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  • richardmitnick 11:36 AM on December 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, , Larry Fuller Trio, Merry TubaChristmas, Messiaen: The Complete Vingt regards sur l'enfant-Jésus,   

    From Toledo Museum of Art: “Upcoming Music Performances at TMA” 

    From Toledo Museum of Art

    1
    FREE It’s Friday! Music
    Larry Fuller Trio
    Dec. 7: 6:30 p.m., GlasSalon
    Toledo native Larry Fuller returns to town with his piano trio for an evening of jazz in the GlasSalon.

    Check out the Larry Fuller Trio performing their song “Mojo”.

    2
    FREE Merry TubaChristmas
    Dec. 9: 1 p.m., Peristyle Theater
    TubaChristmas is a music concert held in cities worldwide that celebrates those who play, teach and compose music for instruments in the tuba family. Merry TubaChristmas is presented by The University of Toledo Department of Music & Toledo Museum of Art.

    3
    Great Performances:
    Messiaen: The Complete Vingt regards sur l’enfant-Jésus
    Dec. 9: 2 p.m., GlasSalon
    Organized by pianist Isabelle O’Connell (Grand Band), this concert features O’Connell, Blair McMillen, Laura Melton, and Stephanie Titus performing Olivier Messiaen’s complete Vingt regards sur l’enfant-Jésus, a two-hour, 20 movement work that Messiaen completed in 1944.
    Purchase Tickets

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Since its founding in 1901, the Toledo Museum of Art has earned a global reputation for the quality of our collection, our innovative and extensive education programs, and our architecturally significant campus.
    And thanks to the benevolence of its founders, as well as the continued support of its members, TMA remains a privately endowed, non-profit institution and opens its collection to the public, free of charge.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 10:06 AM on December 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Anja Lechner: violoncello Pablo Márquez: guitar, Classical Music, , Kim Kashkashian-viola, Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen: violin; Frederik Øland: violin; Asbjørn Nørgaard: viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin: violoncello,   

    From ECM: “OUT NOW ON ECM NEW SERIES” 

    New from From ECM

    From ECM which might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    12.3.18

    1
    Listen/Buy
    Franz Schubert
    Die Nacht
    Anja Lechner: violoncello Pablo Márquez: guitar

    Since 2003 this duo has been exploring the most diverse repertoire and modes of expression in their concerts. For their first album, a conceptual context is provided by the music of Franz Schubert, many of whose songs were published in alternative versions with guitar during the composer’s lifetime. Interspersed on the recording, as an echo and commentary to his spirit and language, are the graceful Trois Nocturnes originally written for cello and guitar by Friedrich Burgmüller (1806-1874).

    2
    Listen/Buy
    Till Fellner
    In Concert
    Beethoven and Liszt
    Till Fellner: piano
    Speaking to the New York Times in 2007, Alfred Brendel said of fellow pianist Till Fellner: “It has impressed me how ambitiously he has developed his repertory, being equally at home in solo and concerto repertoire, chamber music and lieder… “ Fellner’s insightful playing of Liszt is paired here with a concert recording of Beethoven’s Sonata No 32, recorded in 2010, the year in which ECM released Fellner’s interpretation of Beethoven’s Piano Concertos Nos 4 and 5 to a chorus of critical acclaim.

    3
    Listen/Buy

    Kim Kashkashian
    J.S. Bach
    Six Suites for Viola Solo BWV 1007-1012

    Kim Kashkashian: viola

    The poetry and radiance of Bach’s cello suites are transfigured in these remarkable interpretations by Kim Kashkashian on viola, offering “a different kind of somberness, a different kind of dazzlement” as annotator Paul Griffiths observes. One of the most compelling performers of classical and new music, Grammy-winning Kashkashian is hailed as “an artist who combines a probing, restless musical intellect with enormous beauty of tone”, and she brings to Bach revelatory commitment and intensity.

    4
    Listen/Buy

    Danish String Quartet
    Prism 1: Beethoven, Shostakovich, Bach

    Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen: violin; Frederik Øland: violin; Asbjørn Nørgaard: viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin: violoncello

    The prize-winning quartet – “one of the best quartets before the public today” (Washington Post) – inaugurates a series of five albums with the overarching title of Prism, in which the group will present one of Beethoven’s late string quartets in the context of a related fugue by J.S. Bach as well as a linked masterwork from the modern quartet literature. “We hope the listener will join us in the wonder of these beams of music that travel all the way from Bach through Beethoven to our own times.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:20 PM on November 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Classical Music, , , L.A. Philharmonic, , No classical institution in the world rivals the L.A. Phil in breadth of vision   

    From The Rest is Noise: “The Radical Splendor of the L.A. Phil” 

    From The Rest is Noise

    Alex Ross, by E.H Jan 17th 2013

    November 26, 2018 Issue

    1
    Susanna Mälkki, the principal guest conductor, plays a formidable role. Illustration by Mikkel Sommer

    Season of the Century” is the slogan that the Los Angeles Philharmonic is using to tout its centennial season. The phrase is emblazoned on a sign outside Disney Hall and on street banners across the city. The double meaning is apparent: not only is this season intended to celebrate the orchestra’s past hundred years; it aims to make history itself. Ordinarily, such marketing effusions don’t withstand scrutiny, but the L.A. Phil’s 2018-19 season invites superlatives. The ensemble has commissioned pieces from more than fifty composers, ranging from such venerable figures as Philip Glass and Steve Reich to young radicals on the fringes. It is launching a slew of theatrical events and collaborations with pop and jazz artists. It is honoring African-American traditions and exploring the experimental legacy of the Fluxus movement. Gustavo Dudamel, the orchestra’s music director, is leading new works by John Adams and Thomas Adès. Esa-Pekka Salonen, the orchestra’s previous director, is presenting a nine-day Stravinsky festival. Meredith Monk’s opera “ATLAS,” from 1991, will receive a long-awaited revival. And so on. No classical institution in the world rivals the L.A. Phil in breadth of vision.

    Conductor Gustavo Dudamel (Los Angeles Times)

    Esa-Pekka Salonen MulPix.com

    Two months in, the centennial program has already brought three fairly staggering events, any one of which would have counted as the highlight of an ordinary season. First was the première of Andrew Norman’s “Sustain,” a forty-minute, single-movement piece that may become a modern American classic. Dudamel introduced it on a program that included Beethoven’s Triple Concerto and Salonen’s “LA Variations.” In an inversion of the usual orchestral priorities, the Norman came last, and elicited the most excitement. In Los Angeles, decades of promotion of living composers have eroded the skepticism that so often greets new music.

    Norman, who is thirty-nine and lives in L.A., made his name as a composer of kinetic, frenetic music that mirrors the distracted habits of the digital age. The outer movements of “Play,” a three-part symphonic work that Dudamel conducted at the Phil in 2016, evoke the ricocheting, try-and-try-again tempo of video games. Having mined that vein enough, Norman slows things down in “Sustain.” The opening pages of the score consist largely of gorgeous smears of string sound, hypnotically gliding from one instrument to the next. These ethereal atmospheres turn hazy and rough, then give way to intertwining vines of melody in the winds. Rapid-fire patterns course through the orchestra, first chattering and then hammering. That energy subsides into near-silence, with strings producing whispers of tone rather than clear pitches. The sequence undergoes a series of repetitions, with deviations, disruptions, and accelerations. The final iteration ends in glorious chaos: the conductor cedes control, the players fall into an ad-libitum frenzy, and percussionists scrape slabs of plywood. The score is punctuated by a kind of signal: two pianos, tuned a quarter tone apart, arpeggiating upward into silence. With that gesture, the piece also ends.

    Norman has always been a deft orchestrator, but in “Sustain” he reveals himself as a magician of the art. He has spent enough time in Disney Hall that he understands its secret resonances: I was often unsure whether I was hearing tones or overtones, pitches or their ghosts. Even the heaviest textures have an immaterial glow—a counterpart to Frank Gehry’s whorling architecture, which Norman has studied closely. Above all, the composer succeeds in maintaining tension and cohesion across a huge span—“one long unbroken musical thought,” as he writes in his notes. It is thrilling to see a composer tackling a big canvas with such confidence and skill. It is no less thrilling to see a composer being given the opportunity to do so. The orchestra performed expertly and fervently under Dudamel’s direction.

    When I returned two weeks later, the L.A. Phil was playing Prokofiev’s ballet “Romeo and Juliet,” again with Dudamel on the podium. His full-throttle, rhythmically vital interpretation would have been enough to hold the attention, but Benjamin Millepied was on hand to choreograph select scenes, working with performers from the L.A. Dance Project. When a large orchestra occupies Disney’s stage, there is little room for dancers. So Millepied had the idea of sending them into spaces elsewhere in the Gehry complex and following them with a video camera. Images were streamed on a screen in the auditorium. Romeo killed Tybalt in the orchestra’s administrative offices, next to a filing cabinet. The Balcony Scene took place in Disney’s outdoor garden. The crypt scenes were set in an industrial-looking room below the stage. Millepied, holding the camera, was effectively dancing with his performers, weaving around them or running after them.

    The choreographer made a point of casting the lead roles in unconventional fashion. Each night, a different pair performed: first, an interracial straight couple; then two women; and, finally, two men. I saw the last duo, Aaron Carr and Mario Gonzalez. The dance scenes were not only dazzling to the eyes but also wrenchingly expressive: balletic moves alternated with naturalistic gestures of ardor or sorrow. As Prokofiev’s love music was reaching its peak, Carr and Gonzalez lay side by side in the garden, looking up into orchid and coral trees. I found myself wishing that more of the score had been choreographed—Millepied will eventually make a full-length film in this style—but the impact was all the greater for being interspersed with purely orchestral surges of passion and lament.

    Come early November, the L.A. Phil was dividing its attention between two radically different presentations: a staging of portions of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest,” with Sibelius’s incidental music as accompaniment; and John Cage’s “Europeras 1 and 2,” a chance-controlled collage of familiar operatic arias and orchestral parts. The instigator of the latter was Yuval Sharon, the L.A.-based director and the founder of the indie opera company the Industry, which, three years ago, presented the opera “Hopscotch” in locations across the city. The venue for “Europeras,” a co-production of the Industry and the L.A. Phil, was a spacious soundstage at Sony Studios. Sharon and his collaborators repurposed old film props—hand-painted backdrops, B-movie costumes, and the like—to create visual counterpoints to Cage’s operatic kaleidoscope. Thus we saw an Asiatic warrior singing “Non più andrai,” from “The Marriage of Figaro”; an astronaut in a hospital bed belting Wagner’s Song to the Evening Star; and a chef, on skis, essaying “Now the Great Bear and Pleiades,” from “Peter Grimes.”

    The orchestra, meanwhile, tootled unrelated instrumental parts; lighting changed at random; and the backdrops, going up and down on squeaky pulleys, added inapt settings. An excellent cast of singers performed heroically under taxing conditions. Babatunde Akinboboye, for example, gave a secure rendition of the Toreador’s Song while dressed as an infomercial host demonstrating hair-care products. A spirit of joyous absurdity reigned, yet the show had a poignant undertow. Attempting to sing one’s song above the din is a general condition these days.

    Sibelius wrote music for “The Tempest” in the mid-nineteen-twenties, toward the end of his mysteriously abbreviated composing career. The L.A. Phil, under the baton of Susanna Mälkki, its principal guest conductor, gave a brilliant account of the score, but the staging failed to do justice to Sibelius’s mercurially shifting moods, which range from kitschy sweetness to explosions of dissonance. The director was Barry Edelstein, who brought with him actors from the Old Globe theatre in San Diego, and their overmiked voices dominated the sound picture, pushing the orchestra and assisting vocal forces into the background. Still, the production unfolded with the smoothness of a long-running show—this in a week when the orchestra was mounting an equally complex spectacle across town.

    The L.A. Phil’s offbeat ventures are well and good, you sometimes hear people in the classical world mutter, but how’s its Beethoven? Isn’t the programming better than the playing? That put-down is unconvincing: an organization that can bring “Sustain” into the world is more valuable than one that executes yet another hyper-polished Beethoven Seventh. Still, the L.A. Phil has sometimes come up short in mainstream repertory, lagging behind the Cleveland Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, or the best European groups.

    A raft of new players have added depth to the ensemble. Ramón Ortega, who started as principal oboe this season, has a characterful, pungent timbre and arresting phrasing. His Old World style complements the purer, silkier styles of the clarinettist Boris Allakhverdyan and the flutist Denis Bouriakov, both of them recent additions to the ranks. In the brass, Andrew Bain, the principal horn, and Thomas Hooten, the principal trumpet, have solidified a section that was erratic a decade ago. In the strings, Dudamel has pressed for a fuller, richer sound.

    Before “The Tempest,” Mälkki led a virtuosic, vibrant performance of Mahler’s Fifth Symphony. She is best known for her advocacy of new music—she conducted Kaija Saariaho’s “L’Amour de Loin” at the Met in 2016—but she has quietly emerged as a formidable interpreter of the Romantic and early-modern repertory. Last season at the L.A. Phil, she made Strauss’s “Alpine Symphony” sound like a towering masterpiece, which it is not. Her Mahler felt less like a moment-to-moment drama than like a vast landscape undergoing spectacular geological upheavals. The L.A. players’ immersion in new music, far from hindering their work in standard repertory, surely helped them to deliver a fresh account of a familiar score; before intermission, they had given the première of Reich’s Music for Ensemble and Orchestra, a vista of shimmering desert stillness. If the orchestra has a future, it is here.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century is a voyage into the labyrinth of modern music, which remains an obscure world for most people. While paintings of Picasso and Jackson Pollock sell for a hundred million dollars or more, and lines from T. S. Eliot are quoted on the yearbook pages of alienated teenagers across the land, twentieth-century classical music still sends ripples of unease through audiences. At the same time, its influence can be felt everywhere. Atonal chords crop up in jazz. Avant-garde sounds populate the soundtracks of Hollywood thrillers. Minimalism has had a huge effect on rock, pop, and dance music from the Velvet Underground onward.

    The Rest Is Noise shows why twentieth-century composers felt compelled to create a famously bewildering variety of sounds, from the purest beauty to the purest noise. It tells of a remarkable array of maverick personalities who resisted the cult of the classical past, struggled against the indifference of a wide public, and defied the will of dictators. Whether they have charmed audiences with sweet sounds or battered them with dissonance, composers have always been exuberantly of the present, defying the stereotype of classical music as a dying art. The narrative goes from Vienna before the First World War to Paris in the twenties, from Hitler’s Germany and Stalin’s Russia to downtown New York in the sixties and seventies. We follow the rise of mass culture and mass politics, of dramatic new technologies, of hot and cold wars, of experiments, revolutions, riots, and friendships forged and broken. The end result is not so much a history of twentieth-century music as a history of the twentieth century through its music.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:43 PM on November 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music,   

    From Toledo Museum of Art: Music at the Museum 

    From Toledo Museum of Art

    1
    Great Performances:
    Formosa Quartet with Solungga Liu
    Nov. 18: 3 p.m., Great Gallery, FREE
    This dynamic, young string quartet performs with pianist Solungga Liu of Bowling Green State University. The program includes Tchaikovsky’s Quartet No. 1 in D Major and Schnittke’s Piano Quintet. Great Performances is supported in part by the Dorothy MacKenzie Price Fund.

    2
    It’s Friday! Music:
    Larry Fuller Trio
    Dec. 7: 6:30 p.m., GlasSalon
    FREE
    This dynamic, young string quartet performs with pianist Solungga Liu of Bowling Green State University. The program includes Tchaikovsky’s Quartet No. 1 in D Major and Schnittke’s Piano Quintet. Great Performances is supported in part by the Dorothy MacKenzie Price Fund.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Since its founding in 1901, the Toledo Museum of Art has earned a global reputation for the quality of our collection, our innovative and extensive education programs, and our architecturally significant campus.
    And thanks to the benevolence of its founders, as well as the continued support of its members, TMA remains a privately endowed, non-profit institution and opens its collection to the public, free of charge.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:25 PM on November 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, David Krakauer Megan Schubert and Tomás Cruz, Judd Greenstein, , New chamber music, NOW Ensemble   

    From LPR: “NOW Ensemble Presents the Music of Judd Greenstein” 

    From LPR

    1

    with with special guests David Krakauer, Megan Schubert, and Tomás Cruz

    Wed November 28th, 2018 8:00PM

    Main Space
    Minimum Age: 18+
    Doors Open: 7:00PM
    Show Time: 8:00PM
    Event Ticket: $15 / $20
    Day of Show: $20 / $25
    Tickets

    NOW Ensemble Presents the Music of Judd Greenstein

    NOW Ensemble is a dynamic group of performers and composers dedicated to making new chamber music for the 21st century. With a unique instrumentation of flute, clarinet, electric guitar, double bass, and piano, the ensemble brings a fresh sound and a new perspective to the classical tradition, infused with the musical influences that reflect the diverse backgrounds of its members. Having recently celebrated ten years together as an ensemble, they have brought some of the most exciting composers of their generation to national and international recognition. In recent seasons, NOW has performed at Lincoln Center, the Apples and Olives Festival in Zurich, Switzerland, Town Hall Seattle, Da Camera Houston, and in Carnegie Hall’s Neighborhood Concert Series. From 2016-2018 they were the inaugural ensemble in residence at San Diego’s Art of Élan. Highlights of the 2018-19 season include a major collaboration with Sarasota Contemporary Dance, premieres of new works by composers Sean Friar and Michi Wiancko, and the recording of NOW Ensemble’s sixth album, due out by New Amsterdam Records in 2020.

    Judd Greenstein is a composer of structurally complex, viscerally engaging works for varied instrumentation. A passionate advocate for the independent new music community across the United States, much of Judd’s work is written for the virtuosic ensembles and solo performers who make up that community and is tailored to their specific talents and abilities.

    Judd’s philosophy as both a composer and a curator involves music that is an organic blend of multiple styles, sounds, and instruments, open to all influences. Standout groups that reflect this polyglot sensibility, including yMusic, Roomful of Teeth, and NOW Ensemble, all counted Judd among their earliest commissions and continue to perform his work to this day. As a national and international audience has taken notice of these and other like-minded artists, Judd has been increasingly in demand as a composer for the orchestra and the stage, with recent commissions from the Minnesota Orchestra, the Lucerne Festival, and the North Carolina Symphony, among many others. Recent projects attest to the diversity of Judd’s output: an orchestral song cycle for indie rock vocalist DM Stith, an opera about Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs, a ballet score for Isabella Boylston and choreographer Gemma Bond, and a flute concerto for Alex Sopp and the Knights. In 2020, Judd will be re-launching The Yehudim, an ensemble of singers, percussionists, keyboards and guitars that explores Biblical subjects through a contemporary lens.

    In addition to his work as a composer, Judd is active as a promoter of new music in New York and around the world. He is the co-director of New Amsterdam Records, an artists’ service organization that supports post-genre musicians in developing their most personal new projects. He is the curator of the Ecstatic Music Festival in New York’s Merkin Hall, an annual showcase of new collaborative concerts between artists from different musical worlds, and he is a founding member of NOW Ensemble, the composer/performer collective that develops new chamber music for their idiosyncratic instrumentation. He also co-curates the Apples & Olives festival in Zurich, Switzerland, helping to bring to Europe the post-genre ethos of the Ecstatic Music Festival and New Amsterdam.

    Judd has received degrees from Williams College, the Yale School of Music, and Princeton University, and has received Fellowships from the Tanglewood Music Center, the Bang on a Can Summer Institute, the Six Points Fellowship for Emerging Jewish Artists, and the Sundance New Frontier Story Lab.

    With special guests David Krakauer, Megan Schubert, and Tomás Cruz
    3
    Only a select few artists have the ability to convey their message to the back row, to galvanize an audience with a visceral power that connects on a universal level. David Krakauer is such an artist.

    Widely considered one of the greatest clarinetists on the planet, he has been praised internationally as a key innovator in modern klezmer as well as a major voice in classical music. In 2015 he received a Grammy nomination in the Chamber Music/Small Ensemble category as soloist with the conductorless orchestra A Far Cry, and a Juno nomination for the CD Akoka with cellist Matt Haimovitz.

    Over the past decade Krakauer has emerged as an electrifying symphonic soloist who brings his singular sound and powerful approach to the concert stage. He has appeared with the world’s finest orchestras including the Amsterdam Sinfonietta, Baltimore Symphony, Brooklyn Philharmonic, Detroit Symphony, the Weimar Staatskapelle, the Orchestre de Lyon, the Phoenix Symphony, the Dresdener Philharmonie, and the Seattle Symphony.

    Highlights of Krakauer’s lauded career include performances with the Kronos, Emerson, Tokyo, Orion, and Miro String Quartets; performing during the inaugural season of Carnegie Hall’s Zankel Hall with renowned jazz pianist Uri Caine; an eight-­year tenure with the Naumburg Award-­winning Aspen Wind Quintet tours and recordings with Abraham Inc which he co-­leads with Socalled and Fred Wesley and performing in the International Emmy Award-­winning BBC documentary Holocaust, A Music Memorial from Auschwitz.

    Krakauer’s discography contains some of the most important clarinet recordings of recent decades. Among them are The Dreams and Prayers of Isaac the Blind (Osvaldo Golijov and the Kronos Quartet/Nonesuch), which received the Diapason D’Or in France, The Twelve Tribes (Label Bleu) which was designated album of the year in the jazz category for the Preis der Deutschen Schallplattenkritik, and Paul Moravec’s Pulitzer Prize-winning composition Tempest Fantasy (Naxos). He has also recorded with violinist Itzhak Perlman/The Klezmatics (Angel) and Dawn Upshaw/Osvaldo Golijov (Deutsche Gramophon). His unique sound can be heard in Danny Elfman’s score for the Ang Lee film Taking Woodstock and throughout Sally Potter’s The Tango Lesson. New releases include his 2015 album Checkpoint with his band Ancestral Groove (Label Bleu), Paul Moravec’s Clarinet Concerto with The Boston Modern Orchestra Project (BMOP sound), and The Big Picture on his own label, Table Pounding Records in 2014.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings


    Stem Education Coalition

    (le) poisson rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    LPR

    LPR is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of LPR

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:56 PM on November 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Music for Ensemble and Orchestra", Classical Music, ,   

    From The New York Times: “Steve Reich Talks About His First Orchestral Work in 30 Years” 

    New York Times

    From The New York Times

    Nov. 7, 2018
    Joshua Barone

    Steve Reich by Chris Felver/ Getty Images


    The composer Steve Reich, whose Music for Ensemble and Orchestra recently had its premiere with the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

    The 82-year-old composer overcame his reservations to write Music for Ensemble and Orchestra.

    Until last week, Steve Reich hadn’t written for orchestra in over 30 years.

    It took a Bollywood movie and an open-minded commission, but he’s back: Music for Ensemble and Orchestra recently had its premiere here with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and will travel to the New York Philharmonic next fall. A recording from Nonesuch is also on the way.

    Los Angeles Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra by Mathew Imaging

    “I’m someone who writes for ensemble,” Mr. Reich, 82, said in an interview at his Los Angeles hotel over the weekend. He has been most acclaimed for intimate works like Music for 18 Musicians and Double Sextet, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 2009. His next premiere, a collaboration with the visual artist Gerhard Richter for the Shed in New York, is for 14 players.

    The last time he wrote for larger orchestral forces was in 1987, with Four Sections. In his return, Music for Ensemble and Orchestra, Mr. Reich has found a way to maintain his ensemble sensibility — the commission gave him the freedom to give the piece whatever form he wanted — while also paying homage to the Baroque concerto grosso and one of his favorite works, Bach’s Brandenberg Concerto No. 5.

    The five-movement new work is a sequel of sorts to Mr. Reich’s 2016 chamber piece Runner, whose rhythm was inspired by the music of a Bollywood film he watched with his wife, the artist Beryl Korot. Music for Ensemble and Orchestra retains much of that piece’s structure and adds a slight harmonic backdrop from the orchestra.

    A group of 20 soloists — including principal players and vibraphones, as well as two pianos that keep time throughout the piece — begin with propulsive 16th notes that recall the opening of Runner. At times, the cellos and basses have the texture of Baroque continuo accompaniment. But the most explicit tribute to Bach comes roughly five minutes in, when the first-violin soloist plays a scale reminiscent of the broken D major scale that opens the Fifth Brandenburg.

    “It’s my little tip of the hat,” Mr. Reich said.

    In the interview, he discussed his reservations about writing for orchestra and explained the relationship between Runner and his latest work. Here are edited excerpts.

    Why have you resisted writing for orchestra?

    I didn’t really have a desire. My experience with the orchestra goes back to the ’80s, with The Desert Music. And it was a disaster in Cologne. The musicians couldn’t play it, and Peter Eotvos, who was the conductor, at one point said, “What can I do?”

    Eventually it was done with Michael Tilson Thomas and the Brooklyn Philharmonic, with 36 hours of rehearsal and my people thrown in as ringers. And it was great. But I realized this was a freak situation; this is not how orchestras work.

    When I was thinking about this [new piece], I was at the L.A. Phil, and I started looking at the setup. They have the principal strings in a very tight horseshoe. And right behind, the principal winds. I thought: There’s my ensemble. Add some vibes, a couple of pianos, I’m home free. And I thought that if you give the orchestra a straightforward part, you can devote the rehearsal time to the principals.

    Even if the orchestral part were more complicated, I feel like your music comes more naturally to players these days. What changed?

    As a composer, time is on your side if you continue living. I’ve been fortunate in that the works have been performed frequently and recorded. A lot of people have heard a lot of my music, which makes it infinitely easier to deal with them. Eventually you’re not going to be around, so either the music is appreciated and will live, or it’s not. I think a lot of my ensemble pieces are.

    How do you feel about orchestral music as a listener?

    I don’t go to many orchestral concerts at all. There are those like Andrew Norman and John Adams — who is, in a sense, sui generis. I think John is the only person I can say confidently, “This man is writing music that will be in the orchestral literature in the future.” Whereas the ensemble, to me, is the center of musical life that I live in.

    Can you describe how Runner relates to Music for Ensemble and Orchestra?

    That’s a piece that I think I really, after Double Sextet, hit out of the park. And part of it was the structure. Five movements really worked for me. I do a lot of fast, slow, fast — me, Scarlatti and 500 other people! But five is more challenging, and I also thought, What if the tempo never changed, but the note values changed, and that’s how you set off movements?

    I thought, Gosh, this is really nice. This is such a great structure, I’m going to try it again. It’s the same ensemble, plus the string section and four trumpets. I was a little worried. Is it really better the second time, or is a whole lot worse? I tend to be a worrywart, to see only the bad. But I’m leaving here in a much more positive frame of mind.

    So will there be a Runner 3?

    No, no, no. Don’t push your luck.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:22 PM on November 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, Jennifer Koh, ,   

    Cedille Records: “NEW FROM JENNIFER KOH: SAARIAHO X KOH 

    Cedille Records

    1

    Longtime friends Jennifer Koh and Kaija Saariaho come together in their stunning new album Saariaho X Koh, showcasing compositions created by the visionary Finnish composer. The album features works such as Light and Matter, Tocar, and the violin concerto Graal théâtre, which initially sparked their creative relationship.

    Jennifer Koh dives deep into the visionary works of longtime friend and collaborator Kaija Saariaho in her new album Saariaho X Koh.

    Jennifer Koh

    Violinist Jennifer Koh Gears Up to Release Music by Kaija Saariaho from http://stringsmagazine.com

    Kaija Saariaho by Merrin Lazyan Mar 6, 2017 ·

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    About Us
    Our Nonprofit Mission

    Cedille Chicago, NFP is dedicated to bringing Chicago’s finest classical musicians to a worldwide audience by recording, distributing, and promoting their work. Through its high-quality recordings on the Cedille Records label, Cedille furthers the careers of outstanding Chicago classical performers and composers as they present innovative programs featuring the music about which they are most passionate.
    Our Future

    With our mission of widely disseminating recordings in mind, Cedille Chicago invests heavily in marketing and promotion of the recordings. Sales cover only a small fraction of our expenses. We rely on the generous contributions of classical music lovers to support the rest.

    For more than two decades, Cedille has worked tirelessly to fulfill its mission. Once a recording is in print, it will remain perpetually available. Unlike other record labels, we never delete recordings from our catalog. Each CD is intended as a permanent addition to the world’s catalog of classical music.

    With your support, we will continue recording and producing classical recordings of the highest quality featuring outstanding musicians from Chicago.

    How Cedille Came To Be

    In 1989, James Ginsburg founded Cedille Records, a recording company dedicated to making distinctive classical recordings featuring excellent Chicago-area musicians. Mr. Ginsburg’s vision for Cedille was to record local musicians performing important music overlooked by the major labels. After listening to tapes of pianist Dmitry Paperno’s on-air performances at 98.7 WFMT, Chicago’s classical music station, Jim Ginsburg actively and persuasively lobbied Paperno to record Cedille Records’ first album. The resulting project, Dmitry Paperno Plays Russian Piano Music, garnered favorable reviews from numerous critics.

    Cedille Records immediately filled an important niche as the only Chicago-based classical label and first since Mercury Living Presence in the 1950s.

    In 1994, Cedille Records became a not-for-profit record label under the umbrella of an operating foundation, now named Cedille Chicago. This change in structure gives Cedille Records the capacity to produce more noteworthy recordings and pursue larger and more ambitious projects.

    To this day, Cedille sustains its core vision, rarely recording mainstream classical masterworks, and only in the context of original programs by artists who have enlightening and distinctive interpretations. Cedille enters into agreements with artists on a project-by-project basis. Recording projects are artist driven; Cedille helps the artist refine the concept, making it a more valuable contribution to the artist’s discography and the wider catalog of recorded music, as well as of greater interest to the listening public.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:00 PM on November 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, Music for the holiday season,   

    From The New York Philharmonic: “Enjoy the sounds of the holiday season!” 


    From The New York Philharmonic

    1
    Enjoy the sounds of the holiday season! These fun, festive concerts are the perfect gift — treat yourself or your family or friends. We hope to see you over the holidays!

    2

    Handel’s Messiah

    Presented by Gary W. Parr

    “The trumpets made for a sizzling ‘Hallelujah.’” — The New York Times
    Dec 11–15
    Buy Tickets

    3

    Holiday Brass

    Experience the power, brilliance, and virtuosity of the New York Philharmonic Brass and Percussion — reunited with beloved former Principal Trumpet Philip Smith.
    Dec 16
    Buy Tickets

    New Year’s Eve with Renée Fleming
    3
    Ring in the New Year with beloved soprano Renée Fleming, the New York Philharmonic, and Music Director Jaap van Zweden.
    Dec 31
    Tickets

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    New York Philharmonic by Chris Lee


    Founded in 1842, The New York Philharmonicis the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States. Read a complete historical overview, visit the New York Philharmonic Leon Levy Digital Archives, or explore our history below.

    The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc.,globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra (NYPO) or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra based in New York City in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the “Big Five”. The Philharmonic’s home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York’s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

    Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the “Big Five” orchestras. Its record-setting 14,000th concert was given in December 2004.

    The New York Philharmonic was founded in 1842 by the American conductor Ureli Corelli Hill, with the aid of the Irish composer William Vincent Wallace. The orchestra was then called the Philharmonic Society of New York. It was the third Philharmonic on American soil since 1799, and had as its intended purpose, “the advancement of instrumental music.” The first concert of the Philharmonic Society took place on December 7, 1842 in the Apollo Rooms on lower Broadway before an audience of 600. The concert opened with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, led by Hill himself. Two other conductors, German-born Henry Christian Timm and French-born Denis Etienne, led parts of the eclectic, three-hour program, which included chamber music and several operatic selections with a leading singer of the day, as was the custom. The musicians operated as a cooperative society, deciding by a majority vote such issues as who would become a member, which music would be performed and who among them would conduct. At the end of the season, the players would divide any proceeds among themselves.

    After only a dozen public performances and barely four years old, the Philharmonic organized a concert to raise funds to build a new music hall. The centerpiece was the American premiere of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, to take place at Castle Garden on the southern tip of Manhattan. About 400 instrumental and vocal performers gathered for this premiere, which was conducted by George Loder. The chorals were translated into what would be the first English performance anywhere in the world. However, with the expensive US$2.00 ticket price and a war rally uptown, the hoped-for audience was kept away and the new hall would have to wait. Although judged by some as an odd work with all those singers kept at bay until the end, the Ninth soon became the work performed most often when a grand gesture was required.

    During the Philharmonic’s first seven seasons, seven musicians alternated the conducting duties. In addition to Hill, Timm and Étienne, these were William Alpers, George Loder, Louis Wiegers and Alfred Boucher. This changed in 1849 when Theodore Eisfeld was installed as sole conductor for the season. Eisfeld, later along with Carl Bergmann, would be the conductor until 1865. That year, Eisfeld conducted the Orchestra’s memorial concert for the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln, but in a peculiar turn of events which were criticized in the New York press, the Philharmonic omitted the last movement, Ode to Joy, as being inappropriate for the occasion. That year Eisfeld returned to Europe, and Bergmann continued to conduct the Society until his death in 1876.

    Leopold Damrosch, Franz Liszt’s former concertmaster at Weimar, served as conductor of the Philharmonic for the 1876/77 season. But failing to win support from the Philharmonic’s public, he left to create the rival Symphony Society of New York in 1878. Upon his death in 1885, his 23-year-old son Walter took over and continued the competition with the old Philharmonic. It was Walter who would convince Andrew Carnegie that New York needed a first-class concert hall and on May 5, 1891, both Walter and Russian composer Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky conducted at the inaugural concert of the city’s new Music Hall, which in a few years would be renamed for its primary benefactor, Andrew Carnegie. Carnegie Hall would remain the orchestra’s home until 1962.

    The Philharmonic in 1877 was in desperate financial condition, caused by the paltry income from five concerts in the 1876/77 season that brought in an average of only $168 per concert. Representatives of the Philharmonic wished to attract the German-born, American-trained conductor Theodore Thomas, whose own Theodore Thomas Orchestra had competed directly with the Philharmonic for over a decade and which had brought him fame and great success. At first the Philharmonic’s suggestion offended Thomas because he was unwilling to disband his own orchestra. Because of the desperate financial circumstances, the Philharmonic offered Theodore Thomas the conductorship without conditions, and he began conducting the orchestra in the autumn of 1877. With the exception of the 1878/79 season – when he was in Cincinnati and Adolph Neuendorff led the group – Thomas conducted every season for fourteen years, vastly improving the orchestra’s financial health while creating a polished and virtuosic ensemble. He left in 1891 to found the Chicago Symphony, taking thirteen Philharmonic musicians with him.

    Another celebrated conductor, Anton Seidl, followed Thomas on the Philharmonic podium, serving until 1898. Seidl, who had served as Wagner’s assistant, was a renowned conductor of the composer’s works; Seidl’s romantic interpretations inspired both adulation and controversy. During his tenure, the Philharmonic enjoyed a period of unprecedented success and prosperity and performed its first world premiere written by a world-renowned composer in the United States – Antonín Dvořák’s Ninth Symphony From the New World. Seidl’s sudden death in 1898 from food poisoning at the age of 47 was widely mourned. Twelve thousand people applied for tickets to his funeral at the Metropolitan Opera House at 39th Street and Broadway and the streets were jammed for blocks with a “surging mass” of his admirers.

    According to Joseph Horowitz, Seidl’s death was followed by “five unsuccessful seasons” under Emil Paur [music director from 1898 to 1902] and Walter Damrosch [who served for only one season, 1902/03].” After this, he says, for several seasons [1903–1906] the orchestra employed guest conductors, including Victor Herbert, Édouard Colonne, Willem Mengelberg, Fritz Steinbach, Richard Strauss, Felix Weingartner, and Henry Wood.

    In 1909, to ensure the financial stability of the Philharmonic, a group of wealthy New Yorkers led by two women, Mary Seney Sheldon and Minnie Untermyer, formed the Guarantors Committee and changed the Orchestra’s organization from a musician-operated cooperative to a corporate management structure. The Guarantors were responsible for bringing Gustav Mahler to the Philharmonic as principal conductor and expanding the season from 18 concerts to 54, which included a tour of New England. The Philharmonic was the only symphonic orchestra where Mahler worked as music director without any opera responsibilities, freeing him to explore the symphonic literature more deeply. In New York, he conducted several works for the first time in his career and introduced audiences to his own compositions. Under Mahler, a controversial figure both as a composer and conductor, the season expanded, musicians’ salaries were guaranteed, the scope of operations broadened, and the 20th-century orchestra was created.

    In 1911 Mahler died unexpectedly, and the Philharmonic appointed Josef Stránský as his replacement. Many commentators were surprised by the choice of Stránský, whom they did not see as a worthy successor to Mahler. Stránský led all of the orchestra’s concerts until 1920, and also made the first recordings with the orchestra in 1917.

    In 1921 the Philharmonic merged with New York’s National Symphony Orchestra (no relation to the present Washington, D.C. ensemble). With this merger it also acquired the imposing Dutch conductor Willem Mengelberg. For the 1922/23 season Stránský and Mengelberg shared the conducting duties, but Stránský left after the one shared season. For nine years Mengelberg dominated the scene, although other conductors, among them Bruno Walter, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Igor Stravinsky, and Arturo Toscanini, led about half of each season’s concerts. During this period, the Philharmonic became one of the first American orchestras to boast an outdoor symphony series when it began playing low-priced summer concerts at Lewisohn Stadium in upper Manhattan. In 1920 the orchestra hired Henry Hadley as “associate conductor” given specific responsibility for the “Americanization” of the orchestra: each of Hadley’s concerts featured at least one work by an American-born composer.

    In 1924, the Young People’s Concerts were expanded into a substantial series of children’s concerts under the direction of American pianist-composer-conductor Ernest Schelling. This series became the prototype for concerts of its kind around the country and grew by popular demand to 15 concerts per season by the end of the decade.

    Mengelberg and Toscanini both led the Philharmonic in recording sessions for the Victor Talking Machine Company and Brunswick Records, initially in a recording studio (for the acoustically-recorded Victors, all under Mengelberg) and eventually in Carnegie Hall as electrical recording was developed. All of the early electrical recordings for Victor were made with a single microphone, usually placed near or above the conductor, a process Victor called “Orthophonic”; the Brunswick electricals used the company’s proprietary non-microphone “Light-Ray” selenium-cell system, which was much more prone to sonic distortion than Victor’s. Mengelberg’s first records for Victor were acousticals made in 1922; Toscanini’s recordings with the Philharmonic actually began with a single disc for Brunswick in 1926, recorded in a rehearsal hall at Carnegie Hall. Mengelberg’s most successful recording with the Philharmonic was a 1927 performance in Carnegie Hall of Richard Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben. Additional Toscanini recordings with the Philharmonic, all for Victor, took place on Carnegie Hall’s stage in 1929 and 1936. By the 1936 sessions Victor, now owned by RCA, began to experiment with multiple microphones to achieve more comprehensive reproductions of the orchestra.

    The year 1928 marked the New York Philharmonic’s last and most important merger: with the New York Symphony Society. The Symphony had been quite innovative in its 50 years prior to the merger. It made its first domestic tour in 1882, introduced educational concerts for young people in 1891, and gave the premieres of works such as Gershwin’s Concerto in F and Holst’s Egdon Heath. The merger of these two venerable institutions consolidated extraordinary financial and musical resources. Of the new Philharmonic Symphony Society of New York, Clarence Hungerford Mackay, chairman of the Philharmonic Society, will be chairman. President Harry H. Flagler, of the Symphony Society, will be president of the merger. At the first joint board meeting in 1928, the chairman, Clarence Mackay, expressed the opinion that “with the forces of the two Societies now united… the Philharmonic-Symphony Society could build up the greatest orchestra in this country if not in the world.”

    Of course, the merger had ramifications for the musicians of both orchestras. Winthrop Sargeant, a violinist with the Symphony Society and later a writer for The New Yorker, recalled the merger as “a sort of surgical operation in which twenty musicians were removed from the Philharmonic and their places taken by a small surviving band of twenty legionnaires from the New York Symphony”. This operation was performed by Arturo Toscanini himself. Fifty-seventh Street wallowed in panic and recrimination.” Toscanini, who had guest-conducted for several seasons, became the sole conductor and in 1930 led the group on a European tour that brought immediate international fame to the orchestra. Toscanini remained music director until the spring of 1936, then returned several times as a guest conductor until 1945.

    That same year nationwide radio broadcasts began. The orchestra was first heard on CBS directly from Carnegie Hall. To broadcast the Sunday afternoon concerts, CBS paid $15,000 for the entire season. The radio broadcasts continued without interruption for 38 years. A legend in his own time, Toscanini would prove to be a tough act to follow as the country headed into war.

    After an unsuccessful attempt to hire the German conductor, Wilhelm Furtwängler, the English conductor John Barbirolli and the Polish conductor Artur Rodziński were joint replacements for Toscanini in 1936. The following year Barbirolli was given the full conductorship, a post he held until the spring of 1941. In December, 1942, Bruno Walter was offered the music directorship, but declined, citing his age (he was 67 years old).[20] In 1943, Rodziński, who had conducted the orchestra’s centennial concert at Carnegie Hall in the preceding year, was appointed Musical Director. He had also conducted the Sunday afternoon radio broadcast when CBS listeners around the country heard the announcer break in on Arthur Rubinstein’s performance of Brahms’s Second Piano Concerto to update them about the attack on Pearl Harbor. (The initial word of the attack was forwarded by CBS News Correspondent John Charles Daly on his own show before the Philharmonic broadcast.) Soon after the United States entered World War II, Aaron Copland wrote A Lincoln Portrait for the Philharmonic at the request of conductor Andre Kostelanetz as a tribute to and expression of the “magnificent spirit of our country.”

    Artur Rodziński, Bruno Walter, and Sir Thomas Beecham made a series of recordings with the Philharmonic for Columbia Records during the 1940s. Many of the sessions were held in Liederkranz Hall, on East 58th Street in New York City, a building formerly belonging to a German cultural and musical society, and used as a recording studio by Columbia Records. Sony Records later digitally remastered the Beecham recordings for reissue on CD.

    In February, 1947, Artur Rodziński resigned; Bruno Walter was once again approached, and this time he accepted the position but only if the title was reduced to “Music Adviser”; he resigned in 1949. Leopold Stokowski and Dimitri Mitropoulos were appointed co-principal conductors in 1949, with Mitropoulos becoming Musical Director in 1951. Mitropoulos, known for championing new composers and obscure operas-in-concert, pioneered in other ways; adding live Philharmonic performances between movies at the Roxy Theatre and taking Edward R. Murrow and the See It Now television audience on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Orchestra. Mitropoulos made a series of recordings for Columbia Records, mostly in mono; near the end of his tenure, he recorded excerpts from Prokofiev’s ballet Romeo and Juliet in stereo. In 1957, Mitropoulos and Leonard Bernstein served together as Principal Conductors until, in the course of the season, Bernstein was appointed Music Director, becoming the first American-born-and-trained conductor to head the Philharmonic.

    Leonard Bernstein, who had made his historic, unrehearsed and spectacularly successful debut with the Philharmonic in 1943, was Music Director for 11 seasons, a time of significant change and growth. Two television series were initiated on CBS: the Young People’s Concerts and Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic. The former program, launched in 1958, made television history, winning every award in the field of educational television. Bernstein continued the orchestra’s recordings with Columbia Records until he retired as Music Director in 1969. Although Bernstein made a few recordings for Columbia after 1969, most of his later recordings were for Deutsche Grammophon. Sony has digitally remastered Bernstein’s numerous Columbia recordings and released them on CD as a part of its extensive Bernstein Century series. Although the Philharmonic performed primarily in Carnegie Hall until 1962, Bernstein preferred to record in the Manhattan Center. His later recordings were made in Philharmonic Hall. In 1960, the centennial of the birth of Gustav Mahler, Bernstein and the Philharmonic began a historic cycle of recordings of eight of Mahler’s nine symphonies for Columbia Records. (Symphony No. 8 was recorded by Bernstein with the London Symphony.) In 1962 Bernstein caused controversy with his comments before a performance by Glenn Gould of the First Piano Concerto of Johannes Brahms.

    Bernstein, a lifelong advocate of living composers, oversaw the beginning of the Orchestra’s largest commissioning project, resulting in the creation of 109 new works for orchestra. In September 1962, the Philharmonic commissioned Aaron Copland to write a new work, Connotations for Orchestra, for the opening concert of the new Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. The move to Philharmonic Hall in Lincoln Center brought about an expansion of concerts into the spring and summer. Among the many series that have taken place during the off-season have been the French-American and Stravinsky Festivals (1960s), Pierre Boulez’s “Rug Concerts” in the 1970s, and composer, Jacob Druckman’s Horizon’s Festivals in the 1980s.

    In 1971, Pierre Boulez became the first Frenchman to hold the post of Philharmonic Music Director. Boulez’s years with the Orchestra were notable for expanded repertoire and innovative concert approaches, such as the Prospective Encounters which explored new works along with the composer in alternative venues. During his tenure, the Philharmonic inaugurated the Live From Lincoln Center television series in 1976, and the Orchestra continues to appear on the Emmy Award-winning program to the present day. Boulez made a series of quadraphonic recordings for Columbia, including an extensive series of the orchestral music of Maurice Ravel.

    Members of the New York Philharmonic string section are heard on the 1971 John Lennon album Imagine, credited as The Flux Fiddlers.

    Zubin Mehta, then one of the youngest of a new generation of internationally known conductors, became Music Director in 1978. His tenure was the longest in Philharmonic history, lasting until 1991. Throughout his time on the podium, Mehta showed a strong commitment to contemporary music, presenting 52 works for the first time. In 1980 the Philharmonic, always known as a touring orchestra, embarked on a European tour marking the 50th anniversary of Toscanini’s trip to Europe.

    Kurt Masur, who had been conducting the Philharmonic frequently since his debut in 1981, became Music Director in 1991. Notable aspects of his tenure included a series of free Memorial Day Concerts at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and annual concert tours abroad, including the orchestra’s first trip to mainland China. He presided over the 150th Anniversary celebrations during the 1992–1993 season. His tenure concluded in 2002, and he was named Music Director Emeritus of the Philharmonic.

    In 2000, Lorin Maazel made a guest-conducting appearance with the New York Philharmonic in two weeks of subscription concerts after an absence of over twenty years, which was met with a positive reaction from the orchestra musicians. This engagement led to his appointment in January 2001 as the orchestra’s next Music Director. He assumed the post in September 2002, 60 years after making his debut with the Orchestra at the age of twelve at Lewisohn Stadium. In his first subscription week he led the world premiere of John Adams’ On the Transmigration of Souls commissioned in memory of those who died on September 11, 2001. Maazel concluded his tenure as the Philharmonic’s Music Director at the end of the 2008/09 season.

    In 2003, due to ongoing concerns with the acoustics of Avery Fisher Hall, there was a proposal to move the New York Philharmonic back to Carnegie Hall and merge the two organizations, but this proposal did not come to fruition. On May 5, 2010, the New York Philharmonic performed its 15,000th concert, a milestone unmatched by any other symphony orchestra in the world.

    On July 18, 2007, the Philharmonic named Alan Gilbert as its next music director, effective with the 2009/10 season, with an initial contract of five years. In October 2012, the orchestra extended Gilbert’s contract through the 2016/17 season. In February 2015, the orchestra announced the scheduled conclusion of Gilbert’s tenure its music director after the close of the 2016/17 season.

    In January 2016, the orchestra announced the appointment of Jaap van Zweden as its next Music Director, effective with the 2018/19 season, with an initial contract of five years. van Zweden is scheduled to serve as Music Director Designate for the 2017/18 season.

    The current president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the orchestra is Deborah Borda. Borda had previously held the same posts, as well as the post of managing director, with the orchestra.
    (So, Wikipedia)

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:40 PM on November 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Berlioz's "Waverley Overture", Classical Music, The Metropolitan Museum of Art,   

    From The Orchestra Now: “CHOPIN, DELACROIX & THE ROMANTIC IMPULSE” 

    From The Orchestra Now

    1
    Eugène Delacroix The Abduction of Rebecca
    SUN NOV 18 at 2 PM
    at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    Our popular series Sight & Sound continues with an afternoon where Leon Botstein explores the parallels between Chopin’s Variations on “Là ci darem la mano”, Berlioz’s Waverley Overture, and the artwork of Delacroix.

    Leon Botstein from AL.com

    TICKETS $30–$50
    Bring the Kids for $1
    All tickets include same-day museum admission

    BUY TICKETS

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Orchestra Now (TŌN) is a group of vibrant young musicians from across the globe who are making orchestral music relevant to 21st-century audiences. They are lifting the curtain on the musicians’ experience and sharing their unique personal insights in a welcoming environment. Hand-picked from the world’s leading conservatories—including The Juilliard School, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Curtis Institute of Music—the members of TŌN are not only thrilling audiences with their critically acclaimed performances, but also enlightening curious minds by giving on-stage introductions and demonstrations, writing concert notes from the musicians’ perspective, and having one-on-one discussions with patrons during intermissions.
    Conductor, educator, and music historian Leon Botstein founded TŌN in 2015 as a master’s degree program at Bard College, where he also serves as president. The orchestra is in residence at Bard’s Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, performing multiple concerts there each season as well as taking part in the annual Bard Music Festival. They also perform regularly at the finest venues in New York, including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and others across NYC and beyond. The orchestra has performed with many distinguished conductors, including Fabio Luisi, Neeme Järvi, Gerard Schwarz, and JoAnn Falletta.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:11 PM on November 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Classical Music, Denis Matsuev- Piano, , Michelangelo Quartet, St. Lawrence String Quartet   

    From Carnegie Hall: At A Glance 


    From Carnegie Hall

    1
    St. Lawrence String Quartet, Inon Barnatan, Piano

    Thursday, November 8 at 7:30 PM
    Zankel Hall

    Shostakovich’s Piano Quintet, plus quartets by Haydn and Beethoven

    Tickets

    2
    Michelangelo Quartet

    Friday, November 9 at 7:30 PM
    Weill Recital Hall

    Haydn’s “Lark” Quartet, plus music by Smetana and Bartók

    Tickets

    3
    Denis Matsuev, Piano

    Friday, November 9 at 8 PM
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

    Rachmaninoff’s Variations on a Theme of Corelli, plus works by Beethoven, Chopin, and others

    Tickets

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hallis a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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