall

    Carnegie Hall at a Glance

    Chris Thile, Mandolin and Vocals

    Chris Thile

    Wednesday, November 28 at 6:30 PM
    Weill Recital Hall

    Wednesday, November 28 at 9:30 PM
    Weill Recital Hall

    Chris Thile performs an original piece commissioned by Carnegie Hall, as well as works by Bach and other selections sure to delight and excite.

    Limited availability. Call CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800 for more information.

    Julia Wolfe: Anthracite Fields

    Julia Wolfe © Peter Serling, 2009

    2
    Saturday, December 1 at 9 PM
    Zankel Hall
    Tickets

    Ensemble Connect

    Ensemble Connect

    Wednesday, December 5 at 7:30 PM
    Weill Recital Hall
    Tickets

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hallis a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:11 PM on November 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Carnegie Hall, , Denis Matsuev- Piano, , Michelangelo Quartet, St. Lawrence String Quartet   

    From Carnegie Hall: At A Glance 


    From Carnegie Hall

    1
    St. Lawrence String Quartet, Inon Barnatan, Piano

    Thursday, November 8 at 7:30 PM
    Zankel Hall

    Shostakovich’s Piano Quintet, plus quartets by Haydn and Beethoven

    Tickets

    2
    Michelangelo Quartet

    Friday, November 9 at 7:30 PM
    Weill Recital Hall

    Haydn’s “Lark” Quartet, plus music by Smetana and Bartók

    Tickets

    3
    Denis Matsuev, Piano

    Friday, November 9 at 8 PM
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

    Rachmaninoff’s Variations on a Theme of Corelli, plus works by Beethoven, Chopin, and others

    Tickets

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hallis a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:43 PM on October 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: American Composers Orchestra-Phenomenal Women Joan Tower Valerie Coleman and Alex Temple, Carnegie Hall, Mariinsky Orchestra with Valery Gergiev, Maxim Vengerov- Violin Roustem Saïtkoulov- Piano   

    From Carnegie Hall: “This Week: Maxim Vengerov, Mariinsky Orchestra, ACO, and more” 


    From Carnegie Hall

    1
    Maxim Vengerov, Roustem Saïtkoulov

    Tuesday, October 30 at 8 PM
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

    Maxim Vengerov, Violin
    Roustem Saïtkoulov, Piano

    Works by Brahms, Ravel, Paganini, and others

    Tickets

    ______________________________________________

    Mariinsky Orchestra

    2
    Valery Gergiev

    Wednesday, October 31 at 8 PM
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

    Concert performance of Tchaikovsky’s beloved The Nutcracker
    Tickets

    Thursday, November 1 at 8 PM
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

    R. Strauss’s epic Ein Heldenleben, plus Nelson Freire plays Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 2
    Tickets

    ______________________________________________

    American Composers Orchestra
    Phenomenal Women

    Friday, November 2 at 7:30 PM
    Zankel Hall

    3

    Music by Joan Tower, Valerie Coleman, and Alex Temple
    Tickets

    ______________________________________________

    More at the full article
    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:58 AM on October 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Carnegie Hall, Kevin Murphy- Piano, Mezzo-soprano Elina Garanca, Ralph van Raat- Piano   

    From Carnegie Hall: Events 


    From Carnegie Hall

    Elīna Garanča, Mezzo-Soprano
    Kevin Murphy, Piano
    Tuesday, October 23, 2018 8 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    Tickets

    Elīna Garanča’s voice is one-in-a-million, allying grace and power to a commanding authority,” wrote The Independent (London) of the lush-voiced Latvian mezzo-soprano. Garanča returns to Carnegie Hall for an exciting evening of stunning singing.

    2
    Mezzo-soprano Elina Garanca from ZEALnyc

    3
    Kevin Murphy, Piano from Jacobs School of Music – Indiana University Bloomington

    Program
    SCHUMANN Selections from Myrthen, Op. 25
    ·· “Widmung”
    ·· “Der Nussbaum”
    ·· “Jemand”
    ·· “Lieder der Braut aus dem Liebesfrühling I”
    ·· “Lieder der Braut aus dem Liebesfrühling II”
    WAGNER Wesendonck Lieder
    RAVEL Shéhérazade
    FALLA Siete canciones populares españolas

    Ralph van Raat, Piano
    Wednesday, October 24, 2018 7:30 PM Weill Recital Hall
    4
    Ralph van Raat from http://www.ralphvanraat.nl
    Tickets

    Ralph van Raat’s Carnegie Hall debut recital is surely one you will remember. The adventurous Dutch pianist plays world premieres of a new work by Louis Andriessen, commissioned by Carnegie Hall, and a previously unpublished composition by Pierre Boulez. If that wasn’t enough, he tackles Alkan’s Symphony for Solo Piano, a tour de force whose spectacular colors, quirky rhythmic turns, and sheer intensity make gargantuan technical demands on the pianist.

    Program
    ALKAN Symphony for Solo Piano from 12 Etudes in All the Minor Keys
    LOUIS ANDRIESSEN Searching for Unison (Etude for Solo Piano) (World Premiere, commissioned by Carnegie Hall)
    DEBUSSY Etude retrouvée (1915; realized Howat)
    BOULEZ Prelude, Toccata, and Scherzo (US Premiere)

    More at the full article.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:36 PM on October 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Billy Childs, Carnegie Hall, , Igor Levit, , , Senegalese music, Youssou N'Dour   

    From Carnegie Hall: Events 


    From Carnegie Hall

    Igor Levit WRTI


    Friday, October 19 at 7:30 PM
    Zankel Hall
    Igor Levit, Piano

    Works by Bach, Busoni, Schumann, and Liszt
    Tickets

    Youssou N’Dour. Photo- Afrikaportal

    Saturday, October 20 at 8 PM
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

    Youssou NDOUR performs mbalax, Senegalese music that fuses classic African praise-singing, percussion, and guitar-based pop.
    Tickets

    Billy Childs. Photograph by Raj Naik.

    Monday, October 22 at 7 PM
    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture | Manhattan
    Carnegie Hall Citywide
    Billy Childs Quartet

    Billy Childs has performed with an honor roll of jazz luminaries that includes Freddie Hubbard, J. J. Johnson, Joe Henderson, and Wynton Marsalis.
    Free Event

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:06 PM on October 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Carnegie Hall, Hilary Hahn, Montserrat Caballé,   

    From WQXR Listen On Demand: Carnegie Hall plus Montserrat Caballé and Hilary Hahn 

    From WQXR

    1
    Listen On-Demand: Carnegie Hall’s Opening Night with Michael Tilson Thomas, Renée Fleming & Audra McDonald in a program that goes from George Gershwin to Laura Nyro.


    Carnegie Hall COURTESY OF BROOK WARDFLICKR

    2

    WQXR Didn’t Always Play ‘Classical’ Music. Here’s the Story of a Name

    3
    Soprano Montserrat Caballé, 1933-2018: An Appreciation from Fred Plotkin

    Hilary Hahn by Brandes Autographs

    Hilary Hahn Goes Back to Bach: “The most important thing is the music and getting the music across.”

    4
    Vivaldi At The Gate: Stranded Orchestra Makes The Best Out of (Yet Another) Flight Delay

    See the full article here .

    WQXR-FM (105.9 FM) is an American classical radio station licensed to Newark, New Jersey and serving the New York City metropolitan area. It is the most-listened-to classical-music station in the United States, with an average quarter-hour audience of 63,000.[citation needed]

    It is owned by the nonprofit New York Public Radio, which also operates WNYC (820 AM and 93.9 FM) and the four-station New Jersey Public Radio group. New York Public Radio acquired WQXR on July 14, 2009, as part of a three-way trade which also involved The New York Times Company – the previous owners of WQXR – and Univision Radio.[1] WQXR-FM broadcasts from studios and offices located in the Hudson Square neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, and the transmitter is located atop the Empire State Building.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:46 AM on October 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Carnegie Hall,   

    From American Symphony Orchestra at Carnegie Hall: “A Walt Whitman Sampler” 

    From From American Symphony Orchestra

    Wednesday, October 17, 2018
    Conductor’s Notes Q&A 7 PM–7:30 PM
    Concert 8 PM–10:30 PM
    Carnegie Hall
    (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    PRICES
    $25 / $40 / $55
    Tickets

    PROGRAM

    Othmar Schoeck – Trommelschläge
    Kurt Weill – Four Walt Whitman Songs
    Franz Schreker – Vom ewigen Leben (From Eternal Life)
    Ralph Vaughan Williams – A Sea Symphony (Symphony No. 1)

    ARTISTS

    Leon Botstein, conductor

    Leon Botstein by Ric Kallaher


    Angel Blue, soprano

    Angel Blue by Sonya Garza


    Elliot Madore, baritone
    Bard Festival Chorale
    James Bagwell, director

    Walt Whitman, the defining 19th-century poetic voice of America, inspired several generations of European composers. In the 20th century, Whitman’s poetry was beautifully adapted during World War I by Othmar Schoeck. The catastrophe of World War II inspired Kurt Weill to turn to Whitman’s writings. Franz Schreker and Ralph Vaughan Williams were drawn to Whitman’s most famous collection, Leaves of Grass, seeking to create music worthy of the power of Whitman’s poetry.

    Leon Botstein shares the stories behind the music in a lively 30-minute Conductor’s Notes Q&A at 7 PM in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage. Free for all ticket holders.


    From Carnegie Hall

    Carnegie Hall

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition
    Our Mission

    In 1962, Leopold Stokowski founded the American Symphony Orchestra with the imperative “to offer concerts of great music within the means of everyone.” Thirty years later that imperative has expanded to rebuild audiences for orchestral music by connecting music to a wide range of interests and experiences. The mission of the ASO is to renew live orchestral music as a vital force in contemporary American culture. To this end, the ASO presents thematic programming, in which musical works are curated around ideas drawn from a variety of disciplines such as history, visual arts, science, politics and literature. ASO pursues innovation in concert presentation and is devoted to the promotion of musical education.

    In its efforts to increase the constituency for orchestral music by making it once again a relevant and essential experience for a modern, diverse society, the ASO considers itself an organization in the public’s service, and a model for the survival and growth of orchestras in the twenty-first century.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:56 PM on September 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Carnegie Hall, , Leonidas Kavakos,   

    From Carnegie Hall: “San Francisco Symphony” 


    From Carnegie Hall

    Thursday, October 4, 2018 8 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    Tickets

    Program
    ALL-STRAVINSKY PROGRAM
    Pétrouchka (1947 version)
    Violin Concerto
    Le sacre du printemps

    Performers
    San Francisco Symphony
    Michael Tilson Thomas, Music Director and Conductor
    Leonidas Kavakos, Violin

    San Francisco Symphony is also performing October 3.

    Michael Tilson Thomas is also performing October 3, March 5, March 6, May 1, and May 2.

    Leonidas Kavakos is also performing February 6 and March 3.

    Michael Tilson Thomas by Art Streiber

    Leonidas Kavakos by Marco Borggreve

    Michael Tilson Thomas had a lifelong relationship with Stravinsky, dating back to performing in Stravinsky’s presence during Tilson Thomas’s student days in Los Angeles. This all-Stravinsky program promises spectacular orchestral colors, rhythmic vitality, unique melodies, and plenty of excitement. Stravinsky’s ballet Pétrouchka is a thrilling masterpiece where Russian folk tunes enliven brilliant musical tableaux, while the savage rhythms, earthy melodies, and drama of Le sacre du printemps make it a cornerstone of 20th-century music. Another side of Stravinsky shines in his witty Violin Concerto, a four-movement dazzler where pungent harmonies, beautiful song-like passages, and jazzy syncopated rhythms challenge the soloist and captivate the listener.

    Leonidas Kavakos (Greek: Λεωνίδας Καβάκος; born 30 October 1967) is a Greek violinist and conductor. As a violinist, he has won prizes at several international violin competitions, including the Sibelius, Paganini, and Indianapolis competitions. He has also recorded for record labels such as Sony/BMG and BIS. As a conductor, he was an artistic director of the Camerata Salzburg and has been a guest conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra and Boston Symphony Orchestra. Born in Athens into a musical family, Kavakos first learned to play the violin when he was five and later enrolled in the Hellenic Conservatory, studying with Stelios Kafantaris. An Onassis Foundation scholarship enabled him to attend master classes with Josef Gingold at Indiana University. He made his concert debut at the Athens Festival in 1984. In 1985, he won the International Sibelius Competition in Helsinki and in 1986 won silver medal in the Indianapolis International Violin Competition. He also took first prizes at the Naumburg Competition in New York (1988) and the Paganini Violin Competition (1988).

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:57 PM on September 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Carnegie Hall, Dafnis Prieto Big Band, Jason Moran and Alicia Hall Moran, , , Nicholas Payton- Trumpet   

    From Carnegie Hall: “The Sounds of Jazz” Upcoming Events 


    From Carnegie Hall

    From Billie Holiday and Benny Goodman, to the soulful singers and sizzling instrumentalists of today, Carnegie Hall has always been home to the finest jazz. Whether it’s a sultry ballad or breathless up-tempo cooker, jazz sounds best at legendary Carnegie Hall.

    1
    Dafnis Prieto . NPR

    Dafnis Prieto Big Band
    Saturday, November 10, 2018 9 PM Zankel Hall
    Tickets

    Cuban-born drummer, composer, bandleader, and 2011 MacArthur “Genius” Fellow Dafnis Prieto honors his musical heroes and mentors—such as Eddie Palmieri, Chico O’Farrill, Michel Camilo, Henry Threadgill, and Steve Coleman—with his 17-piece orchestra. Showcasing some of the world’s best Latin jazz musicians, Prieto’s compositions mix lush and jubilant melodies with polyrhythms that display a range of musical vocabularies from Latin jazz to classical chamber music.

    Anat Cohen Tentet

    2
    Anat Cohen Tentet http://www.anatcohen.com
    Saturday, January 12, 2019 9 PM Zankel Hall
    Tickets

    Prolific clarinetist, composer, and bandleader Anat Cohen—along with musical director, arranger, and composer Oded Lev-Ari—presents an intercontinental mix of songs that celebrate the clarinet’s beauty, versatility, and stylistic adaptability. Featuring a world premiere for solo clarinet and ensemble by Lev-Ari, co-commissioned by Carnegie Hall, and music from their acclaimed album Happy Song, the Anat Cohen Tentet engages audiences with thrilling musical excursions that draw on Cohen’s diverse sonic loves, from Brazilian music to African grooves, from vintage swing to touching ballads.

    Nicholas Payton, Trumpet
    Saturday, March 16, 2019 9 PM Zankel Hall
    Tickets

    3
    Nicholas Payton © Andrea Canter

    Trumpeter Nicholas Payton traces the path of African rhythms from their arrival in the Caribbean through their journey to New Orleans and on to Kansas City, St. Louis, Chicago, and New York. He explores how the music of New Orleans became, in a sense, the world’s first popular music and how its greatest practitioner—Louis Armstrong—became one of the first pop stars. You’ll hear how swing, bebop, R&B, hip-hop, and more share a DNA that connects people around the world.

    Two Wings: The Music of Black America in Migration
    4
    Jason Moran and Alicia Hall Moran. University of Houston
    Saturday Mar 30 2019 8 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    Tickets
    Jason Moran and Alicia Hall Moran draw upon their own family lore and the historical record of the Great Migration to compose tableaux that explore a continuum of music from rhythm and blues to gospel, classical to Broadway, work songs to rock ‘n’ roll. Experience the ingenuity of these artists as they take a journey from the American South after emancipation to all points North, West, and beyond—shining a light on the epic event that changed the sound of America forever.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:44 AM on September 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Carnegie Hall, , Louis-Hector Berlioz, Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique   

    From From Carnegie Hall: “Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique” 


    From From Carnegie Hall

    1
    Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique

    Sunday, October 14, 2018 3 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    Tickets

    Here’s a rare opportunity to hear the music as Berlioz would have when the piquant winds, warm brass, and crisp strings of a celebrated period-instrument orchestra make his vibrant colors and gorgeous melodies soar even higher. Moving tales inspired by Romantic poetry and classical antiquity are set to music by a quintessentially French Romantic. Berlioz cast the viola as the protagonist in Harold in Italy, a moody and melodic work recalling Byron’s wandering hero, while two legendary queens—Dido and Cleopatra—come to life in impassioned vocal music.

    Program
    ALL-BERLIOZ PROGRAM
    Le Corsaire Overture
    La mort de Cléopâtre
    Selections from Les Troyens, Part II
    ·· “Chasse Royale et Orage”
    ·· “Je vais mourir”
    ·· “Je vais mourir … Adieu, fière cité”
    Harold in Italy

    Performers
    Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique
    Sir John Eliot Gardiner, Artistic Director and Conductor
    Lucile Richardot, Mezzo-Soprano
    Antoine Tamestit, Viola

    Monday, October 15, 2018 8 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
    Tickets

    Obsession, madness, murder, and redemption are portrayed in the richly Romantic music—performed on period instruments—of Berlioz. His Symphonie fantastique is a phantasmagoric tale that depicts an opium overdose, nightmares of murder, a guillotine execution, and a terrifying Witches’ Sabbath. Berlioz called his rarely heard Lélio a “conclusion and complement” to the Symphonie fantastique. Lélio uses vocal soloists, chorus, and orchestra—including two pianists performing on one instrument—to tell of the Symphonie hero’s awaking from the nightmare, his musings on art, and his ultimate triumph as a composer.

    Program
    ALL-BERLIOZ PROGRAM
    Symphonie fantastique
    Lélio

    Performers
    Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique
    Sir John Eliot Gardiner, Artistic Director and Conductor
    Michael Spyres, Tenor
    Ashley Riches, Bass-Baritone
    National Youth Choir of Scotland
    Christopher Bell, Artistic Director
    Narrator to be announced

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: