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  • richardmitnick 10:51 PM on August 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, , ,   

    From ECM via Dazzle: “SPOTLIGHT ON ECM” 

    New from From ECM

    via

    1

    Dazzle
    1512 Curtis St.
    Denver, CO 80202

    Dazzle has teamed up with ECM records to present a whole month packed full of some of the iconic label’s most prominent contemporary musicians.

    2

    3

    4

    5

    Featuring Two Colorado-Based Projects:

    6

    7

    Ticket packages

    From ECM which might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 6:02 PM on August 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, E4TT, ,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “Ensemble for These Times” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    Saturday, January 26, 2019
    at 7:30 PM

    Center for New Music
    55 Taylor Street
    San Francisco, CA 94102

    $5—15
    Tickets

    1

    Celebrating our Tenth Anniversary in 2017/18, Ensemble for These Times (E4TT) is a new music chamber group consisting of Van Cliburn competitor pianist Dale Tsang, 2015 winner of The American Prize in Composition, David Garner, award-winning soprano Nanette McGuinness, and cellist Anne Lerner-Wright.

    E4TT performs 20th and 21st century music—particularly by women composers or with texts by women poets—that is relevant, engaging, original, and compelling, music that resonates today and will speak to tomorrow. E4TT strongly believes in the power of artistic beauty, intelligence, wit, lyricism, and irony to create a deep understanding of our times and the human condition.

    Over the past decade years, E4TT has commissioned over 20 works for premiere in the U.S. and Europe in mix-and-match combination of songs for soprano and piano, solo works for piano, works for cello plus piano, and the occasional work for soprano, cello, and piano, a wonderfully resonant combination. We rebranded in 2015; our new name was inspired by one of E4TT’s first songs, “In dieser Zeit” (“In These Times”), to a poem by Mascha Kaléko, on the ensemble’s critically acclaimed 2016 debut CD, “Surviving: Women’s Words” (Centaur Recordings CRC3490), which won a Silver Medal in the Global Music Awards. The CD sets music to texts by Jewish women poets, reflecting on their wartime experiences and was made possible by grants from the SF Conservatory of Music and SFFCM’s Musical Grant Program.

    what we’ve done

    Formed in 2007/2008 when McGuinness encountered music by Garner during recording sessions at Skywalker Ranch, the Ensemble quickly grew to include pianist Dale Tsang. Co-produced by the Jewish Music Festival in Berkeley in 2011, the group made its international debut in 2012 at a concert produced by the Jüdische Gemeinde Berlin. In 2016 the ensemble toured to the Krakow Culture Festival in Poland and in 2014, the U.S. Embassy in Budapest sponsored the JMPP in a 4-city tour in Hungary as part of the Daniel Pearl World Music Days. Most recently, E4TT toured their “Guernica Project” to Madrid, Spain, in October, 2017. The group has received 15 national and local grants, with Bay Area performances at the German Consulate General, SF Conservatory of Music, Old First Concerts, Noontime Concerts, Berkeley Public Library, and Trinity Concerts, among other venues. The ensemble has received grants from the Clorox Foundation, the Puffin Foundation, the Zellerbach Family Foundation Community Arts Program, the Ross McKee Foundation, the East Bay Fund for Artists, the Jewish Music Commission of Los Angeles, The SFKrakow Sister Cities Association, and CCI’s Quick Capacity Fund. Since 2011, E4TT has been fiscally sponsored by InterMusic SF (formerly SF Friends of Chamber Music).

    where we’re going

    In our 2017/18 tenth anniversary season, we will continue our series, 56×54, presenting 56 works by 54 composers, chosen from our first Call for Scores in 2016, plus we premiere our next commisioning program, “Once/Memory/Night: Paul Celan.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:21 PM on August 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Best place to sit, Classical Music,   

    From WQXR Blog: “Where’s the Best Seat in the Concert Hall?” 

    From WQXR

    WQXR Blog

    Aug 15, 2017
    James Bennett, II

    A concert hall can have thousands of seats. Prices can range from affordable to exorbitant. So where are the best seats with respect to sound? Is more expensive always better?

    To answer this burning question, we turned to Raj Patel of the design and engineering consulting firm Arup Group and Kate Wagner of the viral architecture blog McMansion Hell. She’s also studying acoustics at the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University, synthesizing her interests in music and architecture. What did we learn? Those expensive seats up front aren’t always your best bet, and that the best seat in a concert hall actually depends on the style of the hall itself. Let’s take a look at some of them.

    Shoebox

    2
    Vienna’s Musikverein, a concert hall in the shoebox style. (Public Domain)

    Best places to sit: Off-center balcony and off-center orchestra, ⅔ of the way back.
    Examples: Musikverein (Vienna), Concertgebouw (Amsterdam), Konzerthaus (Berlin)

    The crazy thing about “shoebox” concert halls is that they shouldn’t sound as amazing as they do, at least in theory. “Parallel walls in a rectangular space aren’t good for acoustics because the reflection of sound [on bare walls] can create a ‘ping-pong’ effect,” says Wagner. “But the ornamentation of 19th-century architecture acts a diffuser.” The first shoeboxes open to the public mimicked the design of the other spaces where religious and art music were primarily performed — churches and palatial rooms set aside for the court’s musical enjoyment. Even though these architects may not have know what exactly made these spaces sound so good, they did know that it worked. The ceilings are similarly practical and acoustically functional. They were originally designed to be high enough so that the audience’s body heat and odor wouldn’t hover right above them. The acoustic result of these parallel walls and high ceilings, explained Patel, is that sound can bounce off the side walls to the rear wall, then back over the head of the audience, creating an enveloping sound. So yes, you can thank an overdressed and somewhat smelly citizenry for inadvertently contributing to some of the best-sounding concert halls on the planet.

    American Theater Style or “Modified” Shoebox

    3
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage (Jeff Goldberg / ESTO)

    Best place to sit: In the first few rows of the frontmost balcony.
    Examples: Carnegie Hall (New York), Chicago Symphony Center

    By the beginning of the 20th century, the next wave in concert hall design was becoming apparent. Architects of these buildings were taking their cues from theaters of the day, which explains the inclusion of the proscenium, the highly decorated arch that “frames” the performers on stage, and the hanging balconies. Now don’t get us wrong — these concert halls can be absolutely magnificent, but they also pose a few more seating pitfalls than their earlier shoebox brethren. Grand as they are, those huge balconies render the seats beneath them practically useless — the seats they obstruct don’t get any of the sonic reflection from the ceiling. Wagner says “it’s like listening through a filter, making it a generally worse experience.” However, she stresses that despite their imperfections, these halls are incredibly important, as they’re “like a history lesson in acoustics.”

    “Fan-Shaped” Concert Halls

    4
    Barbican Centre Concert Hall (Wikimedia Commons)

    Best place to sit: Halfway into the orchestra, or close to the front.
    Example: The Barbican (London)

    When she spoke about these halls, Wagner didn’t mince words. “It’s acknowledged in all of acoustics that these concert halls are bad.” Simply put, they try to do too much. A focus on ticket costs and seating means these spaces try to fit as many people as possible into them, all while giving everyone the best possible sightline. Here, sound has a tendency to move to the back wall first and travel up the sides. “There’s a lack of lateral reflection due to the wide walls, and the direct reflection is absorbed quickly by the steep seating,” Patel told us. “There’s a dominance of direct sound.” So, where is the best place to sit? Maybe try to get close to the front, but don’t count on those seats providing a mind-blowing experience.

    Vineyard Style

    5
    Interior of the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg (Iwan Baan)

    Best place to sit: Anywhere.
    Examples: Berliner Philharmonie, Elbphilharmonie (Hamburg), Walt Disney Concert Hall (Los Angeles)

    Not all vineyard-style concert halls were built to the same high standards — some are better than others — but just about every seat in a vineyard-style house is going to give you the same great sound. Vineyard-style halls have in a way become the standard for European concert houses. You can trace their development back to 1963, when construction was completed on German architect Hans Scharoun’s Berliner Philharmonie. Scharoun’s idea for the hall is just as fascinating as the great sound it provides. Patel claims that the idea was born from observing the way passersby arranged themselves to look at street performers — in a circle. Seats close to the director gives the audience heightened visual enjoyment as well, making it perfect for following along with a score in your hand. Wagner says there are only a handful of bad seats in these halls, which are subject to the geometry of the space. “But bad seats in a vineyard are better than bad seats anywhere else.”

    Coupled-Volume Halls

    6
    Harpa, in the Icelandic capital of Reykjavík (Dan Nguyen / Flickr)

    Best place to sit: On the floor, toward the side.
    Examples: KKL (Lucerne), Harpa (Iceland)

    When you’re in a coupled-volume hall you might notice what appear to be several empty rooms surrounding the space. But they aren’t rooms for storage (although they are unfortunately used as such) — these are reverberation chambers, and are the defining feature of these concert halls. These doors can be opened to varying degrees, adjusting reverb time throughout the space. These spaces can be magnificent and sound great. But Wagner says that coupled-volume halls, which generally take a basic shape of shoebox or gently-reversed fan, “were the thing for a few decades, but the idea has sort of run its course.” They’re on the more expensive side, and not everyone understands the purpose of the chambers — they might be seen as empty space, and empty space is hard to sell. However, if you do find yourself in one for a concert, avoid sitting under the balconies, and aim for the sides of the hall. Wagner contends that it’s a delight to listen to chamber music in these spaces. And while many of these concert halls were built in the ’80s and ’90s, some Renaissance and Baroque-era performance spaces contain coupled-volume elements.

    Of course, the real answer of where to sit is up to you. Patel likens the experience to tasting wine — personal preference plays a huge role. Wagner agrees. “Bad acoustics exist, but ‘good’ acoustics [are] subjective. It’s like art.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    WQXR-FM (105.9 FM) is an American classical radio station licensed to Newark, New Jersey and serving the New York City metropolitan area. It is the most-listened-to classical-music station in the United States, with an average quarter-hour audience of 63,000.[citation needed]

    It is owned by the nonprofit New York Public Radio, which also operates WNYC (820 AM and 93.9 FM) and the four-station New Jersey Public Radio group. New York Public Radio acquired WQXR on July 14, 2009, as part of a three-way trade which also involved The New York Times Company – the previous owners of WQXR – and Univision Radio.[1] WQXR-FM broadcasts from studios and offices located in the Hudson Square neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, and the transmitter is located atop the Empire State Building.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:31 AM on August 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Classical Music, ,   

    From Bard’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts: “2018–19 season on sale now!” 

    From Bard’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts

    Highlights

    Bard Fisher Center for the performing Arts

    1

    Join us for a new season of extraordinary concerts, dance, theater, and literary events.

    For ticketing please see the full article.

    Visit the Fisher Center website to explore the full 2018–19 season and order your tickets online.

    Choose three or more new season events and save 25%.

    2
    Photo by David DeNee
    Classical
    The Orchestra Now
    This group of vibrant young musicians presents its fourth season at the Fisher Center, with works by Johannes Brahms, Giuseppe Verdi, Aaron Copland, Richard Wagner, Richard Strauss, and many more.

    2
    Janet Leigh in “Psycho” (1960); Paramount Pictures and Photofest NYC

    The Bard Conservatory of Music

    This season, Conservatory highlights include an evening honoring Joan Tower, a screening of the Hitchcock classic Psycho with live orchestra, the premiere of the China Now Music Festival, the Winter Songfest, and an evening with soprano Dawn Upshaw.

    3
    Photo by Hector Perez

    Fisher Center presents
    Meshell Ndegeocello
    Saturday, October 20 at 8 pm

    The music of Meshell Ndegeocello sparked a new movement in soul music, and has earned her 10 Grammy nominations over her astounding career. Ndegeocello makes her Fisher Center debut, offering a fresh perspective and a musical refuge during these uncertain times.

    4
    “Zurich, September 2014” by Teju Cole

    Fisher Center presents
    Vijay Iyer and Teju Cole
    Blind Spot
    Friday, October 26 at 8 pm

    Vanguard jazz composer and pianist Vijay Iyer and Nigerian American writer and photographer (and Bard faculty member) Teju Cole present a powerful new collaboration. With images and text from Cole’s newly released book of the same title alongside Iyer’s live score, Blind Spot investigates humanity’s blindness to tragedy and injustice throughout history.

    4
    Photo by Brigitte Lacombe

    Fisher Center presents
    Isabella Rossellini: Link Link Circus
    Saturday, November 17 at 7:30 pm

    Award-winning actress and filmmaker Isabella Rossellini takes inspiration from the natural world in her new theatrical lecture, a vivid monologue about the brilliance of the animal kingdom.

    More at the full article.

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    About Us
    The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, designed by Frank Gehry, illustrates the College’s commitment to the performing arts as a cultural and educational necessity. The Center’s adventurous programs and world-class facilities provide an outstanding environment in which to create, perform, learn, and experience. The Center bears the name of Richard B. Fisher, the former chair of Bard’s Board of Trustees. This magnificent building and the extraordinary arts experiences that take place within it are a tribute to his vision, generosity, and leadership.

    The mission of the Fisher Center is to:

    bring leading artists to the Hudson Valley to engage with the public and the College;
    produce and present adventurous and in-depth programs, including new, rare, and undiscovered works;
    support the development of new work by artists at all stages of their careers; and
    provide a home for Bard student and faculty work in the performing arts.

    Bard College seeks to inspire curiosity, a love of learning, idealism, and a commitment to the link between higher education and civic participation. The undergraduate curriculum is designed to address central, enduring questions facing succeeding generations of students. Academic disciplines are interconnected through multidisciplinary programs; a balance in the curriculum is sought between general education and individual specialization. Students pursue a rigorous course of study reflecting diverse traditions of scholarship, research, speculation, and artistic expression. They engage philosophies of human existence, theories of human behavior and society, the making of art, and the study of the humanities, science, nature, and history.

    Bard’s approach to learning focuses on the individual, primarily through small group seminars. These are structured to encourage thoughtful, critical discourse in an inclusive environment. Faculty are active in their fields and stress the connection between the contemplative life of the mind and active engagement outside the classroom. They strive to foster rigorous and free inquiry, intellectual ambition, and creativity.

    Bard acts at the intersection of education and civil society, extending liberal arts and sciences education to communities in which it has been underdeveloped, inaccessible, or absent. Through its undergraduate college, distinctive graduate programs, commitment to the fine and performing arts, civic and public engagement programs, and network of international dual-degree partnerships, early colleges, and prison education initiatives, Bard offers unique opportunities for students and faculty to study, experience, and realize the principle that higher-education institutions can and should operate in the public interest.

    The Bard College of today reflects in many ways its varied past.
    Bard was founded as St. Stephen’s College in 1860, a time of national crisis. While there are no written records of the founders’ attitude toward the Civil War, a passage from the College’s catalogue of 1943 applies also to the time of the institution’s establishment:

    “While the immediate demands in education are for the training of men for the war effort, liberal education in America must be preserved as an important value in the civilization for which the War is being fought. . . . Since education, like life itself, is a continuous process of growth and effort, the student has to be trained to comprehend and foster his own growth and direct his own efforts.”

    This philosophy molded the College during its early years and continues to inform its academic aims.

    Bard College
    30 Campus Rd,
    Annandale-On-Hudson, NY 12504

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:06 AM on August 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, , , The Red Violin   

    From New York Philharmonic: “The Red Violin in Concert Featuring Joshua Bell” 


    From New York Philharmonic

    1

    David Geffen Hall

    Price Range
    $49-150

    Duration
    2 hours & 45 minutes with intermission

    For tickets please see the full article.

    Joshua Bell reprises his movie debut, joining the New York Philharmonic for a live to film performance of John Corigliano’s Oscar-winning score to The Red Violin — the story of a violin’s epic journey from 18th-century Italy to 1997 Montreal.

    The Red Violin is rated R.

    Program To Include
    John Corigliano

    The Red Violin (score performed live to complete film)

    Artists
    Michael Stern Conductor Read More

    Joshua Bell Violin

    Joshua Bell Photo by Phil Knott

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    New York Philharmonic by Chris Lee


    Founded in 1842, the New York Philharmonic is the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States. Read a complete historical overview, visit the New York Philharmonic Leon Levy Digital Archives, or explore our history below.

    The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc.,globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra (NYPO) or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra based in New York City in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the “Big Five”. The Philharmonic’s home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York’s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

    Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the “Big Five” orchestras. Its record-setting 14,000th concert was given in December 2004.

    The New York Philharmonic was founded in 1842 by the American conductor Ureli Corelli Hill, with the aid of the Irish composer William Vincent Wallace. The orchestra was then called the Philharmonic Society of New York. It was the third Philharmonic on American soil since 1799, and had as its intended purpose, “the advancement of instrumental music.” The first concert of the Philharmonic Society took place on December 7, 1842 in the Apollo Rooms on lower Broadway before an audience of 600. The concert opened with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, led by Hill himself. Two other conductors, German-born Henry Christian Timm and French-born Denis Etienne, led parts of the eclectic, three-hour program, which included chamber music and several operatic selections with a leading singer of the day, as was the custom. The musicians operated as a cooperative society, deciding by a majority vote such issues as who would become a member, which music would be performed and who among them would conduct. At the end of the season, the players would divide any proceeds among themselves.

    After only a dozen public performances and barely four years old, the Philharmonic organized a concert to raise funds to build a new music hall. The centerpiece was the American premiere of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, to take place at Castle Garden on the southern tip of Manhattan. About 400 instrumental and vocal performers gathered for this premiere, which was conducted by George Loder. The chorals were translated into what would be the first English performance anywhere in the world. However, with the expensive US$2.00 ticket price and a war rally uptown, the hoped-for audience was kept away and the new hall would have to wait. Although judged by some as an odd work with all those singers kept at bay until the end, the Ninth soon became the work performed most often when a grand gesture was required.

    During the Philharmonic’s first seven seasons, seven musicians alternated the conducting duties. In addition to Hill, Timm and Étienne, these were William Alpers, George Loder, Louis Wiegers and Alfred Boucher. This changed in 1849 when Theodore Eisfeld was installed as sole conductor for the season. Eisfeld, later along with Carl Bergmann, would be the conductor until 1865. That year, Eisfeld conducted the Orchestra’s memorial concert for the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln, but in a peculiar turn of events which were criticized in the New York press, the Philharmonic omitted the last movement, Ode to Joy, as being inappropriate for the occasion. That year Eisfeld returned to Europe, and Bergmann continued to conduct the Society until his death in 1876.

    Leopold Damrosch, Franz Liszt’s former concertmaster at Weimar, served as conductor of the Philharmonic for the 1876/77 season. But failing to win support from the Philharmonic’s public, he left to create the rival Symphony Society of New York in 1878. Upon his death in 1885, his 23-year-old son Walter took over and continued the competition with the old Philharmonic. It was Walter who would convince Andrew Carnegie that New York needed a first-class concert hall and on May 5, 1891, both Walter and Russian composer Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky conducted at the inaugural concert of the city’s new Music Hall, which in a few years would be renamed for its primary benefactor, Andrew Carnegie. Carnegie Hall would remain the orchestra’s home until 1962.

    The Philharmonic in 1877 was in desperate financial condition, caused by the paltry income from five concerts in the 1876/77 season that brought in an average of only $168 per concert. Representatives of the Philharmonic wished to attract the German-born, American-trained conductor Theodore Thomas, whose own Theodore Thomas Orchestra had competed directly with the Philharmonic for over a decade and which had brought him fame and great success. At first the Philharmonic’s suggestion offended Thomas because he was unwilling to disband his own orchestra. Because of the desperate financial circumstances, the Philharmonic offered Theodore Thomas the conductorship without conditions, and he began conducting the orchestra in the autumn of 1877. With the exception of the 1878/79 season – when he was in Cincinnati and Adolph Neuendorff led the group – Thomas conducted every season for fourteen years, vastly improving the orchestra’s financial health while creating a polished and virtuosic ensemble. He left in 1891 to found the Chicago Symphony, taking thirteen Philharmonic musicians with him.

    Another celebrated conductor, Anton Seidl, followed Thomas on the Philharmonic podium, serving until 1898. Seidl, who had served as Wagner’s assistant, was a renowned conductor of the composer’s works; Seidl’s romantic interpretations inspired both adulation and controversy. During his tenure, the Philharmonic enjoyed a period of unprecedented success and prosperity and performed its first world premiere written by a world-renowned composer in the United States – Antonín Dvořák’s Ninth Symphony From the New World. Seidl’s sudden death in 1898 from food poisoning at the age of 47 was widely mourned. Twelve thousand people applied for tickets to his funeral at the Metropolitan Opera House at 39th Street and Broadway and the streets were jammed for blocks with a “surging mass” of his admirers.

    According to Joseph Horowitz, Seidl’s death was followed by “five unsuccessful seasons” under Emil Paur [music director from 1898 to 1902] and Walter Damrosch [who served for only one season, 1902/03].” After this, he says, for several seasons [1903–1906] the orchestra employed guest conductors, including Victor Herbert, Édouard Colonne, Willem Mengelberg, Fritz Steinbach, Richard Strauss, Felix Weingartner, and Henry Wood.

    In 1909, to ensure the financial stability of the Philharmonic, a group of wealthy New Yorkers led by two women, Mary Seney Sheldon and Minnie Untermyer, formed the Guarantors Committee and changed the Orchestra’s organization from a musician-operated cooperative to a corporate management structure. The Guarantors were responsible for bringing Gustav Mahler to the Philharmonic as principal conductor and expanding the season from 18 concerts to 54, which included a tour of New England. The Philharmonic was the only symphonic orchestra where Mahler worked as music director without any opera responsibilities, freeing him to explore the symphonic literature more deeply. In New York, he conducted several works for the first time in his career and introduced audiences to his own compositions. Under Mahler, a controversial figure both as a composer and conductor, the season expanded, musicians’ salaries were guaranteed, the scope of operations broadened, and the 20th-century orchestra was created.

    In 1911 Mahler died unexpectedly, and the Philharmonic appointed Josef Stránský as his replacement. Many commentators were surprised by the choice of Stránský, whom they did not see as a worthy successor to Mahler. Stránský led all of the orchestra’s concerts until 1920, and also made the first recordings with the orchestra in 1917.

    In 1921 the Philharmonic merged with New York’s National Symphony Orchestra (no relation to the present Washington, D.C. ensemble). With this merger it also acquired the imposing Dutch conductor Willem Mengelberg. For the 1922/23 season Stránský and Mengelberg shared the conducting duties, but Stránský left after the one shared season. For nine years Mengelberg dominated the scene, although other conductors, among them Bruno Walter, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Igor Stravinsky, and Arturo Toscanini, led about half of each season’s concerts. During this period, the Philharmonic became one of the first American orchestras to boast an outdoor symphony series when it began playing low-priced summer concerts at Lewisohn Stadium in upper Manhattan. In 1920 the orchestra hired Henry Hadley as “associate conductor” given specific responsibility for the “Americanization” of the orchestra: each of Hadley’s concerts featured at least one work by an American-born composer.

    In 1924, the Young People’s Concerts were expanded into a substantial series of children’s concerts under the direction of American pianist-composer-conductor Ernest Schelling. This series became the prototype for concerts of its kind around the country and grew by popular demand to 15 concerts per season by the end of the decade.

    Mengelberg and Toscanini both led the Philharmonic in recording sessions for the Victor Talking Machine Company and Brunswick Records, initially in a recording studio (for the acoustically-recorded Victors, all under Mengelberg) and eventually in Carnegie Hall as electrical recording was developed. All of the early electrical recordings for Victor were made with a single microphone, usually placed near or above the conductor, a process Victor called “Orthophonic”; the Brunswick electricals used the company’s proprietary non-microphone “Light-Ray” selenium-cell system, which was much more prone to sonic distortion than Victor’s. Mengelberg’s first records for Victor were acousticals made in 1922; Toscanini’s recordings with the Philharmonic actually began with a single disc for Brunswick in 1926, recorded in a rehearsal hall at Carnegie Hall. Mengelberg’s most successful recording with the Philharmonic was a 1927 performance in Carnegie Hall of Richard Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben. Additional Toscanini recordings with the Philharmonic, all for Victor, took place on Carnegie Hall’s stage in 1929 and 1936. By the 1936 sessions Victor, now owned by RCA, began to experiment with multiple microphones to achieve more comprehensive reproductions of the orchestra.

    The year 1928 marked the New York Philharmonic’s last and most important merger: with the New York Symphony Society. The Symphony had been quite innovative in its 50 years prior to the merger. It made its first domestic tour in 1882, introduced educational concerts for young people in 1891, and gave the premieres of works such as Gershwin’s Concerto in F and Holst’s Egdon Heath. The merger of these two venerable institutions consolidated extraordinary financial and musical resources. Of the new Philharmonic Symphony Society of New York, Clarence Hungerford Mackay, chairman of the Philharmonic Society, will be chairman. President Harry H. Flagler, of the Symphony Society, will be president of the merger. At the first joint board meeting in 1928, the chairman, Clarence Mackay, expressed the opinion that “with the forces of the two Societies now united… the Philharmonic-Symphony Society could build up the greatest orchestra in this country if not in the world.”

    Of course, the merger had ramifications for the musicians of both orchestras. Winthrop Sargeant, a violinist with the Symphony Society and later a writer for The New Yorker, recalled the merger as “a sort of surgical operation in which twenty musicians were removed from the Philharmonic and their places taken by a small surviving band of twenty legionnaires from the New York Symphony”. This operation was performed by Arturo Toscanini himself. Fifty-seventh Street wallowed in panic and recrimination.” Toscanini, who had guest-conducted for several seasons, became the sole conductor and in 1930 led the group on a European tour that brought immediate international fame to the orchestra. Toscanini remained music director until the spring of 1936, then returned several times as a guest conductor until 1945.

    That same year nationwide radio broadcasts began. The orchestra was first heard on CBS directly from Carnegie Hall. To broadcast the Sunday afternoon concerts, CBS paid $15,000 for the entire season. The radio broadcasts continued without interruption for 38 years. A legend in his own time, Toscanini would prove to be a tough act to follow as the country headed into war.

    After an unsuccessful attempt to hire the German conductor, Wilhelm Furtwängler, the English conductor John Barbirolli and the Polish conductor Artur Rodziński were joint replacements for Toscanini in 1936. The following year Barbirolli was given the full conductorship, a post he held until the spring of 1941. In December, 1942, Bruno Walter was offered the music directorship, but declined, citing his age (he was 67 years old).[20] In 1943, Rodziński, who had conducted the orchestra’s centennial concert at Carnegie Hall in the preceding year, was appointed Musical Director. He had also conducted the Sunday afternoon radio broadcast when CBS listeners around the country heard the announcer break in on Arthur Rubinstein’s performance of Brahms’s Second Piano Concerto to update them about the attack on Pearl Harbor. (The initial word of the attack was forwarded by CBS News Correspondent John Charles Daly on his own show before the Philharmonic broadcast.) Soon after the United States entered World War II, Aaron Copland wrote A Lincoln Portrait for the Philharmonic at the request of conductor Andre Kostelanetz as a tribute to and expression of the “magnificent spirit of our country.”

    Artur Rodziński, Bruno Walter, and Sir Thomas Beecham made a series of recordings with the Philharmonic for Columbia Records during the 1940s. Many of the sessions were held in Liederkranz Hall, on East 58th Street in New York City, a building formerly belonging to a German cultural and musical society, and used as a recording studio by Columbia Records. Sony Records later digitally remastered the Beecham recordings for reissue on CD.

    In February, 1947, Artur Rodziński resigned; Bruno Walter was once again approached, and this time he accepted the position but only if the title was reduced to “Music Adviser”; he resigned in 1949. Leopold Stokowski and Dimitri Mitropoulos were appointed co-principal conductors in 1949, with Mitropoulos becoming Musical Director in 1951. Mitropoulos, known for championing new composers and obscure operas-in-concert, pioneered in other ways; adding live Philharmonic performances between movies at the Roxy Theatre and taking Edward R. Murrow and the See It Now television audience on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Orchestra. Mitropoulos made a series of recordings for Columbia Records, mostly in mono; near the end of his tenure, he recorded excerpts from Prokofiev’s ballet Romeo and Juliet in stereo. In 1957, Mitropoulos and Leonard Bernstein served together as Principal Conductors until, in the course of the season, Bernstein was appointed Music Director, becoming the first American-born-and-trained conductor to head the Philharmonic.

    Leonard Bernstein, who had made his historic, unrehearsed and spectacularly successful debut with the Philharmonic in 1943, was Music Director for 11 seasons, a time of significant change and growth. Two television series were initiated on CBS: the Young People’s Concerts and Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic. The former program, launched in 1958, made television history, winning every award in the field of educational television. Bernstein continued the orchestra’s recordings with Columbia Records until he retired as Music Director in 1969. Although Bernstein made a few recordings for Columbia after 1969, most of his later recordings were for Deutsche Grammophon. Sony has digitally remastered Bernstein’s numerous Columbia recordings and released them on CD as a part of its extensive Bernstein Century series. Although the Philharmonic performed primarily in Carnegie Hall until 1962, Bernstein preferred to record in the Manhattan Center. His later recordings were made in Philharmonic Hall. In 1960, the centennial of the birth of Gustav Mahler, Bernstein and the Philharmonic began a historic cycle of recordings of eight of Mahler’s nine symphonies for Columbia Records. (Symphony No. 8 was recorded by Bernstein with the London Symphony.) In 1962 Bernstein caused controversy with his comments before a performance by Glenn Gould of the First Piano Concerto of Johannes Brahms.

    Bernstein, a lifelong advocate of living composers, oversaw the beginning of the Orchestra’s largest commissioning project, resulting in the creation of 109 new works for orchestra. In September 1962, the Philharmonic commissioned Aaron Copland to write a new work, Connotations for Orchestra, for the opening concert of the new Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. The move to Philharmonic Hall in Lincoln Center brought about an expansion of concerts into the spring and summer. Among the many series that have taken place during the off-season have been the French-American and Stravinsky Festivals (1960s), Pierre Boulez’s “Rug Concerts” in the 1970s, and composer, Jacob Druckman’s Horizon’s Festivals in the 1980s.

    In 1971, Pierre Boulez became the first Frenchman to hold the post of Philharmonic Music Director. Boulez’s years with the Orchestra were notable for expanded repertoire and innovative concert approaches, such as the Prospective Encounters which explored new works along with the composer in alternative venues. During his tenure, the Philharmonic inaugurated the Live From Lincoln Center television series in 1976, and the Orchestra continues to appear on the Emmy Award-winning program to the present day. Boulez made a series of quadraphonic recordings for Columbia, including an extensive series of the orchestral music of Maurice Ravel.

    Members of the New York Philharmonic string section are heard on the 1971 John Lennon album Imagine, credited as The Flux Fiddlers.

    Zubin Mehta, then one of the youngest of a new generation of internationally known conductors, became Music Director in 1978. His tenure was the longest in Philharmonic history, lasting until 1991. Throughout his time on the podium, Mehta showed a strong commitment to contemporary music, presenting 52 works for the first time. In 1980 the Philharmonic, always known as a touring orchestra, embarked on a European tour marking the 50th anniversary of Toscanini’s trip to Europe.

    Kurt Masur, who had been conducting the Philharmonic frequently since his debut in 1981, became Music Director in 1991. Notable aspects of his tenure included a series of free Memorial Day Concerts at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and annual concert tours abroad, including the orchestra’s first trip to mainland China. He presided over the 150th Anniversary celebrations during the 1992–1993 season. His tenure concluded in 2002, and he was named Music Director Emeritus of the Philharmonic.

    In 2000, Lorin Maazel made a guest-conducting appearance with the New York Philharmonic in two weeks of subscription concerts after an absence of over twenty years, which was met with a positive reaction from the orchestra musicians. This engagement led to his appointment in January 2001 as the orchestra’s next Music Director. He assumed the post in September 2002, 60 years after making his debut with the Orchestra at the age of twelve at Lewisohn Stadium. In his first subscription week he led the world premiere of John Adams’ On the Transmigration of Souls commissioned in memory of those who died on September 11, 2001. Maazel concluded his tenure as the Philharmonic’s Music Director at the end of the 2008/09 season.

    In 2003, due to ongoing concerns with the acoustics of Avery Fisher Hall, there was a proposal to move the New York Philharmonic back to Carnegie Hall and merge the two organizations, but this proposal did not come to fruition. On May 5, 2010, the New York Philharmonic performed its 15,000th concert, a milestone unmatched by any other symphony orchestra in the world.

    On July 18, 2007, the Philharmonic named Alan Gilbert as its next music director, effective with the 2009/10 season, with an initial contract of five years. In October 2012, the orchestra extended Gilbert’s contract through the 2016/17 season. In February 2015, the orchestra announced the scheduled conclusion of Gilbert’s tenure its music director after the close of the 2016/17 season.

    In January 2016, the orchestra announced the appointment of Jaap van Zweden as its next Music Director, effective with the 2018/19 season, with an initial contract of five years. van Zweden is scheduled to serve as Music Director Designate for the 2017/18 season.

    The current president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the orchestra is Deborah Borda. Borda had previously held the same posts, as well as the post of managing director, with the orchestra.
    (So, Wikipedia)

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:44 PM on August 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, , , Opinion   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “A Holistic Approach to Sound” 

    New Music USA


    From NEWMUSICBOX

    August 13, 2018
    Josh Modney

    `1
    IMAGE: Alexander Perrelli and Emma Van Deun

    Depending on who you talk to, “extended techniques” can be a loaded term. To one person, the presence of extended techniques makes a piece of music weird and unlistenable, while to another, their absence would indicate music that is regressive and uninteresting. In either case, ears are closed, and a blanket judgment is being made about the quality of the art using a term that should really only be a quantifier. So, first of all, I’d like to clear away some of the subjective baggage that has built up around extended techniques. The most objective way I can think of to define it is this: an extended technique is any action that produces a result outside the fundamental parameters of sound that an instrument was designed to make. This still leaves some ambiguity as to the designers’ intentions, especially when it comes to an instrument as old as mine, the violin. But it’s clear that on the violin, an execution that causes the string to vibrate with maximum consistency and overtone-rich resonance is the primary function of the instrument, which luthiers have worked very hard to cultivate over the centuries. On the other hand, playing very close to the bridge to create a broken, inconsistent sound that reinforces high overtones, while just as beautiful aesthetically, is one example of the great many techniques that fall outside the instrument’s intended function. This distinction is very important for students, since getting the string to resonate consistently is the most difficult thing to master, and is the foundation of most other physical movements on the instrument.

    As useful as I’ve found this definition as a player and a teacher, it still sets up a dualism that I find troubling. For one thing, it would seem to support the idea that all sounds outside of the core practice of Western classical music represent an extension of that practice, and not a separate identity. To an extent I agree with this – it is very difficult to understand how to play Lachenmann if you haven’t studied Beethoven, as they are strongly connected along the lineage of German music – but this way of thinking excludes artists who have arrived at novel ways of creating sound along a different trajectory. Furthermore, by lumping an incredibly broad array of musical tools into the single category of extended techniques, the implication is that any given sound outside “normal” playing is a shallow, one-dimensional artifact, rather than a component of one of any number of deep reservoirs of practice that have just as much potential for nuanced human expression as the standard technique of the instrument’s original design.

    2

    As my own practice on the violin has evolved to a point where the majority of the sounds I make on the instrument could be defined as extended techniques, I wonder if there is a better way to frame instrumental performance practice for the 21st century that, while respecting and continuing traditions, makes room for a deeper engagement with other avenues of expression. I’ve begun to think of this as a holistic approach to sound.

    The idea of a holistic approach to sound started to coalesce when I was preparing to record Violin Solos, a series of improvised solo violin pieces for my debut album, Engage (New Focus Recordings, August 3, 2018). I had been working this way for a long time in various contexts, from interpreter to collaborator to improviser, but didn’t have the words for it yet. Planning and practicing for that recording session, and then working to break it all down afterward to write the liner notes for the album, gave me the impetus to look under the hood of my practice and really examine what was happening.

    In thinking about my approach to sound, I kept on coming back to the idea of reservoirs. The standard, “romantic” style of violin playing that has been dominant since at least the mid-20th century and that every violin student learns is one reservoir. It utilizes the sounds that the modern violin, paired with the modern bow, were designed to produce – rich and luminous, causing the string to vibrate in a manner that is consistent and sustained. Another, equally deep reservoir encompasses the highly specific timbral study that has been so thoroughly researched by composers like Helmut Lachenmann, Mathias Spahlinger, and many others since (though on a musical level the compositions of Lachenmann and Spahlinger remain deeply connected to the same Germanic tradition that begat “romantic” string playing, on a technical level the sounds represent a radically different engagement with the instrument, requiring an entirely different skill set as a player). Another reservoir is Just Intonation, a practice that has made its way into just about everything that I do. Another might broadly be described as noise-based music. Another that is specific to my individual path would be the sounds and techniques that grew out of collaborative work with my composer colleagues in the Wet Ink Ensemble (Alex Mincek, Kate Soper, Eric Wubbels, and Sam Pluta). Far from a comprehensive list, those are just a few examples of reservoirs that have spoken strongly to me and that I have incorporated into my playing, colored by my unique experiences as a musician. Another violinist would no doubt have some similarities and some differences.

    One can dive deeply into any single reservoir and find more than a complete set of tools for musical expression. I think that a piece based completely in scratch tones and pitchless noise has just as much potential to be beautiful as a piece based in fully voiced notes. It’s only a matter of whether it is done well. For me, a mode of personal expression on the violin that feels rich and fulfilling involves drawing from many of these reservoirs and then quickly cutting between them. By engaging with material in this way, the relationship to sound feels less like the ornamentation of a monolithic practice, and more like personal conversations with distinct musical entities.

    All of this reminds me of a quote from Sam Pluta’s writing about his own work, in which he proposes a type of musicmaking where “anything and everything is possible and acceptable at any moment.” It’s an attitude that embraces adventure and innovative modes of expression without demanding an outright rejection of established practices. And it represents a kind of openness to the universe that makes the music of composers like Sam and Anthony Braxton so compelling and inspiring. This isn’t to say “everything is good” – curation and self-criticism must be valued for art to be successful – but that a nondogmatic engagement with sound can yield beautiful results. Never mind whether an artist hails predominantly from one aesthetic camp or another. If there is a sound or gesture that is right for the music, do it.

    The music that resonates with me tends to be aesthetically adventurous and open-minded, yet tightly curated. I’ll use a few works that were written for me by some of the Wet Ink composers as examples. Sam Pluta’s Jem Altieri with a Ring Modulator Circuit, for violin and electronics, lives mostly in a world of carefully sculpted noise, but in rare and special moments, when the music needs it, calls on the violin to produce fully resonant pitched sonorities. Kate Soper’s Cipher, for soprano and violin, winds up traversing an incredibly diverse array of musical terrain, from timbral study to art song to psycho-acoustic phenomena, all in the service of a thoroughly logical exploration of language and meaning. Eric Wubbels’s “the children of fire come looking for fire,” for violin and prepared piano, begins with an extremely long overpressure sound on the violin, setting up expectations in the listener about the style and form of the work, which are then subverted as it is revealed that the scratch tone functions as a metaphorical well of sound from which the rest of the highly articulate and virtuosic materials for the piece are drawn. In the case of each of these works, when you pull back and take in the big picture, musical choices that are unexpected or surprising in the moment work together beautifully in the larger context.

    A successful performance of multifaceted music like this demands a fluency of movement between strongly defined sonic identities. Another way of expressing that is that the music demands versatility. The idea of versatility loomed large as the ultimate goal of my classical training, the key to unlocking a successful career as a concert violinist. I agree with that in spirit, except that the traditional conservatory approach defines versatility very narrowly as the ability to play in the styles of Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, and Debussy. The idea is that if you can master the techniques required to play those composers, you can play anything. As a teacher, I still think those things are important. The study of classical music is an excellent way to gain fluency in the sounds that the instrument was designed to make, and fluency in the instrument’s primary functions are critical to artistry. But those sounds represent only a small fraction of the tools necessary to thrive as a 21st-century musician.

    As a classically trained violinist, I’d like to propose that we expand our concept of versatility on the instrument. What if a new versatility included improvisation, adventurous reinterpretations of antique music, deep engagement with more recent traditions on the instrument, and collaborations with artists on new compositions, sounds, and techniques? Rather than regarding all sounds as extensions of a single dominant practice, let’s treat the established norms of Western classical music as just one of many reservoirs of musical thought in a holistic approach that values many kinds of expression.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:21 AM on August 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Berkeley Early Music Festival, Classical Music, Juilliard415   

    From Julliard Music: “Juilliard415 Hits the Berkeley Early Music Fest” 

    From Julliard Music

    Aug 07, 2018
    Robert Mealy

    1
    Juilliard HP was a strong presence throughout the Berkeley Early Music Festival on their most recent visit to the Bay Area. No image credit.

    Juilliard415 has now been out to the Bay Area a few times, and our students have become true audience favorites. Last fall we took most of our crew to play a special concert on Philharmonia Baroque’s concert series at the De Young Museum in San Francisco, and in November several of our recent grads will be featured in a Philharmonia concert of double concertos alongside their West Coast mentors. It’s great for our students to be recognized as emerging professionals, and it’s wonderful for the audiences to see a new generation of incredible players. Plus, who doesn’t want to spend a few days in California?

    This year at the Berkeley Early Music Festival, seven students came along to be featured in a main-stage concert at the festival that brought a huge crowd inside on one of those glorious Berkeley days where it’s almost impossible to imagine doing anything besides going for a long hike.

    I have to say, it’s far more stressful to hear one’s students perform than to stand up yourself to play. But despite my sweaty palms and accelerated heart-rate, our students performed spectacularly. I’d put together a challenging program of highly refined French Baroque music that they played with passion, virtuosity, humor, and complete assurance to an enthusiastic ovation. Afterward, among many others, I met a few local Juilliard alumni, including Alex Jones (BFA ’15, dance), who’d found out about the performances thanks to the alumni news.

    Juilliard HP was a strong presence throughout the festival. I led three programs, including the spectacular closing concert with Vox Luminis, a Belgian chamber choir that is rapidly developing a near-cultlike following internationally; the choir also gave an amazing concert of Handel with J415 last fall. And several of our students were also featured with other ensembles. Violinist Alana Youssefian (MM ’18) had a starring role with the group Voices of Music in a completely outrageous and over-the-top Vivaldi concerto, delivered with tremendous panache and impeccable virtuosity. And one of our first-year violinists, Rachell Wong, joined a distinguished ensemble including Monica Huggett in a great performance of Schubert’s Quartettsatz.

    One of the things that really touched me about the Berkeley experience was how many audience members commented on not only how well our students played but also how open, friendly, and approachable they were after concerts and in general. I’m happy to report that our students really seem to get the fact that they are their own best ambassadors for this music: they understand that classical music in America is about bringing this art to people who may not necessarily realize they really need to hear it. Their own performances were brilliant, stunning, and also deeply moving: it’s beyond wonderful to see this music come to life as vividly and as persuasively as possible. I came away energized and inspired by what we do at Juilliard and thrilled that our students are making a difference in the musical life of America.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Julliard School

    The Juilliard School (/ˌdʒuːliˈɑːrd/), informally referred to as Juilliard and located in the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City, is a performing arts conservatory established in 1905. The school trains about 850 undergraduate and graduate students in dance, drama, and music. It is widely regarded as one of the world’s leading music and dance schools, with some of the most prestigious arts programs. In 2016, QS Quacquarelli Symonds ranked it as the world’s best institution for Performing Arts in their inaugural global ranking of the discipline.

    In 1905, the Institute of Musical Art, Juilliard’s predecessor institution, was founded on the premise that the United States did not have a premier music school and too many students were going to Europe to study music. The Institute opened in the former Lenox Mansion, Fifth Avenue and 12th Street, on October 11. It moved in 1910 to 120 Claremont Avenue in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, onto a property purchased from Bloomingdale Insane Asylum. In 1920, the Juilliard Foundation was created, named after textile merchant Augustus D. Juilliard, who bequeathed a substantial amount of money for the advancement of music in the United States. In 1924, the foundation purchased the Vanderbilt family guesthouse at 49 E. 52nd Street, and established the Juilliard Graduate School. In 1926, the Juilliard School of Music was created through a merger of the Institute of Musical Art and the Juilliard Graduate School. The two schools shared a common Board of Directors and President (Columbia University professor John Erskine) but retained their distinct identities. The conductor and music-educator Frank Damrosch continued as the Institute’s dean, and the Australian pianist and composer Ernest Hutcheson was appointed dean of the Graduate School. In 1937, Hutcheson succeeded Erskine as president of the two institutions, a job he held until 1945. In 1946, the Institute of Musical Art and the Juilliard Graduate School completely merged to form a single institution. The president of the school at that time was William Schuman, the first winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Music. Schuman established the Juilliard String Quartet in 1946 and the Dance Division in 1951, under the direction of Martha Hill.

    William Schuman graduated from Columbia’s Teachers College (BS 1935, MA 1937) and attended the Juilliard Summer School in 1932, 1933 and 1936. While attending Juilliard Summer School, he developed a personal dislike for traditional music theory and ear training curricula, finding little value in counterpoint and dictation. Soon after being appointed as president of the Juilliard School of Music in 1945, William Schuman created a new curriculum called the Literature and Materials of Music (L&M), designed for composers to teach. L&M was Schuman’s reaction against more formal theory and ear training, and as a result did not have a formal structure. The general mandate was “to give the student an awareness of the dynamic nature of the materials of music.” The quality and degree of each student’s education in harmony, music history, or ear training was dependent on how each composer-teacher decided to interpret this mandate.

    William Schuman resigned as president of Juilliard after being elected president of Lincoln Center in 1962. Peter Mennin, another composer with directorial experience at the Peabody Conservatory, was elected as his successor. Mennin made significant changes to the L&M program—ending ear training and music history and hiring the well known pedagogue Renée Longy to teach solfège. In 1968, Mennin hired John Houseman to manage a new Drama Division, and in 1969 oversaw Juilliard’s relocation from Claremont Avenue to Lincoln Center. The School’s name was changed to The Juilliard School to reflect its broadened mission to educate musicians, directors, and actors.

    Dr. Joseph W. Polisi became president of Juilliard in 1984, after Peter Mennin died. Polisi’s many accomplishments include philanthropic successes, broadening of the curriculum and establishment of dormitories for Juilliard’s students. In 2001, the school established a jazz performance training program. In September 2005, Colin Davis conducted an orchestra that combined students from the Juilliard and London’s Royal Academy of Music at the BBC Proms, and during 2008 the Juilliard Orchestra embarked on a successful tour of China, performing concerts as part of the Cultural Olympiad in Beijing, Suzhou, and Shanghai under the expert leadership of Maestro Xian Zhang.

    In 1999, the Juilliard School was awarded the National Medal of Arts.

    In 2006, Juilliard received a trove of precious music manuscripts from board chair and philanthropist Bruce Kovner. The collection includes autograph scores, sketches, composer-emended proofs and first editions of major works by Mozart, Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Schumann, Chopin, Schubert, Liszt, Ravel, Stravinsky, Copland, and other masters of the classical music canon. Many of the manuscripts had been unavailable for generations. Among the items are the printer’s manuscript of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, complete with Beethoven’s handwritten amendments, that was used for the first performance in Vienna in 1824; Mozart’s autograph of the wind parts of the final scene of The Marriage of Figaro; Beethoven’s arrangement of his monumental Große Fuge for piano four hands; Schumann’s working draft of his Symphony No. 2; and manuscripts of Brahms’s Symphony No. 2 and Piano Concerto No. 2. The entire collection has since been digitized and can be viewed online. In 2010 philanthropist James S. Marcus donated 10 million dollars to the school to establish the Ellen and James S. Marcus Institute for Vocal Arts at the school.

    On September 28, 2015, The Juilliard School announced a major expansion into Tianjin during a visit by China’s first lady, Peng Liyuan, the institution’s first such full-scale foray outside the United States, with plans to offer a master’s degree program.

    In May 2017, retired New York City Ballet principal dancer Damian Woetzel was named President, replacing Joseph W. Polisi.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:16 PM on August 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Classical Music, In Mo Yang- violin   

    From Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts: “In Mo Yang, violin” 

    Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts

    From Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts

    1
    No photo credit
    Wednesday September 12 11:00am
    Wednesday Morning Concert
    Classical, Recital Music Room, Rosen House
    Concert and Lunch $56, Concert Only $25
    Buy Tickets

    Our 11:00am Wednesday Morning Concerts include a 45-minute performance in the majestic Music Room followed by a tour of the historic Mediterranean-style Rosen House, an optional seasonally inspired buffet lunch, and freedom to explore the gardens. Come enjoy a day at Caramoor in the fall!
    “From his first entrance onward, Yang was an arresting performer: now sweet, now excitable, now chaste, now florid, and always, everywhere, in command.” — The Boston Globe

    In Mo Yang, violin

    Korean violinist In Mo Yang, First Prize Winner of the 2014 Concert Artists Guild Competition, has been hailed by The Boston Globe for his “…seamless technique and a tender warmth of tone,” combined with “…an ability to project an engaging sense of inner sincerity through his playing.”In March 2015, he won the 54th International Violin Competition “Premio Paganini” in Genoa, Italy, marking the first time since 2006 that the Paganini Competition jury has awarded the First Prize. He also garnered the following special prizes: Youngest finalist; Best performance of the contemporary original piece; and Performance most appreciated by the audience, confirming The Violin Channel’s praise of In Mo as “one of the new generation’s most talented young string virtuosi.”

    These impressive First Prize honors have resulted in numerous performance prizes for In Mo with prestigious orchestras and at renowned recital venues worldwide, including his recent Carnegie Hall recital debut at Weill Recital Hall, a concerto engagement with the Danish National Symphony conducted by Fabio Luisi, and a special recital in Genoa using Paganini’s own Guarneri Del Gesu violin, among many others.

    In Mo began the 2017–18 season with a busy summer schedule featuring his concerto debut at the Ravinia Festival with the Lucerne Symphony Orchestra, debut recitals at the Dresden Music Festival and the Yehudi Menuhin Gstaad Festval, as well as concerto engagements with the Philharmonia Zurich in Switzerland and Seoul Philharmonic in Korea, plus tour of South America as featured soloist with the Boston Philharmonic Youth Orchestra. The season continues with a return to Symphony Hall in Boston for a concerto appearance with the NEC Philharmonia and return engagements with Boston’s Bach, Beethoven and Brahms Society and Virginia’s Fairfax Symphony. In Europe, he makes his concerto debut with the Orchestre Nacional de France and his recital debut in Geneva, Switzerland.

    As a chamber musician, In Mo returns to Caramoor in fall 2017 for their Rising Stars series, and he tours regularly with ‘Chamber Music from Ravinia’ and Artistic Director Miriam Fried.
    In Mo has performed as concerto soloist with the NDR Radiophilharmonie, Russian Symphony Orchestra, Brazilian Symphony Orchestra, Baden-Baden Philharmonic, Boston Classical Orchestra, Longwood Symphony Orchestra, Central Aichi Symphony Orchestra, KBS Symphony Orchestra and the Korean Symphony Orchestra. Festival appearances include Ravinia, Rockport Chamber Music Festival, New Hampshire Music Festival, Ishikawa Music Academy, Great Mountains International Music Festival, Japan-Korea Concert for Young Musicians, and Public Concert Academie de Music in Sion. Among his many earlier competition awards are Second Prize in the 2014 Yehudi Menuhin International Competition, and top honors at the 2013 Munetsugu Angel Violin Competition and the 2012 Joachim International Violin Competition.

    Born in Indonesia to a Korean family in 1995, In Mo Yang gave his debut recital at age 11 on the Ewon Prodigy Series in Seoul, followed by his concerto debut at age 15 with the KBS Symphony Orchestra. He graduated from the Korean National Institute for the Gifted in Arts in February 2011 and was then admitted into the Korean National University of Arts as a prodigy in music. He currently attends the New England Conservatory of Music, where he is the only violinist in its selective Artist Diploma program, while concurrently pursuing his Bachelor of Music degree, studying with Miriam Fried In Mo plays on the “Joachim-Ma” Stradivari of 1714, the violin used by Joseph Joachim for the premiere performance of the Brahms Concerto, through the generosity of the New England Conservatory.

    149 Girdle Ridge Road
    PO Box 816
    Katonah, NY 10536
    p: 914.232.5035 f: 914.232.5521 e: info@caramoor.org

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts is a destination for exceptional music, captivating programs, spectacular gardens and grounds, and wonderful moments with friends and family. It enriches the lives of its audiences through innovative and diverse musical performances of the highest quality. Its mission also includes mentoring young professional musicians and providing educational programs for young children centered around music.

    Audiences are invited to explore the lush grounds, tour the historic Rosen House, enjoy a pre-concert picnic, and discover beautiful music in the relaxed settings of the Venetian Theater, Spanish Courtyard, Music Room of the Rosen House, and the magnificent gardens.

    The story of Caramoor, the Rosens, Lucie’s Theremin, the Art Collections and our History is rich and diverse.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:20 AM on August 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Classical Music,   

    From New Amsterdam Records: “Aizuri Quartet announces debut album Blueprinting out September 28 on New Amsterdam Records” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam Records

    Watch the album preview trailer here.

    1
    Aizuri Quartet. L-R: Ariana Kim (violin); Ayane Kozasa (viola); Miho Saegusa (violin); Karen Ouzounian (cello).
    Photo credit: Shervin Lainez.

    “A quartet of expert collaborators, who cogently traverse a range of repertoire staples and modern works.”
    — William Robin, The New York Times

    Award-winning, NYC-based Aizuri Quartet announces their debut album, Blueprinting, which will be released September 28 on New Amsterdam Records. It will be available in digital, CD and vinyl formats and is available for pre-order through Bandcamp here.

    2

    Blueprinting features new works written for the Aizuri Quartet by five of today’s most exciting American composers — Lembit Beecher, Yevgeniy Sharlat, Caroline Shaw, Gabriella Smith, and Paul Wiancko — who all possess a special understanding of the expressive range and power the Aizuri Quartet is capable of harnessing. The result is a collection of viscerally powerful pieces that glow with ingenuity and push the string quartet in inventive and unexpected ways.

    Aizuri Quartet was founded in 2012 and draws its name from “aizuri-e,” a style of predominantly blue Japanese woodblock printing that is noted for its vibrancy and incredible detail. The group has equal devotion to performing works from the past and present, forming a dialogue between classic and contemporary music and bringing the same respect to new pieces as those by Beethoven or Schumann, and as such has been awarded Grand Prize at the 2018 M-Prize Chamber Arts Competition, First Prize at the 2017 Osaka International Chamber Music Competition in Japan, and Third Prize at the 2015 Wigmore Hall International String Quartet Competition in London.

    As the album title suggests, Blueprinting implies building a project that takes time and requires significant planning. The works featured on the album were all born out of a close collaboration between the quartet and the composers, and Aizuri Quartet committed to exploring the full spectrum of the story behind each piece, adding layers of richness through their discovery during long rehearsals, workshops, performances, and tours. These pieces have become a central and personal part of Aizuri Quartet’s repertoire, and embody the inquisitive spirit and infectious energy of the quartet.

    Blueprinting opens with Gabriella Smith’s “Carrot Revolution”, written as a response to the Barnes Foundation’s exhibit The Order of Things in which paintings from Dr. Albert C. Barnes’ collection were displayed with other, mostly unexpected, objects. As such, Smith celebrates new ways of looking at old things, such as the string quar­tet and her musical influences (including Bach, Gregorian chant, Georgian folk songs, and Celtic fiddle tunes) by juxtaposing drastically different techniques and sounds. Caroline Shaw’s “Blueprint” follows, which Shaw describes as a harmonic reduction of Beethoven’s string quartet Op. 18 No. 6 and serves as a conversation without words between the Aizuri Quartet, Beethoven and Haydn.

    Yevgeniy Sharlat’s two-part “RIPEFG”, written in honor of his dear friend, the late composer Ethan Frederick Greene, adds color and texture with the addition of a melodica, an instrument Greene would also bring to lessons. A two-movement suite from Lembit Beecher’s chamber opera “Sophia’s Forest” follows, which depicts the inner world of the opera’s narrator — a 9-year old girl named Sophia who arrives in the US with only her mother after her father disappeared in a civil war — through a sound world made by the quartet and nine custom-built, electronically-con­trolled sound sculptures that generate sound acoustically from bike wheels and wine glasses. The album concludes with Paul Wiancko’s three-part piece “LIFT”, which he describes as “an investigation of elation in musical form” as he “joyously explores the capacity for harmony, color, and rhythm itself to evoke and inspire” — an appropriate finale to an album built on exploration, expression, and wonder.

    Blueprinting tracklisting:

    1. Carrot Revolution (composed by Gabriella Smith)
    2. Blueprint (composed by Caroline Shaw)
    3. RIPEFG – I. (composed by Yevgeniy Sharlat)
    4. RIPEFG – II. (composed by Yevgeniy Sharlat)
    5. Sophia’s Wide Awake Dreams – Dream Nr. 1 (composed by Lembit Beecher)
    6. Sophia’s Wide Awake Dreams – Dream Nr. 2 (composed by Lembit Beecher)
    7. LIFT – Part I (composed by Paul Wiancko)
    8. LIFT – Part II (composed by Paul Wiancko)
    9. LIFT – Part III [Glacial – Maniacal – Lift] (composed by Paul Wiancko)

    Aizuri Quartet is: Ariana Kim and Miho Saegusa (violins); Ayane Kozasa (viola); and Karen Ouzounian (cello).

    The pieces on Blueprinting were made possible by support from the Curtis Institute of Music, Curtis on Tour, the Barnes Foundation, Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts, Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, and the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage.

    Blueprinting was recorded, produced, edited, mixed and mastered by Ryan Streber at Oktaven Audio in Mount Vernon, NY. Nathan Debrine was the assistant engineer, with additional editing by Charles Mueller. Melodica by Ayane Kozasa (tracks 3 and 4) and sound sculptures by Lembit Beecher (tracks 5 and 6).

    Live performances of Blueprinting repertoire:

    09/26/18: New Orleans, LA @ University of New Orleans (Full Album Recital)

    10/26/18: Ann Arbor, MI @ Rackham Auditorium at the University of Michigan (UMS Recital for Grand M-Prize Win, presented by the University Musical Society)

    10/28/18: Brooklyn, NY @ National Sawdust (Full Album Recital)

    11/8/18-11/10/18: Marshfield, VT @ Scrag Mountain Music

    More About Aizuri Quartet:

    Praised by the Washington Post for “captivating” performances that draw from its notable “meld of intellect, technique and emotions,” the Aizuri Quartet was awarded the Grand Prize at the 2018 M-Prize Chamber Arts Competition, First Prize at the 2017 Osaka International Chamber Music Competition in Japan, and Third Prize at the 2015 Wigmore Hall International String Quartet Competition in London. Through its engaging and thought-provoking programs, the Quartet has garnered critical acclaim for bringing “a technical bravado and emotional power” to bold new commissions, and for its “flawless” (San Diego Union-Tribune) performances of the great masterpieces of the past in which “every note is lovingly crafted and savored” (Washington Post).

    Based in New York City, the Aizuri Quartet was the 2017-2018 MetLiveArts String Quartet-in-Residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presenting five unique programs throughout the season, which the New York Times called “genuinely exciting” and “imaginative.” Previously the Quartet was the 2015-2016 Ernst Stiefel String Quartet-in-Residence at the Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, and from 2014-2016, the String Quartet-in-Residence at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. Throughout its residency, the Quartet appeared internationally in Curtis on Tour performances in Bremen, Dresden, Paris and Salzburg, in Aspen, Logan, Napa, La Jolla and Davis with clarinetist Michael Rusinek, at Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and New York City’s Morgan Library and Museum with cellist Peter Wiley, and throughout Chile, Costa Rica and Mexico with violist Roberto Díaz. Additionally, the Quartet was the resident ensemble of the 2014 Ravinia Festival’s Steans Music Institute and was the recipient of the Salon de Virtuosi JCCI Career Grant.

    Highlights of the Quartet’s recent and upcoming seasons include a multi-city tour of Japan, debut recitals at the Kennedy Center’s Fortas Chamber Music Concerts, the Women’s Musical Club of Toronto, the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, Wolf Trap’s Chamber Music at the Barns, Schneider Concerts in New York City, Princeton University’s Summer Chamber Music Concerts, the Chamber Music Society of Minnesota, Chamber Music Society of Bethlehem, the Artosphere Festival and the Honolulu Chamber Music Series, and residencies with Cornell University, Scrag Mountain Music, North Carolina State University, Chamber Music Abu Dhabi, and IRIS Orchestra.

    Finding great joy in working with contemporary composers and exploring unusual collaborations, the Aizuri Quartet is proud to have commissioned and premiered works by Pulitzer Prize-winner Caroline Shaw (Blueprint), Paul Wiancko (LIFT), Yevgeniy Sharlat (RIPEFG), Gabriella Smith (Carrot Revolution), Rene Orth (Stripped), and Alyssa Weinberg (Parallels). The Quartet’s many and varied collaborative partners include pianists Jonathan Biss and Ignat Solzhenitsyn, clarinetist Kinan Azmeh, shakuhachi player Kojiro Umezaki, eighth blackbird in specially-curated performances of Terry Riley’s “In C,” the Aeolus Quartet, poet Denice Frohman, and singer-songwriter Andrew Lipke. Most recently the Quartet premiered the 65-minute chamber opera Sophia’s Forest by Lembit Beecher, featuring the Aizuri Quartet, soprano Kiera Duffy, and expansive, custom-built sound sculptures in Philadelphia in September 2017.

    Combining their deep study of classical music with a naturally warm and exuberant approach to audiences and students, the Aizuri Quartet is passionate about creating diverse points of entry into the string quartet repertoire. As its 2015 resident ensemble, the Quartet worked closely with Philadelphia’s Barnes Foundation to develop programs and commission new works that forged meaningful connections between music and visual art. The Quartet was featured throughout the Curtis-Coursera online course “The World of the String Quartet,” which was hosted by Arnold Steinhardt and has reached thousands of students from over a hundred countries.

    Learn more at http://www.aizuriquartet.com.

    In all of our presenting and recording activities, NewAm holds firmly to its mission to support artists whose work lies outside of traditional music industry infrastructure – whether that be classical, pop/rock/indie, jazz, world, or experimental. In pursuit of this calling, NewAm often collaborates with like-minded organizations. Our past and ongoing partnerships with the River to River Festival, Ecstatic Music Festival, Art of Elan, the Indianapolis Symphony (multi-year residency), MoMA PS 1, Liquid Music, Galapagos Artspace and National Sawdust have yielded high-profile opportunities for our artists to present their work. On the records side, we often partner with other labels in order to offer our artists the best possible representation for their projects. Partner labels have included Bedroom Community (Iceland), Nonclassical (UK), One Little Indian (UK), Sono Luminus (USA), Cantaloupe (USA) and NNA Tapes (USA).

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:31 AM on August 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, , Movie scores, ,   

    From New York Philharmonic: Upcoming Events- There Will Be Blood: Live, and 2001: A Space Odyssey: Live 


    From New York Philharmonic

    12 September, 2018 Wednesday
    13 September, 2018 Thursday
    1
    7:30 PM Special Event
    There Will Be Blood: Live

    14 September, 2018 Friday
    15 September, 2018 Saturday
    2
    8:00 PM Special Event
    2001: A Space Odyssey: Live

    For ticketing see the full article.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    New York Philharmonic by Chris Lee

    Founded in 1842, the New York Philharmonic is the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States. Read a complete historical overview, visit the New York Philharmonic Leon Levy Digital Archives, or explore our history below.

    The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc.,globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra (NYPO) or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra based in New York City in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the “Big Five”. The Philharmonic’s home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York’s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

    Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the “Big Five” orchestras. Its record-setting 14,000th concert was given in December 2004.

    The New York Philharmonic was founded in 1842 by the American conductor Ureli Corelli Hill, with the aid of the Irish composer William Vincent Wallace. The orchestra was then called the Philharmonic Society of New York. It was the third Philharmonic on American soil since 1799, and had as its intended purpose, “the advancement of instrumental music.” The first concert of the Philharmonic Society took place on December 7, 1842 in the Apollo Rooms on lower Broadway before an audience of 600. The concert opened with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, led by Hill himself. Two other conductors, German-born Henry Christian Timm and French-born Denis Etienne, led parts of the eclectic, three-hour program, which included chamber music and several operatic selections with a leading singer of the day, as was the custom. The musicians operated as a cooperative society, deciding by a majority vote such issues as who would become a member, which music would be performed and who among them would conduct. At the end of the season, the players would divide any proceeds among themselves.

    After only a dozen public performances and barely four years old, the Philharmonic organized a concert to raise funds to build a new music hall. The centerpiece was the American premiere of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, to take place at Castle Garden on the southern tip of Manhattan. About 400 instrumental and vocal performers gathered for this premiere, which was conducted by George Loder. The chorals were translated into what would be the first English performance anywhere in the world. However, with the expensive US$2.00 ticket price and a war rally uptown, the hoped-for audience was kept away and the new hall would have to wait. Although judged by some as an odd work with all those singers kept at bay until the end, the Ninth soon became the work performed most often when a grand gesture was required.

    During the Philharmonic’s first seven seasons, seven musicians alternated the conducting duties. In addition to Hill, Timm and Étienne, these were William Alpers, George Loder, Louis Wiegers and Alfred Boucher. This changed in 1849 when Theodore Eisfeld was installed as sole conductor for the season. Eisfeld, later along with Carl Bergmann, would be the conductor until 1865. That year, Eisfeld conducted the Orchestra’s memorial concert for the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln, but in a peculiar turn of events which were criticized in the New York press, the Philharmonic omitted the last movement, Ode to Joy, as being inappropriate for the occasion. That year Eisfeld returned to Europe, and Bergmann continued to conduct the Society until his death in 1876.

    Leopold Damrosch, Franz Liszt’s former concertmaster at Weimar, served as conductor of the Philharmonic for the 1876/77 season. But failing to win support from the Philharmonic’s public, he left to create the rival Symphony Society of New York in 1878. Upon his death in 1885, his 23-year-old son Walter took over and continued the competition with the old Philharmonic. It was Walter who would convince Andrew Carnegie that New York needed a first-class concert hall and on May 5, 1891, both Walter and Russian composer Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky conducted at the inaugural concert of the city’s new Music Hall, which in a few years would be renamed for its primary benefactor, Andrew Carnegie. Carnegie Hall would remain the orchestra’s home until 1962.

    The Philharmonic in 1877 was in desperate financial condition, caused by the paltry income from five concerts in the 1876/77 season that brought in an average of only $168 per concert. Representatives of the Philharmonic wished to attract the German-born, American-trained conductor Theodore Thomas, whose own Theodore Thomas Orchestra had competed directly with the Philharmonic for over a decade and which had brought him fame and great success. At first the Philharmonic’s suggestion offended Thomas because he was unwilling to disband his own orchestra. Because of the desperate financial circumstances, the Philharmonic offered Theodore Thomas the conductorship without conditions, and he began conducting the orchestra in the autumn of 1877. With the exception of the 1878/79 season – when he was in Cincinnati and Adolph Neuendorff led the group – Thomas conducted every season for fourteen years, vastly improving the orchestra’s financial health while creating a polished and virtuosic ensemble. He left in 1891 to found the Chicago Symphony, taking thirteen Philharmonic musicians with him.

    Another celebrated conductor, Anton Seidl, followed Thomas on the Philharmonic podium, serving until 1898. Seidl, who had served as Wagner’s assistant, was a renowned conductor of the composer’s works; Seidl’s romantic interpretations inspired both adulation and controversy. During his tenure, the Philharmonic enjoyed a period of unprecedented success and prosperity and performed its first world premiere written by a world-renowned composer in the United States – Antonín Dvořák’s Ninth Symphony From the New World. Seidl’s sudden death in 1898 from food poisoning at the age of 47 was widely mourned. Twelve thousand people applied for tickets to his funeral at the Metropolitan Opera House at 39th Street and Broadway and the streets were jammed for blocks with a “surging mass” of his admirers.

    According to Joseph Horowitz, Seidl’s death was followed by “five unsuccessful seasons” under Emil Paur [music director from 1898 to 1902] and Walter Damrosch [who served for only one season, 1902/03].” After this, he says, for several seasons [1903–1906] the orchestra employed guest conductors, including Victor Herbert, Édouard Colonne, Willem Mengelberg, Fritz Steinbach, Richard Strauss, Felix Weingartner, and Henry Wood.

    In 1909, to ensure the financial stability of the Philharmonic, a group of wealthy New Yorkers led by two women, Mary Seney Sheldon and Minnie Untermyer, formed the Guarantors Committee and changed the Orchestra’s organization from a musician-operated cooperative to a corporate management structure. The Guarantors were responsible for bringing Gustav Mahler to the Philharmonic as principal conductor and expanding the season from 18 concerts to 54, which included a tour of New England. The Philharmonic was the only symphonic orchestra where Mahler worked as music director without any opera responsibilities, freeing him to explore the symphonic literature more deeply. In New York, he conducted several works for the first time in his career and introduced audiences to his own compositions. Under Mahler, a controversial figure both as a composer and conductor, the season expanded, musicians’ salaries were guaranteed, the scope of operations broadened, and the 20th-century orchestra was created.

    In 1911 Mahler died unexpectedly, and the Philharmonic appointed Josef Stránský as his replacement. Many commentators were surprised by the choice of Stránský, whom they did not see as a worthy successor to Mahler. Stránský led all of the orchestra’s concerts until 1920, and also made the first recordings with the orchestra in 1917.

    In 1921 the Philharmonic merged with New York’s National Symphony Orchestra (no relation to the present Washington, D.C. ensemble). With this merger it also acquired the imposing Dutch conductor Willem Mengelberg. For the 1922/23 season Stránský and Mengelberg shared the conducting duties, but Stránský left after the one shared season. For nine years Mengelberg dominated the scene, although other conductors, among them Bruno Walter, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Igor Stravinsky, and Arturo Toscanini, led about half of each season’s concerts. During this period, the Philharmonic became one of the first American orchestras to boast an outdoor symphony series when it began playing low-priced summer concerts at Lewisohn Stadium in upper Manhattan. In 1920 the orchestra hired Henry Hadley as “associate conductor” given specific responsibility for the “Americanization” of the orchestra: each of Hadley’s concerts featured at least one work by an American-born composer.

    In 1924, the Young People’s Concerts were expanded into a substantial series of children’s concerts under the direction of American pianist-composer-conductor Ernest Schelling. This series became the prototype for concerts of its kind around the country and grew by popular demand to 15 concerts per season by the end of the decade.

    Mengelberg and Toscanini both led the Philharmonic in recording sessions for the Victor Talking Machine Company and Brunswick Records, initially in a recording studio (for the acoustically-recorded Victors, all under Mengelberg) and eventually in Carnegie Hall as electrical recording was developed. All of the early electrical recordings for Victor were made with a single microphone, usually placed near or above the conductor, a process Victor called “Orthophonic”; the Brunswick electricals used the company’s proprietary non-microphone “Light-Ray” selenium-cell system, which was much more prone to sonic distortion than Victor’s. Mengelberg’s first records for Victor were acousticals made in 1922; Toscanini’s recordings with the Philharmonic actually began with a single disc for Brunswick in 1926, recorded in a rehearsal hall at Carnegie Hall. Mengelberg’s most successful recording with the Philharmonic was a 1927 performance in Carnegie Hall of Richard Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben. Additional Toscanini recordings with the Philharmonic, all for Victor, took place on Carnegie Hall’s stage in 1929 and 1936. By the 1936 sessions Victor, now owned by RCA, began to experiment with multiple microphones to achieve more comprehensive reproductions of the orchestra.

    The year 1928 marked the New York Philharmonic’s last and most important merger: with the New York Symphony Society. The Symphony had been quite innovative in its 50 years prior to the merger. It made its first domestic tour in 1882, introduced educational concerts for young people in 1891, and gave the premieres of works such as Gershwin’s Concerto in F and Holst’s Egdon Heath. The merger of these two venerable institutions consolidated extraordinary financial and musical resources. Of the new Philharmonic Symphony Society of New York, Clarence Hungerford Mackay, chairman of the Philharmonic Society, will be chairman. President Harry H. Flagler, of the Symphony Society, will be president of the merger. At the first joint board meeting in 1928, the chairman, Clarence Mackay, expressed the opinion that “with the forces of the two Societies now united… the Philharmonic-Symphony Society could build up the greatest orchestra in this country if not in the world.”

    Of course, the merger had ramifications for the musicians of both orchestras. Winthrop Sargeant, a violinist with the Symphony Society and later a writer for The New Yorker, recalled the merger as “a sort of surgical operation in which twenty musicians were removed from the Philharmonic and their places taken by a small surviving band of twenty legionnaires from the New York Symphony”. This operation was performed by Arturo Toscanini himself. Fifty-seventh Street wallowed in panic and recrimination.” Toscanini, who had guest-conducted for several seasons, became the sole conductor and in 1930 led the group on a European tour that brought immediate international fame to the orchestra. Toscanini remained music director until the spring of 1936, then returned several times as a guest conductor until 1945.

    That same year nationwide radio broadcasts began. The orchestra was first heard on CBS directly from Carnegie Hall. To broadcast the Sunday afternoon concerts, CBS paid $15,000 for the entire season. The radio broadcasts continued without interruption for 38 years. A legend in his own time, Toscanini would prove to be a tough act to follow as the country headed into war.

    After an unsuccessful attempt to hire the German conductor, Wilhelm Furtwängler, the English conductor John Barbirolli and the Polish conductor Artur Rodziński were joint replacements for Toscanini in 1936. The following year Barbirolli was given the full conductorship, a post he held until the spring of 1941. In December, 1942, Bruno Walter was offered the music directorship, but declined, citing his age (he was 67 years old).[20] In 1943, Rodziński, who had conducted the orchestra’s centennial concert at Carnegie Hall in the preceding year, was appointed Musical Director. He had also conducted the Sunday afternoon radio broadcast when CBS listeners around the country heard the announcer break in on Arthur Rubinstein’s performance of Brahms’s Second Piano Concerto to update them about the attack on Pearl Harbor. (The initial word of the attack was forwarded by CBS News Correspondent John Charles Daly on his own show before the Philharmonic broadcast.) Soon after the United States entered World War II, Aaron Copland wrote A Lincoln Portrait for the Philharmonic at the request of conductor Andre Kostelanetz as a tribute to and expression of the “magnificent spirit of our country.”

    Artur Rodziński, Bruno Walter, and Sir Thomas Beecham made a series of recordings with the Philharmonic for Columbia Records during the 1940s. Many of the sessions were held in Liederkranz Hall, on East 58th Street in New York City, a building formerly belonging to a German cultural and musical society, and used as a recording studio by Columbia Records. Sony Records later digitally remastered the Beecham recordings for reissue on CD.

    In February, 1947, Artur Rodziński resigned; Bruno Walter was once again approached, and this time he accepted the position but only if the title was reduced to “Music Adviser”; he resigned in 1949. Leopold Stokowski and Dimitri Mitropoulos were appointed co-principal conductors in 1949, with Mitropoulos becoming Musical Director in 1951. Mitropoulos, known for championing new composers and obscure operas-in-concert, pioneered in other ways; adding live Philharmonic performances between movies at the Roxy Theatre and taking Edward R. Murrow and the See It Now television audience on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Orchestra. Mitropoulos made a series of recordings for Columbia Records, mostly in mono; near the end of his tenure, he recorded excerpts from Prokofiev’s ballet Romeo and Juliet in stereo. In 1957, Mitropoulos and Leonard Bernstein served together as Principal Conductors until, in the course of the season, Bernstein was appointed Music Director, becoming the first American-born-and-trained conductor to head the Philharmonic.

    Leonard Bernstein, who had made his historic, unrehearsed and spectacularly successful debut with the Philharmonic in 1943, was Music Director for 11 seasons, a time of significant change and growth. Two television series were initiated on CBS: the Young People’s Concerts and Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic. The former program, launched in 1958, made television history, winning every award in the field of educational television. Bernstein continued the orchestra’s recordings with Columbia Records until he retired as Music Director in 1969. Although Bernstein made a few recordings for Columbia after 1969, most of his later recordings were for Deutsche Grammophon. Sony has digitally remastered Bernstein’s numerous Columbia recordings and released them on CD as a part of its extensive Bernstein Century series. Although the Philharmonic performed primarily in Carnegie Hall until 1962, Bernstein preferred to record in the Manhattan Center. His later recordings were made in Philharmonic Hall. In 1960, the centennial of the birth of Gustav Mahler, Bernstein and the Philharmonic began a historic cycle of recordings of eight of Mahler’s nine symphonies for Columbia Records. (Symphony No. 8 was recorded by Bernstein with the London Symphony.) In 1962 Bernstein caused controversy with his comments before a performance by Glenn Gould of the First Piano Concerto of Johannes Brahms.

    Bernstein, a lifelong advocate of living composers, oversaw the beginning of the Orchestra’s largest commissioning project, resulting in the creation of 109 new works for orchestra. In September 1962, the Philharmonic commissioned Aaron Copland to write a new work, Connotations for Orchestra, for the opening concert of the new Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. The move to Philharmonic Hall in Lincoln Center brought about an expansion of concerts into the spring and summer. Among the many series that have taken place during the off-season have been the French-American and Stravinsky Festivals (1960s), Pierre Boulez’s “Rug Concerts” in the 1970s, and composer, Jacob Druckman’s Horizon’s Festivals in the 1980s.

    In 1971, Pierre Boulez became the first Frenchman to hold the post of Philharmonic Music Director. Boulez’s years with the Orchestra were notable for expanded repertoire and innovative concert approaches, such as the Prospective Encounters which explored new works along with the composer in alternative venues. During his tenure, the Philharmonic inaugurated the Live From Lincoln Center television series in 1976, and the Orchestra continues to appear on the Emmy Award-winning program to the present day. Boulez made a series of quadraphonic recordings for Columbia, including an extensive series of the orchestral music of Maurice Ravel.

    Members of the New York Philharmonic string section are heard on the 1971 John Lennon album Imagine, credited as The Flux Fiddlers.

    Zubin Mehta, then one of the youngest of a new generation of internationally known conductors, became Music Director in 1978. His tenure was the longest in Philharmonic history, lasting until 1991. Throughout his time on the podium, Mehta showed a strong commitment to contemporary music, presenting 52 works for the first time. In 1980 the Philharmonic, always known as a touring orchestra, embarked on a European tour marking the 50th anniversary of Toscanini’s trip to Europe.

    Kurt Masur, who had been conducting the Philharmonic frequently since his debut in 1981, became Music Director in 1991. Notable aspects of his tenure included a series of free Memorial Day Concerts at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and annual concert tours abroad, including the orchestra’s first trip to mainland China. He presided over the 150th Anniversary celebrations during the 1992–1993 season. His tenure concluded in 2002, and he was named Music Director Emeritus of the Philharmonic.

    In 2000, Lorin Maazel made a guest-conducting appearance with the New York Philharmonic in two weeks of subscription concerts after an absence of over twenty years, which was met with a positive reaction from the orchestra musicians. This engagement led to his appointment in January 2001 as the orchestra’s next Music Director. He assumed the post in September 2002, 60 years after making his debut with the Orchestra at the age of twelve at Lewisohn Stadium. In his first subscription week he led the world premiere of John Adams’ On the Transmigration of Souls commissioned in memory of those who died on September 11, 2001. Maazel concluded his tenure as the Philharmonic’s Music Director at the end of the 2008/09 season.

    In 2003, due to ongoing concerns with the acoustics of Avery Fisher Hall, there was a proposal to move the New York Philharmonic back to Carnegie Hall and merge the two organizations, but this proposal did not come to fruition. On May 5, 2010, the New York Philharmonic performed its 15,000th concert, a milestone unmatched by any other symphony orchestra in the world.

    On July 18, 2007, the Philharmonic named Alan Gilbert as its next music director, effective with the 2009/10 season, with an initial contract of five years. In October 2012, the orchestra extended Gilbert’s contract through the 2016/17 season. In February 2015, the orchestra announced the scheduled conclusion of Gilbert’s tenure its music director after the close of the 2016/17 season.

    In January 2016, the orchestra announced the appointment of Jaap van Zweden as its next Music Director, effective with the 2018/19 season, with an initial contract of five years. van Zweden is scheduled to serve as Music Director Designate for the 2017/18 season.

    The current president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the orchestra is Deborah Borda. Borda had previously held the same posts, as well as the post of managing director, with the orchestra.
    (So, Wikipedia)

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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