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  • richardmitnick 12:11 PM on November 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Denis Matsuev- Piano, Inon Barnatan - piano, Michelangelo Quartet, St. Lawrence String Quartet   

    From Carnegie Hall: At A Glance 


    From Carnegie Hall

    1
    St. Lawrence String Quartet, Inon Barnatan, Piano

    Thursday, November 8 at 7:30 PM
    Zankel Hall

    Shostakovich’s Piano Quintet, plus quartets by Haydn and Beethoven

    Tickets

    2
    Michelangelo Quartet

    Friday, November 9 at 7:30 PM
    Weill Recital Hall

    Haydn’s “Lark” Quartet, plus music by Smetana and Bartók

    Tickets

    3
    Denis Matsuev, Piano

    Friday, November 9 at 8 PM
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

    Rachmaninoff’s Variations on a Theme of Corelli, plus works by Beethoven, Chopin, and others

    Tickets

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hallis a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:33 PM on October 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Baroque Music Ensemble, Bienen Contemporary/Early Vocal Ensemble, Bienen School of Music at Northwestern University, , Inon Barnatan - piano, Northwestern University Jazz Orchestra, University Chorale   

    From Bienen School of Music: “November News” 

    From Bienen School of Music

    1
    Inon Barnatan http://www.inonbarnatan.com
    Inon Barnatan opens the 2018-19 Skyline Piano Artist Series on November 16

    “One of the most admired pianists of his generation”—New York Times

    Friday, November 16, 7:30 p.m.
    Galvin Recital Hall, $30/10

    Inon Barnatan is the recipient of a 2009 Avery Fisher Career Grant and Lincoln Center’s Martin E. Segal Award. His recent engagements include his BBC Proms debut, the world premiere of an Alan Fletcher concerto with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and appearances at London’s Wigmore Hall, New York’s 92nd Street Y, and Carnegie Hall.

    J. S. Bach, Toccata in E Minor, BWV 914
    George Frideric Handel, Allemande from Suite in E Major, HWV 430
    Jean-Philippe Rameau, Courante from Suite in A Minor
    François Couperin, L’Atalante
    Maurice Ravel, Rigaudon from Le tombeau de Couperin
    Thomas Adès, Blanca Variations
    György Ligeti, Musica ricercata Nos. 11 and 10
    Samuel Barber, Piano Sonata in E-flat Minor, Op. 26
    Johannes Brahms, Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel, Op. 24

    Though November brings the first glimpse of the holidays, the Bienen School’s concert season is far from slowing down. This month, we kick off the 2018-19 Skyline Piano Artist Series with Israeli virtuoso Inon Barnatan. Director of Choral Organizations Donald Nally reminds us to vote with the University Chorale’s and Bienen Contemporary/Early Vocal Ensemble’s Pre-Election Concerts featuring works that wrestle with intellectual and moral questions past and present. The Northwestern University Jazz Orchestra showcases the locomotive-inspired music of Duke Ellington, and the Baroque Music Ensemble treats us to festive works by Bach, Rameau, and Handel. Benjamin Britten’s haunting chamber opera, The Turn of the Screw, takes us into Thanksgiving, and the second installment of the 50th Anniversary Season of Keyboard Conversations wraps up the month.

    As always, this is just a sample of the events happening throughout the month. For details on these and more performances, visit http://www.concertsatbienen.org. We hope to see you soon!

    2
    Pre-Election Concerts

    University Chorale
    Sunday, November 4, 4 p.m.
    Galvin Recital Hall, $6/4
    Donald Nally and Corey Everly, conductors; Contemporary Music Ensemble; Charles Foster and Karina Kontorovitch, piano

    Johannes Brahms, Nänie
    Benjamin C. S. Boyle, Empire of Crystal
    Michael Gilbertson, Console Us
    Giacomo Carissimi, Historia Jonae
    Michael Laurello, Envelope Writings
    Tickets | More Information

    Bienen Contemporary/Early Vocal Ensemble
    Monday, November 5, 7:30 p.m.
    Galvin Recital Hall, $8/5
    Donald Nally and Matthew Cramer, conductors; Charles Foster, piano; Chris Rueda, clarinet; Joseph Connor, saxophone

    Nicholas Cline, Water Sheds (world premiere)
    Lansing McLoskey, Zealot Canticles
    William Brooks, in memoriam reducere studemus
    Tickets | More Information

    4
    Northwestern University Jazz Orchestra: Happy-Go-Lucky Local—The Music of Duke Ellington and His Orchestra
    Thursday, November 8, 7:30 p.m.
    Galvin Recital Hall, $6/4
    Jarrard Harris, conductor

    Duke Ellington is considered the most prolific composer in the history of jazz, and his orchestra was one of the most documented of all jazz ensembles. Because he traveled by rail throughout his performing career, Ellington developed a great affection for trains and incorporated their onomatopoeia into many of his compositions. Come “Take the ‘A’ Train” with “Jack the Bear” on “The Happy-Go-Lucky Local” as the Jazz Orchestra celebrates Ellington, his orchestra, and their music.
    Tickets | More Information

    5
    Baroque Music Ensemble: Baroque Brilliance
    Sunday, November 11, 7:30 p.m.
    Galvin Recital Hall, $6/4
    Stephen Alltop, conductor; Kyle Jensen, baritone; Michael Pranger, trumpet

    The Baroque Music Ensemble presents a varied offering of dazzling vocal and instrumental selections. Featured works include Rameau’s Overture to Naïs, arias from Bach’s Cantata No. 110 and Christmas Oratorio, and operatic music from Handel’s Amadigi di Gaula, Faramondo, and Jephtha.
    Tickets | More Information

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Northwestern Bienen School of Music Campus

    Northwestern University’s Henry and Leigh Bienen School of Music is one of the oldest degree-granting music schools in the United States.

    Its beginnings date to 1873, when the Northwestern Female College and the Evanston College for Ladies were incorporated into the Northwestern University Woman’s College. This new institution established the Conservatory of Music, and in 1891 Peter Christian Lutkin was named its director. In 1895 it became the School of Music, with Lutkin serving as its first dean.

    During Lutkin’s 33-year tenure the school grew to a position of national prominence. A new music building opened, the “Beehive” practice facility was constructed, and the first honorary doctor of music degree was awarded in 1915 to Frederick Stock, conductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Lutkin was succeeded in 1928 by Carl Beecher, who had earned the school’s first bachelor’s degree. Music education professor John W. Beattie was appointed the school’s third dean in 1936. During his administration the graduate program was expanded and Lutkin Hall constructed in 1941. George Howerton, a 20-year faculty veteran, assumed the deanship in 1951. Under his leadership the school established an opera program, began a series of guest artist master classes, and greatly increased the music library’s holdings. He was succeeded in 1971 by Thomas Miller, whose tenure brought sweeping revisions to the undergraduate curriculum as well as the opening of Pick-Staiger Concert Hall in 1975 and Regenstein Hall of Music in 1977. Bernard J. Dobroski became the school’s sixth dean in 1990. His term featured a new emphasis on faculty and student recruitment, expansion of course offerings for nonmajors, and community engagement programs.

    Toni-Marie Montgomery has served as dean since 2003. Under her leadership the school has established two major international awards, the Jean Gimbel Lane Prize in Piano Performance and the Michael Ludwig Nemmers Prize in Music Composition; increased guest-artist residencies by internationally renowned performers; established the Institute for New Music; provided all doctor of musical arts candidates with full-tuition scholarships; heightened the school’s visibility through annually recurring high-profile initiatives, including a spring concert in downtown Chicago’s Millennium Park; opened a new state-of-the-art music facility; appointed the acclaimed Dover Quartet as the school’s first quartet-in-residence; and secured funding for a tour to Asia in 2018 by the Northwestern University Symphony Orchestra.

    In 2008 the school was renamed the Henry and Leigh Bienen School of Music, honoring retiring Northwestern University President Henry Bienen and his wife. The naming gift, made possible through the generosity of trustees, alumni, and friends of the University, provides an endowment for scholarships and new creative and scholarly initiatives.

    Construction of the school’s new lakefront home began in 2012 and the building opened for academic music classes in spring 2015. Northwestern announced the building would be named the Patrick G. and Shirley W. Ryan Center for the Musical Arts in honor of the Ryans’ longtime support of the arts at Northwestern. A dedication ceremony took place September 24, 2015.

    Today the Bienen School of Music has an enrollment of more than 600 undergraduate and graduate students and a world-renowned faculty of 125. Students pursue degrees in performance and music studies as well as dual bachelor’s degrees. Alumni hold positions as performers, administrators, and educators in leading arts and educational institutions throughout the world.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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