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  • richardmitnick 1:47 PM on September 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Soul Station", Eli Degibri Quartet, Hank Mobley, ,   

    From JAZZCORNER: “Tenor Saxophonist Eli Degibri Celebrates Release of New Album ‘Soul Station'” 

    From JAZZCORNER

    Tuesday, October 2 at Jazz Standard, NYC

    Jazz Standard by Hannah Mattix

    Album Evokes Sense of Déjà Vu with
    Innovative Reworking of Tenor Saxophonist
    Hank Mobley’s Iconic Soul Station

    4
    Cover art used from Wikipedia under Fair Use. May be owned by Blue Note but this is not stated.

    On October 5, 2018, 40-year-old tenor saxophonist Eli Degibri releases his eighth album Soul Station (via Degibri Records). If the title evokes a sense of déjà vu, that’s because Degibri conceived the date as a tune-for-tune “remake” of an iconic 1960 album of that name for Blue Note Records led by tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley (1930-1986) with a hall-of-fame rhythm section of master practitioners of swing and blues-oriented expression – pianist Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Art Blakey. Fifty-seven years later, Tel Aviv native and resident Degibri and his rhythm section of Israeli twenty-somethings capture the soulful earthiness of those proceedings, while imbuing the repertoire with their individualism and articulate it in their own manner.

    After moving back to his homeland from New York in 2011, Degibri – who is the artistic director of the Red Sea Jazz Festival – began forming bands culled from Israel’s large pool of young hardcore jazz oriented musicians. He’s worked with the musicians on Soul Station – pianist Tom Oren, bassist Tamir Shmerling, and drummer Eviatar Slivnik for the last three years.

    “All my guys knew all this music, because in Israel Soul Station is taught in school,” Eli Degibri says, explaining why this quartet of Millennials renders the repertoire with the seasoned flair you might associate with masters who came of age during the aftermath of World War II. “The kids in Israel know their tradition. They don’t feel it’s not cool to play 4/4 rhythm changes or to play the blues. I think it’s nice for my audience to hear where all the music came from. At the end of the day, I like to play standards. Making them sound good and fresh is important to me.”

    Eli Degibri Quartet will be performing

    Tuesday, October 2
    Performances at 7:30PM & 9:30PM

    Jazz Standard
    116 E 27th St.
    New York, NY 10016
    JazzStandard.com
    (ph) 212-576-2232

    Eli Degibri – tenor / soprano sax
    Tom Oren – piano
    Tamir Shmerling – bass
    Eviatar Slivnik – drums

    3

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    JazzCorner.com is the largest portal for the official websites of hundreds of jazz musicians and organizations. New features on JazzCorner include the jazz video share where you can upload and share jazz and blues videos, JazzCorner Jukebox, surf the net with Jazz always on, submit your latest jazz news, and check out what’s hot at JazzCorner’s Speakeasy, the busiest bulletin board for jazz. Be the first to know where Jazz artists are performing in our gigs section, and be sure to listen to our podcasts with established and up and coming jazz musicians in our Innerviews section.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:24 AM on June 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Art Blakey, Bill Evans, Dave Brubeck, , Ella & Louis, Gregory Porter, Hank Mobley, , , , Sarah Vaughan with Clifford Brown   

    From J.A.L.C . Jazzblog: “10 Essential Jazz Albums” May, 21st 2015 But Worth Your Time if You Love Jazz 

    From J.A.L.C . Jazzblog

    1

    May, 21st 2015

    1. Time Out

    2

    Artist: Dave Brubeck | Release Year: 1959
    Personnel: Dave Brubeck (piano), Paul Desmond (alto saxophone), Eugene Wright (bass), Joe Morello (drums)
    Start With: Take Five

    Why You Need This Album: Take Five is a singular and thrilling mix of the familiar and the unexpected. What has kept this album in the limelight and in listeners’ hearts for so many years is the unending sense of effortless swing, the magnificently catchy melodies, and the beautifully choreographed dance between four luminaries of music.

    2.Blue Train

    1

    Artist: John Coltrane | Release Year: 1957

    Personnel: John Coltrane (tenor saxophone), Lee Morgan (trumpet), Curtis Fuller (trombone), Kenny Drew (piano), Paul Chambers (bass), Philly Joe Jones (drums)

    Start With: Locomotion

    Why You Need This Album: Blue Train features a younger Coltrane playing beautifully on some highly memorable pieces in outstanding company. From the title track’s somber mood giving way to a bluesy swing, to Moment’s Notice’s peppy start-and-stop melody, to Lazy Bird’s bop workout, Blue Train is a delight from start to finish.

    3.The Sidewinder

    4

    Artist: Lee Morgan | Release Year: 1963

    Personnel: Lee Morgan (trumpet), Joe Henderson (tenor saxophone), Barry Harris (piano), Bob Cranshaw (double bass), Billy Higgins (drums)

    Start With: Totem Pole

    Why You Need This Album: The burgeoning soul jazz scene found one of its standard-bearers in Lee Morgan. Taking a page from the boogaloo playbook, the piece Sidewinder may stand as one of the funkiest hard bop tunes set to record. Just try to stop yourself from dancing to this masterpiece. A crowd-pleaser, the album’s secret weapon lies in its heavy-hitting A-team of a band that keeps you grooving even as they get into some deep musical territory.

    4.The Turnaround

    5

    Artist: Hank Mobley | Release Date: 1965

    Personnel: Hank Mobley (tenor saxophone), Donald Byrd (trumpet), Herbie Hancock (piano), Butch Warren (bass), Philly Joe Jones (drums), Freddie Hubbard (trumpet), Barry Harris (piano), Paul Chambers (bass), Billy Higgins (drums)

    Start With: East of the Village

    Why You Need This Album: Hear the full range of Hank Mobley’s greatness: from his beautifully supple tenor saxophone tone, to his earthy bluesy wails, the range of his expressive capabilities make it onto this beautiful album. Recorded over several years and multiple sessions, this album also gives you a veritable who’s-who of great Jazz figures of the mid-1960s.

    5.Ella & Louis

    6

    Artist: Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong | Release Year: 1956

    Personnel: Louis Armstrong (vocals, trumpet), Ella Fitzgerald (vocals), Ray Brown (bass), Herb Ellis (guitar), Oscar Peterson (piano), Buddy Rich (drums)

    Start With: Isn’t This a Lovely Day

    Why You Need This Album: Take two of the greatest artists that music has ever known, pair them with a rhythm section of masters, and give them beloved standard fare from the songbook they helped to define and you’ve got one of the most magical albums of jazz. Relaxed, effortless, beautiful, swinging, and fun, this album will charm even the most resistant of listeners.

    6. Moanin’

    7

    Artist: Art Blakey | Release Year: 1959

    Personnel: Art Blakey (drums), Lee Morgan (trumpet), Benny Golson (tenor saxophone), Bobby Timmons (piano), Jymie Merritt (bass)

    Start With: Blues March

    Why You Need This Album: Gospel, blues, hard bop, and swing congeal in this masterpiece of an album, and at its core is the relentless propulsion machine that is Blakey’s drumming. Endlessly swinging and churning along with Blakey’s inimitable shuffle, this album is a testament to Art’s oft-quoted line, “Jazz washes away the dust of everyday life.”

    7.Everybody Digs Bill Evans

    8

    Artist: Bill Evans | Release Year: 1959

    Personnel: Bill Evans (piano), Sam Jones (bass), Philly Joe Jones (drums)

    Start With: Night and Day

    Why You Need This Album: After listening to this album, you’ll find yourself agreeing with its title. Gorgeously meditative, though often quite sprightly in its swing, Everybody Digs Bill Evans captures the essence of this remarkable artist and showcases the beautiful pearly sound he could draw out of the keyboard.

    8. Ellington Indigos

    9

    Artist: Duke Ellington | Release Year: 1958

    Personnel: Duke Ellington (piano), Jimmy Woode (bass), Sam Woodyard (drums), Paul Gonsalves (tenor saxophone), Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope (clarinet, alto saxophone), Harry Carney (baritone saxophone), Johnny Hodges, Rick Henderson (alto saxophone), John Sanders (bass trombone), Quentin Jackson, Britt Woodman (trombone), Cat Anderson, Shorty Baker, Willie Cook, Clark Terry (trumpet), Ray Nance (trumpet, violin), Ozzie Bailey (vocal)

    Start With: Mood Indigo

    Why You Need This Album: A subtle, gorgeous big band album that presents the remarkable range and capabilities of the Ellington band, this serves as a beautiful introduction to this ensemble. Keep an ear open for the lush, vocal qualities of Johnny Hodges’ alto saxophone as well as the majestic sound of Harry Carney’s baritone saxophone solo.

    9. Be Good

    9

    Artist: Gregory Porter | Release Year: 2012

    Personnel: Gregory Porter (vocals), Chip Crawford (piano), Emanuel Harrold (drums), Keyon Harrold (trumpet), Aaron James (bass), Kamau Kenyatta (horns), Tivon Pennicott (saxophone), Yosuke Sato (saxophone)

    Start With: Be Good

    Why You Need This Album: Gregory Porter wields a beautiful, supple baritone voice, sports a deep knowledge of the Jazz tradition, shows an abiding love of R&B, and has a sense of adventure that drives him to explore new projects and write new music. On Be Good, he struck a perfect balance that will surprise and delight you at every turn.

    10. Sarah Vaughan with Clifford Brown

    10

    Artist: Sarah Vaughan | Release Year: 1954

    Personnel: Sarah Vaughan (vocals), Clifford Brown (trumpet), Paul Quinichette (tenor saxophone), Herbie Mann (flute), Jimmy Jones (piano), Joe Benjamin (bass), Roy Haynes (drums)

    Start With: April in Paris

    Why You Need This Album: On Sarah’s singing alone, this stands as one of the most remarkable albums of jazz. Add in an all-star ensemble, and in particular the master trumpeter Clifford Brown, and you have a legendary album. Incredible ensemble work, beautiful standards, and an intuitive interplay between vocalist and horns make this a record that grabs you on the first listen and keeps you enthralled through hundreds more.

    See the full article here.


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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Mission Statement

    In the Spirit of Swing.

    The mission of Jazz at Lincoln Center is to entertain, enrich and expand a global community for jazz through performance, education, and advocacy. We believe jazz is a metaphor for Democracy. Because jazz is improvisational, it celebrates personal freedom and encourages individual expression. Because jazz is swinging, it dedicates that freedom to finding and maintaining common ground with others. Because jazz is rooted in the blues, it inspires us to face adversity with persistent optimism.

    History

    From our first downbeat as a summer concert series at Lincoln Center in 1987, to the fully orchestrated achievement of opening the world’s first venue designed specifically for jazz in 2004, we have celebrated this music and these landmarks with an ever-growing audience of jazz fans from around the world.

    Representing the totality of jazz music, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s mission is carried out through four elements—educational, curatorial, archival, and ceremonial—capturing, in unparalleled scope, the full spectrum of the jazz experience.

    In the mid-1980s, Lincoln Center, Inc. was looking to expand its programming efforts to attract new and younger audiences, and to fill its halls during the summer months when resident companies were performing elsewhere. Long-time jazz enthusiasts on the Lincoln Center campus and on the Lincoln Center Board recognized the need for America’s music to be represented, and lobbied to include jazz in the organization’s offerings. After four summers of successful Classical Jazz concerts, Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) became an official department of Lincoln Center in 1991. During its first year, JALC produced concerts throughout New York City, including Brooklyn and Harlem. By the second year, JALC had its own radio series on National Public Radio, and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra (now known as the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra) began touring, and recording and selling CDs. By its fourth year, the program reached international audiences with performances in Hong Kong and, the following year, in France, Austria, Italy, Turkey, Norway, Spain, England, Germany and Finland. In July 1996, JALC was inducted as the first new constituent of Lincoln Center since The School of American Ballet joined in 1987, laying the groundwork for the building of a performance facility designed specifically for the sound, function and feeling of jazz.

    “The whole space is dedicated to the feeling of swing, which is a feeling of extreme coordination,” explained Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Managing and Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis of his vision for the new home of jazz, or the “House of Swing.” “Everything is integrated: the relationship between one space and another, the relationship between the audience and the musicians, is one fluid motion, because that’s how our music is.” Under Marsalis’s direction, JALC sought out world-renowned architect Rafael Viñoly and a team of acoustic engineers to create Frederick P. Rose Hall, the world’s first performance, education and broadcast facility devoted to jazz, in New York City. As the centerpiece of a $131 million capital campaign drive, the 100,000-square-foot facility opened in fall 2004 and features three concert and performance spaces (Rose Theater, The Appel Room and Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola) engineered for the warmth and clarity of the sound of jazz.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:19 PM on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Hank Mobley,   

    From Blue Note: “Hank Mobley” 

    From Blue Note

    1

    Hank Mobley’s swinging tune “Up A Step” from his classic 1963 album “No Room For Squares” on the May edition of The Blue Note Monthly, our monthly mix of The Finest In Jazz: https://bluenote.lnk.to/BlueNoteMonthly

    Hank Mobley – tenor saxophone
    Donald Byrd – trumpet
    Herbie Hancock – piano
    Butch Warren – bass
    Philly Joe Jones – drums

    Blue Note Records is an American jazz record label, owned by Universal Music Group and currently operated in conjunction with Decca Records. Established in 1939 by Alfred Lion and Max Margulis, it derives its name from the characteristic “blue notes” of jazz and the blues. Originally dedicated to recording traditional jazz and small group swing, from 1947 the label began to switch its attention to modern jazz. While the original company did not itself record many of the pioneers of bebop, significant exceptions are Thelonious Monk, Fats Navarro and Bud Powell.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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