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  • richardmitnick 12:01 PM on April 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, Tanglewood Music Center, Violinist Yevgeny Kutik   

    Tanglewood Music Center: “Violinist Yevgeny Kutik with Berkshire Lyric” 

    Tanglewood Music Center

    Violinist Yevgeny Kutik with Berkshire Lyric

    2
    Yevgeny Kutik

    Soloist and Conductor for Haydn’s Violin Concerto No. 1

    Sunday, May 27, 2018 at 3pm
    Seiji Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood Music Center
    297 West St | Lenox, MA

    Tickets ($25 adults; children under 12 free) and more information available online at http://www.berkshirelyric.org

    “polished dexterity and genteel, old-world charm” – WQXR

    Watch Yevgeny Kutik perform Ravel’s Tzigane: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfOFqFEN10s

    http://www.yevgenykutik.com

    On Sunday, May 27, 2018 at 3pm Russian-American Yevgeny Kutik, known for his “dark-hued tone and razor-sharp technique” (The New York Times), is the featured guest violinist with Berkshire Lyric on the Spring Masterworks Concert in Seiji Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood Music Center (297 West Street). On this all-Haydn program, Kutik is the soloist and conductor for Haydn’s Violin Concerto No. 1 and joins the orchestra as concertmaster for Haydn’s The Creation.

    Kutik was a Berkshire Lyric competition winner as a young teenager and his mother and first teacher, Alla Zernitskaya, is also the director of the highly regarded string program at Pittsfield High School. Five of the top PHS strings will sit in with Lyric’s professional orchestra for The Creation, along with vocal soloists Maureen O’Flynn, William Hite, and Woodrow Bynum, and a combined 140-voice chorus including the Berkshire Lyric Chorus plus young singers from Monument Mountain Regional High School, Mount Everett Regional High School, and Taconic High School.

    Berkshire Lyric’s two choruses for young singers – The Blafield Children’s Chorus and Melodious Accord – along with the Berkshire Children’s Chorus, open the program with Haydn’s Te Deum for Empress Maria Theresa. This Haydn concert marks the third year in a row that Berkshire Lyric has presented a major oratorio at Tanglewood’s Seiji Ozawa Hall. They performed the Mozart Requiem in 2016 and the Beethoven Mass in C in 2017, also combining professional soloists and orchestra from the wider region with committed amateur singers from the Berkshires.

    Russian-American violinist Yevgeny Kutik has captivated audiences worldwide with an old-world sound that communicates a modern intellect. Praised for his technical precision and virtuosity, he is also lauded for his poetic and imaginative interpretations of standard works as well as rarely heard and newly composed repertoire.

    A native of Minsk, Belarus, Yevgeny Kutik immigrated to the United States with his family at the age of five. His 2014 album, Music from the Suitcase: A Collection of Russian Miniatures (Marquis Classics), features music he found in his family’s suitcase after immigrating to the United States from the Soviet Union in 1990, and debuted at No. 5 on the Billboard Classical chart. The album garnered critical acclaim and was featured on NPR’s All Things Considered and in The New York Times. His 2012 debut album, Sounds of Defiance, also on the Marquis label, features the music of Achron, Pärt, Schnittke, and Shostakovich. Funded in large part by a Kickstarter campaign initiated by Kutik, the album focuses on music written during the darkest periods of the lives of these composers.

    Kutik released his third solo album, Words Fail, on Marquis Classics in October 2016. The album uses Mendelssohn’s Songs Without Words as a starting point to expand upon the idea that music surpasses traditional language in its expressive capabilities, and includes two new commissions by Timo Andres and Michael Gandolfi. Words Fail was Album of the Week on San Francisco’s Classical KDFC, LA’s Classical KUSC, and Seattle’s Second Inversion, which acclaimed in an accompanying review, “Kutik’s violin sings and dreams across two centuries of classical music.”

    Highlights of Yevgeny Kutik’s current season include his debut with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, as well as debuts with the La Crosse and Tallahassee symphony orchestras, and performances with the Traverse and Berkshire symphony orchestras. Highlights of his recitals this season include performances at the University of Arizona Presents, Kean Stage, Tuesday Evening Concert Series, the Glacier Symphony & Chorale’s Festival Amadeus, and the Nantucket Musical Arts Society. Additionally, at the invitation of the International March of the Living, he will perform concerts in Warsaw and Krakow, and appear at the Holocaust Memorial Day ceremony at Auschwitz in April 2018.

    Deeply committed to fostering creative relationships with living composers in addition to performing music from the standard repertoire, Yevgeny Kutik has been involved in commissioning and premiering several new works. In January 2016, he and composer/pianist Timo Andres performed the world premiere of Words Fail, a violin and piano piece he commissioned from Andres, at The Phillips Collection as part of a three-concert series curated by Nico Muhly. Upon the release of Words Fail in October 2016, Kutik gave the world premiere of Michael Gandolfi’s Arioso Doloroso/Estatico, which Kutik commissioned for the album, at National Sawdust in Brooklyn. Additional premiere performances include the world premiere of Ron Ford’s concerto Versus with the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra at Ozawa Hall, the New York premiere of George Tsontakis’ Violin Concerto No. 2 at the 92nd Street Y, and the world premiere of Sheila Silver’s Six Beads on a String, which he commissioned. He has also been involved in the performances of new and rarely played works by Kati Agócs, Joseph Schwantner, Nico Muhly, and Donald Martino.

    Passionate about his heritage and its influence on his artistry, Kutik is an advocate for the Jewish Federations of North America, the organization that assisted his family in coming to the United States, and regularly speaks and performs across the United States to both raise awareness and promote the assistance of refugees from around the world.

    Yevgeny Kutik made his major orchestral debut in 2003 with Keith Lockhart and The Boston Pops as the First Prize recipient of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Young Artists Competition. In 2006, he was awarded the Salon de Virtuosi Grant as well as the Tanglewood Music Center Jules Reiner Violin Prize. He was a featured performer for the 2012 March of the Living observances, where he played for audiences at the Krakow Opera House and for over 10,000 people at Auschwitz-Birkenau.

    Kutik was a featured soloist in Joseph Schwantner’s The Poet’s Hour – Soliloquy for Violin on episode six of Gerard Schwarz’s All-Star Orchestra, a made-for-television classical music concert series released on DVD by Naxos and broadcast nationally on PBS.

    Kutik has performed with orchestras throughout the United States including the East Texas, Greensboro, Greenville, Juneau, Lima, North State, Boca Raton, Springfield (MA), Pensacola, Las Cruces, Westmoreland, Baton Rouge, Lansing, New Haven, Dayton, Asheville, Duluth Superior, Springfield (MO) and Wyoming symphony orchestras, as well as Florida’s The SYMPHONIA, New York City’s Riverside Symphony and Park Avenue Chamber Symphony, and the Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra of Boston. Abroad, he has appeared as guest soloist with Germany’s Norddeutsche Philharmonie Rostock and WDR Rundfunk Orchestra Köln, Montenegro’s Montenegrin Symphony Orchestra, Japan’s Tokyo Vivaldi Ensemble, and the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra. He has appeared in recital as a part of the Dame Myra Hess Concerts Chicago, Peoples’ Symphony Concerts, Merkin Hall Tuesday Matinee Series, and National Sawdust in New York City, Hammond Recital Series and Milton Academy’s Gratwick Concerts in Greater Boston, the Baton Rogue Symphony Orchestra’s Lamar Chamber Series, the Embassy Series and The Phillips Collection in Washington DC, and at the Lobkowicz Collections Prague presented by Prince William Lobkowicz. Festival performances have included the Tanglewood Music Festival, the opening concert of the 2015 Cape Cod Chamber Music Festival, Pennsylvania’s Gretna Music, Germany’s Ludwigsburger Schlossfestspiele, and the Verbier Festival in Switzerland.

    Yevgeny Kutik began violin studies with his mother, Alla Zernitskaya, and went on to study with Zinaida Gilels, Shirley Givens, Roman Totenberg, and Donald Weilerstein. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Boston University and a master’s degree from the New England Conservatory and currently resides in Boston. Kutik’s violin was crafted in Italy in 1915 by Stefano Scarampella.

    For more information, please visit http://www.yevgenykutik.com.

    Berkshire Lyric is a community of choruses where singers ages six to eighty-three explore the world of beauty through the choral art. Founded by Robert Blafield in 1963 and now led by artistic director Jack Brown, Berkshire Lyric continues to explore a wide variety of great music for chorus and believes that the sung word is the language of the heart and has a unique power to transform both the singer and the listener.

    Received via email .

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    Tanglewood Music Center

    The Tanglewood Music Center is an annual summer music academy in Lenox, Massachusetts, United States, in which emerging professional musicians participate in performances, master classes and workshops. The Center operates as a part of the Tanglewood Music Festival, an outdoor concert series and the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO).

    The Tanglewood Music Center (TMC) was founded in 1940 as the Berkshire Music Center by the BSO’s music director, Serge Koussevitzky, three years after the establishment of Tanglewood as the summer home of the BSO. He served as director of the Center until one year after his retirement with the BSO, when he was succeeded by new BSO director Charles Münch, who ran the TMC from 1951 until 1962. Munch was succeeded by BSO director Erich Leinsdorf, who was TMC director from 1963 to 1970.

    In 1970, the rock scene and jazz scene were coming together, as bands like Chicago, Santana, Miles Davis and many more performed. Also in 1970, three years before he was appointed as Music Director of the BSO, Seiji Ozawa took over BSO activities at Tanglewood, with Gunther Schuller as TMC director and Leonard Bernstein as general advisor. In 1975, the Italian conductor Franco Ferrara began teaching conducting at TMC. Schuller remained as director until August 1984 when he resigned over differences with Ozawa. Pianist and conductor Leon Fleisher took over the direction of TMC in 1985, but resigned abruptly several years later in 1997 after a “lengthy, bitter dispute” with Ozawa. Fleisher was replaced by Ellen Highstein, the current TMC director as of 2017. Ozawa was succeeded as BSO director in 2001 by James Levine, who conducted some TMC concerts and operas and worked with the student conductors in addition to leading Tanglewood’s BSO programs. Levine left the BSO in 2011 after health issues. On May 16, 2013, the BSO announced Andris Nelsons as its 15th—and current as of 2017—Music Director, and he has conducted the TMC Orchestra and worked with the conducting fellows there on several occasions.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 5:40 PM on April 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Classical Music, , , , Ted Hearn   

    From Cantaloupe Music- Pulitzer Finalist: “Sound from the Bench, by Ted Hearne” 

    Cantaloupe Music is the recording arm of Bang On a Can, the original New Music DIY organization.

    Recording released on March 24, 2017 by The Crossing, a five-movement cantata for chamber choir, electric guitar and percussion that raises oblique questions about the crosscurrents of power through excerpts from sources as diverse as Supreme Court rulings and ventriloquism textbooks.

    3

    Sound from the Bench
    By Ted Hearne

    1

    “Sound From the Bench” is a 35-minute cantata for chamber choir, two electric guitars and drums, with a libretto by Jena Osman. It was co-commissioned by Volti and The Crossing.

    why these texts?

    Sound From the Bench is a reaction to Jena Osman’s incredible book Corporate Relations, a collection of poems that follows the historical trajectory of corporate personhood in the United States. The five movements combine language taken from landmark Supreme Court Cases with words from ventriloquism textbooks.

    I was instantly drawn to Osman’s work because of its rich intertextuality: she appropriates a variety of texts from diverse sources and assembles them into a powerful bricolage. I strive toward a similar polyphony of oppositional voices and perspectives in my music, and to bring the chaotic forces of life into the work itself. It was this impulse, and the unabashedly political tone of Osman’s poetry, that made me want to set some part of “Corporate Relations” to music.

    why electric guitars?

    Sound From the Bench
    is built around the tension between the human voice and electric guitar. The electric guitar can sound like literally anything. Through circuitry, programming, and analog and digital manipulation, the pitches and rhythms a guitarist plays can be utterly transformed, erasing all human touch. It speaks through an amplifier and could easily drown out any voice. These cyborg-esque qualities contrast the human voice, both in its inescapable limitations and the complex differences found in every individual vocal timbre.

    what does “no mouth” mean?

    No mouth is Osman’s paraphrase of the central reasoning behind the majority in Bellotti v. First National Bank, the 1978 case upon which Citizens United is based: because corporations don’t have a literal mouth, they cannot literally speak, therefore advertising is their only available method of communication and must be considered speech (and is entitled to First Amendment protections as such).

    The phrase the very heart, also found in the second movement, is excerpted from Justice White’s dissent in this case: “It has long been recognized, however, that the special status of corporations has placed them in a position to control vast amounts of economic power which may, if not regulated, dominate not only the economy but the very heart of our democracy, the electoral process.”

    about the third movement

    The central movement sets words from the oral argument to Citizens United. My brain started firing when I realized this poem of Jena’s was a literal erasure of the Supreme Court document – every phrase appeared in order, and in a position approximating the horizontal spot it appeared on the page. When I printed out the full 83-page oral argument and blacked out every phrase that Jena hadn’t included, the remaining words jumped out at me and started to take on new meanings and inferences. That strange, new energy helped propel the decontextualized text into music.

    The time at which the phrases appear approximate and in some way preserve the place at which they appear in the original document. The music between Osman’s text, that which fills the “blank pages,” sometimes includes a quote from Thomas Tallis’s motet Loquebantur Variis Linguis (the text is: “The Apostles spoke in different tongues – Alleluia.”) Aside from loving this music, I liked the image of our Justices as apostles.

    “personhood”

    What could this word even mean when it is applied to non-human things? The courts have systematically granted constitutional rights to corporations since the Civil War – we concede that a corporation can “speak” even though it has no mouth – and these rights have come at the expense of both the private citizen and the government.

    a corporation is to a person as a person is to a machine

    friends of the court we know them as good and bad, they too are sheep
    and goats ventriloquizing the ghostly fiction

    a corporation is to a body as a body is to a puppet

    putting it in caricature, if there are natural persons then there are those
    who are not that, buying candidates. there are those who are strong on
    the ground and then weak in the air. weight shifts to the left leg while
    the propaganda arm extends.
    (Jena Osman, from Corporate Relations)

    • program notes by Ted Hearne, with passages after Eric Howerton’s review of Corporate Relations for The Volta Blog

    — from the composer’s website

    Biography

    Composer, singer and bandleader Ted Hearne (b.1982, Chicago) draws on a wide breadth of influences ranging across music’s full terrain, to create intense, personal and multi-dimensional works.

    The New York Times has praised Mr. Hearne for his “tough edge and wildness of spirit,” and “topical, politically sharp-edged works.” Pitchfork called Hearne’s work “some of the most expressive socially engaged music in recent memory — from any genre.”

    Hearne’s newest theatrical work, The Source, sets text from the Iraq and Afghanistan War Logs, along with words by Chelsea Manning (the U.S. Army private who leaked those classified documents to WikiLeaks), and was premiered to rave reviews last October at the BAM Next Wave Festival in Brooklyn. The New York Times called The Source “a 21st Century masterpiece,” and included it on its list of the best classical vocal performances of 2014 and best albums of 2015, noting that the work “offers a fresh model of how opera and musical theater can tackle contemporary issues: not with documentary realism, but with ambiguity, obliquity, and even sheer confusion.” During the 2016-17 season, the original production of The Source (directed by Daniel Fish) was presented by both the LA Opera and San Francisco Opera.

    Hearne’s piece Katrina Ballads, another modern-day oratorio with a primary source libretto, was awarded the 2009 Gaudeamus Prize in composition and was named one of the best classical albums of 2010 by Time Out Chicago and The Washington Post. A recent collaboration paired him with legendary musician Erykah Badu, for whom he wrote an evening-length work combining new music with arrangements of songs from her 2008 album New Amerykah: Part One.

    Law of Mosaics, Hearne’s 30-minute piece for string orchestra, will see performances this year by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and San Francisco Symphony. His album of the same name, with Andrew Norman and A Far Cry, was named one of The New Yorker’s notable albums of 2014 by Alex Ross.

    A charismatic vocalist, Hearne performs with Philip White as the vocal-electronics duo R WE WHO R WE, whose debut album (New Focus Recordings, 2013) was called “eminently, if weirdly, danceable and utterly gripping.” (Time Out Chicago). Two albums of vocal music, The Source and Outlanders, were recently released on New Amsterdam Records.

    Ted Hearne was awarded the 2014 New Voices Residency from Boosey and Hawkes, and recently joined the composition faculty at the University of Southern California. Recent and upcoming commissions include orchestral works for the San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, New World Symphony, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and A Far Cry, chamber works for eighth blackbird, Ensemble dal Niente and Alarm Will Sound, and vocal works for Volti, The Crossing and Roomful of Teeth.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:51 PM on April 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music, , Bard SummerScape 2018, Opera   

    “Bard SummerScape 2018 Presents Rare New American Production of Anton Rubinstein’s Demon (July 27–Aug 5)” 

    Bard Music Festival

    Bard Music Festival

    Plus Rimsky-Korsakov’s Operas Mozart and Salieri (Aug 18) and The Tsar’s Bride (Aug 19) in Bard Music Festival

    “Some of the most important summer opera experiences in the U.S. are not at the better-known festivals but at Bard SummerScape.”
    Financial Times

    Committed since its inception to reviving important but neglected operas, Bard SummerScape has long proven itself “an indispensable part of the summer operatic landscape” (Musical America). Offering a rare new American production of Demon by Anton Rubinstein as its operatic centerpiece, this year’s immersion in Rimsky-Korsakov and His World is no exception. With Olga Tolkmit and Efim Zavalny heading an all-Russian cast in an original staging by renowned American director Thaddeus Strassberger, with the support of the American Symphony Orchestra under the leadership of music director and festival co-artistic director Leon Botstein, Demon runs for five performances between July 27 and August 5, with an Opera Talk, free and open to the public, before the matinee on July 29. SummerScape 2018 also provides the chance to see Rimsky-Korsakov’s seldom-staged operas Mozart and Salieri (August 18) and The Tsar’s Bride (August 19) during the 29th annual Bard Music Festival. Anchored by the Bard Festival Chorale under the direction of James Bagwell, all three presentations take place on Bard’s glorious Hudson Valley campus in the striking Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center. As Time Out New York notes, “Botstein and Bard SummerScape show courage, foresight and great imagination, honoring operas that larger institutions are content to ignore.”

    Anton Rubinstein’s Demon (1871)
    It was Anton Rubinstein (1829–94), Rimsky-Korsakov’s senior by 15 years, who founded the St. Petersburg Conservatory, now named for the younger composer. Both men had an enormous influence on the next generation of Russian composition, and although in his lifetime Rubinstein was best known as a keyboard virtuoso and star pedagogue whose students included Tchaikovsky, he was also a prolific composer with no fewer than 20 operas to his name. The most popular of these was Demon (1871), one of the two operas mounted most often in 19th-century Russia, and the country’s first to be produced in Britain. Yet despite its rich choruses and fiery libretto, today Rubinstein’s masterpiece has fallen into neglect and is almost never staged in the English-speaking world.

    Composed in three acts to a libretto by Pavel Viskovatov, Demon was based on a narrative poem by Mikhail Lermontov that was initially banned as sacrilegious. Like the poem, Rubinstein’s opera depicts a demon, or fallen angel, who meets Tamara, a mortal princess, and falls desperately in love, trying everything in his power to seduce her. Tamara’s struggle to resist him becomes a battle not only for her soul but for the fate of the earth itself. When at last she weakens, the price of her redemption is death, and the demon is condemned to eternal solitude.

    On the few occasions it has been heard in the West, Demon has received a warm welcome. After a concert performance by the Kirov Opera at the 2003 Lincoln Center Festival, the New York Times admired the composer’s “sure lyrical gift and command of the orchestra,” while a 2009 London presentation prompted Gramophone to admire “Rubinstein’s colourful and lyrically expressive score.” As The Independent declared: “You can see why it did, and still does, carry the wow factor in Russia.”

    Bard’s full staging represents an all-too-rare opportunity to see Rubinstein’s opera mounted outside the composer’s homeland. Conceived expressly for SummerScape 2018, the new production is by renowned American director Thaddeus Strassberger, whose previous SummerScape productions are among Bard’s most resounding success stories. The Financial Times declared: “Les Huguenots in Bard’s staging is a thriller from beginning to end. … Five Stars.” New York magazine named his treatment of Der ferne Klang one of the “Top Ten Classical Music Events of 2010”; the Wall Street Journal called his take on Le roi malgré lui “hilarious”; and the New York Times found his handling of The Wreckers “extraordinarily successful.” As for his treatment of Oresteia by Rubinstein’s contemporary Sergei Taneyev, which marked the opera’s first fully staged production outside Russia, it was nominated for a 2014 International Opera Award.

    Making his U.S. debut in Demon’s title role is baritone Efim Zavalny, first prize-winner at the International Shtokolov Vocalists’ Competition. Singing opposite him as Tamara is soprano Olga Tolkmit, a nominee for Russia’s prestigious Golden Mask Award, in her third major role at Bard; having impressed the Financial Times with her “resonant, bright-voiced soprano” in Oresteia, she returned to grace Dvořák’s Dimitrij last summer. Belarusian bass Andrey Valentiy, who has appeared at Moscow’s Bolshoi Theatre and Milan’s La Scala, sings Tamara’s father, Prince Gudal. Her Nanny is portrayed by mezzo-soprano Ekaterina Egorova, a frequent leading lady at St. Petersburg’s Mikhailovsky Opera. Likewise tenor Alexander Nesterenko, who sings Tamara’s fiancé, Prince Sinodal, regularly headlines productions at Moscow’s Stanislavsky Opera. Bard’s all-Russian cast is completed by bass-baritone Yakov Strizhak as Sinodal’s Old Servant, mezzo-soprano Nadezhda Babintseva as the Angel, and tenor Pavel Sulyandziga as the Messenger. The opera’s thrilling dance sequences will be performed by the highly respected Georgian dance troupe, Pesvebi Georgian Dancers.

    Sets for Demon are designed by Paul Tate dePoo III, who was nominated for a 2017 Helen Hayes Award. The production will be enhanced by video projections from Greg Emetaz, known for his work for New York City Opera and San Francisco Opera, with lighting design by JAX Messenger, whose work on Oresteia helped ensure that “Strassberger’s cohesive vision … was searingly powerful” (Opera News). Demon’s costume design is by Obie Award-winner Kaye Voyce, whose extensive credits range from Broadway to the Royal Shakespeare Company, as well as numerous Bard theater and dance productions.

    High resolution images for Bard’s production of Demon are available here.

    Rimsky-Korsakov’s Mozart and Salieri (1897), Bard Music Festival Program 8
    No 19th-century composer contributed more substantially to Russia’s opera repertoire than Rimsky-Korsakov, who wrote 16 examples of the genre. Based on the same Pushkin verse drama that inspired Peter Shaffer’s Amadeus, his one-act opera Mozart and Salieri covers the same territory, animating the rumor that Salieri, official composer of Vienna’s Hapsburg court, so envied Mozart’s genius that he was driven to poison him. Although the opera is rarely mounted even in Russia, this is to be regretted, according to the New York Times, which – citing “the opera’s success and originality” – ranked it among the composer’s “most interesting work.”

    Forming the second half of a program exploring Domestic Music Making in Russia, Bard’s presentation of the opera stars tenor Gerard Schneider, whose “imposing tenor” (Wall Street Journal) “stole the show” (Allegri con Fuoco) in SummerScape 2016’s mainstage production of Iris. Schneider sings the role of Mozart, with Grammy nominee Mikhail Svetlov, who impressed the Washington Post with his “titanic, all-encompassing bass,” as the composer’s nemesis, Salieri.

    There will be a talk before the concert by festival co-artistic director Christopher Gibbs, who is the James H. Ottaway Jr. Professor of Music at Bard College.

    Rimsky-Korsakov’s The Tsar’s Bride (1898), Bard Music Festival Program 12
    For his tenth opera, Rimsky-Korsakov combined the fantastic with the historical, turning to the so-called Time of Troubles, the same period of Russian history that inspired Boris Godunov and SummerScape 2017’s Dimitrij. Based on a play by Lev Mey, The Tsar’s Bride depicts Marfa, the merchant’s daughter whom Ivan the Terrible (a silent role, in accordance with Tsarist censorship laws) chooses from among thousands of pretty girls as his third wife. Unfortunately she is already in love with another and subject to the unwanted attentions of a third, who attempts to give her a love potion. When poison is substituted, and the man she loves is blamed and executed, Marfa loses her mind, providing the opera with a bona fide mad scene. Although the familiar Slava anthem functions throughout as a leitmotif, Rimsky-Korsakov explained that he intended The Tsar’s Bride as a reaction against Wagner’s ideas, and aimed for “cantilena par excellence.” This proved successful in his homeland, where the opera was warmly welcomed at its premiere, and has remained in regular rotation ever since. In the West, by contrast, revivals are rare. Yet The Tsar’s Bride is “an upfront rumbustious melodrama, packed with big tunes and thrilling climaxes” (The Telegraph, UK). Moreover, it offers “a compelling study of power and powerlessness” (The Independent, UK), and has “one of the most lyrical of all Rimsky-Korsakov scores” (New York Times).

    Bard’s semi-staged production features The Orchestra Now (TŌN), Bard’s graduate training orchestra, under Botstein’s leadership. In the title role of Marfa, it stars Lyubov Petrova, “a soprano of ravishing, changeable beauty, blazing high notes and magnetic stage presence” (Opera News). Demon’s Andrey Valentiy sings Marfa’s father, Vasily Sobakin, and Mozart and Salieri’s Gerard Schneider takes the role of her falsely accused suitor, Ivan Likov. Efim Zavalny, the Demon himself, plays her third admirer, Grigory Gryaznoy, with mezzo-soprano Nadezhda Babintseva, who “brought the house down” (RTE) on tour with the Moscow State Opera, as Lyubasha, his murderous mistress. Joel Sorensen, “a beautifully expressive tenor, gifted at characterization” (The Independent, UK), appears as the Tsar’s physician, Yelisey Bomeliy, with bass-baritone Yakov Strizhak, first-prize-winner at the Rachmaninov International Music Competition, as an oprichnik, or member of the imperial police force. Rounding out Bard’s stellar cast as Petrovna, the Sobakins’ housekeeper, is mezzo-soprano Teresa Buchholz, winner of the female division at Carnegie Hall’s Nico Castel International Master Singer Competition; she returns to the festival after a series of “consistently excellent” (New York Arts) performances in previous SummerScape seasons.

    With lighting by Anshuman Bhatia, named a “Young Designer to Watch” by Live Design magazine, Bard’s semi-staged production is designed and directed by Doug Fitch, the co-founder of Giants Are Small. Consistently cited as benchmarks of innovation, his New York Philharmonic collaborations include Le Grand Macabre, named “Best Opera of the Year” by the New York Times, New York magazine, and Time Out New York; and The Cunning Little Vixen, chosen as the “Best Classical Event of the Year” by New York.

    Before the opera, there will be a talk by Bard’s 2018 Scholar-in-Residence, Marina Frolova-Walker, author of Russian Music and Nationalism: from Glinka to Stalin and editor of the forthcoming volume Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and His World.

    About opera at Bard SummerScape
    Since the opening of the Fisher Center at Bard, Botstein and the American Symphony Orchestra have been responsible for championing and restoring to the stage a growing number of important but long-neglected operas. All these presentations and their remarkable stagings have been warmly received by audiences and critics alike – not least, last season’s full staging of Dvořák’s Dimitrij. The New York Times admired Bard’s “simple and effective updated production,” called the “vivid choral scenes … a triumph for the impressive Bard Festival Chorale,” and concluded:

    “Mr. Botstein drew vibrant playing and a well-paced performance from the American Symphony Orchestra. … He, the festival and this hard-working cast deserve thanks.”

    As Musical America recognizes: “Bard’s annual opera has become an indispensable part of the summer operatic landscape.”

    Illustrating the scope and originality of the festival’s programming, a list of Bard’s previous operatic offerings follows below:

    2017: Dvořák – Dimitrij (first fully staged American production)
    Moniuszko – Halka
    2016: Mascagni – Iris
    Puccini – Il tabarro and Le Villi; Massenet – La Navarraise; Busoni – Turandot; Puccini/Berio – Turandot, Act III
    2015: Smyth – The Wreckers (first fully staged American production)
    2014: Weber – Euryanthe (first American revival in 100 years)
    Schubert – Fierrabras; Die Verschworenen
    von Suppé – Franz Schubert
    2013: Taneyev – Oresteia (first fully staged production outside Russia)
    Stravinsky – Oedipus Rex, Perséphone, and Mavra
    2012: Chabrier – Le roi malgré lui (first staged revival of original version)
    Saint-Saëns – Henry VIII
    2011: Strauss – Die Liebe der Danae (first fully staged New York production)
    2010: Schreker – Der ferne Klang
    Hindemith – Sancta Susanna
    Weill – Royal Palace
    2009: Meyerbeer – Les Huguenots
    2008: Szymanowski – King Roger; Harnasie (double-bill)
    2007: Zemlinsky – Der Zwerg; Eine florentinische Tragödie (first U.S. double-bill production)
    2006: Schumann – Genoveva (first U.S. professional production)
    2005: Blitzstein – Regina
    2004: Shostakovich – The Nose (first East-coast professional production)
    2003: Janáček – Osud (first U.S. staged production)

    Click here to see a celebration of opera at Bard SummerScape.

    Opera at Bard SummerScape 2018

    Anton Rubinstein (1829–94)
    Demon (1871)

    American Symphony Orchestra
    Conducted by Leon Botstein, music director
    Directed by Thaddeus Strassberger
    Bard Festival Chorale
    Conducted by James Bagwell
    Paul Tate dePoo III: set designer
    Kaye Voyce: costume designer
    Candida Nichols: associate costumer
    JAX Messenger: lighting designer
    Greg Emetaz: video designer
    Shorena Barbakadz: choreographer
    Anne Ford-Coates: hair and makeup designer
    Onofrio Colucci: acting coach/assistant director
    Roza Tulyaganova: diction coach/assistant director
    Jordan Fein: assistant director

    Demon: Efim Zavalny, baritone
    Tamara: Olga Tolkmit, soprano
    Angel: Nadezhda Babintseva, mezzo-soprano
    Prince Gudal: Andrey Valentiy, bass
    Prince Sinodal: Alexander Nesterenko, tenor
    Nanny: Ekaterina Egorova, mezzo-soprano
    Old Servant: Yakov Strizhak, bass-baritone
    Messenger: Pavel Sulyandziga, tenor
    Pesvebi Georgian Dancers

    Sosnoff Theater
    July 27* at 8 pm
    July 29*; August 1, 3* & 5* at 2 pm
    Tickets start at $25

    Opening Night Reception for Members
    July 27

    Opera Talk with Leon Botstein
    July 29 at 12 pm
    Free and open to the public

    Opera in the 2018 Bard Music Festival, Rimsky-Korsakov and His World

    Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (18441908)
    Mozart and Salieri (1897)

    Bard Festival Chorale
    Conducted by James Bagwell
    Mozart: Gerard Schneider, tenor
    Salieri: Mikhail Svetlov, bass

    August 18
    Program Eight, Domestic Music Making in Russia
    Olin Hall
    1 pm Preconcert Talk: Christopher Gibbs
    1:30 pm Performance

    Tickets: $40

    Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (18441908)
    The Tsar’s Bride (1898)

    The Orchestra Now (TŌN)
    Conducted by Leon Botstein
    Bard Festival Chorale
    Conducted by James Bagwell
    Designed and directed by Doug Fitch
    Lighting design: Anshuman Bhatia
    Marfa: Lyubov Petrova, soprano
    Lyubasha: Nadezhda Babintseva, mezzo-soprano
    Grigory Gryaznoy: Efim Zavalny, baritone
    Vasily Sobakin: Andrey Valentiy, bass
    Malyuta Skuratov: Yakov Strizhak, bass-baritone
    Yelisey Bomeliy: Joel Sorensen, tenor
    Ivan Likov: Gerard Schneider, tenor
    Petrovna: Teresa Buchholz, mezzo-soprano

    August 19
    Program Twelve, The Tsar’s Bride*
    Sosnoff Theater
    3:30 pm Preconcert Talk: Marina Frolova-Walker
    4:30 pm Performance

    Tickets: $25–$75

    • Round-trip transportation from Manhattan to Bard is available for this performance. The round-trip fare is $40 and reservations are required; see further details below.

    SummerScape 2018: other key performance dates by genre

    MUSIC
    Bard Music Festival, Weekend One: Inventing Russian Music: The Mighty Five (Aug 10–12)
    Bard Music Festival, Weekend Two: Rimsky-Korsakov and His Followers (Aug 17–19)

    DANCE
    Pam Tanowitz, Kaija Saariaho, Brice Marden: T.S. Eliot’s Four Quartets (world premiere of SummerScape commission, featuring Pam Tanowitz Dance, Kathleen Chalfant, and The Knights)
    Sosnoff Theater
    July 6* & 7 at 8 pm
    July 8* at 3 pm
    Tickets start at $25

    Opening Night Reception for Members Friday, July 6
    Post-Performance Conversation Saturday, July 7
    Pre-Performance Conversation Sunday, July 8 at 2pm

    THEATER
    Leonard Bernstein’s Peter Pan (new production)
    Music and lyrics by Leonard Bernstein
    After the play by J. M. Barrie
    Adapted and directed by Christopher Alden
    LUMA Theater
    June 28; July 5, 6*, 8, 12, 15, 19 & 22 at 7 pm
    June 29 & 30; July 7, 13, 14, 20 & 21 at 7:30 pm
    July 1, 4, 7, 8*, 11, 14, 15, 18, 21 & 22 at 2 pm
    Tickets start at $25
    Open to reviewing press beginning July 5
    Suitable for audiences aged 12 and up.

    Opening Night Reception for Members Friday, July 6
    Pre-Performance Conversation Sunday, July 1 at 1pm
    Post-Performance Conversation Wednesday, July 11

    FILM SERIES
    Rimsky-Korsakov and the Poetry of Cinema
    Ottaway Film Center
    July 26 – Russian Ark (Aleksandr Sokurov, 2002, Russia/Germany/Canada/Finland, 96 minutes)
    July 29 – A Night on Bald Mountain (Alexandre Alexeieff and Claire Parker, 1933, France, 8 minutes) and Fantasia (Walt Disney, 1940, USA, 126 minutes)
    August 2 – The Devil is a Woman (Josef von Sternberg, 1935, USA, 79 minutes)
    August 5 – Kismet (Vincente Minnelli, 1955, USA, 113 minutes)
    August 9 – Man of Music (Composer Glinka), (Grigori Aleksandrov, 1952, USSR, 100 minutes)
    August 12 – The Cranes are Flying (Mikhail Kalatozov, 1957, USSR, 97 minutes)
    August 16 – Atlantic City (Louis Malle, 1980, Canada/France, 104 minutes)
    August 19 – The House of Mirth (Terence Davies, 2000, UK/Germany/USA, 140 minutes)
    Tickets: $10

    SPIEGELTENT
    Live Music, Cabaret, Festival Dining, and After Hours salon
    Dates, times, and prices vary

    Bard SummerScape ticket information

    Tickets for all Bard SummerScape events are now on sale. For tickets and further information on all SummerScape events, call the Fisher Center box office at 845-758-7900 or visit http://fishercenter.bard.edu/summerscape.

    Venues:
    SummerScape opera, theater, and dance performances and most Bard Music Festival programs are held in the Sosnoff Theater or LUMA Theater in Bard’s Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, designed by Frank Gehry and celebrated since its opening as a major architectural landmark in the region. Some chamber programs and other BMF events are in Olin Hall, and the Spiegeltent has its own schedule of events, in addition to serving as a restaurant, café, and bar before and after performances. Film Series screenings are at the Jim Ottaway Jr. Film Center in the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Center.

    Full Schedule:
    For a complete schedule of SummerScape and Bard Music Festival events (subject to change), follow the links given below. Updates are posted at the festival web site fishercenter.bard.edu/summerscape.
    Fisher Center members receive priority access to the best seats in advance, and those who join the Center’s email list receive advance booking opportunities as well as regular news and updates.

    Bard SummerScape: http://fishercenter.bard.edu/summerscape

    Bard Music Festival: http://fishercenter.bard.edu/bmf

    Tickets and Subscriptions: http://fishercenter.bard.edu/boxoffice; or by phone at 845-758-7900. Tickets to all mainstage events start at $25.

    Special offers:
    Create Your Own Series: save 25% and enjoy maximum flexibility, by choosing four or more events.
    SummerScape Mainstage Package: save 30% and guarantee seats for dance, theater, and opera events.
    Out-of-Town Package: save up to 23% on mainstage ticket, roundtrip bus from New York City, and three-course meal.
    Night Out Package: save up to 15% on mainstage ticket (selected performances only) and three-course meal.

    Updates: Bard’s “e-subscribers” get all the news in regular updates. Click here to sign up, or send an e-mail to fishercenter@bard.edu.

    All programs are subject to change.

    The 2018 SummerScape season is made possible in part through the generous support of Jeanne Donovan Fisher, the Martin and Toni Sosnoff Foundation, the Board of The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, the Board of the Bard Music Festival, and Fisher Center members, as well as grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

    Received via email.

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    Bard Music Festival

    History of the Bard Music Festival

    Leon Botstein and Christopher H. Gibbs, Artistic Directors
    The Bard Music Festival was founded in 1990 to promote new ways of understanding and presenting the history of music to a contemporary audience. Each year, a single composer is chosen as the main subject. The biography of the composer, the influences and consequences of that composer’s achievement, and all aspects of the musical culture surrounding the time and place of the composer’s life are explored. Perhaps the most important dimensions of the festival are the ways in which it links music to the worlds of literature, painting, theater, philosophy, and politics and brings two kinds of audience together: those with a long history of interest in concert life and first-time listeners, who find the festival an ideal place to learn about and enjoy the riches of our musical past.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

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    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:30 PM on April 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Andrei Ioniţă Cello Naoko Sonoda Piano, Anoushka Shankar with the Pacific Symphony, , Candide, , Classical Music, Ensemble Connect   

    From Carnegie Hall: At A Glance 


    Carnegie Hall

    Candide
    A One-Night-Only Benefit Concert
    In Celebration of the Bernstein Centennial
    Wednesday, April 18, 2018 7 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

    3

    Bernstein’s Candide, based on Voltaire’s satirical tale, is a superb fusion of Broadway flash and operatic virtuosity. Its quicksilver overture, dazzling coloratura soprano aria “Glitter and Be Gay,” sardonic Auto-da-fé chorus, and deeply moving Make Our Garden Grow finale are highlights of an ebullient and irresistible work. Performed in concert by first-rate guest artists and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s, Candide is an ideal celebration of the Bernstein centenary.

    Tickets

    Performers
    Starring
    Paul Appleby, Candide
    Erin Morley, Cunegonde
    Patricia Racette, Old Lady
    William Burden, Governor
    and
    John Lithgow, Voltaire / Dr. Pangloss
    with
    Ryan Silverman, Maximilian
    Bryonha Marie Parham, Paquette
    Special Appearances by
    Danny Burstein (Don Issachar, The Jew)
    Len Cariou (Archbishop)
    Marilyn Horne (Queen of Eldorado)
    Glenn Seven Allen, Ross Benoliel, and Kyle Pfortmiller, Inquisitors
    Christine DiGiallonardo, Andrea Jones-Sojola, David Scott Purdy, and Nathaniel Stampley, Vocal Quartet
    Paloma Garcia-Lee, Stephen Hanna, Akina Kitazawa, and Devin Roberts, Ensemble Dancers

    Orchestra of St. Luke’s
    Mansfield University Concert Choir
    Rob Fisher, Musical Director and Conductor
    Gary Griffin, Director
    Joshua Bergasse, Choreographer
    Scott Lehrer, Sound Designer
    Tracy Christensen, Costume Designer
    Alan Adelman, Lighting Designer
    Wendall K. Harrington, Projections Designer
    Casting by Telsey + Company / Rachel Hoffman, CSA

    Program
    CANDIDE
    A Concert Version
    Music by LEONARD BERNSTEIN
    Book by HUGH WHEELER
    Lyrics by RICHARD WILBUR
    Additional Lyrics by STEPHEN SONDHEIM, JOHN LATOUCHE, LILLIAN HELLMAN, DOROTHY PARKER, AND LEONARD BERNSTEIN
    Orchestration by LEONARD BERNSTEIN and HERSHY KAY
    Additional Orchestration by JOHN MAUCERI

    Event Duration
    The concert will last approximately two and one-half hours, including one 20-minute intermission.

    See the full article here .
    Ensemble Connect
    Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:30 PM Weill Recital Hall

    1
    Ensemble Connect

    Ensemble Connect has workshopped with Steve Reich and Meredith Monk, been led by Sir Simon Rattle, and premiered works by the finest young composers of our day. The group of young musicians enters its second decade with can’t miss music making. To close its season at Carnegie Hall, Ensemble Connect performs Schoenberg’s Pierrot lunaire, a setting of poems for speaker and chamber ensemble, employing a hybrid of spoken and sung vocalization that gives the work a surreal quality.

    Tickets

    Performers
    Ensemble Connect
    ·· Rosie Gallagher, Flute
    ·· Bixby Kennedy, Clarinet
    ·· Mika Sasaki, Piano
    ·· Rebecca Anderson, Violin
    ·· Mari Lee, Violin
    ·· Andrew Gonzalez, Viola
    ·· Madeline Fayette, Cello
    ·· Julia Yang, Cello
    Mellissa Hughes, Soprano

    Program
    MOZART Divertimento in E-flat Major, K. 563
    SCHOENBERG Pierrot lunaire

    Event Duration
    The printed program will last approximately two hours, including one 20-minute intermission.

    See the full article here .

    1
    Andrei Ioniţă, Cello‍ ‍
    Romanian cellist Andrei Ioniţă is the first-prize winner of Moscow’s 2015 International Tchaikovsky Competition. The Guardian wrote of his performance, calling him “a musician with a sparkling technique and the priceless ability to respond to what is going on around him while he is displaying it.”

    4
    Naoko Sonoda, Piano
    Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:30 PM Zankel Hall

    Performers
    Andrei Ioniţă, Cello
    Naoko Sonoda, Piano

    Program
    P.A. LOCATELLI Cello Sonata in D Major (arr. Piatti)
    STRAVINSKY Suite italienne
    BACH Cello Suite No. 2 in D Minor
    SHOSTAKOVICH Cello Sonata

    Event Duration
    The printed program will last approximately two hours, including one 20-minute intermission.

    Tickets

    See the full article here .

    Pacific Symphony

    5
    Anoushka Shankar

    7
    Pacific Symphony
    Saturday, April 21, 2018 8 PM Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

    Sitar meets symphony orchestra when Philip Glass’s famous collaborations with Ravi Shankar are remembered. Meetings Along the Edge from Passages weaves Eastern themes with classic Glass motifs. On a grand scale, there’s the New York premiere of the complete version of The Passion of Ramakrishna, a quietly intense work of tremendous power honoring the Hindu holy man. Shankar’s daughter, Anoushka Shankar, is also center stage when she performs his Concerto No. 3 for Sitar and Orchestra with the Orange County–based Pacific Symphony, led by its music director of 28 seasons, Carl St.Clair.

    Tickets

    Performers
    Pacific Symphony
    Carl St.Clair, Music Director and Conductor
    Anoushka Shankar, Sitar
    Elissa Johnston, Soprano (Sarada Devi)
    Christòpheren Nomura, Baritone (“M”)
    Donovan Singletary, Bass-Baritone (Dr. Sarkar)
    I-Chin Lee, Alto (First Devotee)
    Nicholas Preston, Tenor (Second Devotee)
    Pacific Chorale
    Robert Istad, Artistic Director

    Program
    GLASS Meetings Along the Edge from Passages (based on a theme by Ravi Shankar)
    R. SHANKAR Concerto No. 3 for Sitar and Orchestra
    GLASS The Passion of Ramakrishna (NY Premiere)

    Event Duration
    The printed program will last approximately two hours, including one 20-minute intermission.

    See the full article here .

    Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:21 PM on April 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Classical Music, , , Robert Sirota, Robert Sirota’s third string quartet - Wave Upon Wave, , The Telegraph Quartet is a fervent champion of contemporary and 20th century repertoire   

    From Robert Sirota: Composer Robert Sirota’s “Wave Upon Wave” 

    Robert Sirota, composer

    Composer Robert Sirota’s Wave Upon Wave

    Performed by the Telegraph Quartet
    Winner of the 2016 Naumburg Chamber Music Award
    Presented by Noe Valley Chamber Music

    Sunday, May 20, 2018 at 4pm
    Noe Valley Ministry
    1021 Sanchez St. | San Francisco, CA

    Tickets ($25 advance; $30 at the door) and information available at http://www.nvcm.org or 415-648-5236

    Robert Sirota: http://www.robertsirota.com
    Telegraph Quartet: http://www.telegraphquartet.com

    On Sunday, May 20, 2018 at 4pm the Telegraph Quartet, winners of the 2016 Naumburg Competition, will perform composer Robert Sirota’s third string quartet, Wave Upon Wave on Noe Valley Chamber Music’s 25th anniversary season finale at Noe Valley Ministry (1021 Sanchez Street).

    Wave Upon Wave is the third string quartet in a trilogy spanning fifteen years, which Sirota began in 2002 with Triptych, an extended meditation on 9/11. Sirota’s second string quartet, American Pilgrimage, celebrates the rich diversity of the American landscape and the American spirit, and was completed in spring 2016.

    Sirota says, “Each of the string quartets in my trilogy is in essence a long journal entry reflecting a response to our times. Now, given the uncertainty of this moment in our history, rife with threats of tyranny, environmental catastrophe, and the human potential for evil, I find myself turning inward to examine the topography of the human heart: our vast potential for creative energy, idealism and altruism. Wave Upon Wave is about our fears, our hopes, and our prayers that we will triumph over the forces of darkness which threaten to overwhelm us.”

    Wave Upon Wave was commissioned by The Walter W. Naumburg Foundation for the competition winners and was premiered by the Telegraph Quartet on February 6, 2018 at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall.

    This program also includes Mozart’s String Quartet in D Major, K. 575 and Ravel’s String Quartet in F major. Complimentary wine and light bites are provided at intermission and there is a post-concert AfterParty reception and conversation with the artists moderated by musicologist Kai Christiansen immediately following the concert at La Boulangerie de Noe (3898 24th Street).

    About the Telegraph Quartet:
    The Telegraph Quartet (Joseph Maile, violin; Eric Chin, violin; Pei-Ling Lin, viola; Jeremiah Shaw, cello) was formed in 2013 with an equal passion for standard chamber music repertoire and contemporary and non-standard repertoire. Described by the San Francisco Chronicle in 2017 as, “an incredibly valuable addition to the cultural landscape,” and “powerfully adept… with a combination of brilliance and subtlety,” the Telegraph Quartet was most recently awarded the prestigious 2016 Walter W. Naumburg Chamber Music Award. Past prizes include the Grand Prize at the 2014 Fischoff Chamber Music Competition. The Quartet has since gone on to perform in concert halls, music festivals, and academic institutions from Los Angeles and New York to Italy and Taiwan, including Carnegie Hall, San Francisco’s Herbst Recital Hall and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music Chamber Masters Series and at festivals including the Chautauqua Institute, Kneisel Hall Chamber Music Festival, and the Emilia Romagna Festival. In 2016, the Quartet was invited as one of a handful of emerging professional string quartets from around the world to perform in Paris, France at the Biennale de quatuors à cordes, a showcase for major concert presenters of Europe and Asia taking place at the Philharmonie de Paris. The Telegraph Quartet gave its first Carnegie Hall appearance in Weill Recital Hall in 2015 along with violinist Ian Swensen and pianist Jeff LaDeur. A fervent champion of contemporary and 20th century repertoire, the Telegraph Quartet has co-commissioned John Harbison’s String Quartet No. 6, which received its West Coast premiere in the fall of 2017 at San Francisco State University’s Morrison Artist Series. In 2018, the Quartet plans to release its debut album featuring works by Anton Webern, Benjamin Britten, and Leon Kirchner.

    About Robert Sirota:
    Over four decades, composer Robert Sirota has developed a distinctive voice, clearly discernible in all of his work – whether symphonic, choral, stage, or chamber music. Writing in the Portland Press Herald, Allan Kozinn asserts: “Sirota’s musical language is personal and undogmatic, in the sense that instead of aligning himself with any of the competing contemporary styles, he follows his own internal musical compass.”

    Robert Sirota’s works have been performed by orchestras across the US and Europe; ensembles such as Alarm Will Sound, Sequitur, yMusic, Chameleon Arts, and Dinosaur Annex; the Chiara, American, Ethel, Elmyr, and Blair String Quartets; the Peabody, Concord, and Webster Trios; and at festivals including Tanglewood, Aspen, Yellow Barn, and Cooperstown music festivals; Bowdoin Gamper and Bowdoin International Music Festival; and Mizzou International Composers Festival. Recent and upcoming commissions include the American Guild of Organists, the American String Quartet, Alarm Will Sound, the Naumburg Foundation, Concert Artists of Baltimore, and yMusic.

    Recipient of grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, United States Information Agency, National Endowment for the Arts, Meet the Composer, and the American Music Center, Sirota’s works are recorded on the Capstone, Albany, New Voice, Gasparo and Crystal labels. His music is published by Muzzy Ridge Music, Schott, Music Associates of New York, MorningStar, Theodore Presser, and To the Fore.

    A native New Yorker, Sirota studied at Juilliard, Oberlin, and Harvard and divides his time between New York and Searsmont, Maine with his wife, Episcopal priest and organist Victoria Sirota. They frequently collaborate on new works, with Victoria as librettist and performer, at times also working with their children, Jonah and Nadia, both world-class violists.

    Received via email .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:49 PM on April 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Classical Music, , , The [Switch~ Ensemble] Upstate New York Tour   

    From From NewMusicUSA: “The [Switch~ Ensemble] Upstate New York Tour: Concerts, Residencies, and Recordings” 

    From NewMusicUSA

    Posted on April 6, 2018 from the [Switch~ Ensemble]

    6
    It takes many hands to put on a tour…

    A 5-concert tour featuring a new work by Matt Sargent and celebrating upstate New York’s long-time pioneering spirit.

    Overview

    The [Switch~ Ensemble] seeks support for a tour of concerts and residencies throughout upstate New York. Founded in Rochester, NY, our ensemble is excited to embark on a homecoming tour that features new world premieres alongside works by pioneering composers with ties to the region.

    The crux of our project is a major new work for ensemble and live electronics by Matt Sargent, a former Buffalo resident and current professor of electronic music at Bard College. Our repertoire includes works by the laureates of our 2016-2017 International Commissioning Competition, works by Earle Brown and Morton Feldman, and works by composers with a connection to each tour stop: Annandale-on-Hudson, Woodstock, Ithaca, Rochester, and Buffalo.

    Sargent’s new work, Three Rooms, draws inspiration from a three-stanza poem by Robert Creeley entitled Kitchen. Creeley is naturally connected to our other programming, too, both through his longtime residence in Buffalo and his affiliation with Black Mountain College.

    Sargent writes: There’s a connection in these three stanzas with the three stages of life: birth, life, and death. The last section: “perpetually sweeping / this room, I want it to be / like it was,” is a phrase that I’ve ingrained over the years. It comes to mind daily, while working through the habits and practice that make up a musical life. I am always the most interested to work with simple materials – to explore a kind of delicate, cyclical writing for the ensemble, changing in shades as the music moves through its metaphorical day.

    Our tour begins with three days in the electronic music studios at Bard College. Bard has always had close ties to experimentalism, and we feel it a fitting place to kick off our tour and premiere Matt’s new work. The following day, we will perform at the Woodstock Artists Association and Museum, featuring chamber repertoire, pioneering electroacoustic works, and two works by Bard students. The WAAM holds a prominent collection of the works of Philip Guston, so we are especially excited to share works by Feldman and Brown at this venue.

    Subsequently, we will spend six days in Ithaca in a residency at Cornell University, performing works from our program alongside music by internationally renowned faculty and students, and two days in Rochester working with local composers and Eastman faculty. Our tour concludes with two days of events in residency and collaboration with composers at Buffalo State University.

    As our most ambitious curatorial venture to date, this tour comes at a pivotal time in our ensemble’s life. After thoughtfully considering our collaborators and programming for over a year, this homecoming tour will be a milestone achievement in our 6th season. We are passionate about this repertoire and excited to share it with audiences beyond our planned tour. Indeed, we have plans for a long life for these works, including projects in the 2018-2019 season in San Diego, NYC, and San Francisco, where our artistic director Jason Thorpe Buchanan is a curator at the Center for New Music.

    Project Media
    Voi(rex) by Philippe Leroux (Intro, Mvts. 1-2) – the [Switch~ Ensemble]

    Features: the [Switch~ Ensemble], Zach Sheets, Jason Thorpe Buchanan

    This 3-minute excerpt is from a performance of the [Switch~ Ensemble] in November of 2013, with Jason Thorpe Buchanan, conductor, and Sophia Burgos, soprano. It is the 2nd movement of Philippe Leroux’s 5-movement work, Voi(rex), a 23-minute piece for soprano, ensemble, and live electronics. This was our first major performance together as an ensemble—and the one that sparked our vision to life. More at http://www.switchensemble.com

    Jökulsárlón (2016) by Anna-Louise Walton – the [Switch~ Ensemble]

    Features: the [Switch~ Ensemble], Zach Sheets, Jason Thorpe Buchanan

    A U.S. premiere of Jökulsárlón will be included in our upstate NY tour. “Visiting Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon, I was left speechless by both the sight and sounds before me. As the glacier slowly melts, it creates a lagoon full of ice crystals of all shapes and sizes, which crackle and hiss gently. The vastness of the lagoon seemed to amplify these sounds; they were simultaneously delicate and striking. While writing, I attempted to create a world that was similarly sparse yet captivating, in reflection of the natural polyphony of the ice.”

    Ghost Light Trio by Matt Sargent

    Features: Matt Sargent

    This sample illustrates the beauty & subtlety of Sargent’s electroacoustic works.
    T.Saint, B.Solomon, & J.Torrence, Sep.30 2016, WAAM (Woodstock NY). Ghost Light Trio is a ten-minute work for percussion and field recordings, focusing on two fragile strata of activity. A narrow band of small metal percussion instruments, which are sounding as a single, ever-changing bell tone throughout, and a build-up of many layers of field recordings, played through two speakers placed in hallways or open spaces adjacent to the hall.

    Project Created By
    the [Switch~ Ensemble]
    Brooklyn, New York

    A new music ensemble for the 21st Century, the [Switch~ Ensemble] is dedicated to the creation and performance of new works for chamber ensemble and electronics, often featuring multimedia and other forms of technology. Our 2016-2017 season includes residencies at Kent State University, the San Francisco Center for New Music, and Vernon Salon Series in…
    In Collaboration With

    3
    Matt Sargent
    Composer
    Buffalo, New York

    4
    Zach Sheets
    Executive Director and Flutist
    New York, New York

    5
    Jason Thorpe Buchanan
    Artistic Director and Technician
    San Francisco, California

    the [Switch~ Ensemble]
    Brooklyn, NY

    A new music ensemble for the 21st Century, the [Switch~ Ensemble] is dedicated to the creation and performance of new works for chamber ensemble and electronics, often featuring multimedia and other forms of technology. Our 2016-2017 season includes residencies at Kent State University, the San Francisco Center for New Music, and Vernon Salon Series in Oakland, as well as a Spring residency at the University of Chicago to develop and premiere seven new works by doctoral student composers for ensemble and technology.

    In the summer of 2016, the [Switch~ Ensemble] served as ensemble-in-residence at the Valencia International Performance Academy in Spain. There, [Switch~] worked alongside both faculty and participant composers, led workshops and masterclasses, and performed the premieres of over a dozen works, including the world premiere of newly commissioned works by Timothy McCormack and James Bean. We believe in the pedagogical possibilities of such residencies, and are particularly passionate about helping to build a diverse canon of 21st century works that leaves space for all voices—especially those that, historically, have been excluded from our fields.

    Other recent highlights include an artist residency at Avaloch Farms Music Institute, the CD release of our recording of Christopher Chandler’s Smoke and Mirrors on the SEAMUS label, and featured concerts on the MATA Interval Series, the NYC Electroacoustic Music Festival, the Queens New Music Festival (QNMF), and the Vanguard New Music Series.

    We believe that working directly with composers throughout their creative process — in a medium where the score is a departure point rather than a finish line — allows for new and thrilling musical possibilities, optimizing our performance and collaborative practice for needs that differ radically from the creation and rehearsal of acoustic music while allowing for perpetual experimentation and refinement. [Switch~] contributes to the future of the genre by strongly advocating for and commissioning the music of a new generation of emerging young composers. We have additionally enjoyed fruitful collaborations with composers Rand Steiger, Philippe Leroux, Stefan Prins, Wojtek Blecharz, Anna-Louise Walton, Bryan Jacobs, Stefano Gervasoni, Panayiotis Kokoras, and many others, including American premieres of works by Alexander Schubert, Santiago Diez-Fischer, and Lisa Streich.

    Founded in 2012 at the Eastman School of Music’s Computer Music Center in Rochester, NY as a flexible-size professional ensemble looking toward the future of contemporary music, the [Switch~ Ensemble] specializes in high-level chamber music integrated with cutting-edge technology and multimedia, supporting emerging and early career composers to create bold new works featuring multimedia and electroacoustic elements. At the core of each performance is our commitment of total integration between technology and live performance — our goal is compelling artistry achieved through seamless production, creation, and execution.

    Zach Sheets, flute/Executive Director
    Madison Greenstone, clarinet
    Matt Evans, saxophone/Director of Development
    Lauren Cauley, violin/PR Manager
    T.J. Borden, cello
    Megan Arns, percussion
    Wei-Han Wu, piano
    Christopher Chandler, sound engineer/co-Founder
    Jason Thorpe Buchanan, Artistic Director/co-Founder
    Clay Mettens, sound engineer

    Voi(rex) by Philippe Leroux (Mvts. 1-2) – the [Switch~ Ensemble]

    Voi(rex) (2002)
    Philippe Leroux
    voice, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, piano, percussion, and processing

    the [Switch~ Ensemble]:
    Sophie Burgos, soprano
    Zach Sheets, flute
    Madison Greenstone, clarinet
    Lauren Cauley, violin
    T.J. Borden, cello
    Megan Arns, percussion
    Wei-Han Wu, piano

    Artistic Co-Directors:
    Jason Thorpe Buchanan, composer/conductor
    Christopher Chandler, composer/electronics

    Nov. 20, 2013 – Eastman School of Music
    For more information, visit http://www.switchensemble.com

    HUNGER: Part III, Scene 2, (8 Excerpts) by Jason Thorpe Buchanan

    A new multimedia opera in four parts by composer Jason Thorpe Buchanan & librettist Darcie Dennigan

    Premiered by the [Switch~ Ensemble] on the MATA Interval Series, DiMenna Center, NYC – May 15, 2015
    Sophia Burgos, soprano
    Lucy Dhegrae, soprano
    Jeff Gavett, baritone
    Daniel Bassin, conductor
    Jason Thorpe Buchanan, composer, artistic, and technical director

    Knut Hamsun’s novel Sult is a point of departure for a libretto by award-winning poet Darcie Dennigan, exploring themes of psychological decay, irrationality, and self-destruction…

    Jökulsárlón (2016) by Anna-Louise Walton

    Commissioned by the VIPA Festival for the [Switch~ Ensemble]
    Premiered 7/9/16 – Valencia, Spain

    “When I first visited Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon, I was left speechless by both the sight and sounds before me. As the glacier slowly melts, it creates a lagoon full of ice crystals of all shapes and sizes, which crackle and hiss gently. The vastness of the lagoon seemed to amplify these sounds; they were simultaneously delicate and striking. While writing Jökulsárlón, I attempted to create sound world that was similarly sparse yet captivating…

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:07 AM on April 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Berkeley Symphony, Classical Music, , NewMusicUSA   

    From From NewMusicUSA: “Anna Clyne and the Berkeley Symphony” 

    From NewMusicUSA

    Start and End Dates

    09/01/2016 — 06/30/2019
    Location

    Berkeley, California

    9
    Berkeley Symphony

    1
    Anna Clyne joins the Berkeley Symphony as composer-in-residence from 2016-2019

    Project Created By
    Berkeley Symphony
    2
    Berkeley, California

    In Spring 2018, Berkeley Symphony’s Music Alive Composer-in-Residence Anna Clyne curates three innovative programs of contemporary music featuring Berkeley Symphony musicians as part of UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive’s Full concert series. The performances take place at BAMPFA on nights of the full moon: Saturday, March 31, Sunday, April 29, and Tuesday, May 29, each at 7p.

    In the first concert, titled Pairs, Berkeley Symphony musicians and friends play compositions by the Berkeley Sounds Composer Fellows paired with pieces written by their mentors: Aiyana Braun with Jennifer Higdon; Ursula Kwong-Brown with Myra Melford; Peter Shin with Ted Hearne; and Anna Clyne with Julia Wolfe.

    ON THE PROGRAM:


    Jennifer Hidgon, Song


    Aiyana Tedi Braun, Abrasions Mvt. III

    4
    Ursula Kwong-Brown, Reflections on Rothko

    5
    Myra Melford, The Whole Tree Gone

    7
    Peter Shin, Screaming Shapes

    8
    Ted Hearne, Nobody’s

    9
    Anna Clyne, Primula Vulgaris


    Julia Wolfe, Early That Summer

    Berkeley Symphony
    Berkeley, CA , USA

    Recognized nationally for its spirited programming, Berkeley Symphony has established a reputa­tion for presenting major new works for orchestra alongside fresh interpretations of the classical European and American repertoire. It has been honored with an Adventurous Programming Award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publish­ers (ASCAP) in ten of the past twelve seasons.

    Under the baton of Music Director Joana Carneiro, the Orchestra performs four main-stage concerts a year in Zellerbach Hall. A national leader in music education, the Orchestra partners with the Berkeley Unified School District to produce the award-winning Music in the Schools program, providing comprehensive, age-appropriate music curricula to more than 4,600 local elementary students each year. In association with the Piedmont Center for the Arts, Berkeley Symphony presents an annual chamber music series at the Center called Berkeley Symphony & Friends.

    Berkeley Symphony was founded in 1971 as the Berkeley Promenade Orchestra by Thomas Rarick, a pro­tégé of the great English Maestro Sir Adrian Boult. Under its second Music Director, Kent Nagano, who took the post in 1978, the Orchestra charted a new course with innovative programming that included rarely performed 20th-century scores. In 1981, the internationally-renowned French composer Olivier Messiaen journeyed to Berkeley to assist with the preparations of his imposing oratorio The Transfiguration of Our Lord Jesus Christ, and the Orchestra gave a sold-out performance in San Francisco’s Davies Symphony Hall. In 1984, Berkeley Symphony collaborated with Frank Zappa in a critically-acclaimed production featuring life-size puppets and moving stage sets, catapulting the Orchestra onto the world stage.

    Berkeley Symphony entered a new era in January 2009 when Joana Car­neiro became the Orchestra’s third Music Director in its 40-year history. Under Carneiro, the Orchestra continues its tradition of presenting the cutting edge of classical music. Together, they are forging deeper relationships with living composers, which include several prominent contemporary Bay Area composers such as John Adams, Paul Dresher, and Gabriela Lena Frank.

    Berkeley Symphony has introduced Bay Area audiences to works by upcoming young composers, many of whom have since achieved international prominence, and has supported local composers through its Under Construction new music program, in partnership with EarShot. Celebrated British composer George Benjamin, who subsequently became Composer-in-Residence at the San Francisco Symphony, was first introduced to the Bay Area in 1987 when Berkeley Symphony performed his compositions Jubilation and Ringed by the Flat Horizon; as was Thomas Adès, whose opera Powder Her Face was debuted by the Orchestra in a concert version in 1997 before it was fully staged in New York City, London and Chicago.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:11 PM on April 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Classical Music, Ethan Iversomn, Frederic Rzewski is 80   

    From DO THE M@TH: “Frederic Rzewski is 80” 

    Ethan Iverson
    DO THE M@TH

    Ethan Iverson, Pianist and Composer

    Friday the 13th, 2018: Mr. Rzewski is celebrating a big birthday in London as Igor Levit plays a premiere at Wigmore Hall.

    Next Thursday the Del Sol String Quartet offers Rzewski music old and new at Miller Theatre.

    Two years ago Zachary Woolfe offered a valuable look at Rzewski’s politics. These days “political art” is everywhere: Rzewski’s whole life is an example of walking the walk as well as talking the talk.

    One of the more important items in my CD collection is the Hat Hut recital of four North American Ballads and Squares. This used to be hard to find but is now streaming everywhere.

    5
    6

    It’s impossible to overestimate the impact the North American Ballads had on me. For a time I was playing my own folk song arrangements in the Rzewski style (I’ve Been Working on the Railroad, My Darling Clementine, and so forth). This was the music that Yves Beauvais became interested in producing for a Columbia release. I didn’t feel right about entering the larger marketplace doing Rzewski knock-offs, so I blew Yves off. Six months later I called him back and said, “There’s this new band, the Bad Plus, which I think would actually be a good signing…”

    Rzewski improvises his own terrific cadenzas. Recently I head Igor Levit play Which Side Are You On and improvise his own cadenza. It was an exciting circumstance quite rare from a concert pianist of Levit’s stature. (I wonder if Levit would be improvising in public without Rzewski’s encouraging cue.)

    Afterwards Levit told me there were two more Ballads composed since the first four. What!? Yes, indeed. Number 5, It Makes a Long Time Man Feel Bad, is a long and difficult masterpiece. Like most of Rzewski’s music, the score is available for free at IMSLP. A concert recording by the composer from 2000 is available as well, although there is something recalcitrant about the file (I haven’t been able to get it to play through smoothly yet).

    The tune is first presented as a blues. Offhand I’d say there is only one person that gets permission to do this kind of thing — write an ornamented bluesy tune for huge European piano variations — and their name is Frederic Rzewski.

    1
    Friday 13 April 2018 7:30PM

    2
    Igor Levit piano
    Mendelssohn, Mahler and Frederic Rzewski

    Frederic Rzewski (b.1938)
    Ages (world première) [1]
    Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
    Song without Words in E major Op. 19b No. 1
    Song without Words in A major Op. 19b No. 4
    Song without Words in A flat major ‘Duetto’ Op. 38 No. 6
    Gustav Mahler (1860-1911)
    Symphony No. 10
    I. Adagio (trans. Ronald Stevenson)

    1.Commissioned by Wigmore Hall with the generous support of Annette Scawen Morreau

    Next Thursday the Del Sol String Quartet offers Rzewski music old and new at Miller Theatre.

    Two years ago Zachary Woolfe offered a valuable look at Rzewski’s politics. These days “political art” is everywhere: Rzewski’s whole life is an example of walking the walk as well as talking the talk.

    One of the more important items in my CD collection is the Hat Hut recital of four North American Ballads and Squares. This used to be hard to find but is now streaming everywhere.

    See the full article here.

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:06 PM on April 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: April 2018, Classical Music,   

    From Naxos: “NEW ON NAXOS April 2018” 

    Naxos

    1
    SAINT-SAËNS, C.: Piano Concertos, Vol. 3 – Nos. 4 and 5 (Descharmes, Malmö Symphony, Soustrot)

    Saint-Saëns’s mature creative genius shines throughout these last two piano concertos, looking back over a glorious musical ancestry while at the same time opening the door to new worlds. The Fourth Piano Concerto is prescient of both his great Organ Symphony and the concertos of Rachmaninov, revealing Saint-Saëns at his most inspired and innovative. The Fifth was composed in the Egyptian temple town of Luxor, and displays a rich tapestry of exotic cultural influences from Javanese, Spanish and Middle Eastern music, as well as portrayals of chirping Nile crickets and croaking frogs, and the composer’s representation of ‘the joy of a sea crossing’. Volumes 1 and 2 can be heard on 8.573476 and 77.

    Saint-Saëns, Camille
    [Show Details] Piano Concerto No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 44
    1. I. Allegro moderato 00:12:27
    2. II. Allegro vivace 00:14:00
    [Show Details] Piano Concerto No. 5 in F Major, Op. 103, “Egyptian”
    3. I. Allegro animato 00:11:21
    4. II. Andante 00:10:59
    5. III. Molto allegro 00:06:20

    Total Playing Time: 00:55:07

    Composer(s):
    Saint-Saëns, Camille
    Conductor(s):
    Soustrot, Marc
    Orchestra(s):
    Malmö Symphony Orchestra
    Artist(s):
    Descharmes, Romain
    Label: Naxos
    Genre: Concerto
    Period: Romantic
    Catalogue No: 8.573478
    Barcode: 747313347872
    Physical Release: 04/2018

    2
    KOŽELUCH, L.: Cantata for the Coronation of Leopold II, “Hail to the Monarch” (Vylíčilová, Kořínek, Moravec, Martinů Voices, Prague Symphony, Štilec)

    The coronation of Leopold II in Prague in 1791 came at a difficult time for European monarchs, although Leopold himself enjoyed a reputation as an enlightened ruler. Two musical works were commissioned for the occasion: Mozart’s opera La clemenza di Tito and Koželuch’s cantata Heil dem Monarchen. The cantata, by turns celebratory, serene and darkly dramatic, was well received and enhanced Koželuch’s reputation in royal circles. It almost certainly played a part in his appointment in 1792 to the court of Leopold’s son and successor, the last Holy Roman Emperor Franz II.

    Koželuch, Leopold
    Meissner, August Gottlieb, lyricist(s)
    [Show Details] Cantata for the Coronation of Leopold II, P. XIX:6, “Heil dem Monarchen”
    1. Introduzione 00:05:43
    2. Heil dem Monarchen (Chorus) 00:03:18
    3. Recitative: Vielfach ist der Fürsten Los (Tenor II) 00:02:54
    4. Willkommen mit dem Blute (Tenor II, Chorus) 00:05:12
    5. Recitative: Glänzend Bild (Soprano) 00:03:23
    6. Aria: Du, des Himmels schönste Tochter (Soprano) 00:06:32
    7. Recitative: Ach! Ein neuer Pfad! (Tenor I) 00:04:21
    8. Aria: Doch mit ungebleichten Wangen (Tenor I) 00:04:35
    9. Recitative: Welch ein Schauspiel (Soprano) 00:03:30
    10. Aria: Die in der Fürsten Krone (Soprano) 00:05:26
    11. Recitative: Ist es Täuschung (Tenor I) 00:03:52
    12. Daß wir noch am schwanken Stabe (Chorus) 00:04:04
    13. Recitative: Doch warum (Tenor II) 00:01:43
    14. Aria: Ist es Glück (Tenor II) 00:03:52
    15. Recitative: Aus den Fluten (Soprano) 00:04:38
    16. Trio: Da erschien er (Soprano, Tenor I, II) 00:03:24
    17. Recitative: Sieh, um deine Stirne (Tenor I) 00:02:14
    18. Unseres Volkes (Chorus) 00:02:04

    Total Playing Time: 01:10:45

    Many many more here.

    See the full article here .

    Naxos Records is the world’s leading classical music label as measured by the number of new recordings it releases and the depth and breadth of its catalogue. Naxos was founded in 1987 by Klaus Heymann, a German-born entrepreneur based in Hong Kong. Under his continuing stewardship, Naxos has developed from being known primarily as a budget label focusing on standard repertoire into a global music group comprising a raft of downloading and streaming platforms, a significant catalogue of multimedia products, a vast international logistics network, a recording engineering arm, a publications division, and a licensing department.

    Naxos, the record label, has transformed into a virtual encyclopaedia of classical music with a catalogue of unparalleled depth and breadth. Innovative strategies for recording exciting new repertoire with exceptional talent have enabled Naxos Records to develop one of the largest and fastest-growing catalogues of unduplicated repertoire. Some 9,000 titles are currently available at affordable prices, recorded in state-of- the-art sound, both in hard format and on digital platforms. Naxos works with artists of the highest calibre and its recordings have been recognised with numerous Grammy® awards, Penguin Guide 3-star recommendations, Gramophone Editor’s Choice Awards and many other international honours.

    Naxos still stays true to its original promise of offering great value. Costs are kept to a minimum by focusing on the music rather than the artist; money is not wasted on expensive artist promotions, and profits are invested into recordings of new music rather than multiple versions of standard repertoire already in the catalogue. Naxos recordings include complete cycles or cycles-in- progress of basic repertoire, such as the complete piano works of Liszt or the complete string quartets of Haydn, but the label has also introduced music lovers to many neglected composers, such as Joachim Raff, Ferdinand Ries and Simon Mayr. It has also helped to put contemporary composers such as Krzysztof Penderecki, John Corigliano and William Bolcom in reach of a much wider audience. Additionally the label continues to add to the numerous world première recordings it already has to its credit.

    Naxos Records also has gained stature by pioneering groundbreaking projects like the American Classics series. Currently numbering about 200 titles, the series is set to be the most comprehensive recording project of American concert music ever attempted. Naxos is also leading the field with the landmark Naxos Historical Series. The releases in this massive restoration project are engineered by leading restoration engineers/artists. The series covers all genres of classical music as well as legends of jazz and pop music from the first half of the 20th century. Other notable Naxos series include Japanese Classics, Spanish Classics, Early Music, Organ Encyclopaedia, the Guitar Collection, and Opera Classics. The catalogue of Naxos World, a pioneering world music label, includes international music of many different cultures and genres, folk, pop and classical alike.

    All this, together with the development of a range of apps and ebooks, demonstrates the Naxos commitment to providing the best possible access to recorded classical music in the world.

    Naxos Records is part of the Naxos Music Group. For a comprehensive presentation of the group’s services and products, please visit http://www.naxosmusicgroup.com.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:37 PM on April 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Classical Music, , Doctor Nerve, Ereia iget it for $5.00, Follow the link props, , Sirius String Quartet   

    From Cuneiform Records This Week-ends $5.00 deal: “Eriea by Doctor Nerve with the Sirius String Quartet” 

    Cuneiform Records

    This Weekend Save 50% on an
    Amazing Album and
    Get It For Just $5!

    You Now Have A Great Opportunity
    For One WEEKEND Only
    to
    Buy a Brilliant Album
    from the Cuneiform Catalog for Only $5!

    This sale ends 11:59pm UTC on 4/15/2018
    Use this list to find when this sale ends in your time zone:
    UTC = Coordinated Universal Time, or Zulu
    PST = Pacific Standard Time (UTC – 8 hours)
    ALDT = Alaskan Daylight Time (UTC – 8 hours)
    PDT = Pacific Daylight Time (UTC – 7 hours)
    MST = Mountain Standard Time (UTC – 7 hours)
    MDT = Mountain Daylight Time (UTC – 6 hours)
    CST = Central Standard Time (UTC – 6 hours)
    CDT = Central Daylight Time (UTC – 5 hours)
    EST = Eastern Standard Time (UTC – 5 hours)
    EDT = Eastern Daylight Time (UTC – 4 hours)
    AST = Atlantic Standard Time (UTC – 4 hours)
    ALST = Alaskan Standard Time (UTC – 9 hours)
    HST = Hawaiian Standard Time (UTC – 10 hours)

    THIS WEEK’S ALBUM
    Eriea by
    Doctor Nerve with the Sirius String Quartet

    HOW IT WORKS:

    1) Click the link below which will take you to the above album on Bandcamp

    2) Click “Buy Digital Album”

    3) Type “10” into the Name your price field (The discount comes next! 😉 )

    4) Type the word “FIVE” into the Discount code field.

    5) Click “apply”.

    6) Click “Check out now” or “Add to Cart”.

    That’s it! Easy, right?
    Click Here To Get ‘Ereia’ For Only $5!

    Hello!
    As you know this weekly email is our way of offering Cuneiform fans (you) a way to personally own and easily discover great titles from our back catalog for an amazing price!

    This weekend’s Five Dollar album is Eriea by Doctor Nerve.

    Doctor Nerve is a rock band that has been annihilating the boundaries between rock, metal, improvisation, jazz, and experimental music since 1983. Eriea, recorded with The Sirius String Quartet was the group’s fifth studio album.

    A large work in three movements that spans intimate composition for solo viola, tightly reigned composition for full ensemble, explosive conducted improvisation of orchestral scope, and incendiary solos over rock grooves. It includes a no-holds-barred live performance of the second movement, recorded at Ereia’s premiere at the FIMAV ’97 Festival.

    “Four years of hard labor & 14 musicians with a commitment to total annihilation; painstaking compositions & apocalyptic deconstructions burned into a single laser-guided CD projectile.”
    -Nick Didkovsky

    “Using deconstructed phrasing, computer-generated scores, and intuitive improvisation techniques, the Nerve is one of the most fluent ensembles currently nestled in the Big Apple.
    Ereia is a long form, commissioned work featuring the Sirius String Quartet (joining Doctor Nerve). Divided into three distinct movements (including an incendiary, 20 minute in-concert portion), [leader, guitarist Nick Didkovsky] mixes searing Stravinsky-like chording with inexplicable avant-rock moves.
    With its abundance of classical discipline (though hardly letting the ink dry on the scores), cyber treatments and free skronk execution, Ereia is the first major work of 2K, poised to be measured against by composers and musicians of the future. Exceptional.”
    Focus

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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