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  • richardmitnick 2:43 PM on June 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , JALC, Joe Henderson's "Page One"   

    From Jazz at Lincoln Center and Blue Note: “Joe Henderson’s appropriately-titled “Page One” marked the beginning of a legendary recording career” 

    From Jazz at Lincoln Center
    and

    From Blue Note

    1

    Joe Henderson’s appropriately-titled Page One marked the beginning of a legendary recording career.

    Page One was first released 55 years ago today.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Blue Note Records is an American jazz record label, owned by Universal Music Group and currently operated in conjunction with Decca Records. Established in 1939 by Alfred Lion and Max Margulis, it derives its name from the characteristic “blue notes” of jazz and the blues. Originally dedicated to recording traditional jazz and small group swing, from 1947 the label began to switch its attention to modern jazz. While the original company did not itself record many of the pioneers of bebop, significant exceptions are Thelonious Monk, Fats Navarro and Bud Powell.

    JALC Mission Statement

    In the Spirit of Swing.

    The mission of Jazz at Lincoln Center is to entertain, enrich and expand a global community for jazz through performance, education, and advocacy. We believe jazz is a metaphor for Democracy. Because jazz is improvisational, it celebrates personal freedom and encourages individual expression. Because jazz is swinging, it dedicates that freedom to finding and maintaining common ground with others. Because jazz is rooted in the blues, it inspires us to face adversity with persistent optimism.

    History

    From our first downbeat as a summer concert series at Lincoln Center in 1987, to the fully orchestrated achievement of opening the world’s first venue designed specifically for jazz in 2004, we have celebrated this music and these landmarks with an ever-growing audience of jazz fans from around the world.

    Representing the totality of jazz music, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s mission is carried out through four elements—educational, curatorial, archival, and ceremonial—capturing, in unparalleled scope, the full spectrum of the jazz experience.

    In the mid-1980s, Lincoln Center, Inc. was looking to expand its programming efforts to attract new and younger audiences, and to fill its halls during the summer months when resident companies were performing elsewhere. Long-time jazz enthusiasts on the Lincoln Center campus and on the Lincoln Center Board recognized the need for America’s music to be represented, and lobbied to include jazz in the organization’s offerings. After four summers of successful Classical Jazz concerts, Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) became an official department of Lincoln Center in 1991. During its first year, JALC produced concerts throughout New York City, including Brooklyn and Harlem. By the second year, JALC had its own radio series on National Public Radio, and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra (now known as the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra) began touring, and recording and selling CDs. By its fourth year, the program reached international audiences with performances in Hong Kong and, the following year, in France, Austria, Italy, Turkey, Norway, Spain, England, Germany and Finland. In July 1996, JALC was inducted as the first new constituent of Lincoln Center since The School of American Ballet joined in 1987, laying the groundwork for the building of a performance facility designed specifically for the sound, function and feeling of jazz.

    “The whole space is dedicated to the feeling of swing, which is a feeling of extreme coordination,” explained Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Managing and Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis of his vision for the new home of jazz, or the “House of Swing.” “Everything is integrated: the relationship between one space and another, the relationship between the audience and the musicians, is one fluid motion, because that’s how our music is.” Under Marsalis’s direction, JALC sought out world-renowned architect Rafael Viñoly and a team of acoustic engineers to create Frederick P. Rose Hall, the world’s first performance, education and broadcast facility devoted to jazz, in New York City. As the centerpiece of a $131 million capital campaign drive, the 100,000-square-foot facility opened in fall 2004 and features three concert and performance spaces (Rose Theater, The Appel Room and Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola) engineered for the warmth and clarity of the sound of jazz.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:06 PM on May 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: JALC, , jazzblog, Ornette Coleman   

    From jazzblog: “The Shape of Jazz To Come: 5 Ornette Coleman Albums You Need To Hear” 

    Jazz at Lincoln Center

    1

    News | Apr, 30th 2018

    Pulitzer Prize Winner and NEA Jazz Master Ornette Coleman left an incredible recorded legacy, many of them genre-changing masterpieces for jazz. Celebrate the Ornette with a list of five great albums spanning from 1959-2006.

    Ornette Coleman- Frans Schellekens/Redferns/Getty.jpg

    The Shape of Jazz to Come

    2

    Release Year: 1959 | Label: Atlantic Records
    Personnel: Ornette Coleman (alto saxophone), Don Cherry (trumpet), Charlie Haden (bass), Billy Higgins (drums)
    Why You Need To Hear It: One of jazz’s watershed moments, The Shape of Jazz to Come did away with chord changes, traditional harmonies; indeed, it did away with many of our preconceptions of this music. It’s also hauntingly beautiful, sometimes exuberant, and one of the most bluesy masterpieces of this music.
    Purchase: Amazon | iTunes

    Free Jazz

    3
    Release Year: 1960 | Label: Atlantic Records
    Personnel: Don Cherry (trumpet), Freddie Hubbard (trumpet), Ornette Coleman (saxophone), Eric Dolphy (bass clarinet), Scott LaFaro (bass), Charlie Haden (bass), Billy Higgins (drums), Ed Blackwell (drums)
    Why You Need To Hear It: A profound artistic statement in the new music, Free Jazz showed a double quartet in a largely spontaneous, improvised session. Both novel and exhilarating while also beautiful and even familiar (collective improvisation dates back to jazz’s origins), Free Jazz was and is a far more accessible outing than many gave it credit for being.
    Purchase: Amazon | iTunes

    Dancing in Your Head

    4
    Release Year: 1976 | Label: Horizon Records
    Personnel: Ornette Coleman (alto saxophone, trumpet, violin), Robert Palmer (clarinet), Master Musicians of Joujouka (reeds, strings, drums), Bern Nix (guitar), Charles Ellerbee (guitar), Jamaaladeen Tacuma (electric bass), Ronald Shannon Jackson (drums)
    Why You Need To Hear It: In 1973, Ornette Coleman went to Morocco and made a field recording with the Master Musicians of Joujouka. These tapes were finally released in 1976 on this record, and were paired with tracks featuring the in-formation Prime Time. An infectiously danceable, amazingly melodic and innovative album, and one of Coleman’s most accessible.
    Purchase: Amazon | iTunes

    Of Human Feelings

    5
    Release Year: 1979 | Label: Antilles Records
    Personnel: Ornette Coleman (alto saxophone) Charles Ellerbee (guitar), Bern Nix (guitar), Jamaaladeen Tacuma (electric bass), Grant Calvin Weston (drums), Denardo Coleman (drums)
    Why You Need To Hear It: Prime Time, Ornette’s fusion-style band, was famed for its doubled-up rhythm section and remarkable sense of dance, all within Coleman’s free vision. Of Human Feelings is one of the band’s finest outings, in particular the track Times Square.
    Purchase: This title is out of print

    Sound Grammar

    6
    Release Year: 2006 | Label: Sound Grammar
    Personnel: Ornette Coleman – (alto saxophone, trumpet, violin), Gregory Cohen (bass), Anthony Falanga (bass), Denardo Coleman (drums)
    Why You Need To Hear It: Pulitzer Prizes for jazz artists are rare; only two artists—Wynton Marsalis and Ornette Coleman – have won one. Coleman’s 2006 masterpiece Sound Grammar earned him the award in 2007, and it’s easy to hear why: a bluesy, sonorous, and even playful album that amply rewards multiple listens.
    Purchase: Amazon

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Mission Statement

    In the Spirit of Swing.

    The mission of Jazz at Lincoln Center is to entertain, enrich and expand a global community for jazz through performance, education, and advocacy. We believe jazz is a metaphor for Democracy. Because jazz is improvisational, it celebrates personal freedom and encourages individual expression. Because jazz is swinging, it dedicates that freedom to finding and maintaining common ground with others. Because jazz is rooted in the blues, it inspires us to face adversity with persistent optimism.

    History

    From our first downbeat as a summer concert series at Lincoln Center in 1987, to the fully orchestrated achievement of opening the world’s first venue designed specifically for jazz in 2004, we have celebrated this music and these landmarks with an ever-growing audience of jazz fans from around the world.

    Representing the totality of jazz music, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s mission is carried out through four elements—educational, curatorial, archival, and ceremonial—capturing, in unparalleled scope, the full spectrum of the jazz experience.

    In the mid-1980s, Lincoln Center, Inc. was looking to expand its programming efforts to attract new and younger audiences, and to fill its halls during the summer months when resident companies were performing elsewhere. Long-time jazz enthusiasts on the Lincoln Center campus and on the Lincoln Center Board recognized the need for America’s music to be represented, and lobbied to include jazz in the organization’s offerings. After four summers of successful Classical Jazz concerts, Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) became an official department of Lincoln Center in 1991. During its first year, JALC produced concerts throughout New York City, including Brooklyn and Harlem. By the second year, JALC had its own radio series on National Public Radio, and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra (now known as the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra) began touring, and recording and selling CDs. By its fourth year, the program reached international audiences with performances in Hong Kong and, the following year, in France, Austria, Italy, Turkey, Norway, Spain, England, Germany and Finland. In July 1996, JALC was inducted as the first new constituent of Lincoln Center since The School of American Ballet joined in 1987, laying the groundwork for the building of a performance facility designed specifically for the sound, function and feeling of jazz.

    “The whole space is dedicated to the feeling of swing, which is a feeling of extreme coordination,” explained Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Managing and Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis of his vision for the new home of jazz, or the “House of Swing.” “Everything is integrated: the relationship between one space and another, the relationship between the audience and the musicians, is one fluid motion, because that’s how our music is.” Under Marsalis’s direction, JALC sought out world-renowned architect Rafael Viñoly and a team of acoustic engineers to create Frederick P. Rose Hall, the world’s first performance, education and broadcast facility devoted to jazz, in New York City. As the centerpiece of a $131 million capital campaign drive, the 100,000-square-foot facility opened in fall 2004 and features three concert and performance spaces (Rose Theater, The Appel Room and Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola) engineered for the warmth and clarity of the sound of jazz.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:17 PM on April 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , JALC,   

    From JALC: “Why Mingus Matters: An Intro to the Music and Legacy of Charles Mingus” 

    Jazz at Lincoln Center

    Apr, 20th 2018

    Charles Mingus

    Dive into the incredible range of Charles Mingus’s music by checking out the Jazz at Lincoln Center-curated Spotify playlist of his music.

    “Music is a language of emotions,” the bassist, composer, and bandleader Charles Mingus once said. Indeed, no one in Jazz expressed a wider range of emotions with more musical power than Mingus did, and aside from Duke Ellington, no one drew on as many musical sources of inspiration.

    A master bassist whose big sound and brilliant technique on records continues to astonish musicians, Mingus was raised in the Watts section of Los Angeles, where he absorbed the sounds of the Holiness Church, while also studying classical music on the cello and the bass. During his early career he played alongside Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Lionel Hampton, Art Tatum, Charlie Parker, and Dizzy Gillespie.

    As he developed as a composer, his music—by turns raucous and romantic, tender and turbulent—incorporated all that he had learned and experienced, while drawing on many styles from around the world. And yet, every piece of music was unmistakably Mingus’ own. “I play or write me,” he liked to say, and he called his output “Mingus Music.”

    His musical methods were his own, too. At the helm of his Jazz Workshops, he often dictated his ideas, rather than write them down, and then encouraged the talented young musicians he was always engaging to improvise collectively, thus blurring the lines between soloists and sections. The result is singular: achieving a raw human intensity and fullness rarely encountered in any music.

    Stricken with ALS, Mingus found himself increasingly unable to play his bass, and instead turned to composing. His final decade marked even greater depths of musical exploration, broader genre lines, and ambitious collaborations and large-scale works that sound unceasingly fresh, even more than four decades later.

    Mingus took orders from no one. His art reflected that independence, as well as his sorrow and frustration at the world’s injustices. “My music is alive,” he said, “and it’s about the living and the dead, about good and evil.”

    -Seton Hawkins, Director Education Resources and Public Programming at JALC

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Mission Statement

    In the Spirit of Swing.

    The mission of Jazz at Lincoln Center is to entertain, enrich and expand a global community for jazz through performance, education, and advocacy. We believe jazz is a metaphor for Democracy. Because jazz is improvisational, it celebrates personal freedom and encourages individual expression. Because jazz is swinging, it dedicates that freedom to finding and maintaining common ground with others. Because jazz is rooted in the blues, it inspires us to face adversity with persistent optimism.

    History

    From our first downbeat as a summer concert series at Lincoln Center in 1987, to the fully orchestrated achievement of opening the world’s first venue designed specifically for jazz in 2004, we have celebrated this music and these landmarks with an ever-growing audience of jazz fans from around the world.

    Representing the totality of jazz music, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s mission is carried out through four elements—educational, curatorial, archival, and ceremonial—capturing, in unparalleled scope, the full spectrum of the jazz experience.

    In the mid-1980s, Lincoln Center, Inc. was looking to expand its programming efforts to attract new and younger audiences, and to fill its halls during the summer months when resident companies were performing elsewhere. Long-time jazz enthusiasts on the Lincoln Center campus and on the Lincoln Center Board recognized the need for America’s music to be represented, and lobbied to include jazz in the organization’s offerings. After four summers of successful Classical Jazz concerts, Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) became an official department of Lincoln Center in 1991. During its first year, JALC produced concerts throughout New York City, including Brooklyn and Harlem. By the second year, JALC had its own radio series on National Public Radio, and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra (now known as the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra) began touring, and recording and selling CDs. By its fourth year, the program reached international audiences with performances in Hong Kong and, the following year, in France, Austria, Italy, Turkey, Norway, Spain, England, Germany and Finland. In July 1996, JALC was inducted as the first new constituent of Lincoln Center since The School of American Ballet joined in 1987, laying the groundwork for the building of a performance facility designed specifically for the sound, function and feeling of jazz.

    “The whole space is dedicated to the feeling of swing, which is a feeling of extreme coordination,” explained Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Managing and Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis of his vision for the new home of jazz, or the “House of Swing.” “Everything is integrated: the relationship between one space and another, the relationship between the audience and the musicians, is one fluid motion, because that’s how our music is.” Under Marsalis’s direction, JALC sought out world-renowned architect Rafael Viñoly and a team of acoustic engineers to create Frederick P. Rose Hall, the world’s first performance, education and broadcast facility devoted to jazz, in New York City. As the centerpiece of a $131 million capital campaign drive, the 100,000-square-foot facility opened in fall 2004 and features three concert and performance spaces (Rose Theater, The Appel Room and Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola) engineered for the warmth and clarity of the sound of jazz.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:05 AM on April 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Atlanta Black Star, Bessie Smith, JALC, , Queen Latifah   

    From JALC and Atlantic Black Star: Bessie Smith 

    Jazz at Lincoln Center

    1
    Bessie Smith. Edward Elcha/Michael Ochs Archives via Getty

    Happy Birthday to the Empress of the Blues – Bessie Smith – who was born on this day in 1894!

    One of the most powerful blues vocalists ever recorded, she had an undeniable impact on early jazz vocalists, especially Billie Holiday.

    2

    From Atlanta Black Star

    April 30, 2015
    Taylor Gordon

    Bessie Smith is undeniably remembered as one of the greatest blues singers of all time, but an upcoming HBO biopic will also highlight her role as a pioneer of the emotionally vulnerable jazz era.

    For many people, the relationship between jazz and blues can be compared to today’s relationship between hip hop and rap—it can be hard to separate one from the other in technical terms although one can always identify the difference when they hear it.

    The clear blues influence that thrives in the world of jazz is largely credited to Bessie as jazz singers of the time looked to her for inspiration.

    According to NPR’s Jazz Night In America host, acclaimed bassist Christian McBride, Bessie was not just an iconic blues singer. She played a major part in the creation of the genre’s modern style and sound.

    The type of style she brought to the world of blues laid the foundation for the jazz singers that came after her and ultimately caused the lines between the genres to become blurred.

    “[Bessie’s sound] is very much the initial sound. Bessie Smith was known as the ‘empress of the blues,’” McBride told NPR host Audie Cornish. “She was born in Chattanooga, Tenn., and Bessie Smith is the one that really brought that sort of—the modern blues sound, and Bessie Smith was pretty much the queen of that area.”

    Her distinctive style includes the type of diction that was unusual for her time along with a unique “growl” that accentuated her sultry tone.

    It’s a sound that was inspired by the style of gospel music at the time, according to McBride.

    “She has that little growl every now and then when she says certain words, and that really kind of comes from what gospel singers were doing,” McBride added. “And someone asked the question, like, ‘what’s the difference between gospel and blues?’ I think it’s a simple word.”

    The type of raw emotion and vulnerability that was associated with the early sounds of gospel are also associated with Bessie’s iconic sound in blues and now the entire genre of jazz.

    3
    Queen Latifah in HBO’s ‘Bessie’. https://www.newsday.com/entertainment/tv/bessie-review-queen-latifah-as-bessie-smith-1.10436616

    “It’s the simple changing of the word ‘God’ to ‘baby’ or ‘sweetheart’ or something like that,” McBride said. “It’s the same sound, the same feel. It’s that same passion. And she was the prototype. Everyone from Billie Holiday to Ella Fitzgerald—although they weren’t known as blues singers, you can hear a lot of that—the phrasing, the diction, all of that from Bessie Smith.”

    Her iconic legacy puts a lot of pressure on HBO to not only do her story justice but to also live up to the type of raw emotion and authenticity that fans of Bessie would expect to see in a film chronicling her framing of modern jazz despite the fact that she technically belonged to a different genre of music.

    It will be a complicated relationship to transcend but the casting of Queen Latifah for the lead role has McBride feeling hopeful about the film’s overall authenticity.

    “I’m very impressed that Latifah took this on because I certainly feel that out of all of today’s modern artists — popular artists that is — is that she would be the most well-equipped,” McBride said. “And I say that from experience, because I had a chance to work with her many times. I played on her second jazz CD called Trav’lin’ Light. People don’t even really have any clue just to how talented she really really is — and for her to take on Bessie Smith, I applaud her.”

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Mission Statement

    In the Spirit of Swing.

    The mission of Jazz at Lincoln Center is to entertain, enrich and expand a global community for jazz through performance, education, and advocacy. We believe jazz is a metaphor for Democracy. Because jazz is improvisational, it celebrates personal freedom and encourages individual expression. Because jazz is swinging, it dedicates that freedom to finding and maintaining common ground with others. Because jazz is rooted in the blues, it inspires us to face adversity with persistent optimism.

    History

    From our first downbeat as a summer concert series at Lincoln Center in 1987, to the fully orchestrated achievement of opening the world’s first venue designed specifically for jazz in 2004, we have celebrated this music and these landmarks with an ever-growing audience of jazz fans from around the world.

    Representing the totality of jazz music, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s mission is carried out through four elements—educational, curatorial, archival, and ceremonial—capturing, in unparalleled scope, the full spectrum of the jazz experience.

    In the mid-1980s, Lincoln Center, Inc. was looking to expand its programming efforts to attract new and younger audiences, and to fill its halls during the summer months when resident companies were performing elsewhere. Long-time jazz enthusiasts on the Lincoln Center campus and on the Lincoln Center Board recognized the need for America’s music to be represented, and lobbied to include jazz in the organization’s offerings. After four summers of successful Classical Jazz concerts, Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) became an official department of Lincoln Center in 1991. During its first year, JALC produced concerts throughout New York City, including Brooklyn and Harlem. By the second year, JALC had its own radio series on National Public Radio, and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra (now known as the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra) began touring, and recording and selling CDs. By its fourth year, the program reached international audiences with performances in Hong Kong and, the following year, in France, Austria, Italy, Turkey, Norway, Spain, England, Germany and Finland. In July 1996, JALC was inducted as the first new constituent of Lincoln Center since The School of American Ballet joined in 1987, laying the groundwork for the building of a performance facility designed specifically for the sound, function and feeling of jazz.

    “The whole space is dedicated to the feeling of swing, which is a feeling of extreme coordination,” explained Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Managing and Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis of his vision for the new home of jazz, or the “House of Swing.” “Everything is integrated: the relationship between one space and another, the relationship between the audience and the musicians, is one fluid motion, because that’s how our music is.” Under Marsalis’s direction, JALC sought out world-renowned architect Rafael Viñoly and a team of acoustic engineers to create Frederick P. Rose Hall, the world’s first performance, education and broadcast facility devoted to jazz, in New York City. As the centerpiece of a $131 million capital campaign drive, the 100,000-square-foot facility opened in fall 2004 and features three concert and performance spaces (Rose Theater, The Appel Room and Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola) engineered for the warmth and clarity of the sound of jazz.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:02 PM on April 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , JALC, , ,   

    From JALC: Upcoming events 

    Jazz at Lincoln Center

    Varis Leichtman Studio

    Monk’s Mood: The Life of Monk

    Week Two: Monk and the Bebop Revolution

    1
    Monk’s formative years as a teenager occurred during the Big Band Swing era, when jazz was the popular music of the nation. Bebop was both an extension of and break from that tradition, pioneered by young artists such as Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Max Roach, Bud Powell, and Thelonious Monk.
    2
    Thelonious Monk
    Mon Apr 9 6:30PM
    Buy Class
    Can’t commit to a full course? Single classes are now available at Swing University for $35 each (fees may apply).
    Monk’s formative years as a teenager occurred during the Big Band Swing era, when jazz was the popular music of the nation. Bebop was both an extension of and break from that tradition, pioneered by young artists such as Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Max Roach, Bud Powell, and Thelonious Monk—though Monk stands as a unique and singular exemplar. Monk’s role as house pianist of Minton’s Playhouse—an incubator for bop—and his status as a guide and teacher will be discussed. We’ll also give a listen to his earliest compositions, and discuss why and how they became a part of the standard repertoire of jazz music.
    See the full course series here: https://academy.jazz.org/swing-university-spring-2018

    Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola
    Manhattan School of Music Jazz Orchestra: A Love Supreme by John Coltrane
    2
    John Coltrane
    3
    Mon, Apr 9 7:30
    Buy tickets
    Manhattan School of Music’s programs of study for Jazz Arts majors are designed to develop skilled performers, composers, arrangers, and jazz educators in preparation for careers in jazz music. Systematic and rigorous conservatory training, combined with a myriad of performance and networking opportunities in New York City, make this program one of the richest of its kind for young jazz musicians.
    These talented young musicians prove that the spirit of swing is alive and well, and that the future of jazz is in extremely capable hands. Tonight they will treat audiences to a big band arrangement of John Coltrane’s beloved A Love Supreme, featuring Grammy Award–winning saxophone titan Joe Lovano as special guest.

    Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola
    Christian McBride’s New Jawn
    4
    Christian McBride
    Buy tickets
    Bassist Christian McBride is a master musician who has appeared on over 300 records. He is easily one of the most accomplished bass players alive, and his resume as a bandleader is also quite impressive. Join us at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola to experience New Jawn, which, translated from Philadelphian, could be described as McBride’s “new joint.” The quartet includes Josh Evans, Nasheet Waits, and Marcus Strickland, musicians that are regularly featured at Jazz at Lincoln Center and all over the city both as bandleaders and as sidemen with some of jazz’s biggest names. Fans of McBride’s small groups will love this ensemble, and its unusual two-horns, no-piano lineup gives it a unique flavor. With just bass and drums holding down the rhythm section, McBride and Waits provide as rich and driving a foundation as any group could hope for. The group’s sold-out run at Dizzy’s Club in 2017 featured drastically different material and highlights across various sets, so first-timers and returning fans alike should not hesitate to see what they’re up to this time.

    Many many more. Visit http://www.jazz.org/

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Mission Statement

    In the Spirit of Swing.

    The mission of Jazz at Lincoln Center is to entertain, enrich and expand a global community for jazz through performance, education, and advocacy. We believe jazz is a metaphor for Democracy. Because jazz is improvisational, it celebrates personal freedom and encourages individual expression. Because jazz is swinging, it dedicates that freedom to finding and maintaining common ground with others. Because jazz is rooted in the blues, it inspires us to face adversity with persistent optimism.

    History

    From our first downbeat as a summer concert series at Lincoln Center in 1987, to the fully orchestrated achievement of opening the world’s first venue designed specifically for jazz in 2004, we have celebrated this music and these landmarks with an ever-growing audience of jazz fans from around the world.

    Representing the totality of jazz music, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s mission is carried out through four elements—educational, curatorial, archival, and ceremonial—capturing, in unparalleled scope, the full spectrum of the jazz experience.

    In the mid-1980s, Lincoln Center, Inc. was looking to expand its programming efforts to attract new and younger audiences, and to fill its halls during the summer months when resident companies were performing elsewhere. Long-time jazz enthusiasts on the Lincoln Center campus and on the Lincoln Center Board recognized the need for America’s music to be represented, and lobbied to include jazz in the organization’s offerings. After four summers of successful Classical Jazz concerts, Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) became an official department of Lincoln Center in 1991. During its first year, JALC produced concerts throughout New York City, including Brooklyn and Harlem. By the second year, JALC had its own radio series on National Public Radio, and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra (now known as the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra) began touring, and recording and selling CDs. By its fourth year, the program reached international audiences with performances in Hong Kong and, the following year, in France, Austria, Italy, Turkey, Norway, Spain, England, Germany and Finland. In July 1996, JALC was inducted as the first new constituent of Lincoln Center since The School of American Ballet joined in 1987, laying the groundwork for the building of a performance facility designed specifically for the sound, function and feeling of jazz.

    “The whole space is dedicated to the feeling of swing, which is a feeling of extreme coordination,” explained Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Managing and Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis of his vision for the new home of jazz, or the “House of Swing.” “Everything is integrated: the relationship between one space and another, the relationship between the audience and the musicians, is one fluid motion, because that’s how our music is.” Under Marsalis’s direction, JALC sought out world-renowned architect Rafael Viñoly and a team of acoustic engineers to create Frederick P. Rose Hall, the world’s first performance, education and broadcast facility devoted to jazz, in New York City. As the centerpiece of a $131 million capital campaign drive, the 100,000-square-foot facility opened in fall 2004 and features three concert and performance spaces (Rose Theater, The Appel Room and Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola) engineered for the warmth and clarity of the sound of jazz.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:20 PM on April 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Celebrate Record Store Day with a United We Swing Exclusive!, JALC,   

    From JALC: “Celebrate Record Store Day with a United We Swing Exclusive!” 

    Jazz at Lincoln Center

    Mar, 30th 2018

    Celebrate Record Store Day with a United We Swing Exclusive!

    1

    Mark your calendar for April 21 and celebrate Record Store Day 2018 with Blue Engine Records!

    Blue Engine Records will be taking part in the annual event by releasing a limited-edition exclusive. The 10″ vinyl picture disc from the Wynton Marsalis Septet features two tracks related to our United We Swing project: one is a never-before-heard version of “Night Life” featuring Willie Nelson, and the other is “I’m Gonna Find Another You” featuring John Mayer.

    Only 1000 copies of the exclusive have been printed, and they’ll be available exclusively in indie record stores. By picking up this colorful rarity, you’ll be supporting both your local record shop and Jazz at Lincoln Center’s education initiatives, which reach tens of thousands of aspiring young musicians each year.

    Below is a partial list of stores that will be stocking Night Life b/w I’m Gonna Find Another You. Find the location nearest you that will be celebrating Record Store Day 2018 and support your local record store!

    1-2-3-4 Go! Records
    AFK Books & Records
    Amoeba Records
    Angelo’s Records
    Attic Record Store
    Birdland Music
    Boo Boo Records
    Bull Moose
    Cactus Music
    Cactus Records
    Canterbury Records
    Cat’s Music
    CD Central
    Comeback Vinyl
    Crooked Beat Records
    Daddy Kool Records
    Darkside Records
    Dearborn Music
    Dimple Records
    Disc and Dat
    Down in the Valley
    Dusty Groove
    Electric Fetus
    Euclid Records
    The Exclusive Company
    Finders Records
    Fingerprints
    Forever Young
    Guestroom Records
    Hill & Dale Records
    Hi Voltage Records
    Homer’s Music & Gifts
    House of Guitars
    Independent Records
    Indy CD and Vinyl
    In the Moment Records
    Jack’s Music Shoppe
    Joe’s West Side Records
    Johnny’s Records
    Josey Records
    Landlocked Records
    Louisiana Music Factory
    Luna Music
    Lunchbox Records
    Mills Record Company
    Mojo Books & Records
    Music Millennium
    Newbury Comics
    Off the Record
    Omega Music
    Park Ave CDs
    Plaid Room Records
    Port of Sound Record Shoppe
    Pure Pop Records
    Rasputin Music
    Reckless Records
    Record Cellar
    Record Exchange
    Rough Trade
    Salzer’s Records
    Schoolkids Records
    Scotti’s Record Shop
    Second Ave Records
    Shake It Records
    Shuga Records
    Silver Platters
    Sonic Boom Records
    Streetlight Records
    Strictly Discs
    T-Bones Records
    The Long Ear
    The Sound Garden
    Twist & Shout
    Spinster Records
    Stinkweeds
    Street Corner Music
    Vinal Edge
    Vintage Vinyl
    Vintage Vinyl Records
    Von’s Records
    Waiting Room Records
    Waterloo Records
    Wax ‘N’ Facts
    Zia Record Exchange

    Record Store Day, Record Store Day 2018, Blue Engine, Blue Engine Records, Wynton Marsalis, Wynton Marsalis Septet, Willie Nelson, John Mayer

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Mission Statement

    In the Spirit of Swing.

    The mission of Jazz at Lincoln Center is to entertain, enrich and expand a global community for jazz through performance, education, and advocacy. We believe jazz is a metaphor for Democracy. Because jazz is improvisational, it celebrates personal freedom and encourages individual expression. Because jazz is swinging, it dedicates that freedom to finding and maintaining common ground with others. Because jazz is rooted in the blues, it inspires us to face adversity with persistent optimism.

    History

    From our first downbeat as a summer concert series at Lincoln Center in 1987, to the fully orchestrated achievement of opening the world’s first venue designed specifically for jazz in 2004, we have celebrated this music and these landmarks with an ever-growing audience of jazz fans from around the world.

    Representing the totality of jazz music, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s mission is carried out through four elements—educational, curatorial, archival, and ceremonial—capturing, in unparalleled scope, the full spectrum of the jazz experience.

    In the mid-1980s, Lincoln Center, Inc. was looking to expand its programming efforts to attract new and younger audiences, and to fill its halls during the summer months when resident companies were performing elsewhere. Long-time jazz enthusiasts on the Lincoln Center campus and on the Lincoln Center Board recognized the need for America’s music to be represented, and lobbied to include jazz in the organization’s offerings. After four summers of successful Classical Jazz concerts, Jazz at Lincoln Center (JALC) became an official department of Lincoln Center in 1991. During its first year, JALC produced concerts throughout New York City, including Brooklyn and Harlem. By the second year, JALC had its own radio series on National Public Radio, and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra (now known as the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra) began touring, and recording and selling CDs. By its fourth year, the program reached international audiences with performances in Hong Kong and, the following year, in France, Austria, Italy, Turkey, Norway, Spain, England, Germany and Finland. In July 1996, JALC was inducted as the first new constituent of Lincoln Center since The School of American Ballet joined in 1987, laying the groundwork for the building of a performance facility designed specifically for the sound, function and feeling of jazz.

    “The whole space is dedicated to the feeling of swing, which is a feeling of extreme coordination,” explained Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Managing and Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis of his vision for the new home of jazz, or the “House of Swing.” “Everything is integrated: the relationship between one space and another, the relationship between the audience and the musicians, is one fluid motion, because that’s how our music is.” Under Marsalis’s direction, JALC sought out world-renowned architect Rafael Viñoly and a team of acoustic engineers to create Frederick P. Rose Hall, the world’s first performance, education and broadcast facility devoted to jazz, in New York City. As the centerpiece of a $131 million capital campaign drive, the 100,000-square-foot facility opened in fall 2004 and features three concert and performance spaces (Rose Theater, The Appel Room and Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola) engineered for the warmth and clarity of the sound of jazz.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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