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  • richardmitnick 1:02 PM on September 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ICE and The Crossing: National Anthems, ICE- International Contemporary Ensemble, MATA Honors Claire Chase, Missy Mazzoli and Royce Vavrek,   

    From International Contemporary Ensemble: “This week ICE at Miller Theatre and peak-performances” 


    From International Contemporary Ensemble

    1
    Missy Mazzoli’s Proving Up

    Wednesday, September 26, and Friday, September 28 at 8 PM
    Miller Theatre at Columbia University
    2960 Broadway
    New York, NY 10027

    Missy Mazzoli and Royce Vavrek’s newest opera focuses on a family of homesteaders in their pursuit of the American Dream on the Nebraskan prairie. Join us as we bring one of the New York Times’s “Six Classical Works to See this Week” to Miller Theater. Limited seating still available.

    2
    3
    Photos by James Matthew Daniels. March 2018, Opera Omaha.

    4

    ICE and The Crossing: National Anthems

    Saturday, September 29 at 8 PM
    Alexander Kasser Theater at Montclair State University
    1 Normal Ave
    Montclair, NJ 07043

    Where does patriotism end and nationalism begin? Are there universal values that transcend national borders? Our string section joins The Crossing Choir once again, this time at Peak Performances in Montclair, NJ. Join Peak Performances’ executive director Jedediah Wheeler, composer David Lang, conductor Donald Nally, and the musicians to share reflections and responses immediately following the performance.

    Program:
    Ted Hearne: Consent
    Ted Hearne: What it might say
    David Lang: the national anthems
    Caroline Shaw: To the Hands

    ______________________________________________________________
    5
    7

    MATA Honors Claire Chase
    Friday, November 2, 2018 at 6:30 PM
    India House
    1 Hanover Square
    New York, NY 10004

    On November 2 in New York, ICE founder Claire Chase will be celebrated for her contributions to contemporary music at the annual MATA Honors Benefit. She joins a prestigious list of previous MATA honorees, including Philip Glass, the Kronos Quartet, Merce Cunningham, and Alan Gilbert. If you’d like to share in honoring Claire’s work, tickets for the dinner and performance are available here.

    7
    Proving Up: Album Kickstarter

    The album for Proving Up is in its final stages! Check out Missy Mazzoli’s Kickstarter, and consider contributing here.
    All donations are tax-deductible.

    8
    Based in New York City, MATA’s mission is to present, support, and commission the music of early career composers. Founded by Philip Glass, Eleonor Sandresky, and Lisa Bielawa in 1996 to address the lack of presentation opportunities for unaffiliated composers, MATA has grown into the world’s most sought-after performance opportunity for early career composers.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) is an artist collective that is transforming the way music is created and experienced. As performer, curator, and educator, ICE explores how new music intersects with communities across the world. The ensemble’s 35 members are featured as soloists, chamber musicians, commissioners, and collaborators with the foremost musical artists of our time. Works by emerging composers have anchored ICE’s programming since its founding in 2001, and the group’s recordings and digital platforms highlight the many voices that weave music’s present.

    A recipient of the American Music Center’s Trailblazer Award and the Chamber Music America/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, ICE was also named the 2014 Musical America Ensemble of the Year. The group currently serves as artists-in-residence at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Mostly Mozart Festival, and previously led a five-year residency at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. ICE was featured at the Ojai Music Festival from 2015 to 2017, and at recent festivals abroad such as gmem-CNCM-marseille and Vértice at Cultura UNAM, Mexico City. Other performance stages have included the Park Avenue Armory, The Stone, ice floes at Greenland’s Diskotek Sessions, and boats on the Amazon River.

    New initiatives include OpenICE, made possible with lead funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which offers free concerts and related programming wherever ICE performs, and enables a working process with composers to unfold in public settings. DigitICE, a free online library of over 350 streaming videos, catalogues the ensemble’s performances. ICE’s First Page program is a commissioning consortium that fosters close collaborations between performers, composers, and listeners as new music is developed. EntICE, a side-by-side education program, places ICE musicians within youth orchestras as they premiere new commissioned works together; inaugural EntICE partners include Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and The People’s Music School in Chicago. Summer activities include Ensemble Evolution at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, in which young professionals perform with ICE and attend workshops on topics from interpretation to concert production. Yamaha Artist Services New York is the exclusive piano provider for ICE. Read more at iceorg.org.
    Staff

    Claire Chase, Founder*

    William McDaniel, Executive Director
    Rebekah Heller, co-Artistic Director*
    Ross Karre, co-Artistic Director and Director of digitICE.org*
    Jacob Greenberg, Director of Recordings and Digital Outreach*
    Levy Lorenzo, Engineer and Technical Director*
    Ryan Muncy, Director of Institutional Giving and co-Director, OpenICE*
    Joshua Rubin, Artistic Director Emeritus*
    Karla Brom, General Manager
    Maciej Lewandowski, Director of Production
    Bridgid Bergin, Development Associate
    Alice Teyssier, flute*

    • ICE musician

    Artists

    Bridget Kibbey, harp
    Campbell MacDonald, clarinet
    Claire Chase, flute
    Cory Smythe, piano
    Dan Peck, tuba
    Daniel Lippel, guitar
    David Bowlin, violin
    David Byrd-Marrow, horn
    Erik Carlson, violin
    Gareth Flowers, trumpet
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    James Austin Smith, oboe
    Jennifer Curtis, violin
    Josh Modney, violin and viola
    Joshua Rubin, clarinet
    Katinka Kleijn, cello
    Kivie Cahn-Lipman, cello
    Kyle Armbrust, viola
    Levy Lorenzo, percussion
    Maiya Papach, viola
    Michael Nicolas, cello
    Mike Lormand, trombone
    Nathan Davis, percussion
    Nicholas Houfek, lighting designer
    Nicholas Masterson, oboe
    Nuiko Wadden, harp
    Peter Evans, trumpet
    Peter Tantsits, tenor
    Phyllis Chen, piano
    Randall Zigler, bass
    Rebekah Heller, bassoon
    Ross Karre, percussion
    Ryan Muncy, saxophone
    Steven Schick, Artist-in-Residence
    Tony Arnold, soprano
    Wendy Richman, viola

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 12:44 PM on September 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: a World Premiere, Anthony Cheung's "Cycles and Arrows", at 2018 Fringe Festival in Philadelphia!, ICE- International Contemporary Ensemble, In Plain Air, , , Vault Allure in Jersey City with Nokia Bell Labs   

    From International Contemporary Ensemble: “ICE at Resonant Bodies Festival TONIGHT!” and Future Events 


    From International Contemporary Ensemble

    1
    Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 7:30 pm
    Roulette Intermedium
    509 Atlantic Avenue
    Brooklyn, NY, 11217


    Roulette Intermedium


    $25 door / $20 online
    EVENT PAGE

    ICE returns to Resonant Bodies Festival, the premiere presenter for experimentally virtuosic vocalists from all sides of the concert world. Closing night of Resonant Bodies begins with German soprano Sarah Maria Sun collaborating with ICE on works by Georges Aperghis, Rebecca Saunders, Thierry Tidrow, and Màtyàs Seiber; the legendary San Francisco-based Pamela Z will perform a number of her compositions for voice and electronics; and renowned composer/soprano and 2014 Resonant Bodies Festival performer Gelsey Bell returns.

    In Plain Air, a World Premiere, at 2018 Fringe Festival in Philadelphia!

    2
    ICE in rehearsal at Christ Church (photo credit: Plate 3)

    September 22 at 1 pm
    September 22 at 3:30 pm
    September 22 at 6 pm
    September 23 at 3:30 pm
    September 23 at 6 pm

    Christ Church Philadelphia
    20 N American St., Philadelphia, PA 19106

    Tickets free at door. Limited seating available. Guaranteed seating with $2 advanced reservations using the date links above.
    IN PLAIN AIR PROJECT SITE

    Premiere performances of In Plain Air are presented by Christ Church Preservation Trust in partnership with FringeArts as part of the 2018 Fringe Festival.

    A 3,000-pipe organ, centuries-old bells as they are heard in the belfry, an orchestra of pipe whistles, community-built music boxes: the sounds of In Plain Air carry the audience through the campus and history of one the nation’s most historic sites.

    As Christ Church installed its C.B. Fisk pipe organ—the latest in a 300-year history of grand church organs within the space—it invited members of acclaimed artist collective International Contemporary Ensemble to inaugurate the new instrument with a program of original compositions featuring Parker Kitterman, organ. Composers Phyllis Chen (known for her work with hand-wound music boxes and toy pianos) and Nathan Davis (a percussionist fascinated by the mechanics of instruments) immersed themselves in the sound-making possibilities of the church’s organ, bells, and open spaces, as well as the history and public role of the venerable institution.

    The resulting multi-movement program unites the historic bell tolls of “The Nation’s Church,” the majesty of the intricately constructed organ, and the Ensemble’s characteristic focus on place and community into a one-of-a-kind sonic experience—a worthy welcome to an instrument that will continue to ring in the ears of visitors for the next 300 years.

    Chen, Davis, and International Contemporary Ensemble are in residence at Christ Church throughout 2018. Follow the project here.

    In Plain Air was commissioned by the Christ Church Preservation Trust for the International Contemporary Ensemble and Parker Kitterman.

    Major support for In Plain Air has been provided to Christ Church Preservation Trust by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, with additional support from Dolfinger-McMahon Foundation and Arthur Judson Foundation.

    Vault Allure in Jersey City with Nokia Bell Labs

    4
    Saturday, Sept. 15, 6:00 pm – 10:00 pm
    Riverview Park
    Historic Holland Street, Palisade Avenue at Bowers Street, Jersey City Heights
    FREE TO THE PUBLIC
    Food and drinks available for purchase

    Vault Allure’s final installation for 2018, featuring ICE with Nokia Bell Labs, is happening this Saturday! Also appearing are Seth Cluett Experiments in Art & Technology, Idan Morim Quartet, Maya & Downright Iridescent. Presented by the Statuary, Nokia Bell Labs and Riverview Neighborhood Association.

    ICE’s latest album, composer Anthony Cheung’s Cycles and Arrows, is out on New Focus Recordings! Featuring studio and live recordings from ICE, the album also includes some of our favorite chamber groups, and solo turns by Claire Chase and Maiya Papach. Go to New Focus’s purchase page for preview audio and high-quality downloads!

    5

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) is an artist collective that is transforming the way music is created and experienced. As performer, curator, and educator, ICE explores how new music intersects with communities across the world. The ensemble’s 35 members are featured as soloists, chamber musicians, commissioners, and collaborators with the foremost musical artists of our time. Works by emerging composers have anchored ICE’s programming since its founding in 2001, and the group’s recordings and digital platforms highlight the many voices that weave music’s present.

    A recipient of the American Music Center’s Trailblazer Award and the Chamber Music America/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, ICE was also named the 2014 Musical America Ensemble of the Year. The group currently serves as artists-in-residence at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Mostly Mozart Festival, and previously led a five-year residency at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. ICE was featured at the Ojai Music Festival from 2015 to 2017, and at recent festivals abroad such as gmem-CNCM-marseille and Vértice at Cultura UNAM, Mexico City. Other performance stages have included the Park Avenue Armory, The Stone, ice floes at Greenland’s Diskotek Sessions, and boats on the Amazon River.

    New initiatives include OpenICE, made possible with lead funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which offers free concerts and related programming wherever ICE performs, and enables a working process with composers to unfold in public settings. DigitICE, a free online library of over 350 streaming videos, catalogues the ensemble’s performances. ICE’s First Page program is a commissioning consortium that fosters close collaborations between performers, composers, and listeners as new music is developed. EntICE, a side-by-side education program, places ICE musicians within youth orchestras as they premiere new commissioned works together; inaugural EntICE partners include Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and The People’s Music School in Chicago. Summer activities include Ensemble Evolution at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, in which young professionals perform with ICE and attend workshops on topics from interpretation to concert production. Yamaha Artist Services New York is the exclusive piano provider for ICE. Read more at iceorg.org.
    Staff

    Claire Chase, Founder*

    William McDaniel, Executive Director
    Rebekah Heller, co-Artistic Director*
    Ross Karre, co-Artistic Director and Director of digitICE.org*
    Jacob Greenberg, Director of Recordings and Digital Outreach*
    Levy Lorenzo, Engineer and Technical Director*
    Ryan Muncy, Director of Institutional Giving and co-Director, OpenICE*
    Joshua Rubin, Artistic Director Emeritus*
    Karla Brom, General Manager
    Maciej Lewandowski, Director of Production
    Bridgid Bergin, Development Associate
    Alice Teyssier, flute*

    • ICE musician

    Artists

    Bridget Kibbey, harp
    Campbell MacDonald, clarinet
    Claire Chase, flute
    Cory Smythe, piano
    Dan Peck, tuba
    Daniel Lippel, guitar
    David Bowlin, violin
    David Byrd-Marrow, horn
    Erik Carlson, violin
    Gareth Flowers, trumpet
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    James Austin Smith, oboe
    Jennifer Curtis, violin
    Josh Modney, violin and viola
    Joshua Rubin, clarinet
    Katinka Kleijn, cello
    Kivie Cahn-Lipman, cello
    Kyle Armbrust, viola
    Levy Lorenzo, percussion
    Maiya Papach, viola
    Michael Nicolas, cello
    Mike Lormand, trombone
    Nathan Davis, percussion
    Nicholas Houfek, lighting designer
    Nicholas Masterson, oboe
    Nuiko Wadden, harp
    Peter Evans, trumpet
    Peter Tantsits, tenor
    Phyllis Chen, piano
    Randall Zigler, bass
    Rebekah Heller, bassoon
    Ross Karre, percussion
    Ryan Muncy, saxophone
    Steven Schick, Artist-in-Residence
    Tony Arnold, soprano
    Wendy Richman, viola

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:42 AM on July 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "The Force of Things", ICE- International Contemporary Ensemble, ,   

    From Lincoln Center- “MOSTLY MOZART FESTIVAL” and ICE 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    From Lincoln Center

    MOSTLY MOZART FESTIVAL

    1

    and


    International Contemporary Ensemble

    The Force of Things
    An Opera for Objects
    (New York premiere)

    August 6–8, 2018 Gelsey Kirkland Arts Center, Brooklyn

    Experience the Mostly Mozart Festival in Brooklyn.

    The Program
    Ashley Fure and Adam Fure: The Force of Things: An Opera for Objects (2016–17)

    How do we bear witness to a thing our bodies seem built to ignore? In Ashley Fure’s immersive music-theater piece, created with her architect brother Adam Fure and the International Contemporary Ensemble, 24 subwoofer speakers emit sound too low for humans to hear, creating a subsonic sense of ecological anxiety that ripples around the audience. Under a dense canopy of sculpted matter, tones are “made tactile, objects made audible, noise made beautiful” (New York Times). Drama is steered away from the human, time is stretched to a geologic scale, and seven live performers act as wordless harbingers of a consciousness not limited to the living.

    Related event:

    TALK | FREE

    Composers’ Forum

    Thursday, August 2, 6:00–6:45 pm

    Bruno Walter Auditorium, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts

    International Contemporary Ensemble

    Ashley Fure, composer and co-director

    Adam Fure, architectural design

    César Alvarez, co-director

    Lucy Dhegrae and Lisa E. Harris, voice

    Ross Karre, percussion and producer

    Levy Lorenzo, percussion and engineer

    Nick Houfek, lighting

    Lilleth Glimcher, associate director

    Please visit http://www.lincolncenter.org/mostly-mozart-festival/show/the-force-of-things
    To place a ticket order

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) is an artist collective that is transforming the way music is created and experienced. As performer, curator, and educator, ICE explores how new music intersects with communities across the world. The ensemble’s 35 members are featured as soloists, chamber musicians, commissioners, and collaborators with the foremost musical artists of our time. Works by emerging composers have anchored ICE’s programming since its founding in 2001, and the group’s recordings and digital platforms highlight the many voices that weave music’s present.

    A recipient of the American Music Center’s Trailblazer Award and the Chamber Music America/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, ICE was also named the 2014 Musical America Ensemble of the Year. The group currently serves as artists-in-residence at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Mostly Mozart Festival, and previously led a five-year residency at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. ICE was featured at the Ojai Music Festival from 2015 to 2017, and at recent festivals abroad such as gmem-CNCM-marseille and Vértice at Cultura UNAM, Mexico City. Other performance stages have included the Park Avenue Armory, The Stone, ice floes at Greenland’s Diskotek Sessions, and boats on the Amazon River.

    New initiatives include OpenICE, made possible with lead funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which offers free concerts and related programming wherever ICE performs, and enables a working process with composers to unfold in public settings. DigitICE, a free online library of over 350 streaming videos, catalogues the ensemble’s performances. ICE’s First Page program is a commissioning consortium that fosters close collaborations between performers, composers, and listeners as new music is developed. EntICE, a side-by-side education program, places ICE musicians within youth orchestras as they premiere new commissioned works together; inaugural EntICE partners include Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and The People’s Music School in Chicago. Summer activities include Ensemble Evolution at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, in which young professionals perform with ICE and attend workshops on topics from interpretation to concert production. Yamaha Artist Services New York is the exclusive piano provider for ICE. Read more at iceorg.org.
    Staff

    Claire Chase, Founder*

    William McDaniel, Executive Director
    Rebekah Heller, co-Artistic Director*
    Ross Karre, co-Artistic Director and Director of digitICE.org*
    Jacob Greenberg, Director of Recordings and Digital Outreach*
    Levy Lorenzo, Engineer and Technical Director*
    Ryan Muncy, Director of Institutional Giving and co-Director, OpenICE*
    Joshua Rubin, Artistic Director Emeritus*
    Karla Brom, General Manager
    Maciej Lewandowski, Director of Production
    Bridgid Bergin, Development Associate

    • ICE musician

    Artists

    Alice Teyssier, flute
    Bridget Kibbey, harp
    Campbell MacDonald, clarinet
    Claire Chase, flute
    Cory Smythe, piano
    Dan Peck, tuba
    Daniel Lippel, guitar
    David Bowlin, violin
    David Byrd-Marrow, horn
    Erik Carlson, violin
    Gareth Flowers, trumpet
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    James Austin Smith, oboe
    Jennifer Curtis, violin
    Josh Modney, violin and viola
    Joshua Rubin, clarinet
    Katinka Kleijn, cello
    Kivie Cahn-Lipman, cello
    Kyle Armbrust, viola
    Levy Lorenzo, percussion
    Maiya Papach, viola
    Michael Nicolas, cello
    Mike Lormand, trombone
    Nathan Davis, percussion
    Nicholas Houfek, lighting designer
    Nicholas Masterson, oboe
    Nuiko Wadden, harp
    Peter Evans, trumpet
    Peter Tantsits, tenor
    Phyllis Chen, piano
    Randall Zigler, bass
    Rebekah Heller, bassoon
    Ross Karre, percussion
    Ryan Muncy, saxophone
    Steven Schick, Artist-in-Residence
    Tony Arnold, soprano
    Wendy Richman, viola

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Artsis a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:08 PM on June 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Gelsey Bell, ICE- International Contemporary Ensemble, , Pamela Z,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “Closing Night – Resonant Bodies Festival NYC 2018” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1

    Roulette Intermedium

    3

    4

    5
    Pamela Z. Credit: L. Barry Hetherington

    Thursday, September 13, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    Roulette Intermedium
    509 Atlantic Ave
    Brooklyn, NY 11217

    $15—25
    Tickets

    7:30pm – Sarah Maria Sun (Germany), with ICE

    8:15pm – Pamela Z

    9:00pm – intermission

    9:20pm – Gelsey Bell

    Participants: Resonant Bodies Festival, Pamela Z, Gelsey Bell, International Contemporary Ensemble

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:12 PM on May 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Cory Smythe, ICE- International Contemporary Ensemble,   

    From ICE: “ICE presents: The Music of Anna Thorvaldsdottir… 


    International Contemporary Ensemble

    …with pianist Cory Smythe and the International Contemporary Ensemble”

    Anna Thorvaldsdottír courtesy of the subject

    Cory Smythe, pianist, no image credit

    ICE-International Contemporary music Ensemble Photograph-SquareMoose New York

    Sun, May 27, 2018, 4:00 PM

    For Tickets your will have to visit the website below, as there is no link for tickets

    This performance is hosted by the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), one of National Sawdust’s 2017-2018 Artists-in-Residence. The residency program at National Sawdust is dedicated to incubating bold work and bold artists, devoting a pool of $450,000 of both in-kind and financial contributions among selected artists every year.

    National Sawdust

    Icelandic composer Anna Thorvaldsdóttir’s music is immersive. Inspired by landscapes, nature, and flowing, sustained sounds, it transports a listener to the vast expanse of an unfamiliar, seductive place. The International Contemporary Ensemble’s collaboration with Anna has spanned many years, including an appearance at the Ojai Music Festival. Of that performance, Alex Ross of The New Yorker wrote, “Nothing I witnessed at opera houses this past season was as dramatic.” As the Kravis Emerging Composer at the New York Philharmonic, Anna’s orchestral piece Metacosmos was premiered in April 2018, conducted by Esa-Pekka Salonen. The Philharmonic has presented chamber works by Anna at National Sawdust on their CONTACT! new-music series.

    On Sunday, May 27 at 4 PM, National Sawdust features a selection of works played by ICE which center on her unorthodox use of the piano. ICE pianist Cory Smythe, a champion and commissioner of Anna’s solo music, is in the center of National Sawdust’s stage, circled by the audience, with the audience encircled by ICE musicians, immersed in Anna’s sounds. The conductor Steven Schick, a longtime ICE collaborator, leads the ensemble. This performance forms part of ICE’s presence at National Sawdust in the 2017-18 season as Artists-in-Residence.

    The program features three solo works and one ensemble piece, all of which will be recorded for ICE’s second disc of Anna’s music on the award-winning Sono Luminus label. Trajectories, for piano and video, opens the program, followed by [one] and Scape. The three piano works involve strums and resonant scraping inside the instrument which embellish Anna’s potent harmonies. Aequilibria is an ICE specialty last heard in New York at Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival. The piece highlights all eleven instruments as they emerge to shine from the work’s watery depths. Its glacial yet sure sense of growth is a hallmark of every piece on this varied program.

    OpenICE is made possible by the generous support of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Howard Gilman Foundation, Booth Ferris Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, A.N. and Pearl G. Barnett Family Foundation, Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, Paul M. Angell Family Foundation, Aaron Copland Fund for Music, Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation, Francis Goelet Charitable Lead Trusts, Amphion Foundation, Pacific Harmony Foundation, Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation, Alice M. Ditson Fund of Columbia University, Casement Fund, BMI Foundation, as well as public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, the New York State Council for the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency. Portions of this project are supported by Nokia Bell Labs. Yamaha Artist Services New York is the exclusive piano provider for ICE.

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Space waiting

    See the full article here .

    The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) is an artist collective that is transforming the way music is created and experienced. As performer, curator, and educator, ICE explores how new music intersects with communities across the world. The ensemble’s 35 members are featured as soloists, chamber musicians, commissioners, and collaborators with the foremost musical artists of our time. Works by emerging composers have anchored ICE’s programming since its founding in 2001, and the group’s recordings and digital platforms highlight the many voices that weave music’s present.

    A recipient of the American Music Center’s Trailblazer Award and the Chamber Music America/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, ICE was also named the 2014 Musical America Ensemble of the Year. The group currently serves as artists-in-residence at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Mostly Mozart Festival, and previously led a five-year residency at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. ICE was featured at the Ojai Music Festival from 2015 to 2017, and at recent festivals abroad such as gmem-CNCM-marseille and Vértice at Cultura UNAM, Mexico City. Other performance stages have included the Park Avenue Armory, The Stone, ice floes at Greenland’s Diskotek Sessions, and boats on the Amazon River.

    New initiatives include OpenICE, made possible with lead funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which offers free concerts and related programming wherever ICE performs, and enables a working process with composers to unfold in public settings. DigitICE, a free online library of over 350 streaming videos, catalogues the ensemble’s performances. ICE’s First Page program is a commissioning consortium that fosters close collaborations between performers, composers, and listeners as new music is developed. EntICE, a side-by-side education program, places ICE musicians within youth orchestras as they premiere new commissioned works together; inaugural EntICE partners include Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and The People’s Music School in Chicago. Summer activities include Ensemble Evolution at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, in which young professionals perform with ICE and attend workshops on topics from interpretation to concert production. Yamaha Artist Services New York is the exclusive piano provider for ICE. Read more at iceorg.org.
    Staff

    Claire Chase, Founder*

    William McDaniel, Executive Director
    Rebekah Heller, co-Artistic Director*
    Ross Karre, co-Artistic Director and Director of digitICE.org*
    Jacob Greenberg, Director of Recordings and Digital Outreach*
    Levy Lorenzo, Engineer and Technical Director*
    Ryan Muncy, Director of Institutional Giving and co-Director, OpenICE*
    Joshua Rubin, Artistic Director Emeritus*
    Karla Brom, General Manager
    Maciej Lewandowski, Director of Production
    Bridgid Bergin, Development Associate

    *ICE musician

    Artists

    Alice Teyssier, flute
    Bridget Kibbey, harp
    Campbell MacDonald, clarinet
    Claire Chase, flute
    Cory Smythe, piano
    Dan Peck, tuba
    Daniel Lippel, guitar
    David Bowlin, violin
    David Byrd-Marrow, horn
    Erik Carlson, violin
    Gareth Flowers, trumpet
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    James Austin Smith, oboe
    Jennifer Curtis, violin
    Josh Modney, violin and viola
    Joshua Rubin, clarinet
    Katinka Kleijn, cello
    Kivie Cahn-Lipman, cello
    Kyle Armbrust, viola
    Levy Lorenzo, percussion
    Maiya Papach, viola
    Michael Nicolas, cello
    Mike Lormand, trombone
    Nathan Davis, percussion
    Nicholas Houfek, lighting designer
    Nicholas Masterson, oboe
    Nuiko Wadden, harp
    Peter Evans, trumpet
    Peter Tantsits, tenor
    Phyllis Chen, piano
    Randall Zigler, bass
    Rebekah Heller, bassoon
    Ross Karre, percussion
    Ryan Muncy, saxophone
    Steven Schick, Artist-in-Residence
    Tony Arnold, soprano
    Wendy Richman, viola

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:37 PM on April 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ICE- International Contemporary Ensemble, , , The Radical 2   

    From ICE: Upcoming Events 

    International Contemporary Ensemble

    ICE Plays at Christ Church for the Franklin Institute Science Festival in Philadelphia

    1

    Friday, April 27, 3:00 – 5:00pm, special performance at 7:00pm
    Christ Church Preservation Trust
    20 North American Street
    Philadelphia, PA, 19106
    FREE EVENT — MORE INFORMATION

    Join Franklin Institute science educators, C.B. Fisk organ builders, and members of ICE as we explore the science of Christ Church’s newly installed pipe organ!

    Drop-in activities include opportunities to make and visualize musical sounds, as well as a behind-the-scenes look at the mechanical-action pipe organ. The artists of the ICE, in residence for the year-long project In Plain Air, will engage participants in setting up for a performance of composer Alvin Lucier’s Sizzles—together we’ll find locations in the Christ Church sanctuary where percussion instruments, layered with dried beans or grains, will vibrate sympathetically with the organ.

    This youth and family-focused program runs from 3:00 to 5:00pm. Participants are invited to return for a FREE public performance of Sizzles at 7:00pm.

    Major support for In Plain Air is has been provided by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, with additional support from Dolfinger-McMahon Foundation.

    Phyllis Chen, keyboards
    Eric Derr, Ross Karre, and Levy Lorenzo, percussion

    A Collaboration with Artist Jamilah Sabur at Bas Fisher International in Miami

    2

    Friday, May 11, 8:00pm
    Bas Fisher Invitational
    100 Northeast 11th Street
    Miami, FL, 33132
    FREE TICKET RESERVATION LINK

    Claire Chase and Ross Karre of ICE go to the renowned gallery in Miami for an intimate performance FREE alongside groundbreaking works of art!

    Beneath the rivers, there are no borders is a performance by Jamilah Sabur with music by the International Contemporary Ensemble. Divided into sequences, Sabur takes a formalist approach structuring her choreography based on the geographic spaces of the mouths of rivers in between terrestrial and marine environments. The St. Johns River in Florida is crying and calling on the São Francisco River in Brazil. With gestures occurring above the river and below, Sabur considers what it is to morph into sub-sonar soundwaves, used by sub-sonar profilers to detect reflections of waves off sediments and items on and below the seafloor. Collaborators include dancers: Roxana Barba and Grace Bishop; poet: Terri Witek; ICE; and set designer Freddy Jouwayed.

    In addition to this special collaboration, Claire Chase plays Felipe Lara’s Meditation and Calligraphy, and Ross Karre plays Pauline Oliveros’s Applebox Double!

    BFI is an artist run space dedicated to creativity, experimentation, and discourse in contemporary art. It aims to create a bridge between Miami and the International art world by curating a program that alternates between the local and the global. BFI is committed to building the Miami arts community by offering support for artist projects, in particular, WEIRD MIAMI, a platform for exhibitions and public programming that takes a behind the scenes look at the city and its artistic offerings. BFI is a not-for-profit funded primarily by grants, donations, and the sale of print editions.

    ICEcommons Presents Radical 2 | Call for New Works of Electro-Acoustic Theater

    3

    Sunday, May 6, 7:00pm
    Spectrum NYC
    70 Flushing Ave.
    Brooklyn, NY 11205

    Sullivan: Swarm for lightbots and percussion
    Aperghis: Le Corps à Corps for solo speaking percussionist
    Burkhardt: Simulcast for two speaking percussionist
    Lorenzo: Brain Change for 4 hacked joysticks
    Radical2: SD-6 for small percussion and delay pedals
    Applebaum: Aphasia for solo performer

    The Radical 2 percussion duo is teaming up with the International Contemporary Ensemble to announce a call for new works of electro-acoustic theater for two performers, to be performed in the 2018-19 season. To celebrate this open call for submissions on ICEcommons.org, Radical 2 will share a diverse program from a wide range of theater music composers such as Rick Burkhardt, Mark Applebaum, Georges Aperghis, and Radical 2 themselves as performer/composers.

    Radical 2 (Levy Lorenzo // Dennis Sullivan) is a performance duo based in Brooklyn, NY. Grounded in the tradition of contemporary classical percussion, Radical 2 extends this practice by exploring performances that incorporate theatrical vocal and dramatic techniques while deploying new prototype electronics.

    Meet Radical 2:
    Laura Steenberg – Perseus Slays the Gorgon Medusa
    Jesse Marino – Endless Shrimp

    See the full article here .

    The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) is an artist collective that is transforming the way music is created and experienced. As performer, curator, and educator, ICE explores how new music intersects with communities across the world. The ensemble’s 35 members are featured as soloists, chamber musicians, commissioners, and collaborators with the foremost musical artists of our time. Works by emerging composers have anchored ICE’s programming since its founding in 2001, and the group’s recordings and digital platforms highlight the many voices that weave music’s present.

    A recipient of the American Music Center’s Trailblazer Award and the Chamber Music America/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, ICE was also named the 2014 Musical America Ensemble of the Year. The group currently serves as artists-in-residence at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Mostly Mozart Festival, and previously led a five-year residency at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. ICE was featured at the Ojai Music Festival from 2015 to 2017, and at recent festivals abroad such as gmem-CNCM-marseille and Vértice at Cultura UNAM, Mexico City. Other performance stages have included the Park Avenue Armory, The Stone, ice floes at Greenland’s Diskotek Sessions, and boats on the Amazon River.

    New initiatives include OpenICE, made possible with lead funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which offers free concerts and related programming wherever ICE performs, and enables a working process with composers to unfold in public settings. DigitICE, a free online library of over 350 streaming videos, catalogues the ensemble’s performances. ICE’s First Page program is a commissioning consortium that fosters close collaborations between performers, composers, and listeners as new music is developed. EntICE, a side-by-side education program, places ICE musicians within youth orchestras as they premiere new commissioned works together; inaugural EntICE partners include Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and The People’s Music School in Chicago. Summer activities include Ensemble Evolution at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, in which young professionals perform with ICE and attend workshops on topics from interpretation to concert production. Yamaha Artist Services New York is the exclusive piano provider for ICE. Read more at iceorg.org.
    Staff

    Claire Chase, Founder*

    William McDaniel, Executive Director
    Rebekah Heller, co-Artistic Director*
    Ross Karre, co-Artistic Director and Director of digitICE.org*
    Jacob Greenberg, Director of Recordings and Digital Outreach*
    Levy Lorenzo, Engineer and Technical Director*
    Ryan Muncy, Director of Institutional Giving and co-Director, OpenICE*
    Joshua Rubin, Artistic Director Emeritus*
    Karla Brom, General Manager
    Maciej Lewandowski, Director of Production
    Bridgid Bergin, Development Associate

    • ICE musician

    Artists

    Alice Teyssier, flute
    Bridget Kibbey, harp
    Campbell MacDonald, clarinet
    Claire Chase, flute
    Cory Smythe, piano
    Dan Peck, tuba
    Daniel Lippel, guitar
    David Bowlin, violin
    David Byrd-Marrow, horn
    Erik Carlson, violin
    Gareth Flowers, trumpet
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    James Austin Smith, oboe
    Jennifer Curtis, violin
    Josh Modney, violin and viola
    Joshua Rubin, clarinet
    Katinka Kleijn, cello
    Kivie Cahn-Lipman, cello
    Kyle Armbrust, viola
    Levy Lorenzo, percussion
    Maiya Papach, viola
    Michael Nicolas, cello
    Mike Lormand, trombone
    Nathan Davis, percussion
    Nicholas Houfek, lighting designer
    Nicholas Masterson, oboe
    Nuiko Wadden, harp
    Peter Evans, trumpet
    Peter Tantsits, tenor
    Phyllis Chen, piano
    Randall Zigler, bass
    Rebekah Heller, bassoon
    Ross Karre, percussion
    Ryan Muncy, saxophone
    Steven Schick, Artist-in-Residence
    Tony Arnold, soprano
    Wendy Richman, viola

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:43 AM on April 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , ICE- International Contemporary Ensemble   

    From ICE: Coming Events and Some Photos 

    International Contemporary Ensemble

    Works of New York University and Columbia Composers at Abrons This Week!

    1

    WORKS OF NEW YORK UNIVERSITY COMPOSERS
    Thursday, April 12, 7:00pm (note time)
    FREE TICKET RESERVATION LINK

    WORKS OF COLUMBIA COMPOSERS
    Saturday, April 14, 7:00pm (note time)
    FREE TICKET RESERVATION LINK
    Abrons Arts Center, Underground Theater
    466 Grand St.
    New York, NY 10002

    Come join ICE for our final free events at Abrons Arts Center for the spring season! Capping a year of collaborative workshops, ICE presents brand-new works by the star composers at New York University and Columbia University. A large ICE band takes on these ambitious programs!

    Thursday night’s concert features premieres by Sofy Yuditskaya, Viola Yip, Michael Rose, Merche Blasco, Bernardo Barros, Vasiliki Krimitza, and Joel Rust.

    Saturday’s event features more premieres by Stylianos Dimou, Katherine Balch, David Bird, Taylor Brook, Finola Merivale, John Rot, and Onur Yildrim.

    ICE Returns to Contempo at the University of Chicago!

    2

    Sunday, April 22, 2:00pm
    Logan Center at University of Chicago
    915 E. 60th Street
    Chicago, IL 60637
    TICKET LINK

    In a program titled Echoes of the Earth, ICE explores avant-garde musical depictions of ecological landscapes and natural processes.

    Pauline Oliveros: Earth Ears
    Mario Davidovsky: Synchronisms No. 3
    Harrison Birtwistle: Some Petals from my Twickenham Herbarium
    Toru Takemitsu: Rain Spell
    George Crumb: Eleven Echoes of Autumn

    Rachel Beetz, flute
    Campbell MacDonald, clarinet
    Ross Karre, percussion
    Jordan Thomas, harp
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    Jennifer Curtis, violin
    Michael Nicolas, cello

    Not Art Records Joins OpenICE at Abrons This Sunday!

    Not Art Records: Piano Music
    Sunday, April 15, 7:00pm
    Abrons Arts Center, Underground Theater
    466 Grand St.
    New York, NY 10002
    FREE TICKET RESERVATION LINK

    A contradiction in and of itself, Not Art Records and OpenICE present a concert of piano music for non-pianos. Featuring works by Conlon Nancarrow, Steve Reich, and Heather Stebbins, the instruments used will include analog synthesizers, repurposed piano wiring & components, and B. Toys Meowsic keyboards.

    Photos from ICE’s Travels in Omaha and Ann Arbor!

    3
    4

    If you think a friend might enjoy updates from ICE, forward them this email!
    They can sign up for our newsletter here.

    See the full article here .

    The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) is an artist collective that is transforming the way music is created and experienced. As performer, curator, and educator, ICE explores how new music intersects with communities across the world. The ensemble’s 35 members are featured as soloists, chamber musicians, commissioners, and collaborators with the foremost musical artists of our time. Works by emerging composers have anchored ICE’s programming since its founding in 2001, and the group’s recordings and digital platforms highlight the many voices that weave music’s present.

    A recipient of the American Music Center’s Trailblazer Award and the Chamber Music America/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, ICE was also named the 2014 Musical America Ensemble of the Year. The group currently serves as artists-in-residence at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Mostly Mozart Festival, and previously led a five-year residency at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. ICE was featured at the Ojai Music Festival from 2015 to 2017, and at recent festivals abroad such as gmem-CNCM-marseille and Vértice at Cultura UNAM, Mexico City. Other performance stages have included the Park Avenue Armory, The Stone, ice floes at Greenland’s Diskotek Sessions, and boats on the Amazon River.

    New initiatives include OpenICE, made possible with lead funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which offers free concerts and related programming wherever ICE performs, and enables a working process with composers to unfold in public settings. DigitICE, a free online library of over 350 streaming videos, catalogues the ensemble’s performances. ICE’s First Page program is a commissioning consortium that fosters close collaborations between performers, composers, and listeners as new music is developed. EntICE, a side-by-side education program, places ICE musicians within youth orchestras as they premiere new commissioned works together; inaugural EntICE partners include Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and The People’s Music School in Chicago. Summer activities include Ensemble Evolution at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, in which young professionals perform with ICE and attend workshops on topics from interpretation to concert production. Yamaha Artist Services New York is the exclusive piano provider for ICE. Read more at iceorg.org.
    Staff

    Claire Chase, Founder*

    William McDaniel, Executive Director
    Rebekah Heller, co-Artistic Director*
    Ross Karre, co-Artistic Director and Director of digitICE.org*
    Jacob Greenberg, Director of Recordings and Digital Outreach*
    Levy Lorenzo, Engineer and Technical Director*
    Ryan Muncy, Director of Institutional Giving and co-Director, OpenICE*
    Joshua Rubin, Artistic Director Emeritus*
    Karla Brom, General Manager
    Maciej Lewandowski, Director of Production
    Bridgid Bergin, Development Associate

    • ICE musician

    Artists

    Alice Teyssier, flute
    Bridget Kibbey, harp
    Campbell MacDonald, clarinet
    Claire Chase, flute
    Cory Smythe, piano
    Dan Peck, tuba
    Daniel Lippel, guitar
    David Bowlin, violin
    David Byrd-Marrow, horn
    Erik Carlson, violin
    Gareth Flowers, trumpet
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    James Austin Smith, oboe
    Jennifer Curtis, violin
    Josh Modney, violin and viola
    Joshua Rubin, clarinet
    Katinka Kleijn, cello
    Kivie Cahn-Lipman, cello
    Kyle Armbrust, viola
    Levy Lorenzo, percussion
    Maiya Papach, viola
    Michael Nicolas, cello
    Mike Lormand, trombone
    Nathan Davis, percussion
    Nicholas Houfek, lighting designer
    Nicholas Masterson, oboe
    Nuiko Wadden, harp
    Peter Evans, trumpet
    Peter Tantsits, tenor
    Phyllis Chen, piano
    Randall Zigler, bass
    Rebekah Heller, bassoon
    Ross Karre, percussion
    Ryan Muncy, saxophone
    Steven Schick, Artist-in-Residence
    Tony Arnold, soprano
    Wendy Richman, viola

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:09 PM on April 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "...The safest thing you can ever do is take the risks that matter most....", ICE- International Contemporary Ensemble, , Rebekah Heller   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Jumping Off a Musical Cliff” 

    New Music USA


    NEWMUSICBOX

    March 8, 2018 [Just caught up with this.]
    Rebekah Heller

    1
    Rebekah

    Rebekah Heller, bassoonist and the new co-director of the International Contemporary Ensemble, explains what led her to want to have a career as a solo performer on “something that nobody wanted to play” and a life immersed in new music.

    “An excited hush settled over the gallery. Anticipation and delight fueled the tense few seconds before the first note was played. And then… pure magic!

    Although the audience was small, [SMALL? You want to talk about SMALL? The readership of this blog is SMALL!! But I love doing it and hope it will grow.] the commitment, focus, and sense of community was breathtaking; the barriers between performer, composer, and listener disappeared. For the first time in my life, I was surrounded on all sides by musicians and advocates who were fully committed, generous, brave, and outrageously virtuosic. I felt like we were jumping off a musical cliff together and it was thrilling. By the end of the concert I knew: THIS is what I wanted to do with my life.

    This was 2007: my first concert with the International Contemporary Ensemble, in the beautiful Tenri Institute in Manhattan’s West Village. Before this concert, I could not have imagined this incredible moment, or how it would change the direction of my life and career forever.

    The question I’m most often asked is “why the bassoon?” Growing up in a very small town in New York’s culturally and economically depressed Adirondack Park, I was an outspoken youngest child, aware of being outshone by my older brothers. I gravitated towards the things no one else in my family wanted: I taught myself to LOVE black cherry ice cream, simply because it was the flavor everyone else abhorred. More ice cream for me! The bassoon became the black cherry of musical instruments; in my words, “something that nobody wanted to play.” But, at age nine, I decided I did.

    This shocked and charmed my band teacher, who pulled a behemoth plastic instrument out from a very dusty old case. Delighted by the new object, my mother and I headed home with this beast and spent the rest of the day trying to figure out how to put it together. This was the late ’80s: no YouTube instrument demonstrations, no method books, and—with no private teacher—I was left to forge ahead with encouragement from my mom (a very good amateur flutist) and an old, yellowed fingering chart my band teacher found from his college course on double reeds. By the end of the day, I had figured out how to play the world’s loudest and most-abrasive version of Mary Had a Little Lamb, much to the dismay of my smirking brothers.

    I was ambitious and talented, but never solely focused on music. I never imagined a career as a bassoonist was possible, or even desirable. To feed my myriad interests outside music, as well as my bassooning, I chose to study in the Oberlin College and Conservatory’s rigorous double degree program. And under the direction of Tim Weiss and the amazing Oberlin Contemporary Music Ensemble, found an incredible introduction to new music.

    Although I was at Oberlin when the seeds of ICE began to sprout, I wasn’t involved at the beginning. This was not out of disinterest; it was out of fear. Not only was there very little repertoire that included bassoon, it seemed outside of the realm of possibility to me to pursue such a dream. In my mind, an orchestra path loomed larger than life, the inevitable (if joyless) way to make a decent living playing this ridiculous instrument.

    After Oberlin, I went to graduate school at UT Austin, still unsure of what was next for me. From Texas, I moved to Chicago to join the Civic Orchestra, immediately afterwards winning a coveted spot in the New World Symphony in Miami Beach, where I stayed for three years performing, practicing, and auditioning for countless orchestras around the world.

    As glamorous and high-profile as it was, something about my New World Symphony experience never felt quite right. I kept auditioning for jobs I didn’t really want, never understanding (or questioning) why. Finally, in 2007, I got a phone call from the already legendary Claire Chase, founder of ICE. She invited me to play a concert in New York in a month’s time. I was excited and terrified — the music looked SO hard!

    But then I was onstage with ICE at Tenri, diving headfirst into Christopher Trebue Moore’s brand new opus tentacles and knot formations, performing technical feats on my instrument that, if you’d asked me only months before, I would have promised you were impossible. It felt creative, boundless, and exhilarating; it was nothing like playing Tchaikovsky No. 5 (wonderful as it is) yet again. After that magical concert, I felt so happy and so free, but also so heavy. What would I do with this new pursuit, and the knowledge that something so deeply satisfying existed for me outside the safe orchestral path?

    Gripped by this new obsession (MUST PLAY WITH ICE) and the equally strong fear of being broke in New York (MUST SURVIVE), I wrestled with my next move. On the one hand, I had an offer to play principal bassoon in the Jacksonville Symphony, with all the recognition, stability, and financial security that came along with it. On the other, I had an offer from ICE to move to NYC and join the group as their bassoonist. The ICE offer felt like all my hopes and dreams materializing! But it also couldn’t offer more than a few gigs that first year, and with very few friends or contacts in New York City, I was terrified of not being able to make ends meet.

    I took the Jacksonville job, and with it its modest salary which was more money than I had ever made in my life. And every day I carried home the weight of a job that didn’t bring me joy. Although I worked with some wonderful musicians and made some truly great friends, I discovered very quickly that this world (as I had feared) wasn’t for me. I languished within the rigid structure, longing for agency over what I played, who I played with, and what shape my life would take. After two months, I decided that no amount of fear—especially about something as superfluous as money—would ever keep me from my dreams again. I left the orchestra the next spring and moved to NYC, broke but endlessly optimistic.

    To survive, I hustled, which meant taking every odd job I could until I landed a coveted gig waiting tables. (They’re hard to come by if you don’t know someone!) I relied on tip money to offset my gigs with ICE and other NYC groups for more than four years. Even on the worst days, slammed with tables full of well-meaning foreign tourists who thought a 10% tip meant I did a “really good job,” I was never sorry I left the stability of the wrong job for the right life.

    As my musical career grew, my days of waiting tables faded, but the hustle remained. I hustle every day to do what I do, but the great beauty of my chosen path is I don’t ever have to hustle alone again. I hustle with my colleagues at ICE to expand the way new music is created, experienced, and shared. I hustle with my collaborators—composers, fellow performers, and advocates—to ensure underrepresented voices in our field are brought to the fore. I hustle with the incredible community of performers across all disciplines to shatter assumptions about what we can or cannot do or be as artists. I am most grateful to hustle with and for the younger artists in our community; I strive to help them tear down their own barriers to joy and fulfillment, to empower them to remain fearless in the face of uncertainty, and to convey what I’ve learned along the way: that the safest thing you can ever do is take the risks that matter most.”

    See the full article here.

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:38 PM on March 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: American Composers Orchestra at Carnegie Hall, EntICE Comes to the Five Boroughs Music Festival with UpBeat NYC!, ICE- International Contemporary Ensemble, OpenICE at Corbett vs. Dempsey in Chicago!   

    From International Contemporary Ensemble: “EntICE Comes to the Five Boroughs Music Festival with UpBeat NYC!” and More ICE 

    International Contemporary Ensemble

    EntICE Comes to the Five Boroughs Music Festival with UpBeat NYC!

    1

    Saturday, March 31, 8:00pm
    Pregones Theater
    575 Walton Avenue
    Bronx, NY, 10451
    TICKET PURCHASE LINK

    As a special addition to its mainstage season, Five Boroughs Music Festival partners with ICE‘s EntICE initiative and the South Bronx-based youth music organization UpBeat NYC to present a showcase of new works performed by student musicians alongside members of ICE.

    Introduced in 2015, EntICE unites leading composers with youth ensembles in new works to be performed side-by-side with members of the International Contemporary Ensemble. ICE’s musicians take young people – and their schools, families and communities – through the entire collaborative process of bringing premiere pieces to life.

    n preparation for this performance, instrumentalists from the International Contemporary Ensemble have collaborated with young musicians from UpBeat’s free, community programs in the creation of an exciting concert of new works, presented under the auspices of 5BMF and the Pregones Theater’s March is Music series in the South Bronx.

    George Aperghis: Rasch for viola and soprano saxophone
    Clara Iannotta: Limun for violin, viola, and two page turners
    Zach Sheets: from the Silhouette Quarry for violin and bassoon
    Pauline Oliveros: Thirteen Changes
    Nicole Mitchell: Inescapable Spiral
    Plus a new graphic score composed and performed by student musicians from UpBeat NYC

    Alice Tessier, flute and voice
    Rebekah Heller, bassoon
    Ryan Muncy, saxophone
    Josh Modney, violin
    Wendy Richman, viola

    _____________________________________________________________
    OpenICE at Corbett vs. Dempsey in Chicago!

    2

    Monday, April 2, 8:00pm
    Corbett vs. Dempsey
    1120 North Ashland Avenue
    Chicago, IL, 60622

    Come to the next free concert in our Chicago OpenICE series, with Levy Lorenzo (percussion/electronics) and Peter Evans (trumpets)!

    Levy Lorenzo and Peter Evans began their performing duo as part of OpenICE in early 2016. Their music is an otherworldly blur of dense rhythmic frameworks, elaborate notated pieces, open improvisation and weird drones. Lorenzo’s complex of self-built instruments, gongs, dry percussion, laptop and sound processing engage with Evans’s acoustic trumpet in a dialogue of noise, mystery, precision and chaos.

    You can also catch Levy and Peter on their April tour!
    April 3: Trinosophes, Detroit
    April 4: City of Asylum, Pittsburgh
    April 5: Vox Populi, Philadelphia
    April 6: Princeton University
    April 7: Fridman Gallery, New York City (with Yvette Janine Jackson)

    Photo credit: Peter Ganushkin

    _______________________________________________________________

    ICE Joins the Resonant Bodies Festival at Constellation Chicago!

    4

    5

    6

    Saturday, April 7, 7:30pm (stay for the 8:30 and 9:30 sets!)
    Constellation Chicago
    3111 N. Western Ave.
    Chicago, IL 60618
    TICKET PURCHASE LINK

    ICE performs with soprano and longtime ensemble member Tony Arnold at the Resonant Bodies Festival in the festival’s first Chicago appearance! Included on the program are Cliff Colnot’s wonderful arrangement of Olivier Messiaen’s Chants de Terre et de Ciel, where we’ll be joined by the University of Michigan Contemporary Directions Ensemble, plus the world premiere of Amy Williams’s Fünf Worte for soprano and Indian harmonium. At 8:30 and 9:30, the wonderful Sophia Burgos and Amanda DeBoer Bartlett perform their solo sets!

    You can also get an all-festival pass, good for the entire three nights: April 6, 7, and 8!

    ______________________________________________________________
    Join ICE players as they celebrate two beloved composers in our community!

    April 3, 8pm, Roulette Intermedium: Rebekah Heller and TAK Ensemble perform for Mario Diaz de Leon’s new album release, Sanctuary!

    April 4, 7pm – 10pm, Spectrum NYC: Claire Chase, Rebekah Heller, and Bridget Kibbey join others in a portrait concert of Jason Eckardt!

    _________________________________________________________
    From Our Friends at American Composers Orchestra…

    8

    Friday, April 6, 7:30pm at Carnegie Hall
    George Manahan, Music Director and Conductor
    Elena Urioste, Violin
    Ethan Iverson, Piano

    Hitomi Oba: September Coming (world premiere)
    Ethan Iverson: Concerto to Scale (world premiere)
    Steve Lehman: Ten Threshold Studies (world premiere)
    TJ Anderson: Bahia, Bahia (NY premiere)
    Clarice Assad: Dreamscapes (NY premiere)

    photo credit: Richard Bowditch

    See the full article here .

    The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) is an artist collective that is transforming the way music is created and experienced. As performer, curator, and educator, ICE explores how new music intersects with communities across the world. The ensemble’s 35 members are featured as soloists, chamber musicians, commissioners, and collaborators with the foremost musical artists of our time. Works by emerging composers have anchored ICE’s programming since its founding in 2001, and the group’s recordings and digital platforms highlight the many voices that weave music’s present.

    A recipient of the American Music Center’s Trailblazer Award and the Chamber Music America/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, ICE was also named the 2014 Musical America Ensemble of the Year. The group currently serves as artists-in-residence at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Mostly Mozart Festival, and previously led a five-year residency at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. ICE was featured at the Ojai Music Festival from 2015 to 2017, and at recent festivals abroad such as gmem-CNCM-marseille and Vértice at Cultura UNAM, Mexico City. Other performance stages have included the Park Avenue Armory, The Stone, ice floes at Greenland’s Diskotek Sessions, and boats on the Amazon River.

    New initiatives include OpenICE, made possible with lead funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which offers free concerts and related programming wherever ICE performs, and enables a working process with composers to unfold in public settings. DigitICE, a free online library of over 350 streaming videos, catalogues the ensemble’s performances. ICE’s First Page program is a commissioning consortium that fosters close collaborations between performers, composers, and listeners as new music is developed. EntICE, a side-by-side education program, places ICE musicians within youth orchestras as they premiere new commissioned works together; inaugural EntICE partners include Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and The People’s Music School in Chicago. Summer activities include Ensemble Evolution at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, in which young professionals perform with ICE and attend workshops on topics from interpretation to concert production. Yamaha Artist Services New York is the exclusive piano provider for ICE. Read more at iceorg.org.
    Staff

    Claire Chase, Founder*

    William McDaniel, Executive Director
    Rebekah Heller, co-Artistic Director*
    Ross Karre, co-Artistic Director and Director of digitICE.org*
    Jacob Greenberg, Director of Recordings and Digital Outreach*
    Levy Lorenzo, Engineer and Technical Director*
    Ryan Muncy, Director of Institutional Giving and co-Director, OpenICE*
    Joshua Rubin, Artistic Director Emeritus*
    Karla Brom, General Manager
    Maciej Lewandowski, Director of Production
    Bridgid Bergin, Development Associate

    • ICE musician

    Artists

    Alice Teyssier, flute
    Bridget Kibbey, harp
    Campbell MacDonald, clarinet
    Claire Chase, flute
    Cory Smythe, piano
    Dan Peck, tuba
    Daniel Lippel, guitar
    David Bowlin, violin
    David Byrd-Marrow, horn
    Erik Carlson, violin
    Gareth Flowers, trumpet
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    James Austin Smith, oboe
    Jennifer Curtis, violin
    Josh Modney, violin and viola
    Joshua Rubin, clarinet
    Katinka Kleijn, cello
    Kivie Cahn-Lipman, cello
    Kyle Armbrust, viola
    Levy Lorenzo, percussion
    Maiya Papach, viola
    Michael Nicolas, cello
    Mike Lormand, trombone
    Nathan Davis, percussion
    Nicholas Houfek, lighting designer
    Nicholas Masterson, oboe
    Nuiko Wadden, harp
    Peter Evans, trumpet
    Peter Tantsits, tenor
    Phyllis Chen, piano
    Randall Zigler, bass
    Rebekah Heller, bassoon
    Ross Karre, percussion
    Ryan Muncy, saxophone
    Steven Schick, Artist-in-Residence
    Tony Arnold, soprano
    Wendy Richman, viola

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:13 AM on March 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ensemble Evolution, ICE- International Contemporary Ensemble,   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Breaking Boundaries, Building Visions” 

    New Music USA


    NEWMUSICBOX

    1
    Rebekah Heller, Steven Schick and Ensemble Evolution participants performing Pauline Oliveros’ Environmental Dialogues at the Banff Centre, July 2017 (Photo by Anna Heflin).

    March 29, 2018
    Rebekah Heller

    “It was 2002, and, looking for a summer festival that was a little different, I entered the the Banff Centre’s Masterclass program to study with famed bassoonist Stephen Maxym. At 87, this ended up being his last year teaching, as he passed away just a few months later. I was so thrilled by him — his knowledge and his generosity of spirit — I still feel lucky to have known him even for such a short time. I had come to bask in his wealth of knowledge, eager to enrich my own musical life with a renewed sense of focus and purpose. But I didn’t just want to siphon off his ideas and keep them to myself. I wanted to find a community at Banff: a mutually encouraging group of bassoonists and other instrumentalists, a collective of new friends with whom I could share secrets, tips and joys as we deepened our musical practice together in this beautiful place.

    What I found instead was a shockingly dull and simple program of one masterclass a day, where all of us—at least a dozen bassoonists—were repeatedly left waiting for our chance to play, feeling a forced sense of competition for the attention and time of this great teacher. It felt like such a missed opportunity. There I was, surrounded by incredible musicians in one of the most beautiful places I’d ever been, and what I was feeling was not a sense of renewed creative energy, but its opposite. I was bored. All that creativity, all that vibrancy! It felt like such a waste.

    I wanted to make more chamber music. I wanted to be pushed into exploring unfamiliar repertoire. And most importantly, I wanted to feel that I was doing so with friends and co-conspirators, building each other up, building something new — not fighting for time, recognition and airspace.

    Maybe I had picked the wrong summer program. Or maybe the problem ran deeper than that.

    I had experienced the same thing in my conservatory years, and it’s still something I see today, running through the fabric of most academic institutions and orchestral training programs. I’ve had hours of conversations with young people, inside those institutions now, who feel it too. There’s an unhealthy sense of competition among the musicians: a feeling that students are all fighting for a limited number of spots in a shrinking field. But it’s more than that. In their determination to force young musicians down the well-carved orchestral or academic grooves, institutions seem actually to be getting in the way of young artists curious to explore alternative ways of existing as dynamic and creative artists.

    How do we move towards a more open, more loving, more supportive environment — one that fosters networks of support among artists and incentivizes collaborative creation? What if an intensive summer program were actively designed to nourish this sort of community? How might that vision radiate outward into broader institutional culture?

    Enter Ensemble Evolution, the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE)’s attempt to build such a summer festival at Banff Centre for Arts & Creativity.

    3
    No image caption or credit.

    The goal of Ensemble Evolution is to provide a haven from the shortsighted rigor of practicing the same excerpts and etudes ad nauseam, or performing the same rep over and over, by building a safe place for participants to follow their inner creative compasses, however outrageous or genre-busting those impulses might be. Co-artistic directors Claire Chase (ICE founder) and Steven Schick (longtime ICE collaborator) have designed a program that foregrounds support, inclusion, love and “git-er-done-ness” to empower young artists to dig deep, explore, and support one another as they build work together. The program is about to enter its second three-week season, shaped by feedback from participants and faculty who worked together on the program last summer.

    Ensemble Evolution is a place for young artists who aren’t interested in being treated like precious commodities. It’s a community for players who want to become more complete artists by creating work with one another, from the ground up. It’s a place where participants can come as their whole, complicated, dynamically talented selves and take a deep dive into the music that makes them feel most alive and most themselves, in a community of supportive artists engaged in the same brave soul-searching.

    But this creative discovery can’t happen through contemplation alone. At Ensemble Evolution, young artists are put to work. The first week is fully scheduled: this year players will be performing, side-by-side, brand new pieces written for the occasion by George Lewis, Sabrina Schroeder, Peter Evans, Matana Roberts, and Vivian Fung, among others. Composer participants will be writing new works for their peers. Through a rigorous schedule of musical practice in this first week, including daily 7:00 a.m. hikes in the Canadian Rockies, participants will get to know and trust each other as they move towards curating and producing their own events and concerts in weeks 2 and 3. ICE, as faculty, will be on hand to coach and guide, but every aspect of making the concerts happen is left in the hands of the participants.

    Ensemble Evolution is the program I wish I had found at Banff in 2002. It is a dedicated space for artists to seek deep artistic fulfilment in full acknowledgment of the challenges of such a quest — the blurring of genre lines, the carving out of new career paths. It’s an intensive summer festival that strives to help younger artists find, more rapidly and with more confidence than they might otherwise, a place in the world that makes them feel creatively whole. But there’s nothing utopian about Ensemble Evolution. It confronts the pressures faced by practicing artists head-on.

    I’ve had many obstacles in my path, as I outlined in my first NewMusicBox post, and I expect many more to come. All of us in ICE have learned hard lessons along the way. At Ensemble Evolution, we share these lessons with young artists with the aim of making the path to creative fulfilment less fraught than it already inevitably is. We invite participants to get closer to every part of the creation process in the hopes that they’ll come closer to realizing their dreams, however outrageous (or, indeed, traditional) those dreams may be.

    The most amazing part of last summer, for me, was the amount I learned from the incredible participants. One such musician, Composer Camila Agosto, was already in our midst through her sheer ingenuity and bravery. In 2016, while still an undergraduate student, she submitted information about works to ICEcommons, ICE’s free online database of works by emerging composers. ICE members discovered and subsequently performed Agosto’s music, and we were all blown away by her distinctive voice and vision — rare for a composer so young.

    Camila went on to participate in Ensemble Evolution in 2017, and found that her experience has had a deep impact on her musical practice. “The fact that I have been able to cultivate collaborative relationships that were built from the seeds of creative exploration at Banff has allowed me to develop so many projects that are being performed in various venues around the country, exposing our work to the greater music community.”

    For bassoonist Ben Roidl-Ward, participating in Ensemble Evolution was mind expanding, and provided an incredible opening to new experiences and possibilities. Not only did he help run the shows, deeply involved in all aspects of producing insane marathons of music for himself and his peers, he performed an incredible amount of music, self-curated and self-produced. I asked him what his last day consisted of and he said “That day, I played iPhone, strobe tuner, and bassoon. I played pieces by Biber, Villa-Lobos, Pauline Oliveros, Anna Heflin, Jordon Morton – none of it assigned. This was all music I discovered in those three amazing weeks.”

    The future of music isn’t a decision that will be made by institutions, by donors, or even by established artists. It’s a reality that will be built, from the ground up, by the young artists of today. We are rolling up our sleeves and getting ready to help with the heavy lifting. Through creating, learning together, trusting one another, cultivating curiosity and critical thought, and bringing unique voices to the stage (via the mountaintop), the young artists about to enter into the second season of Ensemble Evolution will change the musical landscape for us all.”

    See the full article here.

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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