Tagged: Jazz Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 2:40 PM on December 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Barre Phillips double bass, ECM on VINYL, , Jazz, Marcin Wasilewski piano; Slawomir Kurkiewicz double bass; Michal Miskiewicz drums, Mark Turner tenor saxophone; Ethan Iverson piano, , Shai Maestro piano; Jorge Roeder double bass; Ofri Nehemya drums, Wadada Leo Smith trumpet; Bill Frisell guitar; Andrew Cyrille drums, Wolfgang Muthspiel guitar; Ambrose Akinmusire trumpet; Brad Mehldau piano; Larry Grenadier double bass; Eric Harland drums   

    From ECM: “NOW AVAILABLE ON VINYL” 

    New from From ECM

    From ECM which might just be the finest recording company in the world.

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    Wadada Leo Smith trumpet; Bill Frisell guitar; Andrew Cyrille drums
    Lebroba featuring Andrew Cyrille, Bill Frisell and Wadada Leo Smith brings together three of creative music’s independent thinkers, players of enduring influence. A generous leader, Cyrille gives plenty of room to his cohorts, and all three musicians bring in compositions. In his own pieces Cyrille rarely puts the focus on the drums, preferring to play melodically and interactively, sensitive to pitch and to space – his priority today is an elliptical style in which meter is implied rather than stated.

    Listen/Buy

    3

    Wolfgang Muthspiel guitar; Ambrose Akinmusire trumpet; Brad Mehldau piano; Larry Grenadier double bass; Eric Harland drums

    Muthspiel’s “lyrical and painterly style” has won him many admirers. Where The River Goes carries the story forward from the highly-acclaimed 2016 recording Rising Grace. Featuring a cast of heavyweight talent (Mehldau, Akinmusire, Grenadier, Harland), this is much more than an “all-star” gathering. The group plays as an ensemble with its own distinct identity, evident both in the interpretation of Muthspiel’s pieces and in the collective playing.

    LISTEN / BUY

    4

    Shai Maestro piano; Jorge Roeder double bass; Ofri Nehemya drums

    The first ECM leader date for Shai Maestro features the gifted pianist fronting his superlative trio in a program predominantly of characteristically thoughtful Maestro originals. “Hearing the Shai Maestro Trio is like awakening to a new world”, All About Jazz has suggested. “Expressions of joy, introspective thoughts and heightened intensity all come to the fore.” Maestro’s differentiated touch is special; he can convey a range of fleeting emotions in a single phrase.
    LISTEN / BUY

    5
    Mark Turner tenor saxophone; Ethan Iverson piano
    This album marks the recording debut of Turner and Iverson in duo. Years after their first meeting at NYC jam sessions, and following much individual success (Turner as a leader and in demand sideman, and Iverson in hit trio The Bad Plus) they re-connected as part of the exhilarating and widely-lauded Billy Hart Quartet. On Temporary Kings, they explore aesthetic common ground that embodies the heightened intimacy of modernist chamber music in a program of predominantly original compositions.
    LISTEN / BUY

    6
    Barre Phillips double bass

    Barre Phillips was the first musician to record an album of solo double bass, back in 1968, and he has always been an absolute master of the solo idiom. In March 2017, Barre recorded what he says will be his last solo album, the final chapter of this journey: it is a beautiful and moving musical statement. All the qualities we associate with his playing are here in abundance – questing adventurousness, melodic invention, textural richness, developmental logic, and deep soulfulness.
    LISTEN / BUY

    7

    Marcin Wasilewski piano; Slawomir Kurkiewicz double bass; Michal Miskiewicz drums

    This live recording captures the trio in energetic, extroverted mode, fanning the flames of their previously recorded repertoire and drawing on the decades-long deep understanding the musicians have established over a quarter century of shared musical endeavor. As UK magazine Jazz Journal has noted, “Wasilewski’s music celebrates a vast dynamic range, from the most deftly struck pianistic delicacies to gloriously intense emotional exuberance, all within a marvelously melodic concept.”
    LISTEN / BUY

    8

    Jakob Bro guitar; Thomas Morgan double bass; Joey Baron drums 

    This poetically attuned group follows its ECM studio album of Streams (2016) – which The New York Times lauded as “ravishing”- with an album recorded live over two nights in New York City. Bay of Rainbows rolls on waves of contemplative emotion, with gradually enveloping lyricism the lodestar. Recast intimately and elastically for trio, the pieces are illustrative of Bro and company’s ability to push and pull the music into mesmerizing new shapes, onstage and in the moment.
    LISTEN / BUY

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 11:36 AM on December 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Jazz, Larry Fuller Trio, Merry TubaChristmas, Messiaen: The Complete Vingt regards sur l'enfant-Jésus,   

    From Toledo Museum of Art: “Upcoming Music Performances at TMA” 

    From Toledo Museum of Art

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    FREE It’s Friday! Music
    Larry Fuller Trio
    Dec. 7: 6:30 p.m., GlasSalon
    Toledo native Larry Fuller returns to town with his piano trio for an evening of jazz in the GlasSalon.

    Check out the Larry Fuller Trio performing their song “Mojo”.

    2
    FREE Merry TubaChristmas
    Dec. 9: 1 p.m., Peristyle Theater
    TubaChristmas is a music concert held in cities worldwide that celebrates those who play, teach and compose music for instruments in the tuba family. Merry TubaChristmas is presented by The University of Toledo Department of Music & Toledo Museum of Art.

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    Great Performances:
    Messiaen: The Complete Vingt regards sur l’enfant-Jésus
    Dec. 9: 2 p.m., GlasSalon
    Organized by pianist Isabelle O’Connell (Grand Band), this concert features O’Connell, Blair McMillen, Laura Melton, and Stephanie Titus performing Olivier Messiaen’s complete Vingt regards sur l’enfant-Jésus, a two-hour, 20 movement work that Messiaen completed in 1944.
    Purchase Tickets

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Since its founding in 1901, the Toledo Museum of Art has earned a global reputation for the quality of our collection, our innovative and extensive education programs, and our architecturally significant campus.
    And thanks to the benevolence of its founders, as well as the continued support of its members, TMA remains a privately endowed, non-profit institution and opens its collection to the public, free of charge.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:32 PM on December 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Eric Revis Group Ft. Julius Rodriguez at The Jazz Gallery, Jazz, ,   

    From The Jazz Gallery: “Eric Revis Group Ft. Julius Rodriguez at The Jazz Gallery” 

    The Jazz Gallery @thejazzgallery

    From The Jazz Gallery

    1
    Thursday, December 13, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    The Jazz Gallery
    1160 Broadway, 5th Floor
    New York, NY 10001

    $10—25
    Tickets

    Eric Revis – bass
    Julius Rodriguez – piano
    Andrew D’Angelo – saxophone
    Nasheet Waits – drums

    See the full article here .

    The Jazz Gallery from Time Out

    The Jazz Gallery NYC Photo by Mark Niskanen

    The Jazz Gallery serves as an international cultural center where the youngest generation of emerging professional jazz musicians are nurtured with opportunities to collaborate with their peers, discover and refine their creativity, and perform in front of eager audiences. We take pride in our world-renowned reputation as a key player in the NYC jazz community by sustaining a tradition of artistic excellence in jazz and fostering artistic growth, presenting both major and established figures in jazz alongside a younger generation of artists. Since 2002, The Gallery has also been actively engaged in commissioning new work by emerging composers, many of whom have gone on to be recognized with MacArthur Foundation “genius” grants (4), Doris Duke Performing Artist Awards, Grammy Awards and more. 12 Thelonious Monk Competition winners got their start on our stage.

    Winner of the 2016, 2014 & 2010 CMA/ASCAP Awards for Adventurous Programming, The Jazz Gallery has garnered a reputation as “the most imaginatively booked jazz club in New York” (NY Times). The Jazz Gallery was founded in 1995 by Dale Fitzgerald, vocalist Lezlie Harrison, and renowned jazz trumpeter Roy Hargrove who envisioned a hub and home for the jazz musicians and composers from around the world who come to New York to take part and enhance the city’s vibrant cultural scene.

    Our current offerings are divided into 4 primary programs: 1) 21st Century Jazz, which showcases both emerging and established artists; 2) Residency Commissions, which support the creation of new works by exciting young composers; 3) our new Mentoring Program, which pairs young musicians with seasoned veterans to gain valuable creative and professional experience; and 4) The Woodshed, which provides free rehearsal space to our city’s jazz artists.

    The Jazz Gallery is open 3 nights per week, 50 weeks per year, presenting more than 300 events to an annual audience of 15,000. We plan to expand to more performances to an increased audience this year and beyond.

    For more background information, or to download our press kit, please click here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:23 PM on December 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bird Blown Out of Latitude, Jazz, ,   

    From The Jazz Gallery: “Bird Blown Out of Latitude” 

    The Jazz Gallery @thejazzgallery

    From The Jazz Gallery

    1

    Xavier Del Castillo– tenor sax
    David Leon– alto sax
    Adam O’Farrill– trumpet
    Gaya Feldheim Schorr– voice
    Nolan Tsang– trumpet
    Tal Yahalom– guitar
    Chris Fishman– piano & synth
    Russell Holzman– drums
    Eva Lawitts– electric bass

    Friday, December 14, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    The Jazz Gallery
    1160 Broadway, 5th Floor
    New York, NY 10001

    $10—35
    Tickets

    See the full article here .

    The Jazz Gallery from Time Out

    The Jazz Gallery NYC Photo by Mark Niskanen

    The Jazz Gallery serves as an international cultural center where the youngest generation of emerging professional jazz musicians are nurtured with opportunities to collaborate with their peers, discover and refine their creativity, and perform in front of eager audiences. We take pride in our world-renowned reputation as a key player in the NYC jazz community by sustaining a tradition of artistic excellence in jazz and fostering artistic growth, presenting both major and established figures in jazz alongside a younger generation of artists. Since 2002, The Gallery has also been actively engaged in commissioning new work by emerging composers, many of whom have gone on to be recognized with MacArthur Foundation “genius” grants (4), Doris Duke Performing Artist Awards, Grammy Awards and more. 12 Thelonious Monk Competition winners got their start on our stage.

    Winner of the 2016, 2014 & 2010 CMA/ASCAP Awards for Adventurous Programming, The Jazz Gallery has garnered a reputation as “the most imaginatively booked jazz club in New York” (NY Times). The Jazz Gallery was founded in 1995 by Dale Fitzgerald, vocalist Lezlie Harrison, and renowned jazz trumpeter Roy Hargrove who envisioned a hub and home for the jazz musicians and composers from around the world who come to New York to take part and enhance the city’s vibrant cultural scene.

    Our current offerings are divided into 4 primary programs: 1) 21st Century Jazz, which showcases both emerging and established artists; 2) Residency Commissions, which support the creation of new works by exciting young composers; 3) our new Mentoring Program, which pairs young musicians with seasoned veterans to gain valuable creative and professional experience; and 4) The Woodshed, which provides free rehearsal space to our city’s jazz artists.

    The Jazz Gallery is open 3 nights per week, 50 weeks per year, presenting more than 300 events to an annual audience of 15,000. We plan to expand to more performances to an increased audience this year and beyond.

    For more background information, or to download our press kit, please click here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:47 AM on November 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Jazz,   

    From Department of Music at Princeton: Jazz at Princeton University in Concert 

    Department of Music at Princeton


    From Department of Music at Princeton

    1
    More Info & Tickets

    2

    3

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Princeton’s Department of Music is at the epicenter of a musical culture that is broad and deep, reaching from edge to edge of the campus, from the classroom to the concert hall, and from faculty-led groups to those run exclusively by students.

    There are several levels of involvement that students can have with the Department of Music: Graduate students can earn a Ph.D. in one of the two main areas of our Graduate program – composition or musicology – including opportunities to focus on theory or ethnomusicology. Undergraduate students can major in music, in a program with emphasis on writing music or writing about music. Undergraduates can also earn certificates in the Program in Musical Performance, both as Music Majors and as majors of other departments. Those who do not plan to pursue a degree or certificate in music are of course welcome to take courses with world-renowned composers and music historians, take instrumental or voice lessons in the private studios of top professionals, and audition to perform with our many ensembles: six jazz groups, three choruses, two orchestras, a wind ensemble, an opera theater, a musical comedy troupe, at least a dozen chamber music ensembles, a laptop orchestra, and almost twenty small a cappella singing groups.

    Community members can attend numerous concerts throughout the academic year. In addition to student performances, world-renowned artists appear on the Princeton University Concerts series; leading performers of contemporary music showcase compositions by faculty and graduate composers through the Princeton Sound Kitchen; Sō Percussion, the Edward T. Cone Artists-in-Residence, perform and engage with the community. The student-run radio station WPRB: 103.3 FM broadcasts many styles of music, often featuring Princeton student performances.

    An important feature hard to discern from a list of courses and ensembles is the Music Department’s emphasis on collaboration. This manifests not only within the department (graduate composers composing for the undergraduate orchestra, graduate musicologists making a performance edition for an undergraduate opera production), but in collaboration with other departments as well. Frequent interdisciplinary collaborators with the music department include students and faculty from Architecture, African American Studies, Computer Science, Irish Studies, and the programs in Theater, Dance, Visual Art, Music Theater, and Creative Writing all housed within the Lewis Center for Arts.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:44 AM on November 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Jazz, ,   

    From ECM: Upcoming Concerts 

    New from From ECM

    From ECM which might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    Upcoming concerts

    UPCOMING CONCERTS
    Nov 24 LOUIS SCLAVIS / DOMINIQUE PIFARÉLY / VINCENT COURTOIS Rijkevorsel Belgium
    Nov 24 ELINA DUNI Sion Switzerland
    Nov 24 DÉNES VÁRJON Norwich United Kingdom
    Nov 24 CAROLIN WIDMANN Brighton United Kingdom
    Nov 24 SINIKKA LANGELAND Eidsvoll Verk Norway
    Nov 25 ANJA LECHNER / FRANÇOIS COUTURIER Bayreuth Germany
    Nov 25 LOUIS SCLAVIS / DOMINIQUE PIFARÉLY / VINCENT COURTOIS Utrecht Netherlands
    Nov 25 ANDRÁS SCHIFF Frankfurt Germany
    Nov 25 SINIKKA LANGELAND Kongsvinger Norway
    Nov 25 ELINA DUNI Geneve Switzerland
    Nov 25 CRAIG TABORN Kalisz Poland
    Nov 26 SHAI MAESTRO TRIO Cologne Germany
    Nov 27 BOBO STENSON TRIO Vasteras Sweden
    Nov 28 JOHN POTTER Sevilla Spain
    Nov 28 JAN GARBAREK GROUP Kaiserslautern Germany
    Nov 28 ANDRÁS SCHIFF Munich Germany
    Nov 28 SHAI MAESTRO TRIO Munich Germany
    Nov 28 GIOVANNI GUIDI Prague Czech Republic
    Nov 28 SINIKKA LANGELAND Oslo Norway
    Nov 29 JAN GARBAREK GROUP Basel Switzerland
    Nov 29 THOMAS STRØNEN Arendal Norway
    Nov 29 KIT DOWNES Berlin Germany
    Nov 29 BOBO STENSON TRIO Orebro Sweden
    Nov 29 MARCIN WASILEWSKI TRIO Krakow Poland
    Nov 29 GIOVANNI GUIDI Porto Portugal
    Nov 30 JAN GARBAREK GROUP Zurich Switzerland
    Nov 30 MARCIN WASILEWSKI TRIO Tilburg Netherlands
    Nov 30 BOBO STENSON TRIO Goteborg Sweden
    Nov 30 ANDRÁS SCHIFF Baden-Baden Germany
    Nov 30 SHAI MAESTRO TRIO Fribourg Switzerland
    Nov 30 VIJAY IYER SEXTET
    W/ STEPHAN CRUMP, TYSHAWN SOREY,
    STEVE LEHMAN, MARK SHIM, GRAHAM HAYNES New Orleans, LA United States of America

    For more information please visit our website: http://www.ecmrecords.com


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:52 PM on November 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Jazz, , , Rudy Van Gelder: How He Pioneered the Ethos of Making Records, SOUNDFLY   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: “Rudy Van Gelder: How He Pioneered the Ethos of Making Records” 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    1

    Brad Allen Williams has written an apt tribute to the work of recording engineer Rudy Van Gelder and has even included the video interview that I did with Rudy in the early 2000s. By the way, let me put to rest the rumor that Rudy would sometimes change microphones so photographers would not capture what he really used. That would have been make work and he was more secretive of his equipment and recording techniques than of his mic choices.

    -Michael Cuscuna

    Rudy Van Gelder: The Optometrist Who Pioneered an Ethos in Record-Making

    August 29, 2016
    Brad Allen Williams

    Rudy Van Gelder died 25 August, 2016 at the age of 91, having made some of history’s most enduring sound recordings. If you’ve explored the variegated tapestry of 20th century recordings lumped together under the criminally reductionist banner of “jazz,” you probably know the name. If you’ve dug through crates and slid records out of jackets to look for the distinctive block-letter “RVG” in the dead wax, you understand that a name can be synonymous with an ethos of record-making — one that, when entwined in double helix around a complementary ethos of composing and performing, formed the DNA of some pretty significant recordings.

    With a tiny sapphire stylus, Rudy Van Gelder scribed a sizable chunk of the Rosetta Stone of American music, translating the genius of artists like Miles Davis, Wayne Shorter, John Coltrane, Lee Morgan, Hank Mobley, and scores of others for the masses.

    Rudy Van Gelder’s boyhood interests in amateur radio and trumpet naturally evolved into a passion for high fidelity audio. He began recording friends in his parents’ Hackensack home at age 22, and in 1959 (seven years after beginning a fruitful association with Blue Note Records), he quit his day job in optometry and opened a purpose-built studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. It was here that he recorded seminal works for Prestige, CTI, Verve, and Impulse!, including Coltrane’s landmark A Love Supreme, as well as nearly every classic Blue Note side before 1967.

    Just perusing through the discography of Van Gelder Studios is enough to induce a headache!

    Van Gelder recorded his most important 1950s and 1960s work direct to either mono or 2-track stereo tape (or both simultaneously). This technical and aesthetic high-wire act combines tracking and mixing into a simultaneous procedure in which numerous microphones are balanced by the recordist live to tape as the musicians play. To do this successfully, performers and mics must be positioned optimally in the room and equipment must be in impeccable repair and alignment. But most importantly, the recordist has to have it together from the first beat, because with artists of Blakey’s caliber, the very first run-through could be the final take.

    3
    A sample from Soundfly’s collection of albums touched by the skilled hand of Rudy Van Gelder.

    There is no “undo.” Any decisions (or non-decisions) are permanent. Equipment failure or human error could mar or render unsalvageable an otherwise brilliant performance. High stakes, immense responsibility, and innumerable pitfalls demand clear judgment, foresight, decisive action, and quick but measured reaction. This is how Rudy Van Gelder made records in the 1950s and ‘60s.

    But despite all of this, the recordings are so engaging, with focus so superbly directed to the artists, that it’s easy to forget that they’re Rudy Van Gelder performances as well. Although the record and mix were complete as soon as the last cymbal decayed, Van Gelder was no Lomax-style documentarian. Like so many of the artists he recorded, Rudy’s work had personality, and his performances were distinctive and individualistic for better or (occasionally) worse. Charles Mingus famously preferred not to record with Van Gelder, alleging that “he tries to change people’s tones… the way he sets [a player] up at the mic, he can change the whole sound.” And although he was famously opaque about technical details, most agree that Van Gelder probably incorporated some then-unconventional techniques, such as DI capture of Hammond organs in combination with microphones on the Leslie speaker, in the case of the wild organist Jimmy Smith.


    The title of Thelonious Monk’s Hackensack is a reference to RVG’s original home studio where many of Monk’s tracks (including this one) were recorded.

    These clues suggest that Van Gelder was most likely guided foremost by the goal of achieving good-sounding recordings, as opposed to any preoccupation with literal verisimilitude or procedural dogma.

    Secretive until the end (there’s an apocryphal legend that Mr. Van Gelder sometimes put up different microphones for photo shoots than he actually used on the sessions), we can only make informed guesses about what Van Gelder actually did. We know there are a lot of Schoeps M221b condensers in the photos (always with the windscreen installed!).

    There’s a famous shot of him posed in front of two Ampex 300 1/4” tape machines and a mono Altec 4322c limiter. A pair of U47s are in the frame with a pensive John Coltrane in a photo from the Blue Train session. We hear a fair bit of room and spill on the records, suggesting that the musicians were most likely allowed to perform more-or-less together, with minimal isolation — an impression supported by the fact that there are certainly no headphones in any of the session photos.

    But in the end, these are mostly superficial details of process, and to focus on the technical would be to miss what makes Van Gelder’s work great. So immediate are the recordings that even the occasional defects — the clipping distortion on the bass drum of an enthusiastic Idris Muhammad (née Leo Morris) during the breaks of Reuben Wilson’s original 1969 recording of “Hot Rod,” for instance — seem to become powerful signifiers of the moment and its authenticity. And when the flaws in your work become features, you are unquestionably an artist.

    For a deeper look into Van Gelder’s mind, check out this interview with producer Michael Cuscuna.


    RIP RVG.

    See the full SOUNDFLY article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:43 PM on November 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ART ENSEMBLE OF CHICAGO AND ASSOCIATED ENSEMBLES, , Jazz,   

    From ECM: “The Art Ensemble of Chicago” 

    ECM Art Ensemble of Chicago

    ART ENSEMBLE OF CHICAGO AND ASSOCIATED ENSEMBLES – LIMITED EDITION BOX SET

    Dear friends of ECM,

    this week sees the release of an absolute highlight for this year.

    ART ENSEMBLE OF CHICAGO AND ASSOCIATED ENSEMBLES is a 21-CD limited and numbered edition issued as the standard-bearers of Great Black Music prepare to celebrate their 50th anniversary.

    With their first ECM album, the widely-acclaimed Nice Guys, the Art Ensemble’s revolutionary and polystylistic “ancient to the future” mix of musics – from the deeply spiritual to the fiercely experimental – was illuminated in new detail in Manfred Eicher’s panoramic production, and the stage set for many adventures to follow. These included the albums Full Force, Urban Bushmen, and The Third Decade with the classic AEC quintet line up of Roscoe Mitchell, Joseph Jarman, Lester Bowie, Malachi Favors Maghostut and Famoudou Don Moye.

    All of Bowie’s and Mitchell’s subsequent ECM recordings are also gathered together here. Charismatic trumpeter Lester Bowie is heard with his Brass Fantasy group, with Wadada Leo Smith and with Jack DeJohnette. Multi-reed master and primary AEC conceptualist Roscoe Mitchell appears with his Note Factory band, with the Transatlantic Art Ensemble co-founded with Evan Parker, and with an historic trios project recorded at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art. Along the way, numerous distinguished creative musicians make appearances – the long list includes Muhal Richard Abrams, Henry Threadgill, Craig Taborn, Vijay Iyer, Matthew Shipp, Tyshawn Sorey, Fontella Bass, Charlie Haden, Kenny Wheeler, Corey Wilkes, Gerald Cleaver, Phillip Wilson, George Lewis, William Parker, John Abercrombie, Eddie Gomez, and many others, in ECM recordings made between 1978 and 2015.

    This beautifully-designed box set incorporates a 300-page book reprising all original album covers, liner notes and poetry (by Joseph Jarman), as well as quotes from Art Ensemble members and the press, new texts by Craig Taborn, Vijay Iyer and George Lewis, a preface by Manfred Eicher, and an introduction by Steve Lake. Plus: many photographs (some previously unpublished), archival documents, and more.

    A very special release price for the box is available in our ECM webshop.
    Up to and including November 18th, you can purchase this 21-CD limited and numbered collectors item
    for just 89,- € instead of the regular 99,-€.

    With best regards,
    ECM Records

    For more news and details about all new releases
    visit our website: http://www.ecmrecords.com

     
  • richardmitnick 1:08 PM on November 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , In Memorium, Jazz, Roy Hargrove   

    From DownBeat: “In Memoriam: Roy Hargrove” 

    From DownBeat

    1
    Roy Hargrove – Photo: R. R. Jones, Courtesy Kuumbwa Jazz Center in Santa Cruz, California

    Trumpeter Roy Hargrove died on Nov. 2 in New York City, according to a statement released by his manager, Larry Clothier. The cause was cardiac arrest, related to a longtime fight with kidney disease. He had been hospitalized due to kidney problems. Hargrove was 49.

    A versatile jazz musician who was equally at home in the worlds of bebop, Latin jazz, r&b and hip-hop, Hargrove won two Grammy awards.

    He won a 2002 Grammy in the category Best Jazz Instrumental Album for Directions In Music: Live At Massey Hall, featuring a band he led with pianist Herbie Hancock and saxophonist Michael Brecker.

    He won a 1998 Grammy in the category Best Latin Jazz Performance for Habana, recorded with his band Crisol.

    Hargrove topped the category Rising Star–Trumpet in the DownBeat Critics Poll in 1991, 1992 and 1993.

    On his 2003 album Hard Groove, recorded with his band The RH Factor, Hargrove blended jazz with r&b and hip-hop, recruiting as collaborators Erykah Badu, Common, D’Angelo, Mark Cary, Karl Denson and others.

    Hargrove played on D’Angelo’s iconic 2000 album, Voodoo, and the same year, he contributed to Common’s album Like Water For Chocolate.

    Roy Anthony Hargrove was born Oct. 16, 1969, in Waco, Texas. He attended Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts in Dallas, and later studied at Berklee College of Music in Boston and The New School in New York.

    His long list of collaborators includes Shirley Horn, Sonny Rollins, Roy Haynes, Johnny O’Neal, Bobby Watson, Joshua Redman, Branford Marsalis, Macy Gray, Marcus Miller, Carl Allen, Steve Coleman and Antonio Hart.

    In a cover story for the March 2006 issue of DownBeat, Hargrove talked to journalist Jennifer Odell about playing music that blended genres: “It’s the same thing I used to see when I was going to Berklee. The jazz guys would be like, ‘The funk cats don’t know tradition, don’t know how to play, don’t know any harmony.’ And then the funk cats would be like, ‘You guys are too heady, never play the groove, play too many notes.’ But there’s a middle ground there, and it’s about understanding a style.

    “If you’re gonna play some funk, you gotta know how to bring it in and not play too many notes,” he continued. “You gotta know how to give enough, to lend to the groove that makes people’s feet tap, makes them nod their heads or clap their hands. When you’re playing jazz, you have to have a knowledge of theory and dexterity. It’s a matter of being right in the middle.”

    As news of Hargrove’s death spread, many musicians paid tribute to him.

    Trumpeter Nicholas Payton wrote, “With every note, this brother dripped soul. In every phrase, he never let you forget you were listening to a Black man playing that horn. He inspires me to no end.”

    Bassist Christian McBride wrote, “I have no words over the loss of my dear brother of 31 years. We played on a lot of sessions together, traveled a lot of miles together, laughed a lot together, bickered on occasion—and I wouldn’t change our relationship for anything in the world. Bless you, Roy Hargrove.”

    Trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire wrote, “Roy Hargrove was Truly and always extremely ’BOUT IT. I don’t think I would be alive if I hadn’t met him when I did. I am extremely grateful I got to tell him as a grown man to his face: thank you & I love You.”

    Drummer Questlove wrote, “The Great Roy Hargrove. He is literally the one-man horn section I hear in my head when I think about music.”

    Trumpeter Theo Croker wrote, “My heart is completely broken. The passing of legend #RoyHargrove is a huge loss to the entire music community. No one single musician has ever represented the scope of Black American music with as much integrity as Roy. Simply put, he was the greatest of all time. REST in POWER.”

    Trumpeter Keyon Harold wrote, “The spirit that radiated from the bell of his horn was always a force of youth enthralled with the wisdom of old. … Roy, thank you. You were always the inspiration. You are already missed though you live forever!!!”

    Jazz educator Bart Marantz, who taught Hargrove as a teenager, shared his memories of the musician in a DownBeat story posted Nov. 3.

    Survivors include his Hargrove’s wife, the singer Aida Brandes; his daughter, Kamala Hargrove; his mother, Jacklyn Hargrove; and his brother, Brian Hargrove. DB

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    DownBeat is an American magazine devoted to “jazz, blues and beyond”, the last word indicating its expansion beyond the jazz realm which it covered exclusively in previous years. The publication was established in 1934 in Chicago, Illinois. It is named after the “downbeat” in music, also called “beat one”, or the first beat of a musical measure.

    DownBeat publishes results of annual surveys of both its readers and critics in a variety of categories. The DownBeat Jazz Hall of Fame includes winners from both the readers’ and critics’ poll. The results of the readers’ poll are published in the December issue, those of the critics’ poll in the August issue.

    Popular features of DownBeat magazine include its “Reviews” section where jazz critics, using a ‘1-Star to 5-Star’ maximum rating system, rate the latest musical recordings, vintage recordings, and books; articles on individual musicians and music forms; and its famous “Blindfold Test” column, in a which a musician listens to records by other artists, tries to guess who they are, and rates them using the 5-star maximum rating system.

    In April 1979, DownBeat went to a monthly schedule for the first time since 1939.

    DownBeat was named Jazz Publication of the Year in 2016 and 2017 by the Jazz Journalists Association

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:37 PM on November 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "For/With", , Jazz, , , Wadada Leo Smith   

    From The New York Times: “Review: New Works Designed With a Daring Trumpeter in Mind” 

    New York Times

    From The New York Times

    Nov. 2, 2018
    Seth Colter Walls

    1
    Nate Wooley, the trumpeter and composer who organized For/With at Issue Project Room, playing on Thursday.Credit Michelle V. Agins/The New York Times

    The composer and trumpeter Nate Wooley’s taste in experimental music is wide-ranging. He likes brash fields of finely textured noise, as well as contemplative pieces generously dotted with silence. He has played jazz. He has played classical. And he particularly relishes the zone where no one is sorting music into any categories at all.

    He’s also a devoted citizen of the artistic ecosystem, organizing a database of recorded American music, running a record label, editing an online journal about avant-garde sounds — and conceiving For/With, a mini-festival that had its second annual run at Issue Project Room in Brooklyn on Wednesday and Thursday.

    There’s consistency in Mr. Wooley’s commitments: The inaugural festival last year included works by Christian Wolff, Michael Pisaro, Ashley Fure and Annea Lockwood; this year, there were more pieces by Ms. Fure and Ms. Lockwood, designed with Mr. Wooley in mind. Anyone who attended the New York Philharmonic’s opening this season could have identified elements from Filament, which Jaap van Zweden conducted on that program, in A Library on Lightning at Issue Project Room.

    Mr. Wooley was a guest soloist in the Philharmonic’s Fure performances, along with the bassoonist Rebekah Heller and the bassist Brandon Lopez. That was the same trio for A Library on Lightning on Thursday. (Ms. Heller also performed Felipe Lara’s vivid Metafagote that evening, playing through its lead part over six prerecorded tracks.)

    2
    Wadada Leo Smith, left, and Mr. Wooley performing Mr. Smith’s Red Autumn Gold.Credit Michelle V. Agins/The New York Times

    A Library is no simple reduction of Filament, as the trio actually had its premiere first, in April this year. At Issue Project Room, without the orchestra or the whispery, roving chorus heard at David Geffen Hall, it was easier to appreciate some of Mr. Lopez’s delicate, near-the-bridge playing. The intimacy of the Brooklyn space didn’t sap any of Ms. Fure’s intensity, either: The final buzzing chords hit with extraordinary force.

    Ms. Lockwood’s music was heard on both evenings. Her 1998 piece Immersion was performed on Wednesday by the percussion duo of Frank Cassara and Dominic Donato. The work’s most compelling stretches were achieved by Ms. Lockwood’s use of a cylindrical container placed atop a marimba. One musician drew a mallet around the cylinder’s circumference, while the other gently thrummed the edges of the bars underneath, producing slight, dreamy dissonances.

    On Thursday, Ms. Lockwood’s recent piece Becoming Air was played by Mr. Wooley, using his extended technique on trumpet to create, as in Immersion, a mood of elegant energy. While using circular breathing to produce long tones on his instrument, he also manipulated a small microphone inside the bell, as well as an effect pedal at his feet. As the microphone moved farther inside the trumpet, the amplified overtones shifted incrementally, producing some dramatic howls of distortion. Ms. Lockwood also made full use of Mr. Wooley’s quieter strategies, like the mouthpiece-free blowings he sometimes uses, blasts of frenzy that remain soft. (The sound is suggestive of a sprinkler system that’s gained consciousness.)

    Mr. Wooley’s interpretive powers were brought into even clearer focus by Red Autumn Gold, a work written by the trumpet virtuoso (and 2013 Pulitzer Prize finalist) Wadada Leo Smith and played twice during For/With. Mr. Wooley’s solo rendition opened the festival on Wednesday. Using polyphonic extended techniques, he made multiple droning lines drift apart and then return to states of equilibrium. Pauses in the music brought shifts toward brief flurries of notes that sounded like descendants of bebop phrasing.

    At the end of the festival, Mr. Smith appeared with Mr. Wooley for another take on the piece, in which Mr. Wooley often ceded the foreground. (A startling opening note from Mr. Smith showed that his clarion ferocity is still in enviable shape.) Yet it was still very much a duet. Over a quarter-hour, a fine balance emerged between Mr. Smith’s brightly pealing sound and the mellower roughness of Mr. Wooley.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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