Tagged: Dance Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 3:50 PM on May 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Dance, Lincoln Center, Music, , Theatre   

    From Lincoln Center: The Mostly Mozart Festival 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    From Lincoln Center

    Join us for the newly expanded Mostly Mozart Festival featuring a thrilling slate of international dance, theater, and classical music.

    1

    May 22, 2018
    Pia Catton

    Music Dance Film Theater

    The Mostly Mozart Festival is growing in every possible direction.

    The 52nd edition of this beloved summer event now runs five weeks—July 12 to August 12—up from four, and will present the mix of classical and contemporary work for which it has become known. But the 2018 festival will extend further into immersive experiences, performances in Brooklyn and Central Park, and, for the first time, theater. (Who better to start with than Shakespeare?)

    “We have diversified Mostly Mozart over the years,” Ehrenkranz Artistic Director Jane Moss explains, “and we are diversifying it further, but Mozart does remain at the center.”

    Devotees of Mozart can hear their favorite composer performed by artists ranging from celebrated pianist Emanuel Ax (July 24 and 25) to 16-year-old violin prodigy Daniel Lozakovich (August 1, 7, and 8)—and, of course, the renowned Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra led by exuberant Renée and Robert Belfer Music Director Louis Langrée.

    But Mozart’s masterpieces, like his final Symphony No. 41 (“Jupiter”), conducted by Thomas Dausgaard (July 20 and 21), are complemented by groundbreaking productions that represent innovation in eras long after that of the festival’s namesake composer.

    The 2018 festival opens on July 12 and 13 with Available Light, a work that combines music, dance, and design by, respectively, composer John Adams, choreographer Lucinda Childs, and architect Frank Gehry.

    Returning to New York for the first time since 1983, Available Light explores modern expressions of each discipline. Even so, they can all be seen as a distillation of classical purity. That is particularly visible in the linear clarity of Childs’s ballet steps—stripped of frills and repeated to express Adams’s score Light Over Water, for synthesizer and recorded brass.

    If Available Light seems atypical for Mostly Mozart, its inaugural theater production—Shakespeare’s Macbeth interpreted by the late Japanese director Yukio Ninagawa—pushes the envelope even further. But the 1980 NINAGAWA Macbeth (July 21–25) is a balance of tradition and innovation. While rooted in the original text and employing music by Samuel Barber and Franz Schubert, the production transports the setting from Scotland in the Middle Ages to feudal-era Japan. And Ninagawa has created a staging beautiful enough to count as visual art.

    Theater
    NINAGAWA Macbeth

    1

    Saturday, July 21, 2018 at 7:30 pm
    Sunday, July 22, 2018 at 5:00 pm
    Tuesday, July 24, 2018 at 7:30 pm
    Wednesday, July 25, 2018 at 7:30 pm

    By William Shakespeare
    Translated by Yushi Odashima
    Masachika Ichimura, Macbeth (Mostly Mozart Festival debut)
    Yuko Tanaka, Lady Macbeth (Mostly Mozart Festival debut)
    Yukio Ninagawa, director

    Performed in Japanese with English supertitles
    Performance length: 2 hours and 45 minutes, including intermission

    The 1980 premiere of Yukio Ninagawa’s “legendarily beautiful” Japanese-language production of Macbeth (Independent, U.K.) was a watershed moment in global theater. Transposing Shakespeare’s tragedy from medieval Scotland to feudal Japan, Ninagawa created a breathtaking world filled with samurai, kabuki witches, a highly expressive cherry tree, and a moving musical score of Buddhist chant and western classical music. This revival, the last production overseen by Ninagawa before his death in 2016, transforms the Bard’s brutal tale of greed, ambition, and revenge into a poetic meditation on the ephemeral nature of existence.

    “Achingly beautiful.”

    Guardian (U.K.)

    “What makes this Macbeth so powerful is that Ninagawa’s gift for painterly spectacle is accompanied by a sense of sadness at mankind’s folly and impermanence.”

    Guardian (U.K.)

    “The most beautiful Macbeth you will ever see.”

    Telegraph (U.K.)

    The festival’s expansion is part of an evolution that has been ongoing for several years, allowing ever wider room for interpreting the classical canon. And a key participant all along has been the Mark Morris Dance Group.

    3
    3
    DanceMotion USA

    A festival regular, choreographer Mark Morris is a musician himself and hews closely to classical music when designing movement. This year, he brings a world premiere set to Schubert’s Trout Quintet, as well as dances using Monteverdi and Brahms, to the Rose Theater (August 9–12).

    Performances in which the audience and performers share exceptional settings are popular in New York, and Mostly Mozart rises to the occasion with the wordless drama The Force of Things, an immersive installation and musical landscape set up at Brooklyn’s Gelsey Kirkland Arts Center (August 6–8). Composed by Ashley Fure, the work includes 24 subwoofers and live music played by the International Contemporary Ensemble, now in its eighth season as the festival’s artists-in-residence.

    4
    Ashley Fure. Photo by Matt Zugale

    In a space designed by Fure’s architect brother Adam, this music-theater experience is designed to make objects and materials part of the drama. “It functions equally as an art installation and a performance,” Moss says.

    But you don’t have to go to Brooklyn to have an immersive Mostly Mozart experience, as the festival presents the world premiere of John Luther Adams’s In the Name of the Earth, a massive choral work commissioned by Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, on August 11. For this free performance near Central Park’s Harlem Meer, guests will walk into the northeast portion of the park to hear some 800 singers perform a new work that honors nature.

    The immersive trend also continues with La Fura dels Baus’s innovative production of Haydn’s The Creation, which features period-instrument ensemble Insula Orchestra and accentus choir. On July 19 and 20, the Rose Theater will be transformed with a 250-gallon water tank, a 20-foot crane, and an assortment of helium balloons, with which performers relate the Biblical story of creation.

    5
    A scene from La Fura dels Baus’s production of Haydn’s The Creation. No image credit.

    But for the new concepts that today’s artists introduce onto the stage, and for the new journeys that immersive productions take audiences on, it’s hard not to feel that Leonard Bernstein got there first. As part of the celebration of Bernstein’s centenary, Mostly Mozart is presenting the landmark Bernstein MASS, directed by SF Opera Lab curator Elkhanah Pulitzer, and featuring over 200 singers, dancers, and musicians on July 17 and 18.

    6
    Bernstein MASS. Photo by Mathew Imaging.

    MASS, originally created for the 1971 opening of the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., is already a multilayered work. Subtitled A Theater Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers, it’s a unique take on the liturgical form, incorporating theater, dance, jazz, and popular music. Pulitzer adds even more by creating a fully staged theater piece, which in fact, notes Moss, is as Bernstein originally intended it. The large-scale MASS will include the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra, Concert Chorale of New York, Young People’s Chorus of New York City, both a marching band and a rock band, dancers, and—making his Mostly Mozart debut—bass-baritone Davóne Tines as the Celebrant.

    In the context of the Mostly Mozart Festival, “Mozart” has come to represent not just a single composer and his era but the entire genre of classical music. Today, we can consider the festival “mostly classical music,” but that leaves room for plenty more—beyond classical and often beyond music itself.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem
    Stem Education Coalition

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 11:26 AM on May 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Dance, , L.A. Times, Mark Morris' "Pepperland"   

    Brought Forward From the L.A. Tines by Ethan Iverson: “Mark Morris mines the Beatles’ ‘Sgt. Pepper’ for an irresistible ‘Pepperland'” A master filled review 

    From Ethan Iverson

    Ethan Iverson 2016 photo by Jimmy Katz at http://www.jimmykatz.com, with permission

    L.A. Times

    May 11, 2018
    Mark Swed

    2
    The Mark Morris Dance Group performing the California premiere of Pepperland at the Granada Theatre Thursday night. (David Bazemore)

    4
    Mark Morris. Charles Haynes CC-BY-SA-2.0

    From Carlsbad to Santa Barbara, the Southern California coast is peppered with pepper — Pepperland Recording Studios, Pepperdine University, Pepper Lane in Montecito, the Pepper Tree Inn in Santa Barbara just up the road from the Granada Theatre, where choreographer Mark Morris’ Pepperland had its California premiere Thursday night.

    An eveninglong dance program based on parts of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, Pepperland, of course, felt very much like it belonged.

    3
    Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover. Robert Fraser/Jann Haworth/Michael Cooper

    Indeed, in an extraordinary nod to California, Morris even found a way to pepper George Harrison’s Indian raga-inspired Within You Without You with an Indonesian gamelan lick in the style of the late Californian maverick composer Lou Harrison.

    Louis Andriessen


    George Harrison. No image credit found

    7
    Lou Harrison. Wikipedia Fair Use

    The dance was originally commissioned by the city of Liverpool, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the release of the Beatles’ historic album, along with a host of other international presenters, including UC Santa Barbara’s Arts & Lectures series. For the next couple of years, it will tour the world. Or maybe even across the universe. It’s that dazzling. (Upcoming local performances will be at the San Diego Civic Theatre on Saturday, and at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa in June 2019.)

    So here comes some of what’s new under the Beatles sun. The visionary German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen, who happens to be among the notable figures who found their way onto the legendary album cover collage, is introduced as a female dancer in DayGlo turquoise and purple.

    5
    Karlheinz Stockhausen. Kathinka Pasveer

    A Day in the Life begins as an otherworldly theremin solo with a cocktail lounge piano accompaniment. Morris’ frisky dancers mimic every single instance of Penny Lane with choreography of such dazzling fast-forward quickness you can’t catch half of it.

    I would suggest that the most astounding achievement of Sgt. Pepper is not that it invented the concept album, now a dated concept in the age of streaming songs and making your own playlists. Nor is it that this is the first great pop album — meant to be, like electronic music, studio-made, not composed of songs intended for live performance. The difference is like that of film and the stage, but obviously Sgt. Pepper is, in the end, performable.

    Instead, the great advance of Sgt. Pepper was the Beatles’ genius for contrasting provincially comfy old Liverpool with the mod rockers of the late 1960s as well as the psychedelic visions of unseen, unimaginable other worlds. No pop record of the past, and none of such significance since, had its musical range, from music hall sentimentality to Bach to Ravi Shankar to the avant-garde of Stockhausen, John Cage and Luciano Berio.

    5
    Ravi Shankar. AP.

    The look of Pepperland — Elizabeth Kurtman’s mod costumes are as bright as neon, with vividly clashing colors and patterns — is not so surprising, nor is Morris’ playful choreography. That’s the popular side of Morris, such as in his hit The Hard Nut. But every single move in the dance is, while being utterly musical, entirely unexpected. What first seems wrong always feels right, as though, to confirm John Lennon’s lyric, “Nothing real, but nothing to get hung about.”

    The music includes Sgt. Pepper, With a Little Help From My Friends, When I’m Sixty Four and A Day in the Life, along with Penny Lane. But other music comes from the jazz pianist Ethan Iverson, a longtime Morris collaborator, writing for a mixed band that includes soprano sax, trombone, harpsichord, percussion and theremin. Baritone Clinton Curtis, who traipses between the classical and pop worlds, adds cool, uninflected lyrics.

    The rest of the hourlong score is made up of Iverson numbers meant to reflect on aspects of the songs, say a riff on Bach (the trumpet solo in Penny Lane having been inspired by the second Brandenburg Concerto) with bravura piano and harpsichord runs, or extending a bluesy guitar lick here, the album’s opening chord extended there. One number is meant to introduce some of the characters on the cover.

    Nothing sounds like Sgt. Pepper. Nothing looks like Sgt. Pepper either. Some dances have a theme. Some don’t. Dancers simply have a ball in chorus line routines. Small psychodramas play out with couples and threesomes but not exactly as narrative to the songs, except in A Day in the Life, which is done as an instrumental.

    Few dances end where they start. Morris and Iverson are masters of the fake-out in general and the false ending in particular. Morris continually plays around with the Beatles’ own contrasts between sentiment and abstraction and sheer fantasy, although he throws in an extra helping of irony now and then.

    There is also an overall mood of flippancy (of which Morris is also an amusing master) that turns out not to be flippancy at all but a deep investigation in the way movement tells us who we are.

    Ultimately Morris’ is the gift of life, as when a mindless meditating hippie sits cross-legged on the floor, while the rest of the company grooves around him in Within You Without You, until he finally rises, not enlightened, just alive.

    Nor is Pepperland sheer joy, although you can be deceived into thinking it is. It can be so much bouncy fun, especially in Morris’ brilliantly animated big ensemble numbers, untouched by cliché.

    But the lonely bits remain in the memory too, the way solo dancers stand apart from the crowd, the way Rob Schwimmer’s desolate theremin solos, Iverson’s torchy piano solos and Curtis’ cheerless vocals could, on their own, comprise a lonely hearts club combo.

    Pepperland is Sgt. Pepper at 50, looking back with irresistible fondness — what fun it all was — but also with wisdom, knowing that it was real and was something to get hung about.

    See the full article here.

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:22 PM on May 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Dance, , , , Sarah Hennies: 'Passing'   

    From New Music USA: “Sarah Hennies: ‘Passing'” 

    From New Music USA

    1

    Saturday, May 5, 2018
    at 8:00 PM

    Project Q
    1850 Amsterdam Ave
    New York, NY 10031

    $12—18
    Tickets

    Supported by a 2018 NYSCA Individual Artist commission, Qubit is thrilled to present Sarah Hennies at Project-Q. Ms. Hennies, alongside a stellar group of eight other New York musicians and dancers, will premiere Passing, an evening-length new work that pairs field recordings of busy and crowded public spaces in NYC, Ithaca, Philadelphia, and Buffalo.

    “The piece elaborates on ideas began with my piece Gather for vibraphone & field recordings. It concerns itself with the ability to exist as an anomalous presence in public life, and features a percussion/movement soloist performance loosely based on the life of upstate New York artist Mark Hogancamp, creator of “Marwencol” and subject of a documentary of the same name.”

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:14 PM on May 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Dance, Michelle Boulé   

    From Baryshnikov Arts Center: “NEXT UP IN DANCE An Evening with Michelle Boulé” 

    Baryshnikov Arts Center

    1

    2

    Next week, the Spring 2018 series of dance works-in-progress continues with Michelle Boulé, who will share Field, which inquires into the relationship between aesthetic form in choreography and the science behind traditional and contemporary healing practices.

    An Evening with Michelle Boulé
    May 11 / Fri at 7PM
    Rudolf Nureyev Studio

    Tickets: $15
    866 811 4111

    See the full article here .

    Baryshnikov Arts Center studio space

    BAC is the realization of a long-held vision by artistic director Mikhail Baryshnikov, who sought to build an arts center in New York City that would serve as a gathering place for artists from all disciplines. BAC’s opening in 2005 heralded the launch of this mission, establishing a thriving creative space for artists from around the world. Located in the Hudson Yards neighborhood of Manhattan, BAC comprises a total of 20,000 square feet, including the 238-seat Jerome Robbins Theater, which opened in 2010; the Howard Gilman Performance Space, a black box performance space seating 136 people; four column-free studios; and office space. BAC serves approximately 500 artists and more than 22,000 audience members annually through presentations and artist residencies.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:20 PM on April 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Dance, Full: Symphony and Ballet, ,   

    From NewMusicUSA: “Full: Symphony and Ballet” 

    From NewMusicUSA

    1

    Sunday, April 29, 2018
    at 7:00 PM

    BAMPFA
    2155 Center Street
    Berkeley, CA 94704

    $8—13
    Tickets

    Programmed by Berkeley Symphony with Music Alive Composer-in-Residence Anna Clyne, Berkeley Sounds composer fellows join forces with the choreographers and dancers of Berkeley Ballet Theater to explore what magical results occur when music meets dance. World premieres of pieces written by Aiyana Braun, Peter Shin, and Ursula Kwong-Brown are matched with work by choreographers Laura O’Malley, Keon Saghari, and Vanessa Thiessen.

    3 pieces for sinfonietta and dance which will be premiered, conducted by Ming Luke, listed below:

    1. Peter Shin, composer, Scène in E minor (2018) [World Premiere]

    Vanessa Thiessen, choreographer, From the Well of Echoes

    Inspired by artwork:

    Theresa Hak Kyung Cha – Dictee [book]

    Theresa Hak Kyung Cha – Father/Mother [handmade photo book]

    Theresa Hak Kyung Cha – Mouth to Mouth [film]

    Dancers: Mai Corkins, Moses Abrahamson, Shannon Landheer, Zoe Carr, Ashira Bloom

    2. Aiyana Braun, composer, One Horizon (2018) [World Premiere]

    Laura O’Malley, choreographer, Inscape

    Inspired by artwork:

    Laurence Weiner – Art Wall

    Dancers: Nina Owen, Georgia Davidson, Elias Coerver, Eugene Bolgatz

    3. Ursula Kwong-Brown, composer, Black and Blue (2018) [World Premiere]

    Keon Saghari, choreographer, Black&Blue

    Inspired by artwork:

    Theresa Hak-Kyung – Black and Blue (8 images)

    Dancers: Violet Buxton-Walsh, Elizabeth Inami, Clara Castronovo, Nina Owen, Julie Deleger

    This event is associated with Anna Clyne and the Berkeley Symphony, a project sponsored by New Music USA.

    Participants: Berkeley Symphony, Anna Clyne, Peter Shin

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:33 PM on December 2, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Dance   

    From The Wall Street Journal: “At Ailey, the Battle Has Only Begun” 

    Under copyright, so, just a couple of hints.

    “When the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater opens its new season Wednesday night at New York City Center, it will mark the 50th anniversary of the company’s signature work, Revelations.

    aa

    But the gala program will also look to the future: On the bill is The Hunt by incoming artistic director Robert Battle, who will succeed the company’s current artistic director, Judith Jamison, when she steps down on July 1, 2011.

    See the full article here.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: