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  • richardmitnick 12:04 PM on October 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, Exquisite Minimalism, Music in Twelve Parts, , Town Hall NYC   

    From Town Hall: “Philip Glass Ensemble performing ‘Music in 12 Parts’ at Town Hall” 

    Town Hall NYC

    Town Hall

    1
    Philip Glass Ensemble performing ‘Music in 12 Parts’ at Town Hall from https://www.timessquarenyc.org

    Saturday, October 27, 2018 • 6:00pm

    Philip Glass premiered Music in Twelve Parts at Town Hall in 1974.

    Music in Twelve Parts, written by Philip Glass between 1971 and 1974, is a deliberate, encyclopedic compendium of some techniques of repetition the composer had been evolving since the mid 1960s. It holds an important place in Glass’s repertory – not only from a historical vantage point (as the longest and most ambitious concert piece for the Philip Glass Ensemble) but from a purely aesthetic standard as well, because Music in Twelve Parts is both a massive theoretical exercise and a deeply engrossing work of art. (Tim Page)

    The entire set is over four hours long plus three intermissions: two short ones, lasting 15 minutes, and a “dinner intermission” that is 75 minutes long.

    6:00PM -6:45PM: Parts 1, 2, 3
    Intermission: 15 minutes
    7:00PM -7:45PM: Parts 4, 5, 6
    Dinner Break: 75 minutes
    9:00PM -9:45PM: Parts 7, 8, 9
    Intermission: 15 minutes
    10:00PM -10:45PM: Parts 10, 11, 12

    Special dinner reservation and menu options at local restaurants will be provided to ticket buyers in advance of the date.

    $55, $65, $75, $85
    Tickets

    Doors:
    5:30pm

    Presented by:
    Town Hall Presents

    Philip Glass, who held the Composer’s Chair position for Carnegie Hall’s 2017-2018 season, will perform as part of the Philip Glass Ensemble at Town Hall on October 27, performing his work “Music in 12 Parts” which actually premiered at Town Hall in 1974:

    Music in Twelve Parts, written by Philip Glass between 1971 and 1974, is a deliberate, encyclopedic compendium of some techniques of repetition the composer had been evolving since the mid 1960s. It holds an important place in Glass’s repertory – not only from a historical vantage point (as the longest and most ambitious concert piece for the Philip Glass Ensemble) but from a purely aesthetic standard as well, because Music in Twelve Parts is both a massive theoretical exercise and a deeply engrossing work of art.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Town Hall has played an integral part in the electrifying cultural fabric of New York City for more than 90 years. Disclosing a tale of a vibrant group of suffragists (The League for Political Education) whose fight for the 19th Amendment led them to build a meeting space to educate people on the important issues of the day. The Hall was designed by renowned architects McKim, Mead & White to reflect the democratic principles of the League. Box seats were eliminated and no seats had an obstructed view giving birth to the term “Not a bad seat in the house.” During completion of the building the 19th Amendment was passed (women’s right to vote), and on January 12, 1921 The Town Hall opened its doors and took on a double meaning: as a symbol of the victory sought by its founders, and as a spark for a new, more optimistic climate.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 8:40 PM on October 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, Jean-Baptiste Barrière, Kaija Saariaho,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “Sonic Temples: Music of Saariaho and Barrière” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    Kaija Saariaho and Jean-Baptiste Barrière from Stanford Arts

    Monday, November 12, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    Advent Lutheran Church
    2504 Broadway at 93rd Street
    New York, NY 10025

    Free Event

    Two of the world’s leading composers join Music Mondays for a program of entrancing, mystical music that envelops the listener in sound. Kaija Saariaho’s fluid, beguiling works (such as L’amour de Loin, a critical and popular success at the Met in 2016) have made her a leading voice in music today; Jean-Baptiste Barrière’s works intermingle acoustic and electronic sounds to build new sonic landscapes, as heard in a portion of his new opera, The 38th Parallel, a tale of Korean displacement and immigration. Charismatic violinist Jennifer Koh (“one of our most thoughtful and intense musicians,” New York Times), bass-baritone Davóne Tines (“immense power and fervor,” L A Times), and flutist Camilla Hoitenga (“explosive,” N Y Times) perform in what promises to be an immersive musical experience.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 6:52 PM on October 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Classical Music, Evnin Rising Stars I   

    From Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts: “The 2018 Evnin Rising Stars are about to arrive!” 

    Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts

    From Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts

    1

    2

    Saturday October 27 8:00pm
    Evnin Rising Stars I
    Pamela Frank, Artistic Director
    Chamber, Classical Music Room
    $25, $40 Free tickets for students 18 and under!

    Tickets

    Overview

    The Evnin Rising Stars program is an incubator for leaders in classical music performance. Along with Pamela Frank, distinguished artist/mentors cellist Timothy Eddy and pianist Gilbert Kalish work alongside a new generation of outstanding young instrumentalists on the great masterworks of the chamber music repertoire. The culmination of this week of intense collaboration and musical discovery is an opportunity for the public to witness musicians on their way to becoming legends themselves.

    Program

    Haydn String Quartet in G Major, Op. 76, No. 1, Hob.III:75
    Mendelssohn String Quartet No. 6 in F Minor, Op. 80
    — Intermission —
    Shostakovich Piano Quintet in G Minor, Op. 57

    Artists
    Distinguished Artists

    Pamela Frank, violin
    Timothy Eddy, cello
    Gilbert Kalish, piano
    Evnin Rising Stars

    Benjamin Baker, violin
    Rubén Rengel, violin
    Tatjana Roos, violin
    Luosha Fang, viola
    Zoë Martin-Doike, viola
    Alexander Hersh, cello
    Coleman Itzkoff, cello

    3
    Sunday October 28 3:00pm
    Evnin Rising Stars II
    Pamela Frank, Artistic Director
    Chamber, Classical Music Room
    $25, $40 Free tickets for students 18 and under!
    Buy Tickets

    Program

    Haydn String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 64, No. 6, Hob.III:64
    Mozart String Quartet in G Major, K. 387
    — Intermission —
    Fauré Piano Quartet No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 45

    4
    Sunday November 4 3:00pm
    Julia Bullock, soprano
    and John Arida, piano
    Classical, Recital, Vocal Music Room
    $25, $35, $50, $65
    Buy Tickets

    Program

    Schubert Suleika I, D. 720 (Op. 14/1)
    Was bedeutet die Bewegung
    Lachen und Weinen, D. 777
    Wandrers Nachtlied II, D. 768
    Seligkeit, D. 433
    Barber Hermit Songs, Op. 29
    Fauré Selections from La chanson d’Ève, Op. 95
    Williams Driftin’ Tide (arr. J. Siskind)
    Hunter, Pinkard You Can’t Tell the Difference After Dark (arr. J. Siskind)
    Hunter, Austin Downhearted Blues (arr. J. Siskind)
    Siskind Frog Tongue Stomp: A Lovie Austin Tribute
    Holiday Our Love is Different (arr. J. Siskind)
    Simone Revolution (arr. J. Siskind)
    Simone Four Women (arr. J. Siskind)

    Artists

    Julia Bullock, soprano
    John Arida, piano

    149 Girdle Ridge Road
    PO Box 816
    Katonah, NY 10536
    p: 914.232.5035 f: 914.232.5521 e: info@caramoor.org

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts is a destination for exceptional music, captivating programs, spectacular gardens and grounds, and wonderful moments with friends and family. It enriches the lives of its audiences through innovative and diverse musical performances of the highest quality. Its mission also includes mentoring young professional musicians and providing educational programs for young children centered around music.

    Audiences are invited to explore the lush grounds, tour the historic Rosen House, enjoy a pre-concert picnic, and discover beautiful music in the relaxed settings of the Venetian Theater, Spanish Courtyard, Music Room of the Rosen House, and the magnificent gardens.

    The story of Caramoor, the Rosens, Lucie’s Theremin, the Art Collections and our History is rich and diverse.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:48 AM on October 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, , New releases from Classical Independent Labels   

    From Naxos: “New releases from Classical Independent Labels” 

    From Naxos

    1
    DONIZETTI, G.: Messa da Requiem
    Remigio • Amarù • Gatell • Concetti • Montanari • Donizetti Opera Choir and Orchestra • Rovaris
    Dynamic CDS7813

    Composed in 1835 to mark the death of Vincenzo Bellini, Donizetti’s Requiem received this 2017 performance to mark the 220th anniversary of the composer’s birth. It is the only modern recording currently available and was made at the 2017 Donizetti Festival in a production by Italy’s Fondazione Donizetti. This release, conducted by Corrado Rovaris, was recorded in the Church of Santa Maria Maggiore in Bergamo, where Donizetti is now buried. The whole cast received very positive reviews, especially tenor Juan Francisco Gatell who sung the famous Ingemisco aria with an excellent use of mezzevoci and coloratura.

    2
    Inspired by Classics – BRAHMS, J. • SARASATE, P. • LISZT, F. • BARTÓK, B. • KODALY, Z.
    Czech Philharmonic Cimbalom Ensemble
    ArcoDiva UP0208

    The Czech Philharmonic Cimbalom Ensemble originated from a group of orchestra members who share passion for traditional music. The ensemble explores and presents the unique approach of every composer and fuses it with new ideas. This recording includes the ensemble’s arrangements of Brahms’ Hungarian Dances, Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsodies, Bartók’s Romanian Folk Dances, Kodály’s Dances of Galánta, and Sarasate’s Zigeunerweisen. Apart from the exquisite performance of technically demanding compositions, the most appealing element of the Czech Philharmonic Cimbalom Ensemble is their deep understanding of folk music and its specific energy which stems out from the very substance of human existence.

    3
    TCHAIKOVSKY, P.I.: Iolanta [Opera] • The Nutcracker [Ballet] (Paris National Opera and Ballet, 2016)
    Yoncheva • Rutkowski • Barbeau • Bullion • Paris National Opera Ballet and Orchestra • Altinoglu
    BelAir Classiques BAC145

    Bringing together again, for the first time since their premiere, Tchaikovsky’s opera Iolanta and ballet The Nutcracker, was the audacious challenge that Russian stage director Dmitri Tcherniakov accepted for the Palais Garnier in Paris in March 2016: a revolutionary production, which was to become one of the key events of the Paris Opera season. Bulgarian soprano Sonya Yoncheva delivers a flamboyant interpretation of the blind princess Iolanta and shares the stage with Polish tenor Arnold Rutkowski and Ukrainian bass Alexander Tsymbalyuk. The internationally renowned French conductor Alain Altinoglu joins forces with the Paris Opera Orchestra and Chorus, while the Paris Opera Ballet revives the most popular ballet of all time.

    Much more on the full article.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Naxos Records is the world’s leading classical music label as measured by the number of new recordings it releases and the depth and breadth of its catalogue. Naxos was founded in 1987 by Klaus Heymann, a German-born entrepreneur based in Hong Kong. Under his continuing stewardship, Naxos has developed from being known primarily as a budget label focusing on standard repertoire into a global music group comprising a raft of downloading and streaming platforms, a significant catalogue of multimedia products, a vast international logistics network, a recording engineering arm, a publications division, and a licensing department.

    Naxos, the record label, has transformed into a virtual encyclopaedia of classical music with a catalogue of unparalleled depth and breadth. Innovative strategies for recording exciting new repertoire with exceptional talent have enabled Naxos Records to develop one of the largest and fastest-growing catalogues of unduplicated repertoire. Some 9,000 titles are currently available at affordable prices, recorded in state-of- the-art sound, both in hard format and on digital platforms. Naxos works with artists of the highest calibre and its recordings have been recognised with numerous Grammy® awards, Penguin Guide 3-star recommendations, Gramophone Editor’s Choice Awards and many other international honours.

    Naxos still stays true to its original promise of offering great value. Costs are kept to a minimum by focusing on the music rather than the artist; money is not wasted on expensive artist promotions, and profits are invested into recordings of new music rather than multiple versions of standard repertoire already in the catalogue. Naxos recordings include complete cycles or cycles-in- progress of basic repertoire, such as the complete piano works of Liszt or the complete string quartets of Haydn, but the label has also introduced music lovers to many neglected composers, such as Joachim Raff, Ferdinand Ries and Simon Mayr. It has also helped to put contemporary composers such as Krzysztof Penderecki, John Corigliano and William Bolcom in reach of a much wider audience. Additionally the label continues to add to the numerous world première recordings it already has to its credit.

    Naxos Records also has gained stature by pioneering groundbreaking projects like the American Classics series. Currently numbering about 200 titles, the series is set to be the most comprehensive recording project of American concert music ever attempted. Naxos is also leading the field with the landmark Naxos Historical Series. The releases in this massive restoration project are engineered by leading restoration engineers/artists. The series covers all genres of classical music as well as legends of jazz and pop music from the first half of the 20th century. Other notable Naxos series include Japanese Classics, Spanish Classics, Early Music, Organ Encyclopaedia, the Guitar Collection, and Opera Classics. The catalogue of Naxos World, a pioneering world music label, includes international music of many different cultures and genres, folk, pop and classical alike.

    All this, together with the development of a range of apps and ebooks, demonstrates the Naxos commitment to providing the best possible access to recorded classical music in the world.

    Naxos Records is part of the Naxos Music Group. For a comprehensive presentation of the group’s services and products, please visit http://www.naxosmusicgroup.com.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:30 PM on October 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Adelphi Orchestra, Ars Musica Chorale, Classical Music,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: Classical Splendor: works for chorus and orchestra by Mozart and Schubert, including Mozart’s Requiem” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    Saturday, November 10, 2018
    at 7:00 PM

    West Side Presbyterian Church
    6 South Monroe Street
    Ridgewood, NJ 07450

    $25—30
    Tickets

    Ars Musica Chorale begins its 53rd season with Classical Splendor: works for chorus and orchestra by Mozart and Schubert, including Mozart’s Requiem. The performance will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Saturday, November 10, 2018, at West Side Presbyterian Church, Ridgewood, New Jersey. The concert is given in memory of those lost during World War I, which officially ended 100 years ago on November 11, 1918.

    The chorus will be accompanied by the award-winning Adelphi Orchestra and members of Ars Musica Chorale’s Encore Young Arts program during this concert of music by titans of the Classical Era, Mozart and Schubert. Mozart’s Requiem, which to this day is shrouded in mystery and intrigue, was composed during the final months of his life. Unfinished at the time of his death, it was later completed by his student Süssmayr. The concert opens with another work from Mozart’s final year, the overture to the opera The Magic Flute, a thrilling tour de force of virtuosity for orchestra. The overture is followed by Franz Schubert’s Mass in G, a work brimming with energy and sublime melodies. The first half concludes with Mozart’s choral miniature, Ave Verum Corpus. The grand finale is Mozart’s powerful, spiritual, fury-filled Requiem, performed with a stunning cast of soloists.

    Advance tickets are $30.00 for adults and $25.00 for seniors and those with special needs. (Add $5.00 if purchased at the door.) Children under 18 are free. For reservations or more information, visit http://www.arsmusica.org or call the Ars Musica Chorale at (551) 226-9305.

    Established in 1965, Ars Musica Chorale is one of the oldest and finest choral groups in Bergen County, well-known for presenting outstanding and unique programs. Under the direction of Music Director James Kennerley, Ars Musica Chorale performs four major concerts annually in Bergen County. West Side Presbyterian Church is wheelchair accessible. Funding has been made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.

    2

    In 1965, Ars Musica began as a small community chorus. Now in its fifth decade, Ars Musica continues to offer singers the opportunity to perform a wide variety of great music. Our concerts, which take place in one of Northern New Jersey’s most beautiful venues, West Side Presbyterian Church in Ridgewood, frequently feature instrumentalists and soloists from the rosters of the Metropolitan area’s renowned opera companies and professional symphony orchestras.

    Recognized as one of the most accomplished choruses in the area, the chorus has regularly been invited to perform as guest artist in such venues as Carnegie Hall (with Opera Orchestra of New York), Columbia University’s landmark St. Paul’s Chapel, and St. John the Baptist Cathedral in Paterson, NJ. Since 1989, the Chorale has traveled abroad in alternate summers, performing throughout Europe and Great Britain, and recently in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    Our performances adhere to the highest standards, as we continue to dedicate ourselves to upholding the heritage of greatness and beauty in choral music. Our rehearsals are distinguished by a genuine sense of camaraderie among the members who come together to sing some of the world’s most beautiful choral compositions.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:22 PM on October 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, ,   

    From SoundStreams: “Ensemble Soundstreams Seduces Shanghai” 

    From SoundStreams

    1

    Soundstreams visited China in September as Artists-in-Residence at the invitation of the Shanghai New Music Week, one of two major festivals of contemporary music in China. Having performed at the Beijing Modern Music Festival in 2013, Soundstreams was really delighted by this invitation.

    “Significant Canadian music and performers were heard for the first time ever in this festival’s history,” explained Lawrence Cherney, Soundstreams’ Artistic Director. “It also ushered in a new era of co-operation as we exchange young composers through our respective Emerging Composers’ Workshop programs. Forging ever stronger cultural links with China is our goal.”

    William Littler, who covered the tour for the Toronto Star reported, “The Torontonians kept good company in Shanghai, appearing alongside international-class colleagues from Paris, Amsterdam, and Athens, performing before overwhelmingly young audiences, and to Soundstreams fell the particular responsibility of representing North American music, presenting works by three Canadians, R. Murray Schafer, Nicole Lizée and Juliet Palmer, and two Americans, John Cage and Steve Reich.”

    SoundStreams-courtesy of the artist

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Soundstreams showcases the work of Canadian and international composers through innovative musical experiences.
    Location 302, 579 Richmond St W, Toronto, ON M5V 1Y6

    Soundstreams is one of the world’s leading contemporary music companies, and the largest global presenter of new Canadian music. Artistic Director Lawrence Cherney and Executive Director Ben Dietschi are committed to showcasing the work of living and international composers with a focus on innovative thematic and experiential programming.

    Soundstreams also serves a broad community of music lovers through free outreach and education programs including Encounters, the Emerging Composer Workshop, SoundWave, and SoundMakers. Encounters is a free monthly discovery series featuring performances, discussions, and audience participation; the Emerging Composer Workshop helps talented contemporary composers from around the world launch their careers; SoundWave provides accessible tickets to young adults; and SoundMakers provides interactive learning experiences online and in the classroom.

    Founded in 1982 by oboist Lawrence Cherney as Chamber Concerts Canada, Soundstreams has presented a variety of series over its 33-year history, including Musical Mondays at the Lorraine Kimsa Theatre for Young People, and Encounters at the CBC’s Glenn Gould Studio. Soundstreams commissions have added more than 150 works to the musical repertoire worldwide, reflecting a diverse variety of genres and cultural traditions. World premieres have included works by composers R. Murray Schafer, John Tavener, Steve Reich, Christos Hatzis, Harry Somers, Nicole Lizée, James MacMillan, James Rolfe, Melissa Hui, and Andrew Staniland, to name a few.

    Projects have included festivals and conferences such as the Northern Encounters festival, University Voices, and Cool Drummings percussion festival and conference, as well as new productions such as Thomson Highway and Melissa Hui’s Cree opera Pimooteewin: The Journey (which toured Northern Ontario in 2009 and 2010), R. Murray Schafer’s Dora Award-winning site-specific opera The Children’s Crusade (produced in association with the Luminato Festival), and Brian Current’s Dora-nominated opera Airline Icarus. Soundstreams is a three-time JUNO nominee and recipient of the Lieutenant Governor’s Award for the Arts.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:36 PM on October 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Billy Childs, , Classical Music, Igor Levit, , , Senegalese music, Youssou N'Dour   

    From Carnegie Hall: Events 


    From Carnegie Hall

    Igor Levit WRTI


    Friday, October 19 at 7:30 PM
    Zankel Hall
    Igor Levit, Piano

    Works by Bach, Busoni, Schumann, and Liszt
    Tickets

    Youssou N’Dour. Photo- Afrikaportal

    Saturday, October 20 at 8 PM
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

    Youssou NDOUR performs mbalax, Senegalese music that fuses classic African praise-singing, percussion, and guitar-based pop.
    Tickets

    Billy Childs. Photograph by Raj Naik.

    Monday, October 22 at 7 PM
    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture | Manhattan
    Carnegie Hall Citywide
    Billy Childs Quartet

    Billy Childs has performed with an honor roll of jazz luminaries that includes Freddie Hubbard, J. J. Johnson, Joe Henderson, and Wynton Marsalis.
    Free Event

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:57 PM on October 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, , ORCHESTRA OF THE ACCADEMIA TEATRO ALLA SCALA   

    From Department of Music at Princeton: “ORCHESTRA OF THE ACCADEMIA TEATRO ALLA SCALA” 

    Department of Music at Princeton

    From Department of Music at Princeton

    ORCHESTRA OF THE ACCADEMIA TEATRO ALLA SCALA

    Iván Fischer, Budapest, 2015 by Kispados

    IVÁN FISCHER, CONDUCTOR
    Tues. Oct 23, 7:30PM | Free, Ticketed
    Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall
    Princeton University Orchestra Presents

    More information and free tickets

    The Princeton University Orchestra presents Milan’s legendary Teatro Alla Scala affiliate orchestra for young professionals, conducted by internationally renowned conductor Iván Fischer in a FREE (but ticketed) one-night-only guest appearance.

    1

    The touring Orchestra of the Accademia Teatro Alla Scala has played all over the world, with recent highlights including the Bolshoi Theatre (Moscow), Royal Opera House (Muscat), and La Fenice (Venice). Over its history, the Orchestra has been led by a long list of preeminent conductors including Zubin Mehta, Christoph Eschenbach, and Gustavo Dudamel; the ensemble has also collaborated with soloists from Lang Lang to Herbie Hancock.

    Iván Fischer is the founder and music director of the Budapest Festival Orchestra, as well as music director of Berlin’s Konzerthaus and Konzerthaus Orchestra. A frequent guest conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, and Cleveland Orchestra, the Maestro has also received the Golden Medal Ward from the President of the Republic of Hungary, and the Crystal Award from the World Economic Forum for his services in promoting international cultural relations, among many other honors.

    The La Scala Academy Orchestra traces its origin to the master courses for young musicians embarking on a career in a professional orchestra. It is currently the only institution providing training across the entire orchestra repertoire: symphonies, operas, and ballets. Under the guidance of acclaimed musicians and the first chairs of the Teatro alla Scala Orchestra, the two-year curriculum provides individual training in the chosen instrument and ensemble lessons in chamber music, orchestra sections, and full orchestra exercises.

    The Academy Orchestra performs at famous theatres, concert societies, and international festivals. The more notable venues include Teatro alla Scala, the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow, the St. Petersburg Philharmonia, the Royal Opera House in Muscat, La Fenice of Venice, Teatro Massimo of Palermo, Teatro San Carlo in Naples, Teatro Petruzzelli in Bari, Teatro Bellini of Catania, the RAI Auditorium in Turin, the Ravello Festival, and the Kissinger Sommer Festival.

    Naturally, the La Scala Academy Orchestra works closely with Teatro alla Scala, which welcomes it to the pit for one of the season’s operas. Notable titles have included Così fan tutte, Le nozze di Figaro, Le convenienze ed inconvenienze teatrali, L’occasione fa il ladro, L’italiana in Algeri, Don Pasquale, La scala di seta, Il barbiere di Siviglia, Die Zauberflöte, and, most recently, Humperdinck’s Hänsel und Gretel. In 2018 Alì Babà e i Quaranta ladroni by Luigi Cherubini and in 2019 Prima la musica poi le parole by Antonio Salieri, Gianni Schicchi by Giacomo Puccini and Rigoletto by Giuseppe Verdi.

    But of course Teatro alla Scala is also famous for ballet, and the Academy Orchestra has accompanied the Ballet Corps on a number of occasions, including A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Giselle, Onegin, and Histoire de Manon.

    Over its history, the Orchestra has been led by a long list of preeminent conductors: Yuri Temirkanov, Zubin Mehta, Fabio Luisi, Ádám Fischer, Christoph Eschenbach, Manfred Honeck, Roland Böer, Michele Mariotti, Gustavo Dudamel, Gianandrea Noseda, Stefano Ranzani, Ottavio Dantone, Giovanni Antonini, John Axelrod, Susanna Mälkki, Pietro Mianiti, Daniele Rustioni, David Coleman, Mikhail Tatarnikov, and Lorenzo Viotti. It has also accompanied soloists of the caliber of Lang Lang, Herbie Hancock, Alexei Volodin, Simon Trpčeski, David Fray, Olga Kern, and Alessandro Taverna.

    PROGRAM:
    Gioachino Rossini Overture to La gazza ladra (The Thieving Magpie)

    Felix Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4 in A Major, Op. 90

    Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 5 in E Minor, Op. 64

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Princeton’s Department of Music is at the epicenter of a musical culture that is broad and deep, reaching from edge to edge of the campus, from the classroom to the concert hall, and from faculty-led groups to those run exclusively by students.

    There are several levels of involvement that students can have with the Department of Music: Graduate students can earn a Ph.D. in one of the two main areas of our Graduate program – composition or musicology – including opportunities to focus on theory or ethnomusicology. Undergraduate students can major in music, in a program with emphasis on writing music or writing about music. Undergraduates can also earn certificates in the Program in Musical Performance, both as Music Majors and as majors of other departments. Those who do not plan to pursue a degree or certificate in music are of course welcome to take courses with world-renowned composers and music historians, take instrumental or voice lessons in the private studios of top professionals, and audition to perform with our many ensembles: six jazz groups, three choruses, two orchestras, a wind ensemble, an opera theater, a musical comedy troupe, at least a dozen chamber music ensembles, a laptop orchestra, and almost twenty small a cappella singing groups.

    Community members can attend numerous concerts throughout the academic year. In addition to student performances, world-renowned artists appear on the Princeton University Concerts series; leading performers of contemporary music showcase compositions by faculty and graduate composers through the Princeton Sound Kitchen; Sō Percussion, the Edward T. Cone Artists-in-Residence, perform and engage with the community. The student-run radio station WPRB: 103.3 FM broadcasts many styles of music, often featuring Princeton student performances.

    An important feature hard to discern from a list of courses and ensembles is the Music Department’s emphasis on collaboration. This manifests not only within the department (graduate composers composing for the undergraduate orchestra, graduate musicologists making a performance edition for an undergraduate opera production), but in collaboration with other departments as well. Frequent interdisciplinary collaborators with the music department include students and faculty from Architecture, African American Studies, Computer Science, Irish Studies, and the programs in Theater, Dance, Visual Art, Music Theater, and Creative Writing all housed within the Lewis Center for Arts.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:46 PM on October 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music,   

    From New York Philharmonic: “‘He brought down the house, winning a clamorous ovation’ — The New York Times on Concertmaster Frank Huang 


    From New York Philharmonic

    1

    “He brought down the house, winning a clamorous ovation”
    — The New York Times on Concertmaster Frank Huang

    $50 Orchestra Seats Now Available

    Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances and Barber

    Juraj Valčuha conductor

    Juraj Valčuha Credit Lawrence K. Ho – Los Angeles Times

    Frank Huang violin

    Frank Huang, Concert Master of the NY Phil courtesy of the artist

    Korngold Much Ado About Nothing Suite
    Barber Violin Concerto
    Rachmaninoff Symphonic Dances

    Wed Oct 31, 2018 7:30 PM
    Thu Nov 1, 2018 7:30 PM
    Sat Nov 3, 2018 8:00 PM

    Buy Tickets

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    New York Philharmonic by Chris Lee


    Founded in 1842, the New York Philharmonic is the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States. Read a complete historical overview, visit the New York Philharmonic Leon Levy Digital Archives, or explore our history below.

    The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc.,globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra (NYPO) or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra based in New York City in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the “Big Five”. The Philharmonic’s home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York’s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

    Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the “Big Five” orchestras. Its record-setting 14,000th concert was given in December 2004.

    The New York Philharmonic was founded in 1842 by the American conductor Ureli Corelli Hill, with the aid of the Irish composer William Vincent Wallace. The orchestra was then called the Philharmonic Society of New York. It was the third Philharmonic on American soil since 1799, and had as its intended purpose, “the advancement of instrumental music.” The first concert of the Philharmonic Society took place on December 7, 1842 in the Apollo Rooms on lower Broadway before an audience of 600. The concert opened with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, led by Hill himself. Two other conductors, German-born Henry Christian Timm and French-born Denis Etienne, led parts of the eclectic, three-hour program, which included chamber music and several operatic selections with a leading singer of the day, as was the custom. The musicians operated as a cooperative society, deciding by a majority vote such issues as who would become a member, which music would be performed and who among them would conduct. At the end of the season, the players would divide any proceeds among themselves.

    After only a dozen public performances and barely four years old, the Philharmonic organized a concert to raise funds to build a new music hall. The centerpiece was the American premiere of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, to take place at Castle Garden on the southern tip of Manhattan. About 400 instrumental and vocal performers gathered for this premiere, which was conducted by George Loder. The chorals were translated into what would be the first English performance anywhere in the world. However, with the expensive US$2.00 ticket price and a war rally uptown, the hoped-for audience was kept away and the new hall would have to wait. Although judged by some as an odd work with all those singers kept at bay until the end, the Ninth soon became the work performed most often when a grand gesture was required.

    During the Philharmonic’s first seven seasons, seven musicians alternated the conducting duties. In addition to Hill, Timm and Étienne, these were William Alpers, George Loder, Louis Wiegers and Alfred Boucher. This changed in 1849 when Theodore Eisfeld was installed as sole conductor for the season. Eisfeld, later along with Carl Bergmann, would be the conductor until 1865. That year, Eisfeld conducted the Orchestra’s memorial concert for the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln, but in a peculiar turn of events which were criticized in the New York press, the Philharmonic omitted the last movement, Ode to Joy, as being inappropriate for the occasion. That year Eisfeld returned to Europe, and Bergmann continued to conduct the Society until his death in 1876.

    Leopold Damrosch, Franz Liszt’s former concertmaster at Weimar, served as conductor of the Philharmonic for the 1876/77 season. But failing to win support from the Philharmonic’s public, he left to create the rival Symphony Society of New York in 1878. Upon his death in 1885, his 23-year-old son Walter took over and continued the competition with the old Philharmonic. It was Walter who would convince Andrew Carnegie that New York needed a first-class concert hall and on May 5, 1891, both Walter and Russian composer Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky conducted at the inaugural concert of the city’s new Music Hall, which in a few years would be renamed for its primary benefactor, Andrew Carnegie. Carnegie Hall would remain the orchestra’s home until 1962.

    The Philharmonic in 1877 was in desperate financial condition, caused by the paltry income from five concerts in the 1876/77 season that brought in an average of only $168 per concert. Representatives of the Philharmonic wished to attract the German-born, American-trained conductor Theodore Thomas, whose own Theodore Thomas Orchestra had competed directly with the Philharmonic for over a decade and which had brought him fame and great success. At first the Philharmonic’s suggestion offended Thomas because he was unwilling to disband his own orchestra. Because of the desperate financial circumstances, the Philharmonic offered Theodore Thomas the conductorship without conditions, and he began conducting the orchestra in the autumn of 1877. With the exception of the 1878/79 season – when he was in Cincinnati and Adolph Neuendorff led the group – Thomas conducted every season for fourteen years, vastly improving the orchestra’s financial health while creating a polished and virtuosic ensemble. He left in 1891 to found the Chicago Symphony, taking thirteen Philharmonic musicians with him.

    Another celebrated conductor, Anton Seidl, followed Thomas on the Philharmonic podium, serving until 1898. Seidl, who had served as Wagner’s assistant, was a renowned conductor of the composer’s works; Seidl’s romantic interpretations inspired both adulation and controversy. During his tenure, the Philharmonic enjoyed a period of unprecedented success and prosperity and performed its first world premiere written by a world-renowned composer in the United States – Antonín Dvořák’s Ninth Symphony From the New World. Seidl’s sudden death in 1898 from food poisoning at the age of 47 was widely mourned. Twelve thousand people applied for tickets to his funeral at the Metropolitan Opera House at 39th Street and Broadway and the streets were jammed for blocks with a “surging mass” of his admirers.

    According to Joseph Horowitz, Seidl’s death was followed by “five unsuccessful seasons” under Emil Paur [music director from 1898 to 1902] and Walter Damrosch [who served for only one season, 1902/03].” After this, he says, for several seasons [1903–1906] the orchestra employed guest conductors, including Victor Herbert, Édouard Colonne, Willem Mengelberg, Fritz Steinbach, Richard Strauss, Felix Weingartner, and Henry Wood.

    In 1909, to ensure the financial stability of the Philharmonic, a group of wealthy New Yorkers led by two women, Mary Seney Sheldon and Minnie Untermyer, formed the Guarantors Committee and changed the Orchestra’s organization from a musician-operated cooperative to a corporate management structure. The Guarantors were responsible for bringing Gustav Mahler to the Philharmonic as principal conductor and expanding the season from 18 concerts to 54, which included a tour of New England. The Philharmonic was the only symphonic orchestra where Mahler worked as music director without any opera responsibilities, freeing him to explore the symphonic literature more deeply. In New York, he conducted several works for the first time in his career and introduced audiences to his own compositions. Under Mahler, a controversial figure both as a composer and conductor, the season expanded, musicians’ salaries were guaranteed, the scope of operations broadened, and the 20th-century orchestra was created.

    In 1911 Mahler died unexpectedly, and the Philharmonic appointed Josef Stránský as his replacement. Many commentators were surprised by the choice of Stránský, whom they did not see as a worthy successor to Mahler. Stránský led all of the orchestra’s concerts until 1920, and also made the first recordings with the orchestra in 1917.

    In 1921 the Philharmonic merged with New York’s National Symphony Orchestra (no relation to the present Washington, D.C. ensemble). With this merger it also acquired the imposing Dutch conductor Willem Mengelberg. For the 1922/23 season Stránský and Mengelberg shared the conducting duties, but Stránský left after the one shared season. For nine years Mengelberg dominated the scene, although other conductors, among them Bruno Walter, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Igor Stravinsky, and Arturo Toscanini, led about half of each season’s concerts. During this period, the Philharmonic became one of the first American orchestras to boast an outdoor symphony series when it began playing low-priced summer concerts at Lewisohn Stadium in upper Manhattan. In 1920 the orchestra hired Henry Hadley as “associate conductor” given specific responsibility for the “Americanization” of the orchestra: each of Hadley’s concerts featured at least one work by an American-born composer.

    In 1924, the Young People’s Concerts were expanded into a substantial series of children’s concerts under the direction of American pianist-composer-conductor Ernest Schelling. This series became the prototype for concerts of its kind around the country and grew by popular demand to 15 concerts per season by the end of the decade.

    Mengelberg and Toscanini both led the Philharmonic in recording sessions for the Victor Talking Machine Company and Brunswick Records, initially in a recording studio (for the acoustically-recorded Victors, all under Mengelberg) and eventually in Carnegie Hall as electrical recording was developed. All of the early electrical recordings for Victor were made with a single microphone, usually placed near or above the conductor, a process Victor called “Orthophonic”; the Brunswick electricals used the company’s proprietary non-microphone “Light-Ray” selenium-cell system, which was much more prone to sonic distortion than Victor’s. Mengelberg’s first records for Victor were acousticals made in 1922; Toscanini’s recordings with the Philharmonic actually began with a single disc for Brunswick in 1926, recorded in a rehearsal hall at Carnegie Hall. Mengelberg’s most successful recording with the Philharmonic was a 1927 performance in Carnegie Hall of Richard Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben. Additional Toscanini recordings with the Philharmonic, all for Victor, took place on Carnegie Hall’s stage in 1929 and 1936. By the 1936 sessions Victor, now owned by RCA, began to experiment with multiple microphones to achieve more comprehensive reproductions of the orchestra.

    The year 1928 marked the New York Philharmonic’s last and most important merger: with the New York Symphony Society. The Symphony had been quite innovative in its 50 years prior to the merger. It made its first domestic tour in 1882, introduced educational concerts for young people in 1891, and gave the premieres of works such as Gershwin’s Concerto in F and Holst’s Egdon Heath. The merger of these two venerable institutions consolidated extraordinary financial and musical resources. Of the new Philharmonic Symphony Society of New York, Clarence Hungerford Mackay, chairman of the Philharmonic Society, will be chairman. President Harry H. Flagler, of the Symphony Society, will be president of the merger. At the first joint board meeting in 1928, the chairman, Clarence Mackay, expressed the opinion that “with the forces of the two Societies now united… the Philharmonic-Symphony Society could build up the greatest orchestra in this country if not in the world.”

    Of course, the merger had ramifications for the musicians of both orchestras. Winthrop Sargeant, a violinist with the Symphony Society and later a writer for The New Yorker, recalled the merger as “a sort of surgical operation in which twenty musicians were removed from the Philharmonic and their places taken by a small surviving band of twenty legionnaires from the New York Symphony”. This operation was performed by Arturo Toscanini himself. Fifty-seventh Street wallowed in panic and recrimination.” Toscanini, who had guest-conducted for several seasons, became the sole conductor and in 1930 led the group on a European tour that brought immediate international fame to the orchestra. Toscanini remained music director until the spring of 1936, then returned several times as a guest conductor until 1945.

    That same year nationwide radio broadcasts began. The orchestra was first heard on CBS directly from Carnegie Hall. To broadcast the Sunday afternoon concerts, CBS paid $15,000 for the entire season. The radio broadcasts continued without interruption for 38 years. A legend in his own time, Toscanini would prove to be a tough act to follow as the country headed into war.

    After an unsuccessful attempt to hire the German conductor, Wilhelm Furtwängler, the English conductor John Barbirolli and the Polish conductor Artur Rodziński were joint replacements for Toscanini in 1936. The following year Barbirolli was given the full conductorship, a post he held until the spring of 1941. In December, 1942, Bruno Walter was offered the music directorship, but declined, citing his age (he was 67 years old).[20] In 1943, Rodziński, who had conducted the orchestra’s centennial concert at Carnegie Hall in the preceding year, was appointed Musical Director. He had also conducted the Sunday afternoon radio broadcast when CBS listeners around the country heard the announcer break in on Arthur Rubinstein’s performance of Brahms’s Second Piano Concerto to update them about the attack on Pearl Harbor. (The initial word of the attack was forwarded by CBS News Correspondent John Charles Daly on his own show before the Philharmonic broadcast.) Soon after the United States entered World War II, Aaron Copland wrote A Lincoln Portrait for the Philharmonic at the request of conductor Andre Kostelanetz as a tribute to and expression of the “magnificent spirit of our country.”

    Artur Rodziński, Bruno Walter, and Sir Thomas Beecham made a series of recordings with the Philharmonic for Columbia Records during the 1940s. Many of the sessions were held in Liederkranz Hall, on East 58th Street in New York City, a building formerly belonging to a German cultural and musical society, and used as a recording studio by Columbia Records. Sony Records later digitally remastered the Beecham recordings for reissue on CD.

    In February, 1947, Artur Rodziński resigned; Bruno Walter was once again approached, and this time he accepted the position but only if the title was reduced to “Music Adviser”; he resigned in 1949. Leopold Stokowski and Dimitri Mitropoulos were appointed co-principal conductors in 1949, with Mitropoulos becoming Musical Director in 1951. Mitropoulos, known for championing new composers and obscure operas-in-concert, pioneered in other ways; adding live Philharmonic performances between movies at the Roxy Theatre and taking Edward R. Murrow and the See It Now television audience on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Orchestra. Mitropoulos made a series of recordings for Columbia Records, mostly in mono; near the end of his tenure, he recorded excerpts from Prokofiev’s ballet Romeo and Juliet in stereo. In 1957, Mitropoulos and Leonard Bernstein served together as Principal Conductors until, in the course of the season, Bernstein was appointed Music Director, becoming the first American-born-and-trained conductor to head the Philharmonic.

    Leonard Bernstein, who had made his historic, unrehearsed and spectacularly successful debut with the Philharmonic in 1943, was Music Director for 11 seasons, a time of significant change and growth. Two television series were initiated on CBS: the Young People’s Concerts and Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic. The former program, launched in 1958, made television history, winning every award in the field of educational television. Bernstein continued the orchestra’s recordings with Columbia Records until he retired as Music Director in 1969. Although Bernstein made a few recordings for Columbia after 1969, most of his later recordings were for Deutsche Grammophon. Sony has digitally remastered Bernstein’s numerous Columbia recordings and released them on CD as a part of its extensive Bernstein Century series. Although the Philharmonic performed primarily in Carnegie Hall until 1962, Bernstein preferred to record in the Manhattan Center. His later recordings were made in Philharmonic Hall. In 1960, the centennial of the birth of Gustav Mahler, Bernstein and the Philharmonic began a historic cycle of recordings of eight of Mahler’s nine symphonies for Columbia Records. (Symphony No. 8 was recorded by Bernstein with the London Symphony.) In 1962 Bernstein caused controversy with his comments before a performance by Glenn Gould of the First Piano Concerto of Johannes Brahms.

    Bernstein, a lifelong advocate of living composers, oversaw the beginning of the Orchestra’s largest commissioning project, resulting in the creation of 109 new works for orchestra. In September 1962, the Philharmonic commissioned Aaron Copland to write a new work, Connotations for Orchestra, for the opening concert of the new Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. The move to Philharmonic Hall in Lincoln Center brought about an expansion of concerts into the spring and summer. Among the many series that have taken place during the off-season have been the French-American and Stravinsky Festivals (1960s), Pierre Boulez’s “Rug Concerts” in the 1970s, and composer, Jacob Druckman’s Horizon’s Festivals in the 1980s.

    In 1971, Pierre Boulez became the first Frenchman to hold the post of Philharmonic Music Director. Boulez’s years with the Orchestra were notable for expanded repertoire and innovative concert approaches, such as the Prospective Encounters which explored new works along with the composer in alternative venues. During his tenure, the Philharmonic inaugurated the Live From Lincoln Center television series in 1976, and the Orchestra continues to appear on the Emmy Award-winning program to the present day. Boulez made a series of quadraphonic recordings for Columbia, including an extensive series of the orchestral music of Maurice Ravel.

    Members of the New York Philharmonic string section are heard on the 1971 John Lennon album Imagine, credited as The Flux Fiddlers.

    Zubin Mehta, then one of the youngest of a new generation of internationally known conductors, became Music Director in 1978. His tenure was the longest in Philharmonic history, lasting until 1991. Throughout his time on the podium, Mehta showed a strong commitment to contemporary music, presenting 52 works for the first time. In 1980 the Philharmonic, always known as a touring orchestra, embarked on a European tour marking the 50th anniversary of Toscanini’s trip to Europe.

    Kurt Masur, who had been conducting the Philharmonic frequently since his debut in 1981, became Music Director in 1991. Notable aspects of his tenure included a series of free Memorial Day Concerts at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and annual concert tours abroad, including the orchestra’s first trip to mainland China. He presided over the 150th Anniversary celebrations during the 1992–1993 season. His tenure concluded in 2002, and he was named Music Director Emeritus of the Philharmonic.

    In 2000, Lorin Maazel made a guest-conducting appearance with the New York Philharmonic in two weeks of subscription concerts after an absence of over twenty years, which was met with a positive reaction from the orchestra musicians. This engagement led to his appointment in January 2001 as the orchestra’s next Music Director. He assumed the post in September 2002, 60 years after making his debut with the Orchestra at the age of twelve at Lewisohn Stadium. In his first subscription week he led the world premiere of John Adams’ On the Transmigration of Souls commissioned in memory of those who died on September 11, 2001. Maazel concluded his tenure as the Philharmonic’s Music Director at the end of the 2008/09 season.

    In 2003, due to ongoing concerns with the acoustics of Avery Fisher Hall, there was a proposal to move the New York Philharmonic back to Carnegie Hall and merge the two organizations, but this proposal did not come to fruition. On May 5, 2010, the New York Philharmonic performed its 15,000th concert, a milestone unmatched by any other symphony orchestra in the world.

    On July 18, 2007, the Philharmonic named Alan Gilbert as its next music director, effective with the 2009/10 season, with an initial contract of five years. In October 2012, the orchestra extended Gilbert’s contract through the 2016/17 season. In February 2015, the orchestra announced the scheduled conclusion of Gilbert’s tenure its music director after the close of the 2016/17 season.

    In January 2016, the orchestra announced the appointment of Jaap van Zweden as its next Music Director, effective with the 2018/19 season, with an initial contract of five years. van Zweden is scheduled to serve as Music Director Designate for the 2017/18 season.

    The current president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the orchestra is Deborah Borda. Borda had previously held the same posts, as well as the post of managing director, with the orchestra.
    (So, Wikipedia)

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:51 PM on October 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Classical Music, Garlands for Steven Stucky, ,   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Garlands for Steven Stucky” 

    New Music USA


    From NEWMUSICBOX

    1

    Steven Stucky by Hoebermann Studio-Courtesy of the artist

    After the passing of Steven Stucky on Valentine’s Day of 2016, Christopher Rouse, Steve’s friend of 40 years, wrote on this website:

    “I don’t think I’m alone in seeing Steve as the sort of person we all wish we were. Even had he lacked the musical genius he did in fact possess, his way of living his life and treating all with kindness and respect would have been a model worth emulating for anyone. Loved by so many, we have lost not only a great composer, but the dearest of friends. I wonder how we will be able to go on without him.”

    Steve died much too soon—and for so many of us, unacceptably—at the age of 66. His unusually aggressive brain cancer had been diagnosed only three months earlier.

    I met Steve in 1988 upon his arrival at the Los Angeles Philharmonic, where I had been working steadily as an “extra” alongside the redoubtable principal keyboard player, Zita Carno. Steve’s tenure there as resident composer and new music advisor lasted for 21 years, the longest such affiliation between a composer and an American orchestra. I was a frequent participant during most of those years in much of the new music programming for the LA Phil’s orchestral series and Green Umbrella concerts. Steve, having largely determined much of that programming, was present at every rehearsal, always exuding his special combination of bemused, gracious, self-deprecating erudition. Over time we became friends, and his interests became my interests. As the foremost authority on the music of Witold Lutosławski, he was my guiding light as I prepared my CD Piano Music of Salonen, Stucky, and Lutosławski. The 2009 Grammy Award bestowed on me for that recording is an honor that I owe in no small part to Steve.

    The day after Steve died, Deborah Borda, then-President of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, phoned to tell me about an April tribute concert already being organized by the Philharmonic. Several of Steve’s friends and former students were being invited to write short piano pieces (one or two minutes each) in Steve’s memory, and she asked me to organize the pianists. There would ultimately be six works, by Fang Man, Anders Hillborg, Magnus Lindberg, James Matheson, Joseph Phibbs, and Esa-Pekka Salonen, interspersed with music by Steve and Lutosławski. The pianists, all associated with Piano Spheres, Los Angeles’ piano series devoted to new music, would be, respectively, Mark Robson, Susan Svrček, Steven Vanhauwaert, Nic Gerpe, Vicki Ray, and myself.

    Following the announcement of the upcoming program, I heard from a few of Steve’s countless composer friends who were expressing a wish to dedicate a piano homage of their own. Though I was not empowered to add them to the Philharmonic’s program, I knew that I couldn’t ignore their heartfelt offers, that I would be in touch afterwards, and that this had the makings of a very good idea that would embody all the goodness that Steve had brought to so many of our lives. Later that spring I began inviting them and others to contribute additional pieces to the initial set of six for a collection that would be called Garlands for Steven Stucky. With the original six pieces having been such powerful declarations of love and friendship, and knowing how many more of Steve’s eminent, emotionally devastated friends and students would want to honor him similarly, I felt that a CD would be the necessary endgame. Unsurprisingly, my wish list of essential invitees, compiled with the help of Christopher Rouse, Donald Crockett, and Steve’s widow, Kristen Stucky, grew very, very long. I had to limit the number to just 24 more composers who then wrote their hearts out to honor Steve in the way they do best.

    The Garlands

    Julia Adolphe: Snowprints
    Julian Anderson: Capriccio
    Charles Bodman Rae: Steven Stucky in memoriam
    Chen Yi: In Memory of Steve
    Louis Chiappetta: This is no less curious
    Donald Crockett: Nella Luce
    Brett Dean: Hommage à Lutosławski
    Fang Man: That raindrops have hastened the falling flowers: in memory of Steven Stucky
    Gabriela Frank: Harawi-cito de charanguista ciego
    Daniel S. Godfrey: Glas
    John Harbison: Waltz
    Anders Hillborg: Just a Minute
    Pierre Jalbert: Inscription
    Jesse Jones: Reverie
    William Kraft: Music for Gloria (In Memoriam Steven Stucky)
    Hannah Lash: November
    David Lefkowitz: In Memoriam: Steven Stucky
    Magnus Lindberg: Fratello
    David Liptak: Epitaph
    Steven Mackey: A Few Things, in memory of Steve
    James Matheson: CHAPTER I: In which our hero dies and encounters Palestrina, Brahms, Debussy, Ligeti, Lutosławski and other dead loves; looks out to see the entire universe before him, and prepares to visit all of the amazing shit therein
    Colin Matthews: some moths for Steve
    Harold Meltzer: Children’s Crusade
    Eric Nathan: In memoriam
    Joseph Phibbs: in memory of Steven Stucky
    Kay Rhie: Interlude
    Christopher Rouse: Muistomerkki
    Esa-Pekka Salonen: Iscrizione
    Michael Small: Debussy Window
    Stephen Andrew Taylor: Green Trees Are Bending
    Andrew Waggoner: …and Maura Brought Me Cookies (Remembering Steve)
    Judith Weir: Chorale, For Steve

    As the recording was shaping up to be a collective portrait of friendship, I invited two more of Steve’s trusted collaborators, Peabody Southwell (mezzo-soprano) and Carolyn Hove (oboe), to join me on the CD. Together, we close the recording with Steve’s Two Holy Sonnets of Donne (1982), based on John Donne’s defiant, mocking proclamations on the powerlessness of death.

    For the 32 composers, I imagine that it must have felt hardly possible to write a one- to two-minute piece that expressed all that they wanted to say about Steve. “How could I even begin to capture the depth and quiet intensity of this man?” asks Esa-Pekka Salonen in his liner note. For me, holding 32 such individual, deeply-felt relationships in my hands has been fulfilling beyond words. As reflections on Steve as a friend and teacher, the Garlands are by no means a compilation of mournful dirges. I note many cheery portrayals of him, such as in Julia Adolphe’s reimagining of his “giddy excitement” during composition lessons, Pierre Jalbert’s inclusion of a “fast rhythmic section (Steve’s wit and humor),” and Steven Mackey’s evocation of “the playful banter” that they shared. We also see Steve invoked several times in quotations of his music and of music that he loved, and in opening motives that seem to summon him with the pitches B-flat (si), E-flat (es), and G (sol), representing his initials.

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    Steven Stucky with Esa-Pekka Salonen and Gloria Cheng (photo by Carlos Rodriguez)

    Proceeds from our CD sales and royalties will be donated to the Steven Stucky Composer Fellowship Fund. The fund was established by the Los Angeles Philharmonic to honor Steve’s vision of engaging young composers in multi-year educational programs with the orchestra. The Composer Fellowship Program continues to flourish under Program Director Andrew Norman and Teaching Artist Sarah Gibson.

    4
    Garlands for Steven Stucky (Bridge 9509). Photo by Jeffrey Herman.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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