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  • richardmitnick 11:50 AM on October 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ethan Iverson, Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette, Thelonious Monk A Centennial Treasure Chest   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: “Thelonious Monk A Centennial Treasure Chest” 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    October 14, 2018

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    1
    Any observation that comes out of Ethan Iverson’s brain is worth serious consideration.

    Ethan Iverson 2016 photo by Jimmy Katz at http://www.jimmykatz.com, with permission

    Ethan Iverson with MarkTurner-Temprary Kings by Robert Lewis

    The original Bad Plus Ethan Iverson, Reid Anderson and Dave King https//www.aladdin-theater.com

    While I am not always in accord with his encyclopedic commentary on Monk’s recordings and compositions, I find everything he has to say enlightening and insightful. This is a great read and his comment on Billy Higgins is spot on. During a soundcheck for the Bobby Hutcherson-Harold Land Quintet at Royce Hall in 1981, Billy was late. But when he finally sat down at the drums, I could feel the music lift ten feet off the ground. -Michael Cuscuna

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 1:44 PM on October 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ethan Iverson, Happy hundredth birthday Thelonious Monk, ,   

    From Ethan Iverson via The New Yorker: “Think of Thelonious Monk” 

    From Ethan Iverson

    Ethan Iverson 2016 photo by Jimmy Katz at http://www.jimmykatz.com, with permission

    via

    new-yorker-bloc-rea-irvin
    Rea Irvin

    The New Yorker

    October 10, 2017
    Ethan Iverson

    Thelonious Monk, Minton’s Playhouse, New York, ca. September 1947. Photograph by William P. Gottlieb

    1
    There are sixty-odd Thelonious Monk pieces still in the active repertoire, something that cannot be said of any other composer’s work.
    Photograph by Gai Terrell / Redferns / Getty

    There was always something to talk about. The avant-garde music that verged on conceptual art but was delivered at a relaxed and buoyant foxtrot. The memorable melodies that sat atop a virtuosic harmonic conception, emphasizing unexpected dissonances. The blues that were an unchanging constant. For those who couldn’t tell he was an unusual musician simply from listening, the visuals were a helpful guide: outrageously idiosyncratic percussive piano techniques and long, spastic dances, not to mention a wardrobe of impeccable flash and taste.

    At the beginning, Thelonious Monk was a shadowy figure known only to fellow-innovators. To help generate publicity, the Blue Note label dubbed him “the high priest” for his first records, as a bandleader, in the late nineteen-forties. After Monk spent a few more years in penniless obscurity, suddenly, most of New York City went to the Five Spot, where he was in residence for multiple months in 1957. From there he became a household name and one of the biggest draws on the European circuit. In 1964, he even appeared on the cover of Time magazine, and was profiled by Lewis Lapham, in the Saturday Evening Post, although most of the mainstream press during Monk’s lifetime made unhappy allusions to craziness, infantilism, and negroid primitivism. Eventually, the record companies decided that he wasn’t a religious icon (“the high priest”) but a warrior instead, and his last significant major-label release, “Underground,” depicted him on the cover with guns, grenades, and a captured Nazi.

    During Monk’s ascendency, his style was so different from that of any other bebop or modern-jazz pianist. It was stubborn, incantatory, utterly African. Occasionally, when his left hand opened up and gave an accurate quotation of glorious Harlem stride, it became downright anachronistic. Some of the cognoscenti were bewildered, at least at first. Most of the skeptics ended up admiring his compositions, although certain great musicians, like Miles Davis, Lennie Tristano, and Oscar Peterson, would continue to dislike aspects of his playing. Ironically, Davis began his ascendency with a performance of Monk’s “ ’Round Midnight.” The ironies are compounded when you remember that Monk would always be irritated about how Davis used incorrect chord changes, not just on “ ’Round Midnight” but on “Well, You Needn’t,” as well.

    After his death, in 1982, scholars and fans settled down and began doing the serious work of parsing the complexities and clearing away the controversies. In 1983, the boutique label Mosaic Records launched with “The Complete Blue Note Recordings of Thelonious Monk.” The quietly stunning cinéma-vérité documentary “Straight, No Chaser,” directed by Charlotte Zwerin, was released, in 1989. In 2002, “The Thelonious Monk Fake Book” collected accurate lead sheets, edited by Steve Cardenas and Don Sickler. In 2009, Robin D. G. Kelley published “Thelonious Monk: The Life and Times of an American Original,” a hefty, family-authorized, and definitive factual biography, which declared that Monk was bipolar and offered clues, if not final answers, about why Monk spent his last years withdrawn and silent.

    There are sixty-odd Monk pieces still in the active repertoire, something that cannot be said of any other composer’s work. Monk has varied musical tributes from Charles Mingus (“Jump Monk”), Sonny Rollins (“Disco Monk”), Eric Dolphy (“Hat and Beard”), Andrew Hill (“Monastery”), McCoy Tyner (“The High Priest”), and hundreds of others. Many of the remaining jazz celebrities are on the board of the Thelonious Monk Institute, which, for almost three decades, has sponsored the world’s biggest jazz contest.

    Monk’s perfect package of accessible surrealism has proved to be catnip to a long line of painters, critics, modern dancers, novelists, and, especially, poets. A collected set of the complete poems written about Monk would fill a small library, most on a theme similar to Abbey Lincoln’s lyric to “Blue Monk”:

    Going alone
    life is your own
    but the cost sometimes is dear.
    Being complete
    knowing defeat
    keeping on from year to year.

    The poets are correct. Monk will always challenge conventional jazz. In “Straight, No Chaser,” Tommy Flanagan and Barry Harris offer duo performances of “Well, You Needn’t” and “Misterioso.” Flanagan and Harris are swinging, but both are far from their magical best, and the result (intentionally or unintentionally—only Zwerin knows) shows how tame and unexciting “normal” bebop piano can be when compared to Monk.

    He is a smooth object that spins out of one’s grasp, as easily as a ball bearing shaped like his middle name, Sphere. The minute you pin him down, he’s dancing in another corner. A child can march to his 4/4 time, yet so many of his internal minimal rhythms are fantastically complex Afro-Cuban derivatives, confusing to all but the initiated. He’s one of the original Afro-futurists—a noble lineage that includes Sun Ra (“Space Is the Place”) and the Art Ensemble of Chicago (“Black Music: Ancient to the Future”)—yet he also programmed campy and sentimental parlor piano songs from the days of yesteryear.

    Jazz musicians began playing “standards” from the American popular songbook to generate a specific feeling, neither a blues nor a musical but some mysterious intersection of the two. After Louis Armstrong, the artist who gave the most early energetic life to this essential chiaroscuro was Billie Holiday. As a young man, Monk would lie in bed and stare at a photo of Holiday taped to his ceiling, illuminated by a single red light bulb.

    In his maturity, Monk would always play a standard redone in harmonic and melodic terms just as specific as an original Monk composition. The most absurd of those standards might be “Just a Gigolo,” a song about being a male escort, which was originally written as an Austrian tango, by the Italian composer Leonello Casucci, before being popularized in America with lyrics by the Romanian-Jewish Broadway great Irving Caesar. Monk is all the way inside the tune while simultaneously impossibly distant. His reading of the original melody is relentlessly accurate, so it must be the manipulation of tone and accompaniment that produces such a complex final product.

    The composer James Newton says that “Timbre is the least investigated and most misunderstood element of African music.” In “Just a Gigolo,” the sonority is as un-European as a piano can possibly be (and perhaps a good reminder that Picasso and his fellow-Cubists were deeply influenced by African art). But the rules and regulations concerning voice-leading in European music are not discarded. Indeed, Monk understands the pure harmonic potential of “Gigolo” better than Cascucci or Caesar, offering a sweet-and-sour palette that heightens the song’s solemn ambivalence. In the end, while Monk’s “Just a Gigolo” remains absurd, it can also reduce one to tears.

    Video footage can help when assessing the performing arts, but not always. There is nothing more boring than decent jazz on a flawed video. However, in the case of Monk, videos are always a true bonus, especially the videos of the working quartet with Charlie Rouse, in the nineteen-sixties. Rouse is a stoic gladiator, the bands swing so hard, and Monk’s pianistic physicality and interpretive dance explode through the screen. One date in particular is glorious: in Tokyo, on May 23, 1963, a crew of smart visual and audio technicians placed one of Monk’s greatest bands, with Rouse, Butch Warren, and the incandescent Frankie Dunlop, against a simple modernist backdrop and let them blow. The version of “Just a Gigolo” from that performance is in “Straight, No Chaser,” and the rest of the songs are available on YouTube.

    Although nobody was more laconic than Monk, none of the twentieth-century jazz greats were especially verbose when an outsider asked them about their music. They didn’t say much, because how could they start? Where to begin? Either you get the perfect balance of references and realities contained in that May 23, 1963, video—race, blues, swing, melody, harmony, time, fashion, clave, avant, folklore, academy, mystic, complex, simple—or you don’t. If you do get it, then, as Monk himself said, “Always know.” In case “Always know” isn’t clear, there’s another line of Monk’s that was copied down by his student Steve Lacy: “You’ve got to dig it to dig, you dig?”

    The dozens of cryptic Monk aphorisms are key. Here’s one that isn’t yet in print. My friend Dean Estes hung out with him in Minneapolis in the sixties, and Monk spent the week saying, “White is right. Two is one.” Years later, Dean realized that Monk was talking about the civil-rights images dominating the television news. Two isn’t one, so white wasn’t right.

    His wife, Nellie, called him Melodious Thunk. Happy hundredth birthday, Thelonious Monk.

    See the full article here .

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    The original Bad Plus Ethan Iverson, Reid Anderson and Dave King https//www.aladdin-theater.com

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:21 PM on October 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Creative writing, Downbeat, Ethan Iverson, , Manfred Eicher and ECM, Mark Morris, , New England Conservatory, , Temporary Kings   

    From Downbeat via Ethan Iverson: “Ethan Iverson: At the Crossroads of Jazz and Classical Music” 

    Downbeat

    Ethan Iverson 2016 photo by Jimmy Katz at http://www.jimmykatz.com, with permission

    October 2018
    Dan Ouellette

    1
    Ethan Iverson and Mark Turner “Temprary Kings” (Photo: Robert Lewis)

    Midway into his career, pianist Ethan Iverson has experienced a universe of multifaceted artistry and in many collegial opinions has become a restless visionary.

    Iverson continues to evolve as a deep, enlightened, good-humored artist who has excelled in a variety of musical settings—from composing formal classical scores, to being the musical composer/arranger for choreographer Mark Morris, to breaking jazz rules in The Bad Plus (the trio he co-founded in 2000 and departed from in 2017).

    Mark Morris 2006 by Charles Haynes

    The original Bad Plus Ethan Iverson, Reid Anderson and Dave King http://www.aladdin-theater.com

    Iverson also teaches at New England Conservatory, where he’s been on faculty since 2016. And he has gained considerable esteem as a prose writer, thanks to his contributions to The New Yorker and his widely read blog, Do the Math.

    Iverson stands as a passionate dynamo at the crossroads of jazz and classical music. “To move the music forward, you have to think about the greatest jazz and the greatest classical music,” he said in his Brooklyn apartment, seated in front of a large painting by his father depicting the house in which he grew up, during formative years spent near the border of Minnesota and Wisconsin. “In back-to-back weekends recently, I got to play duos with Ron Carter, whose tradition I feel myself in, and Miranda Cuckson, one of the best new music violinists in New York, who is also part of my tradition. I was watering my garden in an unbelievable way with these two heavyweights.”

    Ron Carter – courtesy of Ron Carter

    Miranda Cuckson by Beowulf Sheehan

    Iverson’s new album is Temporary Kings (ECM), a remarkable duo project with tenor saxophonist Mark Turner.

    2

    On the recording, the pair dives into a conversational, chamber-jazz setting with mysteries, musings and motif-bending originals (six by Iverson, two by Turner). They give a nod to the Lennie Tristano-Warne Marsh school of cool with a playful flight through Marsh’s “Dixie’s Dilemma” (which is based on the changes to Jerome Kern’s “All The Things You Are”). The two artists have a long history of collaboration. Most notably, they served as the solo powerhouses in drummer Billy Hart’s quartet with bassist Ben Street starting in 2005, later appearing on Hart’s ECM albums All Our Reasons (2012) and One Is The Other (2014).

    In a recent phone conversation, Turner said that the duo album is rooted in the Hart connection. “One thing was clear to Ethan and me in wanting to play with Billy was an interest in older music, traditional music, folklore, and how that informs the music of the present,” he said. “Billy exemplifies that—the modern and the present. He embodies what we want to be. Ethan brought up the idea to do this album. There wasn’t any back-and-forth. It’s just a continuation of our relationship within Billy’s band.”

    Temporary Kings was recorded last year at the RSI studio in Lugano, Switzerland. “It’s fun to play free with Mark, because he has perfect pitch; he can hear what I’m doing.” Iverson said. “I don’t have perfect pitch. But his mind is so acute, he can always do things that are a little less obvious, whereas I can be too obvious, because I’m seeking clarity.” He paused and added, “I’m willing to sacrifice jazz hipness for clarity.”

    On the asymmetrical title track—named after the 1973 novel in Anthony Powell’s 12-volume epic, A Dance To The Music Of Time—Turner sings while Iverson swoops to create flow and sonic power. Iverson said that the book metaphorically nods to the old days when there were kings who served for a brief period and then, at the end of their reigns, were executed. “It’s like our time recording in Lugano,” he said. “We record in this fancy studio with [ECM’s] Manfred Eicher, and then we come back to Brooklyn.

    3
    Manfred Eicher by Bart Babinski

    Mark’s taking his kids to school, and I’m playing for a dance class. So, we were temporary kings.”

    Key to the success of the recording sessions was the artists’ mutual admiration. “I have tremendous respect for Mark in every dimension,” Iverson explained. “I listen to Mark, not just musically, but what he says to me as a person. It’s like when he told me that it takes us longer to be great now because there is so much more to learn. Mark is a very gentle Buddhist and family man. He plays the best tenor saxophone of his generation, and he’s not doing it in an aggressive way. He doesn’t care about commercial success and doesn’t put a package together to make himself famous. It’s really an honor to play with someone who has that level of purity.”

    “Ethan is iconic,” Turner said. “There’s no one like him. He’s a true individual. The main thing he has is his touch, and I like his comping, especially with his note choices and voicings.”

    Iverson took piano lessons up to the 7th grade, but decided to quit when he became concerned that he wouldn’t ultimately get to his passion: jazz by the likes of Count Basie and Thelonious Monk. “I could read music very well,” he said, then laughed. “In fact, I’m a famous sight-reader today. But I got this message that a teacher wasn’t going to help me with jazz. In fact, maybe it could harm me. It’s like the Mary Lou Williams jazz tree, where she says that classical studies don’t help. There are many verdant branches on the tree, but the classical branch, with its études and books, is a dead branch. Paul Bley said that if you go too far down the classical path, you won’t figure out how to play jazz. The irony is that no one knew more about European classical music than he did, and I have become pretty expert at it, too.”

    Iverson enrolled at New York University in 1991 to study jazz, but he only lasted two years. Among his instructors was Jim McNeely. “The most important part of [McNeely’s] classes was when he told stories about playing with Sonny Stitt and Thad Jones and others,” Iverson said. “I know he showed me some stuff on the piano, but I think the essence of jazz is in those stories. That’s the way I think jazz works as a curriculum.”

    Iverson went on to take private lessons with Fred Hersch, who sent him to classical teacher Sophia Rosoff and her colleague Robert Helps (1928–2001). Today, he studies with John Bloomfield.

    Given Iverson’s history in academia, it’s somewhat ironic that he currently has a teaching position at NEC. Before he was offered the job, the school had invited Iverson to give a lecture on stride piano, during which he interspersed his own playing with recordings by artists like Mary Lou Williams, James P. Johnson and Art Tatum.

    “I talked about the base of the music, stuff that was very old,” Iverson recalled. “There’s a way of talking about jazz piano where you start with Bill Evans and everything that happened after that. But when I was in my late teens and early 20s, what set me apart from my peers was my interest in early jazz. To some people, this is just corny music and why do that? But people like Earl Hines had such technical competence with the sheer number of notes he was shoveling around on the instrument that was actually greater than most modern pianists. Plus, they could play for dances. How many modern jazz pianists can sit and play for a dance?”

    Iverson meets seven times with seven students each semester. “It’s a real joy to see people improve when they do stuff I tell them to,” he said. “That’s a unique pleasure I never had before. I teach them that jazz is a blend of two traditions: European harmony and African rhythm. There are other factors, but that’s the basic mix. The European harmony comes naturally to piano players, but the African side is harder to talk about.”

    When Iverson was scrounging gigs in New York in the ’90s, he became associated with Mark Morris, who brought him aboard as the musical director for his dance troupe. Morris is humorously frank in talking about his first experiences with Iverson when he was in his twenties: “Ethan was clueless and completely out of his realm. He played well, but was green. He showed up with enthusiasm, but he wasn’t very sophisticated. … But he was very open-minded.” Iverson spent five years with Morris, frequently on the road. He learned a phenomenal amount about classical music, but many of his tasks were functional, not creative.

    “It was stuff that needed to happen,” the pianist said. “Mark is the perfect example of using a mixture of high and low art. It hits you in your gut, as well as your brain.”

    As he was closing in on 30, Iverson realized he had to devote himself to playing jazz again. “I told Mark, I love you, but I’ve got to go,” he said. “As if I had arranged it, within a month The Bad Plus hit, played the Village Vanguard and got a record deal with Columbia.

    Village Vanguard by John Rogers for NPR

    Without that mix of high and low art I learned from Mark, I don’t think I could have played The Bad Plus music.”

    After Iverson left Morris’ employ, the two continued their friendship, with the choreographer marveling at shows he saw Iverson perform in various settings, including a tango band and a solo piece, “Easy Win,” for John Heginbotham’s Dance Heginbotham troupe. Morris also became a big Bad Plus fan and collaborated with the musicians on dance projects, including “Spring, Spring, Spring,” which involved the trio interpreting Stravinsky’s The Rite Of Spring.

    Now, Iverson has returned to Morris collaboration mode, this time with the choreographer and pianist creating a 50th anniversary celebration of The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band called Pepperland. Iverson wrote the score, which includes his arrangements of six Beatles songs, as well as six originals inspired by Lennon and McCartney’s work. “It’s blowing everyone’s mind,” Iverson said, “especially the Theremin version of ‘A Day In The Life.’”

    Morris is pleased: “The music is complicated, subtle and jarring, rhythmically and sonically. Ethan is fascinating and smart, and a good friend.”

    Iverson will be busy this fall, as a duo tour with Turner will take the musicians to Chicago (Sept. 15), New York (Sept. 18), Los Angeles (Oct. 12) and Seattle’s Earshot Jazz Festival (Oct. 15). Pepperland—which has its own music ensemble—will be staged at performing arts centers for the foreseeable future. “We’re booked for the next five years, which I like,” Iverson said. “It’s an anchor, so that I can explore more.”

    Pepperland also gives him a steady source of revenue. After he cut ties with The Bad Plus, Iverson was wondering what would come next. But post-trio, he has been quite active. “Now, I have so much more air around my head to make the music I want to make,” he said. “It’s been freeing and exciting, because there are limitless possibilities.”

    One product of that freedom is his three-part classical composition Concerto To Scale, which he debuted this spring with the American Composers Orchestra at Carnegie Hall’s Zankel Hall. “For my first symphonic work, I didn’t want it to be too serious,” he said. “A lot of these crossover-type pieces collapse under the weight of trying to do too much. And some jazz composers may ask the orchestra to swing. I know better.”

    When Iverson presented the slightly humorous piece, one of the few jazz elements was having the bass drummer double his left hand for the syncopation. The orchestra played some Mozart-like material and then Iverson played a stretch of ragtime with the orchestra doing what he said is “a freak improv from the Charles Ives tradition.”

    “I like being a little goofy,” Iverson said. “I think The Bad Plus got more serious through the years. We started out punkishly goofy, but as we matured, Reid [Anderson] and Dave [King] wanted to dial that back. But you listen to music by Sonny Rollins, Paul Bley, Ornette Coleman, and they’re all telling jokes in their music.”

    On the horizon, Iverson will be curating two projects. For three days in November at the EFG London Jazz Festival, he’ll oversee a history of British jazz; an overview of modern improvising artists, such as Kenny Wheeler, John Surman, John Taylor and Django Bates; then an avant-garde conduction, based on the English Baroque music of Henry Purcell. At the end of the year at Umbria Jazz’s Orvieto festival, Iverson will debut his 75-minute suite, based on Bud Powell’s music, with new compositions for jazz orchestra.

    Hart marvels at the breadth of Iverson’s work. “It’s Ethan’s positive vision that he brings to everything,” he said. “He has a way to make these visions materialize. He has an instinct that is extremely unique. Even in my band, he puts things into motion. He’s an arranger of the highest order, and an innovator who is on a quest.”

    Iverson appreciates the accolades, yet pushes forward to find his voice. “There are so many things I’ve just scratched the surface on that I’m ready to get into,” he said. “One of my idols is Paul Motian [1931–2011]. His music didn’t get truly personal till he was in his late forties. No one thinks about the early records of Paul’s career, but he kept figuring out the blending of European and African traditions to make great records later in his life. That inspires me. I’m 45 and have been a part of a very successful band that played on the biggest stages of jazz. But as for what’s next, I feel like I’ve accumulated a lot information to sift through to use to present the real Ethan Iverson.” DB

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:25 AM on September 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Ethan Iverson, Miranda Cuckson, , SpectrumNYC   

    From Ethan Iverson: “Next week Miranda Cuckson and I take another look at two masterful midcentury sonatas at Spectrum” 

    From Ethan Iverson

    Ethan Iverson 2016 photo by Jimmy Katz at http://www.jimmykatz.com, with permission

    Next week Miranda Cuckson and I take another look at two masterful midcentury sonatas at Spectrum

    3


    2
    SpectrumNYC

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:47 PM on September 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ethan Iverson, , , Star Tribune   

    From Ethan Iverson Via Star Tribune: “Former Bad Plus pianist still ‘loves playing in the Midwest’ despite rocketing career” 

    From Ethan Iverson

    Ethan Iverson 2016 photo by Jimmy Katz at http://www.jimmykatz.com, with permission

    via

    1

    Star Tribunehttp://www.startribune.com

    September 14, 2018
    Jon Bream

    2
    Menomonie, Wis., native Ethan Iverson writes about jazz for the New Yorker. By ROBERT LEWIS

    So much for slowing down.

    After he left the jazz world’s busiest touring group, the Bad Plus, at the end of 2017, pianist Ethan Iverson thought his life would get less hectic.

    The original Bad Plus Ethan Iverson, Reid Anderson and Dave King https http://www.aladdin-theater.com

    Wrong.

    “This year I’ve been just as busy. I’m going to Europe five times with different groups,” he pointed out.

    Plus, he’s teaching at the New England Conservatory, writing about jazz for the New Yorker, serving as musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group, curating two European jazz festivals, composing a concerto, writing big-band arrangements, interviewing jazz luminaries for his popular blog, forming his own quartet and touring to promote his new duo album with tenor saxophonist Mark Turner.

    The album, “Temporary Kings,” was released last week to rave reviews, and Iverson was the subject of a major profile in Downbeat magazine. He and Turner have hit the road, with a two-night stand at Crooners in Fridley beginning Sunday.

    Ethan Iverson and Mark Turner

    When: 6:30 p.m. Sun. & 7:30 p.m. Mon.

    Where: Dunsmore Room at Crooners, Fridley.

    Tickets: $25-$30, http:/www. ticketfly.com.

    “A lot of times we [musicians] play in situations with drums and high energy. With a duo, it’s spacious and sort of like chamber music,” Iverson said. “We play the blues and swinging jazz. But the emphasis is on listening and thoughtful interaction.”

    One of the album’s highlights, the lonely blues “Unclaimed Freight,” was inspired by a sign Iverson spotted on a building in rural northern Minnesota.

    “I was driving with some relatives and on an otherwise completely undeveloped road, we came across a huge warehouse with a gigantic sign ‘Unclaimed Freight,’ ” Iverson remembered, “and I thought that’s the title of the blues if there ever was one.”

    What road?

    “If you go up [Interstate] 35 and at Black Bear Casino take a left, it was out there somewhere,” he recalled.

    That sounds like directions from someone out there somewhere.

    Speaking from his Brooklyn apartment earlier this month, Iverson, 45, had logged four hours of piano practice by lunchtime in preparation for an afternoon rehearsal with the new Ethan Iverson Quartet and its two upcoming New York City gigs.

    Iverson, who has been playing piano since seventh grade in Menomonie, Wis., is attracted to music that is “unknowable to him,” observed saxophonist Joshua Redman, who has worked with Iverson.

    “The thing about jazz [is] you can really be stumped as to why it’s so great,” Iverson opined. “Great jazz is mysterious music — and I love mystery.”

    ‘Writing feels just as natural’

    Thoughtful, studious and articulate, Iverson is in his third year of teaching seven students for seven days per semester at Boston’s New England Conservatory.

    “It’s really gratifying when a student is good and I tell them to do something and they do it and then they get better,” the teacher noted.

    He’s an avid student himself of jazz and classical music. He began collecting as a high schooler when he had a piano gig at a restaurant job in Menomonie and spent his entire paychecks on jazz records via mail order or trips to the Electric Fetus in Minneapolis.

    Combing through his record collection, he preps diligently for interviews for his blog, for which he has conversed with such jazz stars as Ron Carter, Keith Jarrett, Wynton Marsalis, Jason Moran and Cécile McLorin Salvant.

    “They’re people I feel like I can learn from or that I really love,” Iverson said of the interview subjects. “I haven’t interviewed anybody who I wasn’t going to get something out of in a practical sense. It’s not a job. I’m just having fun.”

    He started the blog in 2005 — “when blogging felt relevant and hip” — during downtime on tour with the Bad Plus. He wanted to share his love for all kinds of music with this new fan base. He uses the blog, dubbed “Do the Math,” to muse about jazz, European classical music and other topics, particularly crime fiction, which he loves to read.

    While he has no formal writing background or training, he says “writing feels just as natural as playing the piano or composing.” Plus, he credits his writer-wife, Sarah Deming, who serves as his de facto editor.

    In the past year, Iverson has segued into writing jazz pieces for the New Yorker. In honor of saxophonist Wayne Shorter’s 85th birthday, the pianist wrote in the esteemed magazine about three classic Shorter albums, all released in 1964. Iverson was such an obsessive researcher that he even published outtakes from the New Yorker story on his blog.

    Midwestern homecoming

    Among Iverson’s new projects this year was his three-part classical composition, “Concerto to Scale,” which he premiered last spring at Carnegie Hall with the American Composers Orchestra.

    One project keeping Iverson on the road is “Pepperland” with the Morris dance troupe, with which the pianist has been affiliated on and off since the late ’90s. For this dance tribute to the Beatles’ landmark 1967 “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” album, Iverson composed a score featuring his arrangements of six Beatles tunes and six originals inspired by the Fab Four. The troupe will take “Pepperland” on tour intermittently for five years, with a week this year at Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.

    In November, Iverson is curating the London Jazz Festival, with three distinct programs — a history of British jazz; an overview of modern improvising artists, and an avant-garde piece based on British Baroque composer Henry Purcell.

    At the Umbria Winter Jazz Festival in Italy in late December, Iverson will premiere an orchestral suite inspired by the work of jazz pianist Bud Powell.

    Iverson wouldn’t have had time for all these endeavors if he were still doing 100 gigs a year with Bad Plus. He left the Minnesota-tied trio (the other two members grew up in the Twin Cities) over differences in priorities and artistic direction. He hasn’t heard the ensemble with his replacement, Orrin Evans.

    “I’ll let them just do their thing,” Iverson said with no hint of bitterness. “It’s too soon for me to check it out.”

    However, the pianist admits that coming to the Twin Cities without the Bad Plus for the first time “will be a little lonely in some ways.” Still, home is home.

    “I always love playing in the Midwest whatever the situation is,” he acknowledged. “I like to think there’s something in all the music I make that has something to do with this Minnesota/Wisconsin connection. The audiences there understand that.”

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:46 PM on September 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: DownBeat Digital, Ethan Iverson, , Journalism   

    From Ethan Iverson” “DownBeat Digital” 

    From Ethan Iverson

    Ethan Iverson 2016 photo by Jimmy Katz at http://www.jimmykatz.com, with permission

    1

    See the full article here. There is much more than what I have chosen to show.
    Please do see the full article. I do not poach, so look for yourselves,


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:56 PM on September 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ethan Iverson, ,   

    From Ethan Iverson: “Tonight and tomorrow, I play at the Jazz Gallery with Dayna Stephens, Thomas Morgan, and Eric McPherson” 

    From Ethan Iverson

    Ethan Iverson 2016 photo by Jimmy Katz at http://www.jimmykatz.com, with permission

    Tonight and tomorrow, I play at the Jazz Gallery with Dayna Stephens, Thomas Morgan, and Eric McPherson. The book includes originals include pieces written especially for each member of the 4tet, a tribute to an enemy, and my new theme song with lyrics by Sarah Deming.

    yesterday the rehearsal was really fun!

    1

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:09 AM on September 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ethan Iverson, , Jazz Speaks, ,   

    From Ethan Iverson via Jazz Speaks- “Let Them Play: Ethan Iverson Speaks” 

    From Ethan Iverson

    Ethan Iverson 2016 photo by Jimmy Katz at http://www.jimmykatz.com, with permission

    via

    Jazz Speaks from Jazz Gallery

    Jazz Speaks

    Let Them Play: Ethan Iverson Speaks

    1
    Photo by Jonathan Chimene (courtesy of the artist)

    This weekend, pianist Ethan Iverson brings a new quartet to The Jazz Gallery along with a newly composed book of music to explore. Since his departure from The Bad Plus at the end of 2017, Iverson has had a busy year, which has included premiering a new piano concerto, writing for the Culture Deskat the New Yorker, and performing with peers and elders.

    We spoke by phone with Ethan Iverson, who was spending some time with family in Duluth, Minnesota.

    The Jazz Gallery: How’s your summer been?

    See the full article here. Please do see it.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:03 PM on September 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ethan Iverson, Ethan Iverson Quartet, , ,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “Ethan Iverson Quartet at The Jazz Gallery” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    Ethan Iverson 2016 photo by Jimmy Katz at http://www.jimmykatz.com, with permission

    Friday, September 7, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    The Jazz Gallery
    1160 Broadway, 5th Floor
    New York, NY 10001

    $20—45
    Tickets

    Ethan Iverson – piano
    Dayna Stephens – saxophone
    Thomas Morgan – bass
    Eric McPherson – drums

    “The composition is begun when the musicians are chosen.” (attributed to Duke Ellington) New music for a new ensemble plus “Misty,” “Tea for Two,” and the blues

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:44 AM on September 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Charlie Parker, Ethan Iverson, , , , Whitney Balliett   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: “Whitney Balliett on Charlie Parker, Ethan Iverson ‘Wayne Shorter’s 1964′” 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    Whitney Balliett on Charlie Parker

    1
    Charlie Parker. No image credit

    This posting of Whitney Balliett’s March 1, 1967 New Yorker review of Charlie Parker’s Savoy sessions is a welcome reminder of what an astute observer and creative writer he was. Who else would describe the sloppy execution of a theme by writing “the ensembles are smidged”?

    -Michael Cuscuna

    Read the article…

    2
    Wayne Shorter’s 1964. No image credit.

    Ethan Iverson is fast becoming as remarkable a journalist and historian and he is a pianist. On the eve of Wayne Shorter’s 85th birthday, Ethan examines the three masterpieces that Wayne recorded for Blue Note in 1964 and illustrates the very different musical arenas in which each project was created. A fascinating must-read.

    -Michael Cuscuna

    Read the article…

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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