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  • richardmitnick 3:09 PM on June 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , discovermusic.com, Herbie Hancock's ‘Empyrean Isles’, Jazz   

    From Blue Note via discovermusic.com: “How Herbie Hancock Charted New Territory With ‘Empyrean Isles’” 

    From Blue Note
    via

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    discovermusic

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    June 17, 2018
    Charles Waring

    From soul-jazz cuts to risk-taking avant-garde explorations, ‘Empyrean Isles’ revealed that Herbie Hancock was a musical chameleon and a jazz icon in the making.

    On Wednesday, 17 June 1964, pianist Herbie Hancock went into Van Gelder Studio, in New Jersey, to record what became Empyrean Isles, his fourth album for Blue Note Records.

    Herbie Hancock. CREDIT Francis Wolff-Mosaic Images

    By then, at the age of 24, the bespectacled, classically-trained Chicagoan was already a rising star in the jazz world. As well as being an integral member of Miles Davis’ groundbreaking quintet since 1963, his solo career was in the ascendant, propelled by Watermelon Man, the lead track from his 1962 debut album, Takin’ Off, which had been popularised thanks to a hit version by Latin percussionist Mongo Santamaria.

    Given the simpatico he felt with fellow Miles Davis band members, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Tony Williams, it was no surprise, perhaps, that Hancock elected to exploit their unique skills on Empyrean Isles, a concept album based on a mythical place, that consisted of four self-penned tracks expressing different facets of Hancock’s musical psyche.

    Many jazz albums of the time used a two-horn front line, usually consisting of saxophone and trumpet, but on Empyrean Isles, Hancock, going against the grain – the pianist’s career-defining characteristic – used only a single horn: Freddie Hubbard on cornet. Hubbard, another young lion signed to Blue Note, was no stranger to Hancock’s music and had graced Takin’ Off with his virtuosic playing. But the concept behind Empyrean Isles was more advanced and exploratory than Hancock’s debut, and allowed its protagonists greater space, flexibility and freedom in regard to improvisation.

    Herbie Hancock. Mosaic Images

    Structurally, Empyrean Isles’ opener, One Finger Snap, which begins with a fleeting unison theme on cornet and piano, before Hubbard breaks off for a solo, demonstrates Hancock’s propensity to take risks – something that he had learned from working with Miles Davis, who instilled in him the notion that there were no wrong notes or mistakes. Williams and Carter initiate a lightly swinging groove, over which Hubbard lets rip with molten cornet lines while Hancock supports him with subtle staccato punctuation. He picks up the baton from Hubbard, demonstrating his total mastery of the piano with a solo comprising fleet-fingered right-hand melodies. Hubbard returns a burning passage of improv before allowing the spotlight to fall on young Tony Williams, then just 18, who serves up a swirling hurricane of drums and cymbals. After that, the horn and piano return momentarily to state a brief closing motif.

    Ron Carter’s elastic bassline propels the midtempo ‘Oliloqui Valley’, on which Hubbard’s cornet enunciates a short theme prior to a long solo from Hancock over a blithely swinging rhythmic undertow. Hubbard’s solo is incandescent, though the piece loses momentum to allow Ron Carter room for a spacious bass solo which not only underlines his dexterity but also his judicious use of dynamics and nuanced sense of feel.

    Cantaloupe Island is one of Hancock’s most famous tunes, a jaunty soul-jazz groove with a relaxed vibe that is a companion piece to Watermelon Man – only catchier and even funkier, and on which Freddie Hubbard again excels as a soloist. With its blues-infused melody and danceable vamp, it’s undoubtedly the most down-to-earth cut on Empyrean Isles, showing that the pianist could write credible commercial material as well as more abstract, exploratory pieces. Hancock revisited the song, in 1973, on his Head Hunters album, transforming it into an exotic slice of jazz-funk. The original Blue Note version – which the label also released as a single – was sampled by British hip-hop group Us3, in 1993, for their US Blue Note hit Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia).

    The most radical cut on Empyrean Isles is its finale, The Egg, a desultory, avant-garde-style piece initially driven by Hancock’s repeated ostinato piano figure. Essentially, it’s an open-ended vehicle for improv but has a more abstract section in the middle, where the track’s rhythmic impetus dissolves and Ron Carter plays a bass solo with a bow. Hancock then plays a passage of unaccompanied piano, before Carter and Williams reinstate the groove.

    With its blend of advanced bebop and modal jazz with funk and free improv – all convincingly rendered – Empyrean Isles offered ample evidence that Herbie Hancock was a jazz master in the making.

    Revealing himself as a musical chameleon, Hancock would go on to record a welter of albums in an array of styles in the succeeding five decades, but this astounding album, recorded 54 years ago, remains one of the early high points in his long and illustrious career.

    Blue Note Records is an American jazz record label, owned by Universal Music Group and currently operated in conjunction with Decca Records. Established in 1939 by Alfred Lion and Max Margulis, it derives its name from the characteristic “blue notes” of jazz and the blues. Originally dedicated to recording traditional jazz and small group swing, from 1947 the label began to switch its attention to modern jazz. While the original company did not itself record many of the pioneers of bebop, significant exceptions are Thelonious Monk, Fats Navarro and Bud Powell.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 12:25 PM on June 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Jazz,   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: Miles and Teddy Wilson 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

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    Each Sunday, Pitchfork takes an in-depth look at a significant album from the past, and any record not in our archives is eligible. Today, we explore 1974’s black funk dreamscape from Miles Davis.

    One autumn in New York, in 1972, the most famous jazz musician in the world tried to take a right turn at 60 mph off the West Side Highway and totaled his Lamborghini Miura. A bystander found Miles Davis with both legs broken, covered in blood and cocaine. Even after the crash, Miles had a bleeding ulcer, a bad hip, nodes in his larynx, and a heart attack while on tour in Brazil. He spat blood onstage, his legs in so much pain he had to work his wah-wah and volume pedals with his hands, and offstage, he self-medicated with Scotch and milk, Bloody Marys, Percodan, and more cocaine. “Everything started to blur after that car accident,” Miles later wrote.

    His trajectory up to that point was a blur of a different hue. From teen sideman to Charlie Parker’s bebop revolution to a solo career that’s better compared to Pablo Picasso than other jazz musicians, Miles instigated entire paradigm shifts in music. Or, as he hissed to a matron at a White House dinner in the 1980s: “I’ve changed music five or six times.” Most narratives point to iconic albums like Birth of the Cool, Relaxin’ With the Miles Davis Quintet, Kind of Blue, Sketches of Spain, Miles Smiles and Bitches Brew, but his 1974 album Get Up With It hangs like an ominous storm cloud over them all, the one that fans of his other works might hesitate to name, his last studio album before he fell mute for the rest of the decade. Like Orpheus grieving in the underworld or Marlow going up the river, Miles went to a place that forever altered his DNA. When he finally returned to the studio, he never sounded the same.

    Starting with Bitches Brew in 1970, Miles proceeded to drop eight double albums as well as audacious efforts like A Tribute to Jack Johnson and On the Corner, each one deploying a strategy that undercut his audiences’ expectations. With Get Up With It, Miles began the most defiant shift of his storied career, dropping a totemic yet untidy leviathan that rebuffed jazz fans and critics alike. Each song careens between extremes, as Miles presages everything still to come: ambient, no wave, world beat, jungle, new jack swing, post-rock, even hinting at the future sound of R&B and chart-topping pop. For many modern fans, it’s his heaviest era, but Miles himself offers little insight into his mindset of that period, the music barely mentioned in his 1989 book Miles: The Autobiography. Instead, he writes: “I was spiritually tired of all the bullshit…I felt artistically drained, tired… And the more I stayed away, the deeper I sank into another dark world.”

    Mosaic Records – Teddy Wilson transfers

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    YouTube


    The legendary Columbia producer Michael Brooks listens in to a previously unissued performance for Columbia Records of Teddy Wilson’s small group (along with J.C. Heard on drums) from July 31, 1942. The tune has a number of titles but an early shellac test pressing has it listed as “Stomp” Pt. 2 (this had been mistakenly thought to be “Something To Shout About” with a vocal by Helen Ward). Matt Cavaluzzo is the engineer and Scott Wenzel the producer of this new set for Mosaic: Classic Brunswick & Columbia Teddy Wilson Sessions 1934-1942.

    Mosaic’s Teddy Wilson Sessions: A Look Behind the Scenes (Part 2)

    Another quick glimpse into the transfer process at Battery Studios during our work on the Teddy Wilson set. Michael Brooks, producer for Columbia producer, joins Matt Cavaluzzo and myself as we hear for the first time a previously unissued performance on our newly released Wilson set.
    -Scott Wenzel

    Visit The Jazz Gazette


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:38 PM on June 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Jazz, , ECM ARTISTS ON TOUR – ADDITIONAL JUNE DATES   

    From ECM: “ECM ARTISTS ON TOUR – ADDITIONAL JUNE DATES” 

    New from From ECM

    From ECM which might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    1

    Jack DeJohnette / Ravi Coltrane
    Matt Garrison

    June 15 Brooklyn, NY
    Shapeshifter Lab

    Vijay Iyer

    June 16 New York, NY
    Le Poisson Rouge
    June 22 Katonah, NY
    Caramoor Center
    June 25-29 New York, NY
    The Kitchen

    Django Bates
    June 19-20 New York, NY
    (Jazz Standard)
    June 23 Rochester, NY
    Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival
    June 25 Ottawa, ON
    Ottawa Jazz Festival

    Thomas Strønen
    June 21 San Diego, CA
    The Athenaeum
    June 23 Seattle, WA
    Poncho Concert Hall
    June 24 San Francisco, CA
    Red Poppy
    June 26 Baltimore, MD
    An Die Musik Live!
    June 28 New York, NY
    Scandinavia House
    June 29 Washington, DC
    DuPont Underground
    June 30 Rochester, NY
    Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival

    Kuára
    Trygve Seim, Samuli Mikkonen, Markku Ounaskari
    June 24 Rochester, NY
    (Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival)

    Maciej Obara Quartet
    June 19 New York, NY
    Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola
    June 22 Edmonton, AB
    Edmonton International Jazz Festival
    June 25 Victoria, BC
    Victoria International Jazz Festival
    June 26 Vancouver, BC
    Vancouver International Jazz Festival
    June 28 Ottawa, ON
    Ottawa International Jazz Festival
    June 29 Rochester, NY
    Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:42 AM on June 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Count basie, Jazz,   

    From Rutgers University: “Count Basie’s New Home at Rutgers-Newark” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

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    All photos credit: Suliman Olatunji

    The Institute of Jazz Studies (IJS) at Rutgers University-Newark is now home to the collection of nearly 1,000 artifacts that belonged to late jazz icon William J. “Count” Basie Jr. The Count Basie Collection includes his pianos, Hammond organ, photos, correspondence, concert programs, business records, housewares and press clippings. Scholars, curators, writers, students, filmmakers, and music aficionados also will find clothes, accessories, scrapbooks, and audiovisual material from Basie as the collection comes “home” to reside in the Red Bank, New Jersey native’s home territory. Items including a Grammy, Downbeat award, and one of Basie’s signature ship captain’s hats were on display at the official announcement of the acquisition today at 15 Washington Street in the Great Hall.

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    “Although the materials cover the entire years of Basie’s lifetime, the collection represents the latter years of Basie’s life and career particularly well, including a large number of accolades Grammy awards, honorary degrees, and proclamations,” said Wayne Winborne, executive director of IJS. “It’s important to note here that there are several boxes of materials related to the life of Catherine Basie who was herself a very charismatic and interesting woman. She was Basie’s wife and life partner for over 40 years and was very involved in the community with young people in her neighborhood and in the civil rights movement. She will no doubt be a subject of historical examination.”

    According to Winborne, the acquisition of Basie’s collection is a perfect fit for Rutgers-Newark and The Rutgers University Libraries with IJS long recognized as the world’s foremost archives and research facility devoted to jazz, as well as the University’s proximity to Basie’s hometown of Red Bank, approximately 40 miles south of IJS. In addition to hundreds of artifacts, Rutgers-Newark now also retains the rights to Basie’s name, likeness, and trademark. The collection will become available to the public in the near future for research and exhibition.

    President and Chief Executive Officer of New Jersey Performing Arts Center (NJPAC), John Schreiber, and Executive Director Emeritus of IJS, Dan Morgenstern, both shared fond memories with the music legend. Schreiber spoke about being on the road as a manager twice for the Count Basie Orchestra. “Basie was this really gentle, kind, twinkle-in-his-eye, brilliant guy. He never said much but he was on time.”

    The Honorable Ras J. Baraka, Mayor of Newark, New Jersey, and Amy Niles, President and Chief Executive Officer of WBGO, also made remarks at the announcement, in addition to Joy Rosenthal who spoke on behalf of the Basie estate.

    One of the giants of jazz, a global icon, Count Basie remains one of the most popular and recognized figures in American music, even now, 34 years after his death. He was a jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. He enjoyed a career that spanned more than 60 years and helped to elevate jazz as a serious art form. Count Basie established swing as one of jazz’s predominant styles and solidified the link between jazz and the blues.

    Count Basie’s accolades are many. He earned nine Grammy Awards and made history in 1958 by becoming the first African American to receive a Grammy. Four of his recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame: One O’clock Jump (1979), April in Paris (1985), Everyday I Have the Blues (1992), and Lester Leaps In (2005). In addition to his music, he also received numerous awards and honors from around the world for his humanitarianism and philanthropy.

    About Rutgers University-Newark
    Rutgers University – Newark (RU-N) is a diverse, urban, public research university that is an anchor institution in New Jersey’s cultural capital. Nearly 13,000 students are currently enrolled at its 38-acre campus in a wide range of undergraduate and graduate degree programs offered through the College of Arts and Sciences, University College, the Graduate School, Rutgers Business School-Newark and New Brunswick, the Rutgers Law School – Newark, the School of Criminal Justice, and the School of Public Affairs and Administration. RU-N is exceptionally well positioned to fulfill higher education’s promise as an engine of discovery, innovation, and social mobility. It has a remarkable legacy of producing high-impact scholarship that is connected to the great questions and challenges of the world. It has the right mix of disciplines and interdisciplinary centers and institutes to take on those questions and challenges. It is in and of a city and region where its work on local challenges undertaken with partners from many sectors resonates powerfully throughout our urbanizing world. Most importantly, RU-N brings an incredible diversity of people to this work—students, faculty, staff, and community partners—making it more innovative, more creative, more engaging, and more relevant for our time and the times ahead. For more information please visit http://www.newark.rutgers.edu.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:49 AM on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "A Conversation with Kenny Barron and Benny Green (by Tom Gsteiger), , Jazz   

    From Ethan Iverson DO THE M@TH: “A Conversation with Kenny Barron and Benny Green (by Tom Gsteiger)” 

    From From Ethan Iverson DO THE M@TH

    Ethan Iverson 2016 photo by Jimmy Katz at http://www.jimmykatz.com, with permission

    Kenny Barron and Benny Green played a series of duo concerts at Marians Jazzroom from April 17-21, 2018 as part of Jazz Festival Bern, in Bern, Switzerland. In this conversation, which took place on April 21, they mused on aesthetics, technique and other piano players. They both can look back on illustrious careers as bandleaders and sidemen (i.e. they both played with the great trumpeter Freddie Hubbard).

    The interview was edited by Juan Rodriguez, longtime Montreal music journalist.

    See the full article with the interview here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:54 AM on June 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Jazz, , Steve Tibbets "Life Of"   

    From ECM: ” LONG-AWAITED NEW RELEASE FROM STEVE TIBBETTS” 

    New from From ECM

    From ECM which might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    1
    Steve Tibbetts guitar, piano | Marc Anderson percussion, handpan, Michelle Kinney cello, drones

    “Instead of conjuring other worlds, Tibbetts has spent the past 40 years trying to figure out what this one sounds like in its entirety — a quiet, noble quest for one of the most underappreciated musicians of our time. Tibbetts’ exquisite new album, Life Of, is his strongest since 1989’s superb Big Map Idea, and is easily the most elegant of his career.
    Forget about jazz, forget about guitars. Life Of should make beautiful sense to anyone on this vast and unknowable Earth who’s ever spent time listening to the rain.”
    – Chris Richards, Washington Post

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:32 PM on June 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "[COMMISSION] Jonathan Finlayson", Jazz, ,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “[COMMISSION] Jonathan Finlayson” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    No photo credit provided

    Sunday, June 24, 2018
    at 8:00 PM

    Roulette Intermedium
    509 Atlantic Ave
    Brooklyn, NY 11217

    $15—20
    Tickets

    2
    Roulette

    Andre Solomon Glover – Baritone
    Jonathan Finlayson – Trumpet
    David Bryant – Piano
    Chris Tordini – Acoustic Bass
    Craig Weinrib – Drums and Percussion

    For his Commission at Roulette, Jonathan Finalyson has set to music selected poems by renowned Harlem Renaissance poet Sterling Brown, whose work was deeply influenced by jazz.

    This commission and performance is made possible, in part, by the Jerome Foundation. The Jerome Foundation, a long-time supporter of young composers, was a mainstay in Roulette’s early development and continues to help us fulfill our mission by presenting ambitious work by promising artists. Each year, the Jerome Foundation supports five artist residencies and four commissions at Roulette.

    This performance is presented through GENERATE.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:17 PM on June 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Jazz, , , Samuel Blaser Trio: Taktlos   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “Samuel Blaser Trio: Taktlos” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    No photo credit provided

    Monday, June 18, 2018
    at 8:00 PM

    Roulette Intermedium
    509 Atlantic Ave
    Brooklyn, NY 11217

    2
    Roulette

    $20—25
    Tickets

    Samuel Blaser – Trombone
    Marc Ducret – Guitar
    Peter Bruun – Drums

    Samuel Blaser and his trio will give a rare New York performance at the Roulette. Blaser’s grounding in jazz and classical music produces tunes which develop seamlessly through wonderful interaction between the trio members. French guitarist Marc Ducret (known for his work with Tim Berne) and Danish drummer Peter Bruun (also a member of Django Bates Beloved band) complete the international line-up. The trio released a new album on legendary Swiss label HatArt to coincide with the performance.

    The Samuel Blaser Trio was founded after a downtime poolside dialogue between Samuel Blaser and Marc Ducret in Cabo Frio, Brazil. Danish drummer Peter Bruun seemed like a felicitous fit, and beginning with an inaugural gig in May of 2013 at the Jazzdor Festival in Berlin, the three players began extensive tours of Europe, Asia and South America. Blaser estimates roughly 120 concerts over the ensuing years, no meager feat considering the band had yet to cut a commercial recording.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:04 PM on June 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Jazz, , [VAN LIER FELLOW] Brandon Lopez: The Lamentations + Bennett/Foster/Wooley/Lopez   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: [VAN LIER FELLOW] Brandon Lopez: “The Lamentations” + Bennett/Foster/Wooley/Lopez 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    Photo: Cameron Kelly courtesy ISSUE Project Room

    Event Information

    The Lamentations
    Brandon Lopez – Bass
    Sam Yulsman – Piano

    Bennett/Foster/Wooley/Lopez
    Nate Wooley – Trumpet
    Michael Foster – Saxophone
    Ben Bennett – Percussion
    Brandon Lopez – Bass

    Composed specifically for improvising musicians, Lamentations is named for the Book of Lamentations, though the work itself is secular and harbors no overt meaning. Sam Yulsman and Brandon Lopez will play them first. Followed by the 4tet. Brandon Lopez and Sam Yulsman have been working together since meeting in 2015. The 4tet is a new venture.

    Thursday, June 21, 2018
    at 8:00 PM

    Roulette Intermedium
    509 Atlantic Ave
    Brooklyn, NY 11217

    $20—25
    Tickets

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:42 AM on June 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Jazz, , , Rostam   

    From Nonesuch Records- Rostam: Half-Light Remixes: EP 1 

    From Nonesuch Records

    Latest Release
    Half-Light Remixes: EP 1

    1

    Rostam’s Half-Light Remixes: EP 1 includes reimagined versions of four tracks from his 2017 debut album, Half-Light, from Tourist, Jim-E Stack, Instupendo, and Matsor Projects. The New Yorker called Half-Light “a wondrous album, full of coy dreams and quiet yearning,” and the Daily Beast declared it “one of the more extraordinary albums of the year.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Nonesuch Records is an American record company and label owned by Warner Music Group, distributed by Warner Bros. Records, and based in New York City. Founded by Jac Holzman in 1964 as a budget classical label, Nonesuch has developed into a label that records critically acclaimed music from a wide range of genres. Robert Hurwitz was president of the company from 1984 to 2017.

     
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