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  • richardmitnick 8:46 AM on November 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "The Hard Nut", "The Nutcracker", , Dance,   

    From BAM: “The Hard Nut” 

    From BAM-Brooklyn Academy of Music

    1

    Dec 14—23
    Tickets start at $25

    Mark Morris Dance Group breathes new life into The Nutcracker while playfully preserving the warm spirit of the original. Based on the comic book art of Charles Burns and featuring a live orchestral rendition of Tchaikovsky’s original score, The Hard Nut is a swinging 70s homage to all that’s wild and wonderful in E.T.A. Hoffmann’s holiday tale.

    BUY TICKETS

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition


    The Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) is a performing arts venue in Brooklyn, New York City, known as a center for progressive and avant garde performance. It presented its first performance in 1861 and began operations in its present location in 1908.

    Today, BAM has a reputation as a leader in presenting “cutting edge” performance and has grown into an urban arts center which focuses on both international arts presentation and local community needs. Its purpose is to provide an environment in which its audiences – annually, more than 775,000 people – can experience a broad array of aesthetic and cultural programs. From 1999 to 2014, BAM was headed by Karen Brooks Hopkins, President, and Joseph V. Melillo, Executive Producer. Katy Clark is now president, succeeding Hopkins who retired in spring 2015.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 1:29 PM on November 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Dance, , Review: 10 Glimpses of Twyla Tharp the Minimalist   

    From The New York Times: “Review: 10 Glimpses of Twyla Tharp the Minimalist” 

    New York Times

    From The New York Times

    1
    Matthew Dibble, center, with other members of Twyla Tharp Dance in “Eight Jelly Rolls” at the Joyce Theater. Credit Andrea Mohin/The New York Times

    Nov. 15, 2018
    Alastair Macaulay

    Twyla Tharp by Ruven Afanador-Courtesy of Ellen Jacobs Associates

    The choreographer Twyla Tharp has been a classicist, a modernist, a postmodernist — often at the same time — and maybe now and then a feminist and a Romantic, too. She also has a strong streak of the clown: tough, solemn-deadpan, with crazy timing, making a joke of how impossible things can be.

    Now, in “Minimalism and Me,” a production that began life last year in Chicago, and which is currently at the Joyce for four weeks — with six Tharp dancers, some old films and photographs, and 10 other people playing onstage audience members — Tharp reminds us that she was once a minimalist. It’s evident that this was just an early phase: Minimalism wasn’t big enough to contain a temperament with her streaks of rococo excess and genre crossover, but she wryly tells us that her work from then on had to do with “less is more,” as she takes us through 10 works she made from 1965 to ’71.

    Increasingly since the 1980s, Ms. Tharp has become a memoirist, too — in writing, on TV (using film of her earlier work) and in live performance. Reading from a lectern onstage, she narrates the first half of this show, a retrospective of her first seven years of making dances. In her earliest work, “Tank Dive” (1965), she stayed in motionless dance positions for whole minutes while Petula Clark’s “Downtown” played; she now connects this to the painters Barnett Newman and Frank Stella, whose studios were close to the loft where she lived at the time, on Franklin Street in New York.

    2
    Martha Graham, center, with clockwise from left: Merce Cunningham, Erick Hawkins, Paul Taylor, Yvonne Rainer, Don Redlich, José Limón and Twyla Tharp. Credit Jack Mitchell/Getty Images

    Minimalism is her starting point; “Me” (or at least her work) is her main fascination. Yet she is our most obvious problem here: Her way of talking mixes seriousness and comedy in an awkward amalgam and in vocal tones that lack any spontaneity. Both her vocal delivery and her dances get laughs at some unlikely moments, while some of her funniest lines elicit no reaction. And, though she’s keen to demonstrate the creative sophistication she quickly built up in the 1960s, she seems to be rewatching her early work impatiently, with the fast-forward button. The excerpts are fascinating but, until we reach 1970, too brief.

    By 1968, she was famous enough to be included in what has become an often-reproduced Jack Mitchell photograph of eight modern-dance artists of several generations: Martha Graham at its center, and featuring José Limón, Erick Hawkins, Merce Cunningham, Paul Taylor, Don Redlich, Yvonne Rainer and the youngest, Ms. Tharp. In excerpts from the late-1960s — there are snippets of original-cast film, too — you see the emergence of Tharpian style. This included the shrug, the shimmy, the wriggle. When I first experienced her work, in 1980, it was the most kinesthetically intoxicating dance style I’d ever experienced.

    It is not Ms. Tharp’s task to make connections between herself and other choreographers of her time, but that photograph is not the only reason many of us will do so. Taylor’s 1950s experimental pieces, not least “3 Epitaphs” (1956), seem to have been an influence, and when we see the different solos coinciding in one space, we’re likely to think of Cunningham. These early works, and that Tharpian style itself, all have a pronounced kinship to Ms. Rainer’s development of “democratic dance” (non-virtuoso movement related to the everyday).

    We see only half of the 20-minute work “The Fugue” (1970) at the Joyce, but that’s enough to show why she considers it her real Opus 1. (It’s the earliest work she has regularly revived.) An arrangement of 20th-century tap-related movement sequences in baroque-type musical structures — less a single fugue than a series of mini-fugues, with no music than the sound made by the dancers’ hands and shoes — it made her the formal classicist of her generation. But its blend of seeming informality and objectivity has always looked related to other dances from her generation, like Ms. Rainer’s “Trio A” (1966) and Trisha Brown’s “Opal Loop” (1980).

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    Twyla Tharp, being lifted at left, and Kara Chan, right, with members of Twyla Tharp Dance at the Joyce Theater. Credit Andrea Mohin/The New York Times

    Its first cast was made up of three women. (Viewers saw it as women’s liberation onstage.) B y the time I first saw it in 1980, it had three men, but other combinations have been used. On Wednesday, it was danced by Kara Chan, Kellie Drobnick and Reed Tankersley — elegantly, exactly, charmingly. I find these dancers somewhat slick when I compare them to the Tharp stylists I watched in the 1980s, but that’s not a new complaint: Today’s Tharp dancers, almost too accomplished in lines and rhythms, lack the juicy, weighty texture that emanated from their predecessors’ whole body language.

    That’s true also of the one full piece shown here, “Eight Jelly Rolls” (1971), the first piece she made to fit its musical accompaniment (old jazz recordings by Jelly Roll Morton and Charles Luke), and one of her greatest comedies. Since Ms. Tharp has staged this with the assistance of Sara Rudner, the greatest of Ms. Tharp’s collaborators — I was lucky to see them both in this work and others — trouble has certainly been taken.

    Here, too, men now have some of the originally female roles. There are marvelously right moments, as when Ron Todorowski suddenly suspends a gesture of both arms in midair; Ms. Tharp’s drastic contrasts of dynamics are often brilliant. This “Eight Jelly Rolls” — its dancers dressed in white, replacing the previous black — is alive, if lightweight. I’m glad today’s audience can see it.

    It’s immediately followed by a new encore that Ms. Tharp has added: a Jelly Roll sequel of sorts in which she dances, too, in her consciously eccentric way. The main joke is that she’s chasing to keep up. I’d like to join in the applause for this flimsy footnote: She’s in good shape, and it ought to be fun to see her back in clown mode. Perhaps the comedy will click into focus as the Joyce run continues.

    Twyla Tharp Dance
    Through Dec. 9 at the Joyce Theater, Manhattan; 212-242-0800, http://www.joyce.org.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:10 PM on November 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Dance, , Twyla Tharp the Maximal Minimalist and Her ‘Eight Jelly Rolls’   

    From The New York Times: “Looking Back at Her Avant-Garde” 

    New York Times

    From The New York Times

    Twyla Tharp, the Maximal Minimalist, and Her ‘Eight Jelly Rolls’

    1
    Twyla Tharp, center, rehearsing Eight Jelly Rolls with her company, from left: Kara Chan, Ron Todorowski (back to camera), Mary Beth Hansohn and Reed Tankersley. “One of the things that people found interesting,” Ms. Tharp said of the work’s creation, “is that we were actually having fun, and it was still called dance.”
    Credit Lauren Lancaster for The New York Times

    It took Twyla Tharp six years to get one of her dances on a proscenium stage, and what a dance it was: Eight Jelly Rolls, set to early jazz music by Jelly Roll Morton. The year was 1971; the stage was the Delacorte Theater at Central Park.

    2
    Jelly Roll Morton. Public domain

    How did Ms. Tharp go from “Tank Dive” (1965), her first work ever, in which she spun a yo-yo and held a relevé to the Petula Clark recording of “Downtown,” to the exuberant “Eight Jelly Rolls”? The period in between was a time of remarkable invention. With Ms. Tharp at the helm, a close-knit group of female dance artists worked tirelessly, frequently in a farmhouse attic in upstate New York in the dead of winter.

    “We danced in gymnasiums,” Ms. Tharp said of herself and her striking band of dancers, which included Sara Rudner and Rose Marie Wright. “We danced in malls, we danced in parks, we danced in museums. We danced wherever we could dance.”

    When the opportunity did come for Ms. Tharp to create a work for a stage, she was ready to make Eight Jelly Rolls, a dance for six in eight sections. Her adventure, she said, was to define — or redefine — “What is dance?” “And because I wasn’t forced into a stage with wings and curtains and 30-minute pieces, I had to make up all of the definitions. We were completely independent. I learned how to do it.”

    Although many may think of Ms. Tharp, 77, in relation to her work for Broadway and ballet, she started as an experimentalist who pushed boundaries at every turn. In “Minimalism and Me,” at the Joyce Theater for four weeks, beginning on Wednesday, Nov. 14, Ms. Tharp has put together a two-part program paying homage to those early years.

    The first half, more a lecture than a performance — she thinks of it, she said, as an “illustrated monologue” — will feature excerpts from her earliest works; the second half is the reconstruction of “Eight Jelly Rolls,” for which Ms. Tharp has, for the first time, inserted men into two of the three leading parts, originally danced by Ms. Rudner and herself.

    3
    Clowning around: Ms. Tharp rehearsing with Mr. Todorowski. “I like shtick,” Ms. Tharp said. “And I can do falls. We were very physical, so it was, ‘Let’s do some physical clowning.’”Credit Lauren Lancaster for The New York Times

    “Could I cast it with all women?” she asked about that decision. “Yes. Does that make it more ‘authentic’? I’m not sure about that.”

    “We were perhaps not given all of the opportunities one might have liked, being women,” she continued, “but we now have the authority to recast this. We can be inclusive, whereas before we were exclusive.”

    Her present company is small but mighty; for Eight Jelly Rolls, which was reconstructed by Ms. Tharp and Ms. Rudner, there are two casts. Reed Tankersley and Ron Todorowski will alternate in Ms. Rudner’s role, while Kara Chan and Matthew Dibble take on Ms. Tharp’s part; Kellie Drobnick and Mary Beth Hansohn will share the role originated by Rose Marie Wright.

    Eight Jelly Rolls engages both Ms. Tharp’s technical and comedic sides, with movement so silken and perfectly timed that it seems to roll off the body. (One particularly slippery solo, originally for Ms. Tharp, is nicknamed “The Drunk.”)

    “It looks very free and fun,” Mr. Todorowski said, but “it’s very structured, very specific and detailed.” The challenge, he added, is trying to find the balance that the original dancers found “and really listening to each other, because these women knew each other so well.”

    The seeds of Eight Jelly Rolls were planted at Oberlin College, where a pregnant Ms. Tharp created “The History of Up and Down I & II” for her company and a group of students; the first part included music by Morton.

    4
    Sara Rudner dancing in Eight Jelly Rolls in 1974. “If I took a step,” she said of the process of making the solo with Ms. Tharp, “she added a dip and then a little turn. Between the two of us, we were combining a sequence of activity that became the basis for the solo.” Credit Tony Russell.

    “Twyla worked differently with each one of us, and she asked us all to make 15 positions,” Ms. Rudner said of that time. “When I was in the studio with her, she looked at them and then made the transitions. If I took a step, she added a dip and then a little turn. Between the two of us, we were combining a sequence of activity that became the basis for the solo.”

    In the solo, the third Jelly Roll, that material adds up to only about 30 seconds; to fill out the music, the dancer takes the base phrase and rearranges the movements in real time. Because of that, the solo is never performed the same way twice.

    Mr. Todorowski doesn’t use the word “improvisation” to describe this process. But, he said: “The units are so ingrained in you that they’re just coming out based on what the music is telling you to do. You’re meant to be executing it as if you’re dancing by yourself in your room. There’s no audience. You’re meant to just get lost.”

    The oppositional forces of order and chaos have always been important for Ms. Tharp, and in Eight Jelly Rolls, she illustrates them with its two groups of dancers: three leads and three others who make up the chorus. Because there are two casts during the run, the dancers will get to experience both sides of the piece’s exacting framework.

    “To see such a complete flip in the cast is interesting both in terms of seeing the dance, but also in terms of seeing dancers,” Ms. Tharp said. “Those who were front become the back, and the back is fun, too.”

    The other flavor in Eight Jelly Rolls is its humor. “I like shtick,” Ms. Tharp said. “And I can do falls. We were very physical, so it was, ‘Let’s do some physical clowning.’”

    5
    Mr. Todorowski and Ms. Tharp: “It looks very free and fun,” Mr. Todorowski said, but “it’s very structured, very specific and detailed.”Credit Lauren Lancaster for The New York Times

    If Eight Jelly Rolls was a feminist statement, as Ms. Tharp has called it, it’s because men dominated clowning at the time. “I was like, ‘Wait a minute — I can do this stuff,’” she said. “That’s where ‘The Drunk’ came from.”

    This summer, to prepare for Eight Jelly Rolls, the dancers learned the dance that Ms. Tharp made before it, Torelli, which gave them a foundation for the movement. Ms. Rudner referred to the process as “a Tharp boot camp.” Because the phrases in “Torelli” are altered during performance, that experience gave the dancers the chance to become comfortable with what Ms. Tharp referred to as “developing a wider channel” as performers.

    “You know it really well,” she continued, “but you can move in, out and around it.”

    Last year, Ms. Tharp reconstructed The Raggedy Dances, another early work; in the end, she said, there wasn’t enough time for the dancers to embed themselves in the movement. But this time, with the Torelli boot camp and because Ms. Tharp wasn’t working on a new dance, both Ms. Rudner and Ms. Tharp believe bringing back Eight Jelly Rolls is different. (Last year, Ms. Tharp was also creating a new work, set to music by Bob Dylan.)

    “The more you do this, the more you realize what’s involved,” Ms. Tharp said of putting up an old piece.

    Ms. Rudner said she also thought of dance “as creating dancers — and that the dancer learns from the challenges that are offered.”

    “And Twyla was into learning and challenging us,” she added. “That’s how all those dances were made.”

    Ms. Tharp insisted that she couldn’t bring back the past. “But I can bring back the essence of movement — where it came from, how it operated, what it was intended to do,” she said. “And in the case of ‘Eight Jelly Rolls,’ one of the biggest components is that we loved doing it. One of the things that people found interesting is that we were actually having fun, and it was still called dance.”

    She paused for effect. “I like to think that’s still a possibility.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:18 PM on November 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 'Reckoning': Music and Motion at Roulette, Dance, ,   

    From Roulette: ” ‘Reckoning’: Music and Motion at Roulette” 

    Roulette Intermedium

    From Roulette

    1

    Sunday, November 18, 2018
    at 8:00 PM

    Roulette
    509 Atlantic Ave.
    Brooklyn, NY 11217

    $18—25
    Tickets

    Known for their intense and poetic collaborative work, composer/saxophonist Ross Feller and choreographer/performer Kora Radella present an evening of new work at Roulette with many fine musicians and movement artists. World premieres by Feller performed by String Noise with violinists Pauline Kim Harris and Conrad Harris, pianist Adam Tendler, and saxophonists Johnny Butler, Caroline Davis, and Matt Nelson. The NYC premieres of Radella’s solo Sequinza, danced by Tim Bendernagel, is met full force with Feller’s duet Force Majeure performed by Pauline Kim Harris and Tendler. Also, on tap is Wrest danced by Anna Pinault with an electronic score featuring the drums of Cheer-Accident’s Thymme Jones, and an excerpt of the evening-length tour de force, Reckoning, performed in this NYC premiere by Chris Seibert and Radella. The evening is further brightened by improvisations by the Snow Trio consisting of guitarist Nick Didkovsky, bass clarinetist Michael Lytle, and Feller. Get your tickets soon and come see these amazing artists! Invite your friends. Please help spread word about this event. Tickets and more info at:
    http://roulette.org/event/reckoning-music-and-motion/

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Mission

    Roulette’s mission is to support artists creating new and adventurous art in all disciplines by providing them with a venue and resources to realize their creative visions and to build an audience interested in the evolution of experimental art.

    History

    Roulette Intermedium was founded in 1978 at the height of the Downtown Experimental Arts revolution by three young composers: trombonist/composer Jim Staley, composer/producer David Weinstein, and Intermedia artist Dan Senn. The informal concerts they presented in a small loft space in TriBeCa in Manhattan soon attracted an audience and critical attention. The first donation – an unsolicited and unexpected check for $1,000 – arrived in the mail from the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, suggested by noted composer, John Cage. By the mid-1980s, Roulette had emerged as “a landmark for New York’s downtown new music composers.”

    Over the next three decades, Roulette attracted a steadily growing audience and worldwide reputation as a center for musical innovation. Seminal pioneering figures who have presented their work at Roulette, oftentimes early in their careers, include Maryanne Amacher, Robert Ashley, Anthony Braxton, Simone Forti, Bill Frisell, Philip Glass, Yusef Lateef, Christian Marclay, Meredith Monk, Ikue Mori, Pauline Oliveros, Zeena Parkins, Arthur Russell, Kaija Saariaho, Wadada Leo Smith, Henry Threadgill, and John Zorn. Roulette continues to make a mark as a venue where scores of promising avant-garde artists make their first professional statements. Representatives of the latest generation of composing artists who have recently developed and presented works at Roulette include Aaron Burnette, Maria Chavez, Phyllis Chen, Jennifer Choi, Mario Diaz de Leon, Mary Halvorson, Darius Jones, Mary Kouyoumdjian, Alfredo Marin, Tristan Perich, Matana Roberts, Tyshawn Sorey, Ben Stapp, C. Spencer Yeh and many more.

    As audiences grew and rents in lower Manhattan began to rise, the staff and Board members began the search for a larger, more flexible and affordable home. On September 15th, 2011, Roulette opened a new chapter in its history when it moved into the 1928 Memorial Hall in the Downtown Brooklyn Cultural District. The new 400-seat theater allows us to expand our presentations along with our services to artists and our community; each season, we now present more than 100 music, dance, and intermedia performances. Our annual attendance now tops 60,000.

    In recent years, Roulette has effected a major transition, expanding programs, audiences and community, but it is still an artist-driven space, valued for its payment of professional guaranteed fees, its insistence on the best presentation conditions, and the provision of other critical artists’ services. Our GENERATE Program, supported for more than 30 years by the Jerome Foundation and other private and public support, awards emerging and established composers commissions and/or monetary stipends along with extensive rehearsal time in Roulette’s theater, access to audio and lighting equipment and technical staff to help them with their experiments, and full production support for performances of the work created during the residency.

    Our programming has expanded globally through Roulette’s online and television broadcast programs where audiences all over the world can explore the treasures of our archives. Roulette TV features senior figures of the avant-garde movement and their young successors.

    Roulette is one of the few surviving organizations to maintain its identity as an Artists’ Space and its commitment to bring the experimental performing arts to a wider public; its history of performances (preserved in an archive that contains nearly 3,000 hours of recordings and videos), leaves a detailed and distinguished record of almost four decades of artistic development, experimentation, and achievement.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:09 PM on November 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Dance, Museum of Modern Art, , Review: The Revelatory Early Works of Lucinda Childs at MoMA   

    From The New York Times: “Review: The Revelatory Early Works of Lucinda Childs at MoMA” 

    New York Times

    From The New York Times

    Oct. 31, 2018
    Alastair Macaulay

    1
    She is her own canoe: Shakirah Stewart in Lucinda Childs’s “Pastime” (1963).CreditCreditAndrea Mohin/The New York Times

    The most marvelous revelations of the Museum of Modern Art’s Judson Dance Theater: The Work Is Never Done have come in the shape of live performances of works from 1961 to 1978. But the pleasure has been double-edged; an era is ending.

    Trisha Brown, one of the choreographers honored in this series, died last year. And this week’s performances by Lucinda Childs Dance (running through Sunday) will be that company’s final appearances. The dancers may still perform Ms. Childs’s work, and she may still make new work for them or others, but this is the last hurrah for this ensemble. I’m sad — but glad that I found myself succumbing to her choreography as never before.

    2
    Lucinda Childs performing her solo “Particular Reel” (1973).CreditAndrea Mohin/The New York Times

    The audience sits on three sides of the square performing space in MoMA’s atrium. The geometries of Ms. Childs’s style would seem to encourage distance, but, to my surprise, proximity enhanced appreciation. Although she has become known for her collaborations with minimalist composers like Philip Glass and John Adams, six of the seven early works on this program are performed in silence: They are their own music.

    Philip Glass by Timothy Judd

    John Adams by Deborah O’Grady

    Ms. Childs became a member of the Judson Dance Theater in 1963. The dances presented here date from 1963 to 1978. (One was rearranged as a quartet in 2013.) The oldest work, “Pastime” (1963), which opens this program and is accompanied by a Philip Corner score, immediately shows her arresting and peculiar individuality. Three women are positioned across the stage in an unchanging diagonal: They might belong to three different species — or three different kinds of moving sculpture. Each stays rooted to her spot, dancing without traveling.

    One (Caitlin Scranton) stands upright, obdurate, rhythmically swinging a leg and even hopping while maintaining a handsome, often two-dimensional, upper-body tension. The second (Shakirah Stewart), her torso and outstretched legs encased in a jersey tube from which only her head emerges, stays seated: She looks like her own canoe. The third (Katie Dorn) spends the dance largely upended, balanced on one straight leg but with her torso plunged as if she were a flamingo. It’s an odd vision, but forceful. All three show striking technical rigor.

    Ms. Childs, 78 and in exceptional shape (erect, coolly composed), dances one solo, “Particular Reel” (1973), herself. Here, she crisscrosses the space, walking in a steady zigzag from one corner to another, embellishing each line of her path with slow turns, powerfully outstretched gestures and telling, momentary pauses. Her whole manner is austere: Touchingly tentative transitional moments are followed by others of complete authority as her eyes, hands and arms arrive perfectly in a completed forward gesture into the beyond.

    4
    From left, Lonnie Poupard Jr., Vincent McCloskey, Robert Mark Burke and Kyle Gerry, members of the Lucinda Childs Dance Company, in “Radial Courses.”CreditAndrea Mohin/The New York Times

    Spatial geometry is one of Ms. Childs’s enduring themes. Another is meter: You’re intensely aware of individual feet, as in verse, and of their rhythmic play in far larger units. The two coincide in her 1970s work to build a genre of startling and uncompromising minimalism. You see why she would become a like-minded choreographer — in scansion, structure and thought — for Mr. Glass. It’s seldom possible to discern the start or end of any phrase. Each dance’s current is nonstop (the pauses in her own “Particular Reel” are somewhat illusory, caesuras rather than halts), while its sense of process is constant.

    Each Childs composition establishes its own flight paths. The three men of “Reclining Rondo” (1975) don’t travel at all, or even stand: In one vertical line, they lie, sit, reposition themselves, in a steady rhythm. It’s fun to note how a position that looks fetal or sleeplike is followed by one of exertion or Sphinx-like fixity, but this “Rondo” is too schematic to feel like much more than a scientific experiment.

    The manner is entirely objective, but the steps take on their own affective qualities. Those turning leaps catch your breath; some of the rapid smaller walks touch on comedy.

    The program builds to the bafflingly intricate patterning and scansion of the light-footed dance quintet “Interior Drama” (1977). Five women, their insteps lively and their legs often straight, begin by advancing in a wedge shape, but the parallel vertical paths they take soon become interwoven with retreats, turns, arcs — and with metrical variations, too. Ms. Childs, known as a seminal figure of dance postmodernism, is here a child of the Renaissance.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:27 PM on November 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Billy Strayhorn, Dance,   

    From BAM Brooklyn Academy of Music: “A lively tribute to an extraordinary jazz virtuoso” 

    From BAM-Brooklyn Academy of Music

    1

    2

    DANCE | MUSIC
    Halfway to Dawn

    Dec 5—8
    BAM Harvey Theater
    Tickets start at $25

    This jubilant dance-theater celebration is inspired by the openly gay jazz composer and arranger Billy Strayhorn, perhaps best known as Duke Ellington’s main collaborator.

    Billy Strayhorn Credit Jazz Times

    David Roussève’s choreography sets nine dancers to various movement styles with video elements and a score that features Strayhorn’s music, channeling the spirit of the virtuoso through past, present, and fantasy.

    BUY TICKETS

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition


    The Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) is a performing arts venue in Brooklyn, New York City, known as a center for progressive and avant garde performance. It presented its first performance in 1861 and began operations in its present location in 1908.

    Today, BAM has a reputation as a leader in presenting “cutting edge” performance and has grown into an urban arts center which focuses on both international arts presentation and local community needs. Its purpose is to provide an environment in which its audiences – annually, more than 775,000 people – can experience a broad array of aesthetic and cultural programs. From 1999 to 2014, BAM was headed by Karen Brooks Hopkins, President, and Joseph V. Melillo, Executive Producer. Katy Clark is now president, succeeding Hopkins who retired in spring 2015.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 6:48 AM on October 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Dance, Jessica Lang-choreographer,   

    From McCarter Theatre Center: “Jessica Lang Dance” 


    From McCarter Theatre Center

    Tesseracts of Time (and other works)
    FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2018, Matthews Theatre

    Tickets

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    “Each work feels unique. Between the visually rich dancing and striking use of lighting, we seem to enter new realms with each dance. Lang’s dancers perform with an easy, unaffected clarity.”

    The Boston Globe

    A master of visual composition, Jessica Lang has quickly emerged as one of the most important choreographers of her generation.

    Jessica Lang – Choreographer from Opera Musica

    Twyla Tharp by Ruven Afanador-Courtesy of Ellen Jacobs Associates

    A former Tharp dancer, Lang’s works extend the boundaries of the dancing body through architectural decor, and a prime example is Tesseracts of Time, her collaboration with Steven Holl, the architect of Princeton University’s Lewis Arts complex. Lang’s McCarter program will also include Thousand Yard Stare, which celebrates the pride, honor, and searing loss experienced by military veterans.

    Program includes four pieces choreographed by Jessica Lang:

    Solo Bach (2008) with music by Johann Sebastian Bach, featuring Lara St. John on the violin.
    Sweet Silent Thought (2016) with an original score by Jakub Ciupinski, inspired by Shakespeare’s sonnets.
    Thousand Yard Stare (2016) with music by Ludwig van Beethoven and performed with support from the Takás Quartet. Movingly celebrates the pride, honor, and searing loss experienced by military veterans.
    The Calling (excerpt from Splendid Isolation II) (2006) with music by Trio Mediaeval and original lighting by Al Crawford.
    Tesseracts of Time (2015), a concept created in collaboration with architect Steven Holl, which explores Holl’s basic belief of the relationship of architecture to the ground: Under the ground, In the ground, On the ground and Over the ground.

    The 2018-2019 Dance Series is sponsored by the Jerome Robbins Foundation.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    McCarter Theatre Center

    McCarter Theatre Center is recognized as one of this country’s leading theaters, and is the only organization in this country that is both a professional producing theater and a major presenter of the performing arts. With this identity comes a unique commitment to creating, developing and producing new work for the stage, reinvestigating classical theatrical repertoire, and bringing the best of the world’s performing artists to Central New Jersey. McCarter demonstrates an unwavering commitment to engaging, educating and cultivating a broad range of audiences, making the arts accessible to all people, and presenting an unparalleled variety of bold, stimulating, diverse and provocative programs across disciplines.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:48 AM on October 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Dance, George Balanchine, New York City Center, , When City Center Was Balanchine’s House   

    From The New York Times: “When City Center Was Balanchine’s House” 

    New York Times

    From The New York Times

    Oct. 25, 2018
    Marina Harss

    Jacques d’Amboise, Patricia Wilde, Allegra Kent and Edward Villella talk about the roles they danced at the theater, which is celebrating George Balanchine and its 75th anniversary as a palace of the arts.

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    George Balanchine, right, rehearsing with Jacques d’Amboise at City Center. CreditJohn Dominis/The LIFE Picture Collection, via Getty Images

    When Lincoln Kirstein and the choreographer George Balanchine were attempting to get a company off the ground in the 1930s and ’40s, they had little more than a pickup troupe, with meager seasons and slender prospects. That began to change in 1948, when the company, the newly named New York City Ballet, found an institution willing to take it in: New York City Center.

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    The PAR Group

    The studios had splintery floors. The orchestra pit was cramped. There was practically no backstage space — and the stage itself was small.

    “I could do a couple of jumps and be past center stage,” said Jacques d’Amboise. He danced with the company during its City Center years, as did Edward Villella, who lived a brownstone away from the theater. “They used to deliver huge blocks of ice,” Mr. Villella said, “and they would take it into the alley in the back, and that was the air-conditioning.”

    Since those early days, the building, a fanciful Moorish-style structure built as a meeting place for the Shriners, a Masonic group, has been updated many times, most recently in 2011. In 1943, it became a temple for the arts, converted for that purpose by the civic-minded mayor Fiorello La Guardia. Tickets were kept affordable. In the ’40s, a prime seat went for $2.40, roughly equivalent to $35 today.

    When New York City Ballet was invited to become a resident company, in 1948, Balanchine got to work, developing his dynamic, streamlined American style.

    As part of a season celebrating the 75th anniversary of the building’s rebirth as a palace of culture, City Center is hosting a ballet festival, “Balanchine: The City Center Years,” from Oct. 31 through Nov. 4. The works included — 13 in all — were either created or performed there during City Ballet’s first decade and a half, 1948-64.

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    George Balanchine-From New York City Center

    “What we’ve tried to do,” Arlene Shuler, City Center’s president and chief executive officer, said, “is represent the full range of what was performed here during Balanchine’s time.” Two of the ballets, “Symphony in C” and “Concerto Barocco,” were part of the company’s very first program at the hall. “Tarantella” was the last to premiere there, in 1964, before the company moved into a shiny and vastly more spacious new building at Lincoln Center.

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    The dancer Jacques d’Amboise. Vincent Tullo for The New York Times

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    Mr. d’Amboise in the title role of George Balanchine’s “Apollo” in 1962. “I want American boy!” Mr. d’Amboise said Balanchine told him. “He wanted me to be a wild, untamed youth, not just look pretty and make poses.”CreditJack Mitchell/Getty Images

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    Patricia Wilde in 1963. Ms. Wilde was often thrown into roles at the last minute: “Mr. B would always say, ‘Pat can do it!’”CreditJack Mitchell/Getty Images

    See the full article for the individual artist images and acccounts.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:41 AM on October 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Dance, , ,   

    From White Light Festival: “Only the Sound Remains” 

    From White Light Festival

    Only the Sound Remains
    Kaija Saariaho, composer

    Kaija Saariaho by Andrew Campbell


    Peter Sellars, director
    (U.S. premiere)

    November 17–18, 2018 Rose Theater, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall
    Choose a Performance

    Saturday, November 17, 2018 at 7:30 pm
    Sunday, November 18, 2018 at 5:00 pm

    For tickets please see the full article as there is no tickets link.

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    All photos by Ruth Walz

    In Kaija Saariaho’s hypnotic opera, based on Ezra Pound’s translations of two Japanese Noh plays, a ghost and an angel emerge from a world of light and shadow. A trio of celebrated performers—countertenor Philippe Jaroussky, bass-baritone Davóne Tines, and dancer Nora Kimball-Mentzos—conjures these supernatural encounters in a U.S. premiere directed by Peter Sellars that shimmers with spectral power and ”overwhelms with beauty” (Bachtrack).

    “This introspective music theatre, this future of opera, overwhelms with beauty, stimulates the imagination, and entrances the mind. Don’t miss it.”

    Bachtrack

    “Sensual and evocative.”

    Financial Times

    “Disarms, seduces and hypnotizes…. Not since Written on Skin has modern opera thrilled with such intensity”

    Bachtrack

    Philippe Jaroussky, countertenor
    Davóne Tines, bass-baritone
    Nora Kimball-Mentzos, dancer and choreographer
    Ernest Martínez Izquierdo, conductor

    Ernest Martínez Izquierdo Courtesy of the artist


    Theatre of Voices
    Meta4; Eija Kankaanranta, kantele; Camilla Hoitenga, flute; Heikki Parviainen, percussion
    Julie Mehretu, scenery designer
    Robby Duiveman, costume designer
    James F. Ingalls, lighting designer
    Christophe Lebreton, sound designer

    Once again, I hope you’ll join us for our acclaimed classical music series Great Performers, which offers you the chance to experience the world’s great orchestras, conductors, soloists, and ensembles on Lincoln Center’s legendary stages. In addition, it gives me great pleasure to announce the 2018 White Light Festival, our annual exploration of the power of art to illuminate our interior and communal lives.

    We hope you will join us for this always stimulating exploration of how art reveals what lies within us, and invite you to experience these artistic offerings as a still point in our ever-turning world. I look forward to seeing you often.

    The White Light Festival is made possible by:
    The Shubert Foundation
    The Katzenberger Foundation, Inc.
    Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater
    The Joelson Foundation
    The Harkness Foundation for Dance
    Great Performers Circle
    Chairman’s Council
    Friends of Lincoln Center

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:04 AM on October 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Blak Whyte Gray, Dance,   

    From White Light Festival: “Blak Whyte Gray” 

    From White Light Festival

    Blak Whyte Gray
    (U.S. premiere)

    November 16–17, 2018 Gerald W. Lynch Theater at John Jay College

    A world in flux, a need for change: This is the driving force behind Blak Whyte Gray, an electrifying dance-theater work from Olivier Award–winning East London company Boy Blue. Rooted in pure hip-hop with a fierce political bite, brilliant stage imagery, and a driving electronic music score, Blak Whyte Gray pulses with physical virtuosity.

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    All photos by Carl Fox or courtesy of Blue Boy

    Boy Blue
    Michael “Mikey J” Asante, creative direction and music
    Kenrick “H2O” Sandy, choreography
    Lee Curran, lighting design
    Ryan Dawson Laight, costume design

    Friday, November 16, 2018 at 7:30 pm
    Saturday, November 17, 2018 at 7:30 pm

    For tickets please see the full article as there is no tickets link provided.

    See the full article here .

    Once again, I hope you’ll join us for our acclaimed classical music series Great Performers, which offers you the chance to experience the world’s great orchestras, conductors, soloists, and ensembles on Lincoln Center’s legendary stages. In addition, it gives me great pleasure to announce the 2018 White Light Festival, our annual exploration of the power of art to illuminate our interior and communal lives.

    We hope you will join us for this always stimulating exploration of how art reveals what lies within us, and invite you to experience these artistic offerings as a still point in our ever-turning world. I look forward to seeing you often.

    The White Light Festival is made possible by:
    The Shubert Foundation
    The Katzenberger Foundation, Inc.
    Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater
    The Joelson Foundation
    The Harkness Foundation for Dance
    Great Performers Circle
    Chairman’s Council
    Friends of Lincoln Center

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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