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  • richardmitnick 1:02 PM on April 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Ethan Iverson, , Martin Speake   

    From DO THE M@TH: “Looking forward to extensive tour with Martin Speake next week!” 

    DO THE M@TH
    From Ethan Iverson

    Ethan Iverson, Pianist and Composer

    1
    Martin Speake
    Saxophonist, composer and Jazz educator

    20/4 Sheffield Jazz Crookes Social Club http://www.sheffieldjazz.org.uk/

    21/4 Brighton Verdict https://verdictjazz.co.uk/

    22/4 Colchester Arts Centre https://www.colchesterartscentre.com/

    23 Cheltenham Jazz http://www.cheltenhamjazz.co.uk/

    24/4 London Pizza Express https://www.pizzaexpresslive.com/venues/soho-jazz-club

    25/4London Pizza Express https://www.pizzaexpresslive.com/venues/soho-jazz-club

    26/4 St George’s Bristol https://www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk/

    27/4 Reading Progress Theatre http://www.jazzinreading.com/

    29/4 Cinnamon Club Manchester http://www.thecinnamonclub.net/

    1/5 Hastings http://jazzhastings.co.uk/

    3/5 Cambridge https://www.cambridgejazz.org/index.php?name=home

    4/5 Poole Lighthouse https://www.lighthousepoole.co.uk/
    https://www.facebook.com/martinspeakemusic/

    See the full article here.

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 12:49 PM on April 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Billy Harper, Billy Hart, Buster Williams, Ethan Iverson,   

    From DO THE M@TH: “Rich Scheinin on Billy Harper” 

    DO THE M@TH

    Ethan Iverson, Pianist and Composer

    4.15.18
    Ethan Iverson

    1

    I’ve got Mr. Billy Harper on my mind, of course.

    After Richard Scheinin contributed the Cecil Taylor essay to DTM, Rich mentioned that he was a friend and admirer of Harper.

    He has also written the liner notes to several Harper albums, and there are online essays for the Mercury News:

    Like a Bolt of Truth from Above

    Art Blakey told him, ‘Billy, I’m your favorite fan.

    Profile from 1996

    See the full article here.

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:55 AM on April 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Ethan Iverson, , ,   

    From The New York Times: “Review: American Composers Orchestra Brings Jazz to Classical, Effortlessly” 

    New York Times

    The New York Times

    APRIL 8, 2018
    SETH COLTER WALLS

    1
    The pianist Ethan Iverson performing his composition Concerto to Scale with the American Composers Orchestra on Friday at Zankel Hall. Credit Hiroyuki Ito for The New York Times.

    The American Composers Orchestra takes the concept of jazz-informed classical composition seriously. That may sound like an obvious strategy for an ensemble hoping to represent its native soil. Yet this healthy attitude is not terribly common.

    In commissioning new works over the years by the saxophonist Steve Coleman or the pianist Vijay Iyer, the A.C.O. has bucked the historical trend of treating orchestrated works by sometime improvisers as mere curiosities. The orchestra’s Friday night show at Zankel Hall added to this legacy. More than half of the program was devoted to world premieres by composers with backgrounds in jazz performance. Two were by established stars: the saxophonist Steve Lehman and the pianist Ethan Iverson.

    Mr. Lehman’s piece, Ten Threshold Studies, trafficked in some of the hallucinogenic mystery of the small groups he has led. In his score, the composer instructs an oboist to switch between different fingerings, on the same pitch, producing notes “nearly identical in tuning” while remaining “extremely timbrally distinct.”

    2
    The saxophonist Steve Lehman composed Ten Threshold Studies, which had its world premiere. Credit Hiroyuki Ito for The New York Times.

    As a player, Mr. Lehman has few peers when it comes making severe changes of attack feel fluid. In the hands of the orchestra, these effects sounded more labored during the early going on Friday. But as the piece morphed from leaden, hard-struck percussive passages to a sense of weightless drift, carried by resonant vibraphone chords, the conductor George Manahan and his orchestra gradually realized Mr. Lehman’s interest in mystic change.

    Concerto to Scale, a three-movement work by Mr. Iverson, was a world away in texture: It was studded with familiar scales and ragtime riffs that were designed to take advantage of Mr. Iverson’s vivid presence as soloist, alongside the orchestra. Yet, as with Mr. Lehman’s work, Scale also managed to connect with some of its composer’s prior efforts in jazz clubs.

    Its referentiality recalled a winking approach to pop-music covers that Mr. Iverson has helped perfect, in different ensembles. And his punchy piano part — often shadowed by a thumping bass drum — drew from the same playfully complex style as some of his pieces for the Bad Plus (a trio he worked in for nearly two decades, before exiting last year).

    He also took advantage of the vintage reference points to work as a vaudevillian. At one point, Mr. Iverson allowed a theatrical sweep of the piano’s highest register to carry him up from his bench, where he then regarded the audience and waited for a laugh. (He got one.) Thankfully the piece wasn’t all jokey: A middle movement meant to reflect a “19th-century nocturne atmosphere” had a genuinely personal approach that rivaled the more boisterous movements as entertainment.

    3
    The violinist Elena Urioste, left, performing Clarice Assad’s Dreamscapes with the orchestra and its conductor, George Manahan, right. Credit Hiroyuki ito for The New York Times.

    During the premiere of the newly revised September Coming, by the young saxophonist Hitomi Oba, the orchestra did not sound as successfully attuned to the composer’s sensibility. This new piece had some of the same dramatic spacings and crisply distinguished layers as another recent work, With Bare Feet, though here the impact was smudged by some tentative-sounding entrances. Still, the piece advertised enough invention to recommend a repeat hearing.

    More persuasive was the orchestra’s presentation of two works that, while not premieres, carried a sense of novelty. The 1990 essay Bahia, Bahia came from T. J. Anderson, a veteran educator who also produced an important orchestration of Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha. The episodic nature of this particular narrative occasionally seemed thin on development, though the orchestra navigated the twists confidently.

    And its way of handling Clarice Assad’s 2009 Dreamscapes, alongside the violin soloist Elena Urioste, proved riveting. In a program note, the composer said she was inspired by research into REM states, but the work didn’t sound weighed down by any clinical investigation.

    Most satisfying of all was the easygoing way that the concert moved between these styles. Since no one piece had to stand alone as the “jazz-inspired” work, the anxiety that can often be felt around this sort of programming was lessened. Simple enough, seemingly. But somehow still too difficult for most orchestras to attempt.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:54 PM on April 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Ethan Iverson, ,   

    From DO THE M@TH: “The World of Cecil Taylor” 

    Ethan Iverson
    DO THE M@TH

    Ethan Iverson, Pianist and Composer

    April 5, 2018

    RIP.

    The trio with Jimmy Lyons and Andrew Cyrille is widely held to be one of the great groups of all time. Video has surfaced of an extraordinary gig in 1973. At the seven minute mark the music finally begins in earnest and the camera angle on the piano is appropriate. Peak Cecil thunder. Nobody else played like this.


    Cecil Taylor – Live in Jazz 1973.

    Jimmy Lyons was so great too, damn. Truly in the top tier of underrated cats. As the video continues, it becomes obvious why Lyons spent so much time simply inside the Taylor vortex. Lyons plays just how he wants to play, so unforced and so beautiful.

    Cyrille is also perfect, of course. Swinging like crazy but not a steady tempo in sight.

    Lyons and Cyrille sound like jazz musicians. Their connection to Charlie Parker and Max Roach is obvious. Cecil didn’t sound like that. He had another kind of poetry, some other kind of sheer strength of will. Cecil never played as a sideman and probably he just couldn’t do it. The direction of the ensemble music had to come from him. Period. (The set with Mary Lou Williams is my least favorite Cecil, he just storms over her throughout.)

    “I am the artist” was Cecil’s credo. That kind of assertiveness was relatively new in jazz when he showed up to wage war on convention. Perhaps this approach had a stronger dosage of European aesthetic in the mix than the previous jazz masters, although it is also important to remember that Pablo Picasso’s cubism was inspired by sculpture from West and Central Africa.

    Certain listeners have compared the tempests of Taylor to noisy European composers. I personally go back and forth: sometimes I can see the direct connection of Cecil to something like the Jean Barraqué Piano Sonata, other times I think C.T. is just painting in broad African strokes. (These are not mutually exclusive conceits, of course.)

    Actually the most “European” Cecil I ever heard was just recently at the Ornette memorial. What is he doing here? Reading an unpublished Debussy salute to the gamelan? It is stunningly gorgeous, and all the more eerie for being preserved only on bootleg video with oblivious other photographers fussing about, a jarring cellphone going off, etc. It sometimes feels like jazz can’t catch get a break…

    The Cecil I listened to the most as a youngster were two of his earliest albums. The World of Cecil Taylor has a version of This Nearly Was Mine that can be placed on the Mount Rushmore of Deconstructed Standards.

    (This may be bassist Buell Neidlinger’s most valuable contribution to the discography as well; Richard Williams has a fascinating commentary on Neidlinger, who also died just recently.)

    Three tracks on Into the Hot, Pots, Bulbs and Mixed, are gems of bluesy horn composition. This is from 1962 but still sounds exceptionally modern. Bulbs in particular is my jam. I usually think comparing Cecil Taylor to Duke Ellington is a superficial cliché, maybe even worse than comparing him to Messiaen, but on the head of Bulbs I accept the Ellington-to-Taylor continuum.

    If there hadn’t been a Cecil Taylor, we would have needed to invent him. Fortunately he was ready and willing. He held it down.

    More on DTM about Cecil soon…

    See the full article here.

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:30 AM on March 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ECM PLAYLISTS: ARTIST'S CHOICE #2 With Ethan Iverson, Ethan Iverson   

    From ECM: “ECM PLAYLISTS: ARTIST’S CHOICE #2 With Ethan Iverson” 

    New from ECM

    ECM might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    1
    Ethan Iverson

    Jazz pianist, composer and critic Ethan Iverson appears on ECM recordings with the Billy Hart quartet. He signs the second edition of ECM’s streaming playlist “Artist’s Choice” with a selection of 50 tracks, presented in a chronological order, accompanied by fine personal stories.

    Please visit the full article below link to see Ethan’s 50 picks for ECM

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:34 AM on March 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Ethan Iverson   

    From Ethan Iverson: ” DO THE M@TH-Practice, Practice, Practice” 

    Ethan Iverson

    Ethan Iverson, Pianist and Composer

    warm-up:

    1

    main event:

    2

    also:

    Nishan Aghababian
    Jeffrey Farrington
    David Iskowitz
    Ethan Iverson
    Pete Malinverni
    Dennis Malone
    Jacob Sacks
    Hiroko Sasaki
    Reiko Uchida
    Stefan Vasnier

    all pay tribute to Sophia Rosoff on Wednesday, March 28 with a program of “One Piano, Four Hands” at Weill Recital Hall. I am paired with my friend Jacob Sacks.

    See the full article here.

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:55 PM on March 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ahmet Ertegün, “Ertegün Hall of Fame”, Ethan Iverson, , , , ,   

    From Ethan Iverson: “Paul Chambers, Eric Dolphy, Freddie Hubbard” 

    Ethan Iverson

    Ethan Iverson, Pianist and Composer

    “Ertegün Hall of Fame”

    Ahmet Ertegün

    “Paul Chambers, Eric Dolphy, Freddie Hubbard”

    For the past few years I’ve been part of the early selection process for those getting into the Ertegun Hall of Fame at JALC. Full list of previous inductees here: https://academy.jazz.org/hall-of-fame/

    Last year McCoy Tyner got in, that was at least partly my doing inasmuch as I cast an early vote…more significantly, in a previous year Lennie Tristano was selected, which I certainly campaigned for. (My argument was simply, “Look, I can be as racist as anybody in jazz, but if you have Bix and Bill Evans in there, you gotta allow in Tristano.”)

    Somehow the team keeps coming back to me for more opinions. “Pick three more you think should belong!” they cry.

    Well, I have 300 for you…

    OK, just three? Best not to think about this too much: how about “Paul Chambers, Eric Dolphy, and Freddie Hubbard?”

    _______________________________________________________

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00Am-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM

     
  • richardmitnick 3:51 PM on March 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Elena Urioste, Ethan Iverson, , , , ,   

    From American Composers Orchestra: Orchestra Underground: Dreamscapes 

    American Composers Orchestra

    Orchestra Underground: Dreamscapes

    Friday, April 6, 2018 7:30 PM Zankel Hall

    Tickets

    Performers
    American Composers Orchestra
    2
    George Manahan, Music Director and Conductor
    Elena Urioste, Violin
    3
    Ethan Iverson, Piano
    5

    Program
    HITOMI OBA September Coming (World Premiere)
    ETHAN IVERSON Concerto to Scale (World Premiere)
    STEVE LEHMAN Ten Threshold Studies (World Premiere)
    TJ ANDERSON Bahia, Bahia (NY Premiere)
    CLARICE ASSAD Dreamscapes (NY Premiere)

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition


    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

    American Composers Orchestra (ACO) is the only orchestra in the world dedicated to the creation, performance, preservation and promotion of music by American composers. Founded in 1977, ACO pursues a singular mission by maintaining an unparalleled range of activities:

    Concerts
    Commissions
    Recordings
    Educational programs
    New music reading sessions

    Creating new opportunities for American Composers

    ACO makes the creation of new opportunities for American composers and new American orchestral music its central purpose. ACO programs increase opportunities for American composers and generate broader awareness of their work. ACO’s new approach generates further interest and programming by other music organizations. It also increases the audience for contemporary American orchestral music by influencing music decision makers.

    We start by identifying today’s brightest emerging composers and championing prominent established artists. To increase international awareness of the variety of American orchestral music, we incubate new ideas, develop talent, and serves as a catalyst and advocate for American composers and their music.

    Now in its 40th season, ACO has performed music by over 800 composers, including more than 350 world premieres and commissioned works. Many ACO-commissioned composers have gone on to win important prizes such as the Pulitzer, Guggenheim Fellowship and Prix de Rome.

    Honors

    A special award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters
    A proclamation from the New York City Council
    The inaugural MetLife Award for excellence in community engagement
    BMI has honored ACO for its outstanding contribution to American music
    The League of American Orchestras has awarded the ASCAP annual prize for adventurous programming 35 times
    ASCAP has singled-out ACO as “the orchestra that has done the most for new American music in the United States”

     
  • richardmitnick 6:25 PM on March 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 24-hour marathon of women composers on Second Inversion, , Ethan Iverson   

    From Ethan Iverson: “Second Inversion’s 24-Hour Marathon of Women Composers” 

    Ethan Iverson

    Ethan Iverson, Pianist and Composer

    1

    In celebration of International Women’s Day on March 8, we’re featuring a 24-hour marathon of women composers on Second Inversion. Tune in all day long to hear works by over 100 women who have helped shape, inspire, and expand the world of classical music.

    Click here to stream the marathon from anywhere in the world.

    Top picks from the Women Composers Marathon
    3

    See the full article here.

    Ethan Iverson isa pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

     
  • richardmitnick 5:33 PM on March 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A Physically Punishing Solo-Piano Masterpiece, , , , , Ethan Iverson, , , Michael Gordon, , , , ,   

    From Cantaloupe Music and the New Yorker: “A Physically Punishing Solo-Piano Masterpiece” 

    Cantaloupe Music is the recording arm of Bang On a Can, the original New Music DIY organization.

    The New Yorker

    3.8.18
    Ethan Iverson [The strongest left hand in Jazz]

    Ethan Iverson, Pianist

    Vicky Chow, Pianist

    The pianist Vicky Chow says that playing “Sonatra” is a “traumatic physical experience.” Composed by Michael Gordon, in 2004, and released on Cantaloupe Music, in two versions, one in normal tuning and one in unsettling just intonation, “Sonatra” is a spectacular addition to the piano repertoire. In 1987, Gordon helped found Bang on a Can, a celebrated New York ensemble that has produced a long list of valuable premières from artists working in the terrain of post-minimalist and experimental sounds. Yet, few of the composers associated with that milieu have been noted for their solo-piano music. Indeed, Gordon says, “When I started writing ‘Sonatra,’ I decided . . . I would probably only ever write one piano piece in my entire life.”

    “Sonatra” is a fifteen-minute perpetual-motion study that may be the culmination of a tradition of pieces that place inhuman demands on concert pianists. It’s been exactly a century since Béla Bartók composed his fearsome Op. 18 Études, the second of which is in chain thirds, just like “Sonatra.” The composer Conlon Nancarrow created maniacal keyboard music in the forties and fifties, although most people didn’t hear his piano rolls until the Nancarrow recordings became available, in the sixties and seventies. György Ligeti was inspired by both Bartók and Nancarrow in a series of famous études that began with “Désordre,” in 1985.

    “Sonatra” is a milestone of composition, but the recording is also a milestone of pianism. With a score this difficult, the performer becomes an essential collaborator. The arpeggios begin in extremis and only get harder. Tossing off one glissando is easy, but, near the end of “Sonatra,” the hundreds of glissandos in a row must nearly rub the pianist raw. One might wonder how much studio magic is present in this recording. I can verify that Chow can play it live. At a terrific recital in October, 2016, at Roulette, in Brooklyn, Chow closed with “Sonatra.” It was my first exposure to the piece and I felt it land like an unfriendly tap on the shoulder from a heavyweight boxer.

    The athletic aspects of “Sonatra” are leavened by a breezy kind of American aesthetic. The title references the famous saloon singer. (When you google “Sonatra,” the search engine asks, “Did you mean Sinatra?”) The ear can follow the charming form on first listen. There’s a cheerfully experimental approach to tuning. (Perhaps we should now listen Bartok’s Op. 18 and the Ligeti études in just intonation.) Chow’s cover photo is like that of a sardonic action hero who doesn’t take herself too seriously.

    The looping streams in “Sonatra” suggest the endless flow of binary information, music for the computer age, but the limited edition offers heavy vinyl at 45 r.p.m. with normal and skewed versions, a copy of the score, and a large cover worthy of framing. Filing the LP on my shelf gave me a rare sense of satisfaction, especially when so much of my contemporary collection is stored in the cloud. At times, it feels like the era of undisputed masterpieces is over, but it turns out that there’s still work that deserves the old-fashioned phrase from the glory days of vinyl: “An essential library item.”

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist and composer based in Brooklyn, NY, USA.


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