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  • richardmitnick 12:56 PM on October 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ambrose Akinmusire & Jazz Small Group I, Department of Music at Princeton, ,   

    From Department of Music at Princeton: “Ambrose Akinmusire & Jazz Small Group I” 

    Department of Music at Princeton


    From Department of Music at Princeton

    Ambrose Akinmusire by Eva Hambach AFP Getty
    Images

    Jazz at Princeton University
    Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018 8:00 pm
    Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

    Tickets

    Blue Note Records trumpet star Ambrose Akinmusire joins Jazz at Princeton University’s Small Group I in a program including a commissioned suite in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of W. E. Du Bois’ birth.

    About the Artist:

    Born and raised in Oakland, California, Ambrose Akinmusire (pronounced ah-kin-MOO-sir-ee) was a member of the Berkeley High School Jazz Ensemble when he caught the attention of saxophonist Steve Coleman. Akinmusire was asked to join Coleman’s Five Elements, embarking on a European tour when he was just a 19-year-old student at the Manhattan School of Music. After returning to the West Coast to pursue a master’s degree at the University of Southern California, Akinmusire went on to attend the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz in Los Angeles, where he studied with Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter and Terence Blanchard.

    In 2007 Akinmusire won the prestigious Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition, decided by a panel of judges that included Blanchard, Quincy Jones, Herb Alpert, Hugh Masekela, Clark Terry and Roy Hargrove. That year Akinmusire also won the Carmine Caruso International Jazz Trumpet Solo Competition and released his debut album Prelude…To Cora on the Fresh Sound label. He moved back to New York and began performing with the likes of Vijay Iyer, Aaron Parks, Esperanza Spalding and Jason Moran. It was also during this time that he first caught the attention of another discerning listener, Bruce Lundvall, President of Blue Note Records.

    Akinmusire’s Blue Note debut When The Heart Emerges Glistening was released in 2011 to rave reviews. The Los Angeles Times praised his “chameleonic tone that can sigh, flutter or soar,” adding that “Akinmusire sounds less like a rising star than one that was already at great heights and just waiting to be discovered.” DownBeat described his playing as “spectacular and not at all shy — muscular, driving, with a forward sound, pliant phrasing and a penchant for intervallic leaps,” concluding that “clearly something very special and personal is at work here, a vision of jazz that’s bigger than camps, broader and more intellectually restless than blowing sessions.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Princeton’s Department of Music is at the epicenter of a musical culture that is broad and deep, reaching from edge to edge of the campus, from the classroom to the concert hall, and from faculty-led groups to those run exclusively by students.

    There are several levels of involvement that students can have with the Department of Music: Graduate students can earn a Ph.D. in one of the two main areas of our Graduate program – composition or musicology – including opportunities to focus on theory or ethnomusicology. Undergraduate students can major in music, in a program with emphasis on writing music or writing about music. Undergraduates can also earn certificates in the Program in Musical Performance, both as Music Majors and as majors of other departments. Those who do not plan to pursue a degree or certificate in music are of course welcome to take courses with world-renowned composers and music historians, take instrumental or voice lessons in the private studios of top professionals, and audition to perform with our many ensembles: six jazz groups, three choruses, two orchestras, a wind ensemble, an opera theater, a musical comedy troupe, at least a dozen chamber music ensembles, a laptop orchestra, and almost twenty small a cappella singing groups.

    Community members can attend numerous concerts throughout the academic year. In addition to student performances, world-renowned artists appear on the Princeton University Concerts series; leading performers of contemporary music showcase compositions by faculty and graduate composers through the Princeton Sound Kitchen; Sō Percussion, the Edward T. Cone Artists-in-Residence, perform and engage with the community. The student-run radio station WPRB: 103.3 FM broadcasts many styles of music, often featuring Princeton student performances.

    An important feature hard to discern from a list of courses and ensembles is the Music Department’s emphasis on collaboration. This manifests not only within the department (graduate composers composing for the undergraduate orchestra, graduate musicologists making a performance edition for an undergraduate opera production), but in collaboration with other departments as well. Frequent interdisciplinary collaborators with the music department include students and faculty from Architecture, African American Studies, Computer Science, Irish Studies, and the programs in Theater, Dance, Visual Art, Music Theater, and Creative Writing all housed within the Lewis Center for Arts.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:57 PM on October 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Department of Music at Princeton, ORCHESTRA OF THE ACCADEMIA TEATRO ALLA SCALA   

    From Department of Music at Princeton: “ORCHESTRA OF THE ACCADEMIA TEATRO ALLA SCALA” 

    Department of Music at Princeton

    From Department of Music at Princeton

    ORCHESTRA OF THE ACCADEMIA TEATRO ALLA SCALA

    Iván Fischer, Budapest, 2015 by Kispados

    IVÁN FISCHER, CONDUCTOR
    Tues. Oct 23, 7:30PM | Free, Ticketed
    Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall
    Princeton University Orchestra Presents

    More information and free tickets

    The Princeton University Orchestra presents Milan’s legendary Teatro Alla Scala affiliate orchestra for young professionals, conducted by internationally renowned conductor Iván Fischer in a FREE (but ticketed) one-night-only guest appearance.

    1

    The touring Orchestra of the Accademia Teatro Alla Scala has played all over the world, with recent highlights including the Bolshoi Theatre (Moscow), Royal Opera House (Muscat), and La Fenice (Venice). Over its history, the Orchestra has been led by a long list of preeminent conductors including Zubin Mehta, Christoph Eschenbach, and Gustavo Dudamel; the ensemble has also collaborated with soloists from Lang Lang to Herbie Hancock.

    Iván Fischer is the founder and music director of the Budapest Festival Orchestra, as well as music director of Berlin’s Konzerthaus and Konzerthaus Orchestra. A frequent guest conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, and Cleveland Orchestra, the Maestro has also received the Golden Medal Ward from the President of the Republic of Hungary, and the Crystal Award from the World Economic Forum for his services in promoting international cultural relations, among many other honors.

    The La Scala Academy Orchestra traces its origin to the master courses for young musicians embarking on a career in a professional orchestra. It is currently the only institution providing training across the entire orchestra repertoire: symphonies, operas, and ballets. Under the guidance of acclaimed musicians and the first chairs of the Teatro alla Scala Orchestra, the two-year curriculum provides individual training in the chosen instrument and ensemble lessons in chamber music, orchestra sections, and full orchestra exercises.

    The Academy Orchestra performs at famous theatres, concert societies, and international festivals. The more notable venues include Teatro alla Scala, the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow, the St. Petersburg Philharmonia, the Royal Opera House in Muscat, La Fenice of Venice, Teatro Massimo of Palermo, Teatro San Carlo in Naples, Teatro Petruzzelli in Bari, Teatro Bellini of Catania, the RAI Auditorium in Turin, the Ravello Festival, and the Kissinger Sommer Festival.

    Naturally, the La Scala Academy Orchestra works closely with Teatro alla Scala, which welcomes it to the pit for one of the season’s operas. Notable titles have included Così fan tutte, Le nozze di Figaro, Le convenienze ed inconvenienze teatrali, L’occasione fa il ladro, L’italiana in Algeri, Don Pasquale, La scala di seta, Il barbiere di Siviglia, Die Zauberflöte, and, most recently, Humperdinck’s Hänsel und Gretel. In 2018 Alì Babà e i Quaranta ladroni by Luigi Cherubini and in 2019 Prima la musica poi le parole by Antonio Salieri, Gianni Schicchi by Giacomo Puccini and Rigoletto by Giuseppe Verdi.

    But of course Teatro alla Scala is also famous for ballet, and the Academy Orchestra has accompanied the Ballet Corps on a number of occasions, including A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Giselle, Onegin, and Histoire de Manon.

    Over its history, the Orchestra has been led by a long list of preeminent conductors: Yuri Temirkanov, Zubin Mehta, Fabio Luisi, Ádám Fischer, Christoph Eschenbach, Manfred Honeck, Roland Böer, Michele Mariotti, Gustavo Dudamel, Gianandrea Noseda, Stefano Ranzani, Ottavio Dantone, Giovanni Antonini, John Axelrod, Susanna Mälkki, Pietro Mianiti, Daniele Rustioni, David Coleman, Mikhail Tatarnikov, and Lorenzo Viotti. It has also accompanied soloists of the caliber of Lang Lang, Herbie Hancock, Alexei Volodin, Simon Trpčeski, David Fray, Olga Kern, and Alessandro Taverna.

    PROGRAM:
    Gioachino Rossini Overture to La gazza ladra (The Thieving Magpie)

    Felix Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4 in A Major, Op. 90

    Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 5 in E Minor, Op. 64

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Princeton’s Department of Music is at the epicenter of a musical culture that is broad and deep, reaching from edge to edge of the campus, from the classroom to the concert hall, and from faculty-led groups to those run exclusively by students.

    There are several levels of involvement that students can have with the Department of Music: Graduate students can earn a Ph.D. in one of the two main areas of our Graduate program – composition or musicology – including opportunities to focus on theory or ethnomusicology. Undergraduate students can major in music, in a program with emphasis on writing music or writing about music. Undergraduates can also earn certificates in the Program in Musical Performance, both as Music Majors and as majors of other departments. Those who do not plan to pursue a degree or certificate in music are of course welcome to take courses with world-renowned composers and music historians, take instrumental or voice lessons in the private studios of top professionals, and audition to perform with our many ensembles: six jazz groups, three choruses, two orchestras, a wind ensemble, an opera theater, a musical comedy troupe, at least a dozen chamber music ensembles, a laptop orchestra, and almost twenty small a cappella singing groups.

    Community members can attend numerous concerts throughout the academic year. In addition to student performances, world-renowned artists appear on the Princeton University Concerts series; leading performers of contemporary music showcase compositions by faculty and graduate composers through the Princeton Sound Kitchen; Sō Percussion, the Edward T. Cone Artists-in-Residence, perform and engage with the community. The student-run radio station WPRB: 103.3 FM broadcasts many styles of music, often featuring Princeton student performances.

    An important feature hard to discern from a list of courses and ensembles is the Music Department’s emphasis on collaboration. This manifests not only within the department (graduate composers composing for the undergraduate orchestra, graduate musicologists making a performance edition for an undergraduate opera production), but in collaboration with other departments as well. Frequent interdisciplinary collaborators with the music department include students and faculty from Architecture, African American Studies, Computer Science, Irish Studies, and the programs in Theater, Dance, Visual Art, Music Theater, and Creative Writing all housed within the Lewis Center for Arts.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:52 PM on October 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Debbie Diamond, Department of Music at Princeton, Masterclass with Debbie Diamond- baroque violin, Masterclass with Kelly Hall-Tompkins-Violin   

    From Department of Music at Princeton: Two Masterclasses at Princeton 

    From Department of Music at Princeton

    Early Music Princeton

    Friday, Oct. 19, 2018 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
    Lee Rehearsal Room, Lewis Arts complex

    Debbie Diamond
    1

    About the Artist:

    Debbie Diamond is a professional violinist, specialising in Baroque historical performance. She is also adept at virtually all styles of music, ranging from klezmer and Irish fiddle playing right through to Classical and Romantic repertoire, and her own original compositions. Debbie was born in Toronto, Canada, but made several cross-Atlantic journeys. Her first crossing was to Israel to study at the Rubin Academy in Jerusalem, after which she returned to Toronto to finish her undergraduate studies at the University of Toronto. Upon completing a Masters Degree in Historical Performance (also in Toronto), she journeyed south to Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, for two years of Doctoral Studies in Early Music Performance at their Early Music Institute. The ocean beckoned yet again, and Debbie moved to Israel to lead the Jerusalem Baroque Orchestra and to join the Jerusalem Consort. Once there, she also joined Black Velvet, an Israeli Irish band, and performed with Black Velvet up and down the country, discovering the merits of pub performances and folk festivals. She was also founder, leader and artistic director of the chamber group Ensemble Nuance as well as Barock ‘n’ Roll, a chamber group specialising in the fusion of baroque and rock music.

    After several years, Debbie decided to settle with crossing the Mediterranean and English Channel (but not the Atlantic) and settled in London. Debbie has been a regular member of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment since 1999, and has worked for eminent conductors including Sir Simon Rattle, Sir Charles Mackerras, Sir Mark Elder, Vladimir Jurowski, Ivan Fischer, Sir Roger Norrington, Franz Bruggen and Masaaki Suzuki. She has performed regularly with the English Baroque Soloists, L’Orchestre Romantique et Revolutionnaire (both conducted by Sir John Eliot Gardiner), Gabrieli Consort, Florilegium, and The Sixteen. Debbie has appeared as soloist with Fiori Musicali, Ensemble Sonnerie, and the Sweelinck Ensemble. She has performed as guest violinist with the chamber group Red Priest. Her playing has been described as “…intense…graceful…”, “…passionate and full of energy”, “one who has the ability to rise to the occasion in a public performance in a special and dramatically persuasive way…”. As a soloist, she has given recitals in Canada, the United States, Israel, Germany, Ireland and the United Kingdom.

    In addition to concertising, Debbie has always made teaching a priority. Currently Debbie teaches at the Junior Academy (Royal Academy of Music) where she leads and coaches the Classical Orchestra, coaches Baroque chamber music, and teaches individual lessons. In addition, she is a music consultant for MiSST (Music in Secondary Schools Trust), a program that provides whole class instrumental tuition, and individual and paired lessons privately at primary school level. Debbie also teaches individual and group lessons in schools and privately, and is a director and conductor for school orchestras. As she is extremely knowledgeable about performance practice (Baroque and Classical performance), Debbie also gives masterclasses and lectures, and has run a course titled ‘Baroque Music on Modern Instruments’ at City Lit, Covent Garden.

    Sunday November 18, 2018 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm

    2

    A Masterclass with Kelly Hall-Tompkins, Violin
    Donna Weng Friedman ’80 Masterclass Series
    Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall

    Renowned violinist Kelly-Hall Tompkins works with talented Princeton University student violinists in a workshop free and open to all.

    She will offer a recital, free and open to all, at 5PM.

    Sponsored by the Donna Weng Friedman ’80 Master Class Series.

    Acclaimed by the New York Times as “the versatile violinist who makes the music come alive” and for her “tonal mastery” (BBC Music Magazine) and “searing intensity” (American Record Guide), violinist Kelly Hall-Tompkins is forging a dynamic career as a soloist and chamber musician. Winner of a Naumburg International Violin Competition Honorarium Prize as well as a Concert Artists Guild Career Grant, Ms. Hall-Tompkins has appeared as soloist with orchestras including the Dallas Symphony, Oakland Symphony, Jacksonville Symphony, Tulsa Philharmonic, Chamber Orchestra of New York, and a Brevard Festival Orchestra under the baton of Keith Lockhart, in addition to numerous concerts and recitals in cities including Kiev, Ukraine; New York, Washington, Cleveland, Toronto, Chicago, Baltimore, and Greenville, South Carolina, and at festivals in France, Germany and Italy.

    For thirteen months on Broadway, Ms. Hall-Tompkins was the “Fiddler,” violin soloist, for the Bartlett Sher production of “Fiddler on the Roof,” with numerous solos written especially for her. The New York Times hailed her in a feature article as holding the title role, together with dancer Jesse Kovarsky. Featured as soloist in over 400 Broadway performances, plus a Grammy-nominated cast album alongside a bonus track by Itzhak Perlman, Ms. Hall-Tompkins has been the featured subject on NBC’s Today Show with Harry Smith, NBC 4 New York with Janice Huff, NBC 4 at 5, Playbill.com, BroadwayWorld.com, WWFM radio Princeton and Strings Magazine among numerous other major press outlets for her role in Fiddler. Kelly Hall-Tompkins interviews and Kiev performances will also be featured in an upcoming new documentary on Fiddler on the Roof, set to be released in theaters Spring of 2018. A significant collaborating partner with violinist/composer Mark O’Connor for five years, Ms. Hall-Tompkins performed his Double Violin Concerto with O’Connor in concerts across the United States. As a passionate chamber musician, Ms. Hall-Tompkins was first violinist of the O’Connor String Quartet, which performed concerts nationally, including Tanglewood, Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival and Lincoln Center’s Great Performer’s Circle, and a member of the Florida-based Ritz Chamber Players, including concerts in residence at Jacksonville’s Times Union Center for the Performing Arts, the Ravinia Festival’s “Rising Stars Series,” New York at Lincoln Center’s Allen Room, and in Baltimore in collaboration with BSO concertmaster and string principals, along with many other venues. She has performed at the Garth Newel Music Center, Chamber Music South Dakota, New York City’s Bargemusic, live on WNYC’s “Soundcheck”, at Miami’s Deering Estate Series and for the Raleigh Chamber Music Guild.

    Additional performance highlights include a 2007 Benefit for the Victims of Darfur at Carnegie Hall. Ms. Hall-Tompkins was invited by actress Mia Farrow and conductor George Matthew to perform as soloist before an orchestra comprised of musicians from every major orchestra in the world. In 2002 Hall-Tompkins commissioned a new work for violin and percussion from the German composer Siegfried Matthus, which was premiered at Michigan’s Pine Mountain Music Festival and gave in 2016 with the Oakland East Bay Symphony the US Premiere of Professor Matthus’s newest Violin Concerto. Ms. Hall-Tompkins’ performances have been broadcast in New York by WQXR, by Chicago’s WFMT and live on the BBC.

    Ms. Hall-Tompkins’ newest recording project is The Fiddler: Expanding Tradition, featuring for the first time ever a full album of newly commissioned and original Fiddler-inspired works. The full recording will be released on Broadway Records in 2018; Two music videos from the project were released on You Tube in 2016. This follows the success of her recent Imagination recording, a double video release of the Ysaÿe sonata No. 6 and her own jazz arrangement of “Pure Imagination” from the original film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. The videos, released online and on Collector’s Edition DVD in early 2014, now enjoy over 1,000,000 You Tube views, were featured in Strings Magazine and hailed as “ground-breaking…sumptuous… a potent package” and by Chamber Music America in a public presentation on creating music videos. She released her debut CD recording in 2002, featuring the Kodaly duo, Brahms D minor Sonata and the Ravel Tzigane. Ms. Hall-Tompkins released her second CD, entitled In My Own Voice, in 2008, featuring music by Kreisler, Saint-Saëns, William Grant, and David Baker. The album was praised by Fanfare for its “opulent intensity” and by The Strad, which described Hall-Tompkins’ “winning way,” noting her “mercurial charms [and] genial touch…impressive.”

    Regularly tapped as concertmaster, Ms. Hall-Tompkins’ distinguished orchestral career includes a performance on the BBC Proms leading the Chineke! Orchestra, the 2016 Lincoln Center Benefit for the 10 year Anniversary of “Light in the Piazza,” and a 2016 PBS Live from Lincoln Center Broadcast with Lang Lang. Ms. Hall-Tompkins’ orchestral career also includes extensive touring in the United States and internationally with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, including performances in Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Japan, Singapore, Scotland and a recording with countertenor Andreas Scholl. She has also performed over 150 performances with the New York Philharmonic, under conductors including Kurt Masur, Leonard Slatkin, Andre Previn, Charles Dutoit and Valery Gergiev. Ms. Hall-Tompkins has also lead numerous Carnegie Hall concerts with the New York Pops and as founding member and concertmaster of the Chamber Orchestra of New York, which performed its debut concert in Carnegie’s Zankel Hall in the Fall ’07 with Ms. Hall-Tompkins also as soloist. For 13 seasons, she was a member of the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra’s first violin section.

    A dedicated humanitarian, Ms. Hall-Tompkins founded and directs Music Kitchen-Food for the Soul, which has, to date, brought almost 100 chamber music performances to New York City and Los Angeles homeless shelters, with over 150 artists including Emanuel Ax, Glenn Dicterow, Albrecht Mayer, Jeff Ziegler and Rene Marie. Kelly and Music Kitchen have been featured in The New York Times, on CBSNews.com and ABCNews.com, plus Strings Magazine, Chamber Music America Magazine, Spirituality and Health Magazine, Columbia University Radio and cable’s Hallmark Channel.

    Ms. Hall Tompkins received an Honorary Doctorate from the Manhattan School of Music, her alma mater, in 2016, and also delivered the Commencement address. She is also one of three 2017 recipients of the Sphinx Medal of Excellence, which was presented at the US Supreme Court by Justice Sotomayor. She earned a Master’s degree from the Manhattan School under the mentorship of Glenn Dicterow, concertmaster of the New York Philharmonic. While there, she was concertmaster of both of the school’s orchestras. Prior to that, she earned a Bachelor of Music degree with honors in violin performance with a minor in French from the Eastman School of Music studying with Charles Castleman. While at Eastman she won the school’s prestigious Performer’s Certificate Competition, several scholarship awards from the New York Philharmonic, and was invited to perform chamber music on the school’s Kilbourn Concert Series with members of the faculty.

    An avid polyglot, Ms. Hall-Tompkins studies and speaks eight languages. A native of Greenville, South Carolina, Ms. Hall-Tompkins began her violin studies at age nine. She lives in New York City with her husband Joe.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Princeton’s Department of Music is at the epicenter of a musical culture that is broad and deep, reaching from edge to edge of the campus, from the classroom to the concert hall, and from faculty-led groups to those run exclusively by students.

    There are several levels of involvement that students can have with the Department of Music: Graduate students can earn a Ph.D. in one of the two main areas of our Graduate program – composition or musicology – including opportunities to focus on theory or ethnomusicology. Undergraduate students can major in music, in a program with emphasis on writing music or writing about music. Undergraduates can also earn certificates in the Program in Musical Performance, both as Music Majors and as majors of other departments. Those who do not plan to pursue a degree or certificate in music are of course welcome to take courses with world-renowned composers and music historians, take instrumental or voice lessons in the private studios of top professionals, and audition to perform with our many ensembles: six jazz groups, three choruses, two orchestras, a wind ensemble, an opera theater, a musical comedy troupe, at least a dozen chamber music ensembles, a laptop orchestra, and almost twenty small a cappella singing groups.

    Community members can attend numerous concerts throughout the academic year. In addition to student performances, world-renowned artists appear on the Princeton University Concerts series; leading performers of contemporary music showcase compositions by faculty and graduate composers through the Princeton Sound Kitchen; Sō Percussion, the Edward T. Cone Artists-in-Residence, perform and engage with the community. The student-run radio station WPRB: 103.3 FM broadcasts many styles of music, often featuring Princeton student performances.

    An important feature hard to discern from a list of courses and ensembles is the Music Department’s emphasis on collaboration. This manifests not only within the department (graduate composers composing for the undergraduate orchestra, graduate musicologists making a performance edition for an undergraduate opera production), but in collaboration with other departments as well. Frequent interdisciplinary collaborators with the music department include students and faculty from Architecture, African American Studies, Computer Science, Irish Studies, and the programs in Theater, Dance, Visual Art, Music Theater, and Creative Writing all housed within the Lewis Center for Arts.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:27 PM on October 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Department of Music at Princeton, Master Class, , Wu Han   

    From Princeton University Department of Music: “A Masterclass with Wu Han, Piano” 

    Princeton University
    From Princeton University Department of Music

    1
    A Masterclass with Wu Han, Piano
    Donna Weng Friedman ’80 Masterclass Series
    Thursday, Oct. 18, 2018 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm
    Add to Calendar
    Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall
    Free non-ticketed

    Program
    Frederic Chopin
    Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52
    John Hoffmeyer ’19

    Robert Schumann
    Piano Sonata No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 22: I. So rasch wie möglich
    Seho Young ’19

    Joseph Haydn
    Piano Sonata in E-flat Major, Hob XVI/52: I. Allegro (Moderato)
    David Nie ’19

    Ludwig van Beethoven
    Piano Sonata No. 15 in D Major, Op. 28 “Pastoral”: I. Allegro
    Michaela Hennebury ’21

    Event Info

    Renowned pianist Wu Han works with talented Princeton University student pianists in a workshop free and open to all.

    Sponsored by the Donna Weng Friedman ’80 Master Class Series.
    About the Artist:

    Named Musical America’s Musician of the Year, pianist Wu Han ranks among the most esteemed and influential classical musicians in the world today. Leading an unusually multifaceted artistic career, she has risen to international prominence as a concert performer, recording artist, educator, arts administrator, and cultural entrepreneur. Wu Han appears regularly at many of the world’s most prestigious concert series and venues, as both soloist and chamber musician: she tours extensively with cellist David Finckel, and in piano trios with Philip Setzer. Together with David Finckel, Wu Han serves as Artistic Codirector of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center (CMS), and they are the founding Artistic Directors of Music@Menlo in the Silicon Valley as well as Artistic Directors of Chamber Music Today, an annual festival in Seoul, South Korea. Wu Han’s wide-ranging musical activities also include the launch of ArtistLed, classical music’s first musician-directed and Internet-based recording company, whose 19-album catalogue has won widespread acclaim. This is a milestone season as the label turns twenty in 2018. Passionately committed to education, she taught alongside the late Isaac Stern at Carnegie Hall and the Jerusalem Music Center for many years, and in 2013, she established the Finckel-Wu Han Chamber Music Studio at the Aspen Music Festival and School.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Stem Education Coalition
    Princeton University Campus

    About Princeton: Overview

    Princeton University is a vibrant community of scholarship and learning that stands in the nation’s service and in the service of all nations. Chartered in 1746, Princeton is the fourth-oldest college in the United States. Princeton is an independent, coeducational, nondenominational institution that provides undergraduate and graduate instruction in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and engineering.

    As a world-renowned research university, Princeton seeks to achieve the highest levels of distinction in the discovery and transmission of knowledge and understanding. At the same time, Princeton is distinctive among research universities in its commitment to undergraduate teaching.

    Today, more than 1,100 faculty members instruct approximately 5,200 undergraduate students and 2,600 graduate students. The University’s generous financial aid program ensures that talented students from all economic backgrounds can afford a Princeton education.

    Princeton Shield

     
  • richardmitnick 12:52 PM on September 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Department of Music at Princeton, PEKING OPERA: AN INTRODUCTION & PERFORMANCE   

    From Department of Music at Princeton: “PEKING OPERA: AN INTRODUCTION & PERFORMANCE” 

    From Department of Music at Princeton

    PEKING OPERA: AN INTRODUCTION & PERFORMANCE
    Sat. Oct 6, 9:30AM – 2:00PM | FREE, Unticketed
    Lee Rehearsal Room, Lewis Arts Complex
    Shanghai Peking Opera Summer Immersion Program
    Co-sponsored by the East Asian Studies Program, in collaboration with the Office of Vice Provost for International Affairs

    “An Introduction to Peking Opera,” including fully-staged excerpts performed by Princeton University students from the Shanghai Peking Opera Summer Immersion Program. Stop by throughout the event!

    1

    Peking Opera
    An Introduction & Performance
    Saturday, Oct. 06, 2018 9:30 am to 2:00 pm
    Add to Calendar
    Lee Rehearsal Room, Lewis Arts complex

    Program
    9:30AM Opening Reception
    10:00AM Introduction & Discussion
    11:00AM Performance, Part 1
    11:50AM Light Buffet Lunch
    12:30PM Performance, Part 2
    1:30PM Q&A

    Event Info

    An introduction to Peking Opera, including fully-staged excerpts performed by Princeton University students from the Shanghai Peking Opera Summer Immersion Program. Stop by throughout the event!

    Free Event

    About the Artist:

    The Shanghai Peking Opera Immersion Program ran as a pilot project in summer 2018. The program provided an unprecedented opportunity for Princeton students to engage in an intensive period of study and training in Chinese theater. It offered 3 weeks of intensive study and performance of the Northern style of Chinese drama (called “Peking Opera”) at the Shanghai Peking Opera Company (SPOC), based in Shanghai. Students picked at least one Peking Opera specialty to concentrate on: Song, Speech/Acting, Dance, Combat/Acrobatics, or Instruments.

    Co-Sponsored by the East Asian Studies Program, in collaboration with the Office of Vice Provost for International Affairs.
    2
    3
    4

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Princeton’s Department of Music is at the epicenter of a musical culture that is broad and deep, reaching from edge to edge of the campus, from the classroom to the concert hall, and from faculty-led groups to those run exclusively by students.

    There are several levels of involvement that students can have with the Department of Music: Graduate students can earn a Ph.D. in one of the two main areas of our Graduate program – composition or musicology – including opportunities to focus on theory or ethnomusicology. Undergraduate students can major in music, in a program with emphasis on writing music or writing about music. Undergraduates can also earn certificates in the Program in Musical Performance, both as Music Majors and as majors of other departments. Those who do not plan to pursue a degree or certificate in music are of course welcome to take courses with world-renowned composers and music historians, take instrumental or voice lessons in the private studios of top professionals, and audition to perform with our many ensembles: six jazz groups, three choruses, two orchestras, a wind ensemble, an opera theater, a musical comedy troupe, at least a dozen chamber music ensembles, a laptop orchestra, and almost twenty small a cappella singing groups.

    Community members can attend numerous concerts throughout the academic year. In addition to student performances, world-renowned artists appear on the Princeton University Concerts series; leading performers of contemporary music showcase compositions by faculty and graduate composers through the Princeton Sound Kitchen; Sō Percussion, the Edward T. Cone Artists-in-Residence, perform and engage with the community. The student-run radio station WPRB: 103.3 FM broadcasts many styles of music, often featuring Princeton student performances.

    An important feature hard to discern from a list of courses and ensembles is the Music Department’s emphasis on collaboration. This manifests not only within the department (graduate composers composing for the undergraduate orchestra, graduate musicologists making a performance edition for an undergraduate opera production), but in collaboration with other departments as well. Frequent interdisciplinary collaborators with the music department include students and faculty from Architecture, African American Studies, Computer Science, Irish Studies, and the programs in Theater, Dance, Visual Art, Music Theater, and Creative Writing all housed within the Lewis Center for Arts.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:51 AM on September 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Andrew Olendzki, Department of Music at Princeton, Listening to the Music of the Mind, Meditation Practice and the Buddhist Understanding of the Mind   

    From Department of Music at Princeton: “Listening to the Music of the Mind” 

    From Department of Music at Princeton

    Workshop with Andrew Olendzki

    1

    Saturday, Sep. 29, 2018 10:00 am to 1:00 pm

    Lee Rehearsal Room, Lewis Arts complex

    Free, non-ticketed

    Program

    Listening to the Music of the Mind: Meditation Practice and the Buddhist Understanding of the Mind
    Event Info

    Andrew Olendzki, noted Buddhist scholar and teacher, will use musical practice as a metaphor for meditation practice and the Buddhist understanding of the mind. The workshop will include lecture, discussion, and periods of meditation (both guided and silent).

    Listening to music is a skill that can be learned and enhanced by practice. As one comes to understand certain formal structures of music, along with the unique features of specific genres of music, one’s ‘musical intelligence’ is enhanced and the experience of listening deepens.

    The same can be said of meditation, the activity of looking closely at—or, one might say, of listening carefully to—the rhythms and melodies of the mind. In this workshop we look closely at the basic structures of the five aggregates and the six sense spheres, observe the steady arising and falling away of mind moments, and discern the difference between harmonious (wholesome) and dissonant (unwholesome) mental and emotional states.

    The workshop demonstrates the basic principles of integrating study and practice, and helps develop enhanced skills of ‘phenomenological intelligence’. It consists of equal parts lecture and discussion, as well as sessions of both guided and silent meditation.

    The workshop is open to the public and is suitable for anyone with interests in Buddhism, meditation, and the workings of their own mind.

    The Saturday workshop is sponsored by Princeton Insight Meditation and the Princeton Dharma Practice Group. The Princeton University Office of Religious Life will sponsor a talk Friday evening, September 28, 7-9pm. More information at religiouslife.princeton.edu.
    About the Artist:

    Andrew Olendzki is a Buddhist scholar, teacher, and writer living in Amherst, Massachusetts. He has been the executive director of both the Insight Meditation Society and the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies, and has taught at numerous New England colleges. He is the author of Unlimiting Mind: The Radically Experiential Psychology of Buddhism (Wisdom 2010) and Untangling Self: A Buddhist Investigation of Who We Really Are (Wisdom 2016). He is the founder of the Integrated Dharma Institute, an online educational
    resource, and is currently a Visiting Associate Professor of Buddhist Studies at Hampshire College.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Princeton’s Department of Music is at the epicenter of a musical culture that is broad and deep, reaching from edge to edge of the campus, from the classroom to the concert hall, and from faculty-led groups to those run exclusively by students.

    There are several levels of involvement that students can have with the Department of Music: Graduate students can earn a Ph.D. in one of the two main areas of our Graduate program – composition or musicology – including opportunities to focus on theory or ethnomusicology. Undergraduate students can major in music, in a program with emphasis on writing music or writing about music. Undergraduates can also earn certificates in the Program in Musical Performance, both as Music Majors and as majors of other departments. Those who do not plan to pursue a degree or certificate in music are of course welcome to take courses with world-renowned composers and music historians, take instrumental or voice lessons in the private studios of top professionals, and audition to perform with our many ensembles: six jazz groups, three choruses, two orchestras, a wind ensemble, an opera theater, a musical comedy troupe, at least a dozen chamber music ensembles, a laptop orchestra, and almost twenty small a cappella singing groups.

    Community members can attend numerous concerts throughout the academic year. In addition to student performances, world-renowned artists appear on the Princeton University Concerts series; leading performers of contemporary music showcase compositions by faculty and graduate composers through the Princeton Sound Kitchen; Sō Percussion, the Edward T. Cone Artists-in-Residence, perform and engage with the community. The student-run radio station WPRB: 103.3 FM broadcasts many styles of music, often featuring Princeton student performances.

    An important feature hard to discern from a list of courses and ensembles is the Music Department’s emphasis on collaboration. This manifests not only within the department (graduate composers composing for the undergraduate orchestra, graduate musicologists making a performance edition for an undergraduate opera production), but in collaboration with other departments as well. Frequent interdisciplinary collaborators with the music department include students and faculty from Architecture, African American Studies, Computer Science, Irish Studies, and the programs in Theater, Dance, Visual Art, Music Theater, and Creative Writing all housed within the Lewis Center for Arts.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:37 PM on September 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Department of Music at Princeton, Sō Percussion marks 5th year in residence at Princeton with a free concert, WHYY   

    From Princeton University Department of Music and via WHYY: “So Percussion marks 5th year in residence at Princeton with a free concert” 

    Princeton University
    From Princeton University Department of Music

    and

    Sō Percussion

    via

    1

    WHYY

    September 14, 2018
    Kimberly Haas

    Sō Percussion in performance by Vartoogian-FrontRowPhotos

    Princeton University went beyond the usual suspects when it selected the quartet Sō Percussion as their Edward T. Cone Performers in Residence in 2014.

    “The idea of a music ensemble in residence traditionally has meant a string quartet, reaching back into the classical tradition to play Beethoven and Bartok and things like that,” said So Percussion member Adam Slawinski. “Instead, when we started here, the idea was that Princeton has a large community of composers making new works of music, and because we didn’t have much repertoire to begin with, what we do is to generate new repertoire and forge relationships with composers.”

    In addition to working with composers in the graduate program, Princeton asked the ensemble to interact with the entire school community.

    “They said they want every student touched by the arts,” said founding member Jason Treuting. “So we’ve looked for ways to work with students at all different levels, not just music majors.” Those efforts range from the formation of a steel band and working with the Princeton Laptop Orchestra, to teaching classes that explore the intersection of music, dance and visual arts.

    Members of the group pride themselves on being much more than four drummers. “We write our own music. We commission and collaborate with musicians who aren’t necessarily in the classical fold,” said Sliwinski.

    Contemporary music icon Steve Reich wrote “Mallet Quartet” for them and three co-commissioning ensembles in 2009.

    “We grew up idolizing Steve Reich,” said Treuting. “In a lot of ways, it was what drew us to do what we do.” For other works, they’ve cast a wide net, with commissions ranging from jazz pianist Vijay Iyer to Bryce Dessner, guitarist with the rock band The National. Those two works will appear on an eclectic program for this evening’s concert.

    “We’re musically omnivorous, and the program really reflects who we are,” said Treuting. “We’re including some of the lineage we come from, like Iannis Xenakis and Pauline Oliveros, plus pieces written by two members of our group. And we’re also focusing on our commissioning work, with new works by Puerto Rican composer Angélica Negrón and Joan Tower, who wrote it for her 80th birthday.”

    Sō Percussion will mark the beginning of their fifth year as Performers in Residence at Princeton University with a free concert Friday at 7:30 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium Hall.

    The “artist”

    Adam Sliwinski has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2002. Adam is particularly interested in keyboard instruments, especially marimba and piano.

    Eric Cha-Beach has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2007-A consummate percussionist he loves to learn new instruments like the musical saw integrating them into diverse setups

    Jason Treuting is a founding member of Sō Percussion- Jason has pioneered an innovative drum set practice within the new music sphere. He is also a composer.

    Josh Quillen has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2006- Josh is an expert Steel Drum artist having studied in Trinidad and immersed himself in Steel Band culture.

    Our Mission:

    Sō Percussion is a percussion-based music organization that creates and presents new collaborative works to adventurous and curious audiences and educational initiatives to engaged students, while providing meaningful service to its communities, in order to exemplify the power of music to unite people and forge deep social bonds.
    Our Vision:

    To create a new model of egalitarian artistic collaboration that respects history, champions innovation and curiosity, and creates an essential social bond through service to our audiences and our communities.
    Ensemble Bio:

    Sō is: Eric Cha-Beach, Josh Quillen, Adam Sliwinski, and Jason Treuting

    With innovative multi-genre original productions, sensational interpretations of modern classics, and an “exhilarating blend of precision and anarchy, rigor and bedlam,” (The New Yorker), Sō Percussion has redefined the scope and vital role of the modern percussion ensemble.

    Sō’s repertoire ranges from “classics” of the 20th century, by John Cage, Steve Reich, and Iannis Xenakis, et al, to commissioning and advocating works by contemporary composers such as Caroline Shaw, David Lang, Steve Mackey, and Paul Lansky, to distinctively modern collaborations with artists who work outside the classical concert hall, including vocalist Shara Nova, electronic duo Matmos, the groundbreaking Dan Deacon, legendary drummer Bobby Previte, jam band kings Medeski, Martin, and Wood, Wilco’s Glenn Kotche, choreographer Shen Wei, and composer and leader of The National, Bryce Dessner, among many others.

    Sō Percussion also composes and performs their own works, ranging from standard concert pieces to immersive multi-genre programs – including Imaginary City, Where (we) Live, and A Gun Show, which was presented in a multi-performance presentation as part of BAM’s 2016 Next Wave Festival. In these concert-length programs, Sō Percussion employs a distinctively 21st century synthesis of original music, artistic collaboration, theatrical production values and visual art, into a powerful exploration of their own unique and personal creative experiences.

    Rooted in the belief that music is an essential facet of human life, a social bond, and an effective tool in creating agency and citizenship, Sō Percussion enthusiastically pursues a growing range of social and community outreach. Examples include their Brooklyn Bound presentations of younger composers; commitments to purchasing offsets to compensate for carbon-heavy activities such as touring travel; and leading their SōSI students in an annual food-packing drive, yielding up to 25,000 meals, for the Crisis Center of Mercer County through the organization EndHungerNE.

    Sō Percussion is the Edward T. Cone Ensemble-in-Residence at Princeton University, where they offer educational work and present an annual series of concerts. They are also Co-Directors of the percussion department at the Bard College-Conservatory of Music, and run the annual Sō Percussion Summer Institute (SōSI, now in its ninth year), providing college-age composers and percussionists an immersive exposure to collaboration and project development.

    One of the first things any group needs is a name. When our group was founded in 1999, we cast far and wide among our friends and family for suggestions. The winner was this simple, short word offered by Jenise Treuting, Jason’s sister.

    Jenise has been living and working in Japan as an English-Japanese translator for 20 years. The word “Sō” was punchy, enigmatic, and memorable.

    “The Sō in Sō Percussion comes from 奏, the second character in the compound Japanese word 演奏 (ensou), to perform music. By itself, so means “to play an instrument.” But it can also mean “to be successful,” “to determine a direction and move forward,” and “to present to the gods or ruler.” Scholars have suggested that the latter comes from the character’s etymology, which included the element “to offer with both hands.” 奏 is a bold, straightforward character, but lends itself to calligraphy with a certain energy that gives so a springy, delicate look.”

    – Jenise Treuting

    About Princeton: Overview

    Princeton University is a vibrant community of scholarship and learning that stands in the nation’s service and in the service of all nations. Chartered in 1746, Princeton is the fourth-oldest college in the United States. Princeton is an independent, coeducational, nondenominational institution that provides undergraduate and graduate instruction in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and engineering.

    As a world-renowned research university, Princeton seeks to achieve the highest levels of distinction in the discovery and transmission of knowledge and understanding. At the same time, Princeton is distinctive among research universities in its commitment to undergraduate teaching.

    Today, more than 1,100 faculty members instruct approximately 5,200 undergraduate students and 2,600 graduate students. The University’s generous financial aid program ensures that talented students from all economic backgrounds can afford a Princeton education.

    Princeton Shield

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:19 PM on September 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Department of Music at Princeton, Riley Lee, Shakuhachi, Shakuhachi (bamboo flute)   

    From Princeton University Department of Music: “Riley Lee, Shakuhachi'” 

    Princeton University
    From Princeton University Department of Music

    1
    Photo by Rudi van Starrex, taken prior to a performance of Kaidan, a TaikOz/Sydney Festival co-production, during a season at the Sydney Opera House in January 2007

    Guest Faculty Recital
    Thursday, Sep. 20, 2018 7:30 pm
    Add to Calendar
    Taplin Auditorium in Fine Hall
    Free, Not ticketed

    Program
    Autumn Fields
    A shakuhachi concert by Riley Lee
    with Professor Barbara White, clarinet

    Traditional
    Akita Sugugaki Daha/Pounding Waves
    Sokkan/Breath-Sight
    Kokū/Empty Sky

    Ross Edwards Raftsong at Sunrise (1995)

    John Cleworth & Riley Lee Stillness (2014)

    Hildegard of Bingen Caritas Abundat, De Sancta, Sed Diabolus

    Barbara White Refuge (2012)

    Event Info

    An evening of traditional and modern music for the japanese bamboo flute, performed by one of the world’s foremost practitioners of the instrument.
    About the Artist:

    Riley Lee first went to Japan in 1970 to work at the World Expo in Osaka. He began playing the shakuhachi in 1971.

    He is the recipient of two of the oldest and most venerated lineages of traditional shakuhachi, which can be traced back to the Zen Buddhist komusô, or “priests of nothingness” of the Edo period in Japan. In 1980, he became the first non-Japanese to attain the rank of dai shihan or Grand Master.

    Riley is a consummate teacher, performer and collaborator with other musicians of all genres.

    RILEY LEE’S JOURNEY
    RILEY LEE began playing the shakuhachi (bamboo flute) in Japan in 1971, studying was with Chikuho Sakai until 1980, and has been a student of Katsuya Yokoyama since 1984.He was given the rank of Dai Shihan (grand master) in 1980.

    Riley was born in Plainview Texas USA in 1951, and moved to Shawnee Oklahoma USA in 1957, where, aged 13, he became the bass player of the award-winning rock band “The Workouts”. He and his family moved to Hawai’i in 1966. He first went to Japan in 1970, and returned in 1971, when he began his shakuhachi studies. He lived there continuously until 1977.

    From 1973, Riley became the first non-Japanese to play taiko professionally, by touring internationally as a full-time performer of taiko (Japanese festival drums), yokobue (a high pitched bamboo transverse flute) and shakuhachi with Ondekoza (now called Kodo) a troupe of traditional Japanese musicians, performing with such groups as the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and at venues such as Kennedy Center (Washington DC), Roundhouse Theatre (London), Espace Pierre Cardin (Paris), and the Boston Symphony Hall.

    Riley’s studies with traditional teachers in Japan have included such peculiar methods as practicing barefoot in the snow, blowing into his flute under waterfalls and in blizzards until icicles form at its end, and running the Boston Marathon and then playing taiko drums at the finish line.

    In 1976, while on tour in Europe with Ondekoza, Riley met Patricia, who was at that time living in Paris. Patricia returned with Riley to Sado Island, and they left the group in 1977, while on tour in the USA. They were married that year. Patricia is Riley’s primary inspiration, and critic, and has worked full time as his manager / agent since 1992.

    After returning to Honolulu with Patricia in 1978, he began teaching privately and performing. He founded the Chikuho School of Shakuhachi of Hawaii. He was a lecturer of the shakuhachi at the University of Hawai’i until leaving for Australia in 1986 to take up a PhD fellowship at the University of Sydney.

    Patricia and Riley’s twin daughters, Aiyana and Marieke, were born in 1979 in Kahuku, on the North Shore of Oahu.

    Riley completed his BA and MA degrees in music at the University of Hawai’i, and received his PhD degree in ethnomusicology from the University of Sydney. His PhD dissertation topic was on the Zen repertoire of the shakuhachi. He was an East-West Center grantee in 1985-1986 and a Japan Foundation fellow in 1988-1989. He was made Honourary Fellow of the University of Western Sydney in 1997.

    He has published scholarly articles and book reviews in leading national and international musicology journals, such as Ethnomusicology and Asian Music. He has translated for journals such as Contemporary Music Review. His PhD dissertation, on the transmission of the Zen repertoire of the shakuhachi, (completed in 1993) is published by UMI (USA).

    In 2003, he was made Visiting Fellow at Princeton University, New Jersey, the first shakuhachi player ever to be so honored. He was given a second Fellowship at Princeton, lecturing in the Comparative Literature Department during the spring semester (Feb-June) 2009. He returned again in 2011, working with graduate composition students, and performing in Barbara White’s acclaimed opera, Weakness.

    Riley was the Artistic Director and Chair of the Executive Committee of the World Shakuhachi Festival 2008, a four day event held in Sydney 4-8 July 2008, at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and in the City Recital Hall at Angel Place. Seventy of the world’s leading shakuhachi players attended as invited performers. They were joined by 400 shakuhachi enthusiasts, participating in thirty concerts, workshops, forums, seminars and other Festival events.

    Riley started teaching breathing workshops in the late 1980s, at the suggestion of one of his students, well-known Sydney acupuncturist Ross Penman. Riley has since refined and expanded his repertoire of exercises, gleaned from a number of sources and from his long and focused relationship with shakuhachi. The exercises are designed to create an awareness of one’s breath while at the same time, improving the strength and control of the muscles used in breathing. His workshops last from one to six hours, and single sessions have been attended by as many as two thousand people.

    Riley lives with Patricia in beautiful Manly NSW Australia, facing both the Tasman Sea and Sydney Harbour.

    Riley first heard the shakuhachi in 1967 while attending Roosebelt High School in Honolulu Hawai’i, on an LP recording brought home by his elder brother. About the same time, his Chinese father gave him a dongxiao, a Chinese bamboo flute whose ancestry is shared with the shakuhachi, and taught him an old Chinese folksong on it.

    In 1971, he made his second visit to Japan on the end of a six month, round the world backpacking journey, with no funds to make the final leg back to Hawai’i. He planned to be in Japan for three months, long enough to work for his plane fare back home. After a while, remembering his father’s bamboo flute the dongxiao, he decided to buy a shakuhachi. He went to the Hankyû Department store in Osaka, where he found instruments ranging in price from ¥10,000 to ¥50,000. They all looked like pieces of bamboo to him, so he asked the salesperson what the difference was between them.

    Rather than explaining why the most expensive instrument was the best, the salesperson, an older man and himself a shakuhachi player, instead looked hard at Riley, and said that if he really wanted to know, he should go to a teacher from whom he could learn the difference. The man proceeded to look up in a telephone directory a teacher that he thought was the best in the area (and that had a telephone) and set up a lesson.

    With the old man’s introduction, Riley began studying with this teacher, purchased a shakuhachi, and became ever more immersed in the music and tradition of the instrument. The three months stay in Japan eventually stretched out to seven years, the end of which the shakuhachi was the focal point of Riley’s working life.

     

    See the full article here .

    John Schaefer

    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    Princeton University Campus

    About Princeton: Overview

    Princeton University is a vibrant community of scholarship and learning that stands in the nation’s service and in the service of all nations. Chartered in 1746, Princeton is the fourth-oldest college in the United States. Princeton is an independent, coeducational, nondenominational institution that provides undergraduate and graduate instruction in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and engineering.

    As a world-renowned research university, Princeton seeks to achieve the highest levels of distinction in the discovery and transmission of knowledge and understanding. At the same time, Princeton is distinctive among research universities in its commitment to undergraduate teaching.

    Today, more than 1,100 faculty members instruct approximately 5,200 undergraduate students and 2,600 graduate students. The University’s generous financial aid program ensures that talented students from all economic backgrounds can afford a Princeton education.

    Princeton Shield

     
  • richardmitnick 10:12 PM on September 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Department of Music at Princeton, ,   

    From Princeton University Department of Music: “Sō Percussion” 

    Princeton University
    From Princeton University Department of Music

    Sō Percussion
    Edward T. Cone Performers-in-Residence
    Friday, Sep. 14, 2018 7:30 pm
    Add to Calendar
    Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

    Program

    With guest artists TODD MEEHAN and DOUG PERKINS, percussion
    Eric Cha-Beach

    Four and Nine
    Juri Seo

    VV
    Joan Tower

    Small Plus
    Vijay Iyer

    TORQUE
    Jason Treuting

    Nine Numbers 6 (World Premiere)
    ANGÉLICA NEGRÓN

    gone
    Pauline Oliveros

    Tuning Meditation
    Iannis Xenakis

    Peaux
    Event Info

    Sō Percussion open their fifth year as Princeton University’s Edward T. Cone Performers-in-Residence with an exciting, eclectic, and diverse program, free and open to all. From the intimate virtuosity of Princeton faculty Juri Seo’s vv, to the massive force of Iannis Xenakis’ Pleiades; from Angélica Negrón’s popping percussion robots, to Vijay Iyer’s mind-bending mallet quartet TORQUE; and from the playful mischief of Joan Tower to the sonic puzzles of Jason Treuting — this concert encapsulates the freshness and innovation of the current crop of music being written for Sō Percussion.

    FREE TICKETS:

    Tickets will only become available on Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 10AM online and in person during box office hours at the Frist Campus Center and Lewis Arts complex box offices.

    Tickets will only become available on Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 10AM online and in person during box office hours at the Frist Campus Center and Lewis Arts complex box offices.

    Remaining tickets will be available one hour before each concert at the venue.

    About the Artist:

    With innovative multi-genre original productions, sensational interpretations of modern classics, and an “exhilarating blend of precision and anarchy, rigor and bedlam,” (The New Yorker), Sō Percussion has redefined the scope and role of the modern percussion ensemble.

    Their repertoire ranges from “classics” of the 20th century, by John Cage, Steve Reich, and Iannis Xenakis, et al, to commissioning and advocating works by contemporary composers such as David Lang, Steve Mackey, and Paul Lansky, to distinctively modern collaborations with artists who work outside the classical concert hall, including vocalist Shara Nova, electronic duo Matmos, the groundbreaking Dan Deacon, legendary drummer Bobby Previte, jam band kings Medeski, Martin, and Wood, Wilco’s Glenn Kotche, choreographer Shen Wei, and composer and leader of The National, Bryce Dessner, among many others.

    Sō Percussion also composes and performs their own works, ranging from standard concert pieces to immersive multi-genre programs – including Imaginary City, Where (we) Live, and their newest endeavor, A Gun Show, which will be performed throughout the current season, most notably in a multi-performance presentation as part of BAM’s 2016 Next Wave Festival. In these concert-length programs, Sō Percussion employs a distinctively 21st century synthesis of original music, artistic collaboration, theatrical production values and visual art, into a powerful exploration of their own unique and personal creative experiences.

    The “artist”

    Adam Sliwinski has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2002. Adam is particularly interested in keyboard instruments, especially marimba and piano.

    Eric Cha-Beach has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2007-A consummate percussionist he loves to learn new instruments like the musical saw integrating them into diverse setups

    Jason Treuting is a founding member of Sō Percussion- Jason has pioneered an innovative drum set practice within the new music sphere. He is also a composer.

    Josh Quillen has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2006- Josh is an expert Steel Drum artist having studied in Trinidad and immersed himself in Steel Band culture.

    Our Mission:

    Sō Percussion is a percussion-based music organization that creates and presents new collaborative works to adventurous and curious audiences and educational initiatives to engaged students, while providing meaningful service to its communities, in order to exemplify the power of music to unite people and forge deep social bonds.
    Our Vision:

    To create a new model of egalitarian artistic collaboration that respects history, champions innovation and curiosity, and creates an essential social bond through service to our audiences and our communities.
    Ensemble Bio:

    Sō is: Eric Cha-Beach, Josh Quillen, Adam Sliwinski, and Jason Treuting

    With innovative multi-genre original productions, sensational interpretations of modern classics, and an “exhilarating blend of precision and anarchy, rigor and bedlam,” (The New Yorker), Sō Percussion has redefined the scope and vital role of the modern percussion ensemble.

    Sō’s repertoire ranges from “classics” of the 20th century, by John Cage, Steve Reich, and Iannis Xenakis, et al, to commissioning and advocating works by contemporary composers such as Caroline Shaw, David Lang, Steve Mackey, and Paul Lansky, to distinctively modern collaborations with artists who work outside the classical concert hall, including vocalist Shara Nova, electronic duo Matmos, the groundbreaking Dan Deacon, legendary drummer Bobby Previte, jam band kings Medeski, Martin, and Wood, Wilco’s Glenn Kotche, choreographer Shen Wei, and composer and leader of The National, Bryce Dessner, among many others.

    Sō Percussion also composes and performs their own works, ranging from standard concert pieces to immersive multi-genre programs – including Imaginary City, Where (we) Live, and A Gun Show, which was presented in a multi-performance presentation as part of BAM’s 2016 Next Wave Festival. In these concert-length programs, Sō Percussion employs a distinctively 21st century synthesis of original music, artistic collaboration, theatrical production values and visual art, into a powerful exploration of their own unique and personal creative experiences.

    Rooted in the belief that music is an essential facet of human life, a social bond, and an effective tool in creating agency and citizenship, Sō Percussion enthusiastically pursues a growing range of social and community outreach. Examples include their Brooklyn Bound presentations of younger composers; commitments to purchasing offsets to compensate for carbon-heavy activities such as touring travel; and leading their SōSI students in an annual food-packing drive, yielding up to 25,000 meals, for the Crisis Center of Mercer County through the organization EndHungerNE.

    Sō Percussion is the Edward T. Cone Ensemble-in-Residence at Princeton University, where they offer educational work and present an annual series of concerts. They are also Co-Directors of the percussion department at the Bard College-Conservatory of Music, and run the annual Sō Percussion Summer Institute (SōSI, now in its ninth year), providing college-age composers and percussionists an immersive exposure to collaboration and project development.

    One of the first things any group needs is a name. When our group was founded in 1999, we cast far and wide among our friends and family for suggestions. The winner was this simple, short word offered by Jenise Treuting, Jason’s sister.

    Jenise has been living and working in Japan as an English-Japanese translator for 20 years. The word “Sō” was punchy, enigmatic, and memorable.

    “The Sō in Sō Percussion comes from 奏, the second character in the compound Japanese word 演奏 (ensou), to perform music. By itself, so means “to play an instrument.” But it can also mean “to be successful,” “to determine a direction and move forward,” and “to present to the gods or ruler.” Scholars have suggested that the latter comes from the character’s etymology, which included the element “to offer with both hands.” 奏 is a bold, straightforward character, but lends itself to calligraphy with a certain energy that gives so a springy, delicate look.”

    – Jenise Treuting

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    Princeton University Campus

    About Princeton: Overview

    Princeton University is a vibrant community of scholarship and learning that stands in the nation’s service and in the service of all nations. Chartered in 1746, Princeton is the fourth-oldest college in the United States. Princeton is an independent, coeducational, nondenominational institution that provides undergraduate and graduate instruction in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and engineering.

    As a world-renowned research university, Princeton seeks to achieve the highest levels of distinction in the discovery and transmission of knowledge and understanding. At the same time, Princeton is distinctive among research universities in its commitment to undergraduate teaching.

    Today, more than 1,100 faculty members instruct approximately 5,200 undergraduate students and 2,600 graduate students. The University’s generous financial aid program ensures that talented students from all economic backgrounds can afford a Princeton education.

    Princeton Shield

     
  • richardmitnick 12:20 PM on June 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Sibylla", Department of Music at Princeton, Gallicantus- Gabriel Crouch director, Signum Records   

    From Department of Music at Princeton via Signum Classics: “Sibylla” 

    From Department of Music at Princeton

    1
    Sibylla
    This item will be released at a future date.

    There is a Pre-order link on the full article.

    Gallicantus
    Gabriel Crouch director
    CATALOGUE NUMBER SIGCD520

    BAR CODE 635212052020

    RELEASE DATE 25/05/2018

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Princeton’s Department of Music is at the epicenter of a musical culture that is broad and deep, reaching from edge to edge of the campus, from the classroom to the concert hall, and from faculty-led groups to those run exclusively by students.

    There are several levels of involvement that students can have with the Department of Music: Graduate students can earn a Ph.D. in one of the two main areas of our Graduate program – composition or musicology – including opportunities to focus on theory or ethnomusicology. Undergraduate students can major in music, in a program with emphasis on writing music or writing about music. Undergraduates can also earn certificates in the Program in Musical Performance, both as Music Majors and as majors of other departments. Those who do not plan to pursue a degree or certificate in music are of course welcome to take courses with world-renowned composers and music historians, take instrumental or voice lessons in the private studios of top professionals, and audition to perform with our many ensembles: six jazz groups, three choruses, two orchestras, a wind ensemble, an opera theater, a musical comedy troupe, at least a dozen chamber music ensembles, a laptop orchestra, and almost twenty small a cappella singing groups.

    Community members can attend numerous concerts throughout the academic year. In addition to student performances, world-renowned artists appear on the Princeton University Concerts series; leading performers of contemporary music showcase compositions by faculty and graduate composers through the Princeton Sound Kitchen; Sō Percussion, the Edward T. Cone Artists-in-Residence, perform and engage with the community. The student-run radio station WPRB: 103.3 FM broadcasts many styles of music, often featuring Princeton student performances.

    An important feature hard to discern from a list of courses and ensembles is the Music Department’s emphasis on collaboration. This manifests not only within the department (graduate composers composing for the undergraduate orchestra, graduate musicologists making a performance edition for an undergraduate opera production), but in collaboration with other departments as well. Frequent interdisciplinary collaborators with the music department include students and faculty from Architecture, African American Studies, Computer Science, Irish Studies, and the programs in Theater, Dance, Visual Art, Music Theater, and Creative Writing all housed within the Lewis Center for Arts.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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