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  • richardmitnick 1:19 PM on September 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Eric Dolphy, , Resonance Records,   

    From WBGO: “Resonance Records Celebrates 10 Years with a New Eric Dolphy Release” 

    Sep 17, 2018
    Nate Chinen

    From WBGO

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    When George Klabin started Resonance Records, he had no idea he was planting the seed for a bumper crop of historic jazz recordings.

    “We started with living musicians,” says Klabin, a veteran producer and engineer, “and it didn’t make the impact that it makes even now.”

    That was a decade ago, and a lot has changed since. Most notably, Resonance is now an industry leader in deluxe archival releases, many of them new discoveries and all of them meticulously sourced and handsomely produced. The label catalog features sprung-from-the-vault gems from Wes Montgomery, Bill Evans, Grant Green and others — and will soon include a trove of studio material from saxophonist, bass clarinetist and flutist Eric Dolphy.

    Read Nate Chinen’s full story and interview with Resonance Record’s Co-President Zev Feldman, and hear an exclusive track premiere of Eric Dolphy’s “Mandrak (Alternate Version)” [at the full article] – never before released.

    Eric Dolphy Credit Chuck Stewart courtesy of Resonance Records

    The Dolphy release — a three-disc set titled Musical Prophet: The Expanded 1963 New York Sessions — will be available on limited-edition vinyl on Nov. 23, with a wider release next Jan. 25. It contains two albums originally produced by Alan Douglas, Conversations and Iron Man.

    Along with that music, featuring Dolphy alongside contemporaries like vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson, bassist Richard Davis and, making his recorded debut, trumpeter Woody Shaw — the set will include 85 minutes of previously unreleased material, taken from tapes that had come into the possession of flutist James Newton. Among those unissued tracks is an alternate take of “Mandrake,” which has its premiere here [at the full article].

    As is the case with most high-profile Resonance releases, Musical Prophet comes with a lavish booklet packed with historic photographs and commissioned essays. (It runs 96 pages, with contributions from Chuck Stewart, Val Wilmer and Robin D.G. Kelley, among many others.) The initial, limited release will be a Black Friday exclusive for Record Store Day, a tie-in that the label has proudly cultivated.

    It also arrives just as Resonance is celebrating its 10th anniversary, with all due ceremony. On Oct. 28 and 29, the label will take over Birdland in New York with an array of artists from its contemporary roster. Among them are clarinetist and tenor saxophonist Eddie Daniels, trumpeter Claudio Roditi, violinist Christian Howes, and vocalists Polly Gibbons and Aubrey Logan.

    Resonance is also about to make its first foray into music streaming services, a meaningful gesture for a label that has placed such emphasis on controlled physical formats. As with everything else involving the label, it’s the product of much deliberation. “You cannot deny the fact that we are now living in a streaming world,” says Zev Feldman, who was promoted from general manager to co-president of the label this year. “So I wanted for us to find ways of coexisting in this realm without cannibalizing our releases.”

    The resulting compromise will be a series of compilations on all digital platforms starting next February: selections from the label’s Montgomery and Evans stock, along with separate vocal and piano samplers, drawing from both the historic and present-day roster. If all goes according to plan, the presence of these tracks on streaming services will introduce Resonance to a wider listening public, raising its overall profile and eventually boosting sales. But Feldman and Klabin emphasize that they see the compilations as standalone products, made with intention.

    “I like to think back to the time when Warner Brothers and Pacific Jazz used to churn out album samplers,” says Feldman. “Some of the artwork was really incredible.” In that spirit, Resonance has commissioned the noted graphic designer Takao Fujioka to create art for the compilations, which will also be available on CD.

    Klabin, who has seen his label grow in unexpected ways, reiterates the point that it’s all of a piece. “There are enormous numbers of rare recordings that are hiding, still,” he says. “We’re going to continue to bring out some really important, unknown material. And if that is all we do, it’s very valuable. But of course we’re going to continue signing living musicians. Our goal is to keep mainstream jazz alive.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:22 AM on June 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Betty Carter, , Count Basie Orchestra, , Eric Dolphy, , , Mary Lou Williams, Nancy Wilson/Cannonball Adderley, , , Wes Montgomery   

    From J.A.L.C. Jazzblog: “10 More Essential Jazz Albums” 

    From J.A.L.C. Jazzblog

    1

    6.3.18 [Originally posted Oct, 20th 2016]

    Mingus Ah Um

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    Artist: Charles Mingus | Release Year: 1959

    Personnel: Charles Mingus (bass), John Handy (reeds), Booker Ervin (tenor sax), Shafi Hadi (saxophones), Willie Dennis (trombone), Jimmy Knepper (trombone), Horace Parlan (piano), Dannie Richmond (drums)

    Why You Need This Album:
    The album title suggests this as a defining moment for the bassist, and while it’s true that Mingus Ah Um functions as a soulful survey of Mingus’s colorful world, it also serves as a Rosetta Stone for the influences that shaped his music. There are the homages to recently deceased masters Lester Young and Charlie Parker (Goodbye Pork Pie Hat and Bird Calls, respectively); the gospel-infused swing of Better Git Hit In Your Soul that harks back to Mingus’s childhood in the church; and even the charged politics of Fables of Faubus, which thumbed its nose at Arkansas Governor Orval E. Faubus and his segregationist policies (though this instrumental recording of the song was not as barbed as later versions, which included lyrics). Mingus Ah Um reveals Mingus’s prodigious compositional breadth, moving from joyous to mournful and back and making the most out of this small group palette.

    The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery

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    Artist: Wes Montgomery | Release Year: 1960

    Personnel: Wes Montgomery (guitar), Tommy Flanagan (piano), Percy Health (bass), Albert “Tootie” Heath (drums)

    Why You Need This Album: The title says it all. Along with Django Reinhardt and Charlie Christian, Montgomery defined the jazz guitar’s sound and status as a modern, soloing instrument. His chops are on full display throughout this 1960 Riverside date, which helped make him a household name. The stellar rhythm section provides a supple foundation for Montgomery’s pyrotechnics, including his trademark use of octaves and tuneful thumb-picking.

    Speak No Evil

    Artist: Wayne Shorter | Release Year: 1964

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    Personnel: Wayne Shorter (tenor saxophone), Freddie Hubbard (trumpet), Herbie Hancock (piano), Ron Carter (bass), Elvin Jones (drums)

    Why You Need This Album: Recorded only a few months after the also-classic JuJu,Shorter’s Speak No Evil was the saxophonist’s third record for Blue Note.

    Shorter gathered together two fellow inductees into Miles Davis’s newest band, John Coltrane’s regular drummer, and his frontline partner from the Jazz Messengers and made a haunting, deeply atmospheric album. The record’s six new Shorter compositions all hint at a submerged darkness, skillfully building tension, and the subtle interplay between the members of this all-star lineup make Speak No Evil a moody masterpiece.

    The Audience With Betty Carter

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    Artist: Betty Carter | Release Year: 1980

    Personnel: Betty Carter (vocals), John Hicks (piano), Curtis Lundy (bass), Kenny Washington (drums)

    Why You Need This Album: Carter is no longer with us, but luckily this jam-packed double album captures for posterity just how riotously entertaining her electric live shows could be. Opener Sounds (Moving On) is 25 minutes long but flies by (thanks in large part to the double-time passage during her sprawling scat solo). The setlist is a mix of Carter originals (including her masterwork Tight) and well-chosen standards, including a deeply felt rendition of Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most, and the ever-tasteful rhythm section helps Carter keep the audience enraptured. It’s only a recording, but this is the next-best thing to being there.

    The Atomic Mr. Basie

    6

    Artist: Count Basie Orchestra | Release Year: 1958

    Personnel: Wendell Culley (trumpet), Snooky Young (trumpet), Thad Jones (trumpet), Joe Newman (trumpet), Henry Coker (trombone), Al Grey — (trombone), Benny Powell (trombone), Marshal Royal (reeds), Frank Wess (reeds), Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis (reeds), Frank Foster (reeds), Charles Fowlkes (reeds), Count Basie (piano), Eddie Jones (bass), Freddie Green (guitar), Sonny Payne (drums)

    Why You Need This Album: Look “pocket” up in the dictionary and you’ll be greeted with that iconic explosion of a cover. This is the Basie band at its tightest and most dynamically sensitive: the quiet parts are played feather-light, and the shout choruses paste you back against the wall. All of the album’s slinky charts—including the now-iconic Splanky and Lil’ Darlin’—were contributed by longtime collaborator Neal Hefti, making this one of the signature albums of Basie’s “New Testament Band.”

    Out to Lunch!

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    Artist: Eric Dolphy | Release Year: 1964

    Personnel: Eric Dolphy (reeds), Freddie Hubbard (trumpet), Bobby Hutcherson (vibraphone), Richard Davis (bass), Tony Williams (drums)

    Why You Need This Album: For those seeking to venture a little out of their jazz comfort zone, Out to Lunch! is the perfect place to start. Widely regarded as Dolphy’s best album, it was his only record for Blue Note, and it came out just a few months before his tragic death caused by complications from diabetes. His angular, oddly-timed compositions give the album’s talented personnel plenty of latitude to explore, but—free as it is—the album’s outré inclinations are still couched within a swinging, tuneful sensibility that won’t turn off jazz traditionalists.

    Nancy Wilson/Cannonball Adderley

    8

    Artist: Nancy Wilson and Cannonball Adderley | Release Year: 1961

    Personnel: Nancy Wilson (vocals), Cannonball Adderley (alto saxophone), Nat Adderley (cornet), Joe Zawinul (piano), Sam Jones (bass), Louis Hayes (drums)

    Why You Need This Album: Sometimes, recording a great album is really as simple as getting a couple of superb, sweet-toned musicians together in the same studio. That’s not to say Wilson and Adderley had no prior history—they’d actually performed together in Ohio, where Cannonball encouraged the singer to try her luck in New York—but this was their first recording date together. Nevertheless, the chemistry is evident, especially on the jaunty Little Unhappy Boy.

    Brilliant Corners

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    Artist: Thelonious Monk | Release Year: 1957

    Personnel: Thelonious Monk (piano), Ernie Henry (alto saxophone), Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone), Clark Terry (trumpet), Oscar Pettiford (bass), Paul Chambers (bass), Max Roach (drums)

    Why You Need This Album: Picking the best Monk album is no easy task, but few would quibble with the assertion that Brilliant Corners finds the pianist at the height of his powers. From the staggering swagger of the ebullient title track to the woozily sweet Pannonica, the album’s a perfect encapsulation of what made Monk such a unique composer and improviser, and the supporting cast is one of the strongest with which Monk ever recorded. Plus, that cover!

    Live at the Cookery

    10

    Artist: Mary Lou Williams | Release Year: 1976

    Personnel: Mary Lou Williams (piano), Brian Torff (bass)

    Why You Need This Album: Captured more than four decades after she made her recorded debut, this live set lays bare everything that made Williams a master: her ability to synthesize every era of jazz piano, her fiery blues licks, her sensitive use of space, and more. Bassist Torff is a delicate accompanist, egging Williams on at times and getting out of her way at others. The record’s a remarkable document of Williams’s prowess and an instructional look at the full range of jazz piano’s evolution over the course of the 20th century.

    Conference of the Birds

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    Artist: Dave Holland | Release Year: 1972

    Personnel: Dave Holland (bass), Sam Rivers (reeds), Anthony Braxton (reeds), Barry Altschul (percussion, marimba)

    Why You Need This Album: Don’t let this record’s spare instrumentation fool you: there’s a lot going on. Holland gathered up the personnel of Circle (sans founding member Chick Corea) plus Sam Rivers, with whom he’d enjoy a long collaboration. The bassist’s muscular lines power the group’s six avant-garde excursions into wide-open space. The compositions are generally quite free but, despite the winding roads they offer the listener, they all arrive at fascinating destinations. Like Out to Lunch!, this record is a good place for those uninitiated in free jazz to start: it swings hard from start to finish.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Mission Statement

    In the Spirit of Swing.

    The mission of Jazz at Lincoln Center is to entertain, enrich and expand a global community for jazz through performance, education, and advocacy. We believe jazz is a metaphor for Democracy. Because jazz is improvisational, it celebrates personal freedom and encourages individual expression. Because jazz is swinging, it dedicates that freedom to finding and maintaining common ground with others. Because jazz is rooted in the blues, it inspires us to face adversity with persistent optimism.

    History

    From our first downbeat as a summer concert series at Lincoln Center in 1987, to the fully orchestrated achievement of opening the world’s first venue designed specifically for jazz in 2004, we have celebrated this music and these landmarks with an ever-growing audience of jazz fans from around the world.

    Representing the totality of jazz music, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s mission is carried out through four elements—educational, curatorial, archival, and ceremonial—capturing, in unparalleled scope, the full spectrum of the jazz experience.

    In the mid-1980s, Lincoln Center, Inc. was looking to expand its programming efforts to attract new and younger audiences, and to fill its halls during the summer months when resident companies were performing elsewhere. Long-time jazz enthusiasts on the Lincoln Center campus and on the Lincoln Center Board recognized the need for America’s music to be represented, and lobbied to include jazz in the organization’s offerings. After four summers of successful Classical Jazz concerts, Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) became an official department of Lincoln Center in 1991. During its first year, JALC produced concerts throughout New York City, including Brooklyn and Harlem. By the second year, JALC had its own radio series on National Public Radio, and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra (now known as the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra) began touring, and recording and selling CDs. By its fourth year, the program reached international audiences with performances in Hong Kong and, the following year, in France, Austria, Italy, Turkey, Norway, Spain, England, Germany and Finland. In July 1996, JALC was inducted as the first new constituent of Lincoln Center since The School of American Ballet joined in 1987, laying the groundwork for the building of a performance facility designed specifically for the sound, function and feeling of jazz.

    “The whole space is dedicated to the feeling of swing, which is a feeling of extreme coordination,” explained Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Managing and Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis of his vision for the new home of jazz, or the “House of Swing.” “Everything is integrated: the relationship between one space and another, the relationship between the audience and the musicians, is one fluid motion, because that’s how our music is.” Under Marsalis’s direction, JALC sought out world-renowned architect Rafael Viñoly and a team of acoustic engineers to create Frederick P. Rose Hall, the world’s first performance, education and broadcast facility devoted to jazz, in New York City. As the centerpiece of a $131 million capital campaign drive, the 100,000-square-foot facility opened in fall 2004 and features three concert and performance spaces (Rose Theater, The Appel Room and Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola) engineered for the warmth and clarity of the sound of jazz.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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