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  • richardmitnick 4:16 PM on October 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Jaleel Shaw-saxophone, Jazz, Kush Abadey – drums, Lage Lund – guitar, ,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “JALEEL SHAW: IMAGES PROJECT: THE JAZZ GALLERY FELLOWSHIP COMMISSION WORLD PREMIERE” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    Jaleel Shaw by Layla Watson

    Friday, November 2, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    The Jazz Gallery
    1160 Broadway, 5th Floor
    New York, NY 10001

    $10—35
    Tickets

    Jaleel Shaw will perform new music based on a recent “nature” retreat.

    Lage Lund – guitar
    1
    Lage from his Website

    Lawrence Fields – piano
    2
    Lawrence Fields from Berkelee.edu

    Joe Martin – bass
    3
    Joe Martin from All About Jazz

    Kush Abadey – drums
    3
    Kush Abadey from J.A.L.C.

    // sets 7.30pm + 9.30pm //
    // each set: $25/$10 members; reserved table seating: $35/$20 members

    Fellowship is awarded to established artists and advanced professionals who often balance the professional demands of performing, touring, and teaching with additional obligations related to their families (e.g., parenting). The Fellowship aims to provide the financial support and logistical freedom to its recipients to focus their energy for a brief but substantial period on new compositions.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 12:52 PM on October 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Horace Silver, Jazz,   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: “Horace Silver” 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    October 21, 2018

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    September 2, 2018
    Charles Waring

    A pioneering hard bop pianist, the late Horace Silver was a founding member of The Jazz Messengers. He left an enormously important legacy.

    Horace Silver by Francis Wolff-Mosiac Images

    Charles Waring traces Horace Silver’s influential innovations in modern jazz that led among other things to what was called the Blue Note. Horace impacted the hard bop scene as a pianist, composer and bandleader. -Michael Cuscuna

    “2 September 2018 marks what would have been the 90th birthday of Horace Silver, one of jazz’s most significant pianists and composers.

    As co-founder of The Jazz Messengers, Horace Silver was a key architect of the popular bebop offshoot known as hard bop, which absorbed elements from blues and gospel music, and evolved in the early 50s to quickly become the dominant currency in modern jazz. A dexterous pianist renowned for his distinctive percussive style, Silver also distinguished himself as a composer, which resulted in several of his songs – among them ‘Song For My Father’, ‘Nica’s Dream’, ‘Doodlin’’ and ‘Peace’ – being adopted by the jazz community as standards. In addition to this, Silver had a profound influence on the way jazz was arranged, and his pioneering use of a two-horn frontline (saxophone and trumpet) in a quintet setting became the norm in the 50s and 60s.

    Originally from Norwalk, Connecticut, Horace Ward Martin Tavares Silver was born on 2 September 1928, into a family with Cape Verdean ancestry on his father’s side. He was drawn to music at an early age (his father was an amateur folk musician who played by ear) and started playing the piano when he was ten, initially in a boogie-woogie style. But it was when he first heard jazz – in particular Jimmie Lunceford’s orchestra – at the age of 11 that he first felt truly passionate about music.

    Young Horace’s interest in jazz, and in particular the big band sound, prompted him to start playing the tenor saxophone. Influenced by the smooth phrasing of noted horn man Lester Young, a teenaged Silver played in the brass section of his high-school orchestra. Outside of school, his versatility meant that he was in demand as a young musician, either playing piano or sax – or both – in a variety of local combos, though eventually he relinquished the saxophone to focus exclusively on the piano.

    “I had plenty of material. I was always recording”

    When he was 18, Silver got a job playing piano in Hartford, Connecticut, at a nightclub, and it was there, in 1950, that he and his band were recruited by saxophone star Stan Getz, with whom the young pianist made his recording debut later that same year. With his reputation burgeoning, the in-demand Silver was summoned to his first Blue Note Records session in 1952, backing saxophonist Lou Donaldson.

    After a second Blue Note studio date with Donaldson later that year, a third was arranged by the label’s boss, producer Alfred Lion, but the saxophonist was unavailable; instead, Silver was asked if he could step in and make a recording with a trio under his own name. “Naturally, I accepted,” wrote Silver in his 2007 autobiography, Let’s Get To The Nitty Gritty. “Luckily, I had plenty of material. I was always composing. I had three days to pick the material I wanted to record, get in the woodshed and practice.” What resulted was the 10” Blue Note LP, New Faces New Sounds (Introducing The Horace Silver Trio), an eight-track album featuring rising drummer Art Blakey and which announced Silver as an exciting new pianist and composer (he wrote six of the eight tunes on offer). It would mark the start of a fertile 28-year relationship between Silver and Blue Note Records.

    Though Silver didn’t record another LP under his own name until 1954, he wasn’t idle. The pianist appeared as a sideman on recordings by Coleman Hawkins, Al Cohn, Art Farmer and Miles Davis (he played on the trumpeter’s classic Walkin’ LP). More significantly, he appeared on the seminal hard bop manifesto A Night In Birdland, recorded in 1954 by the Art Blakey Quintet, which Blue Note intended as a showcase for trumpet sensation Clifford Brown.

    Jazz Messenger

    For his next Blue Note offering, Silver expanded his group from a trio to a quintet, adding two horn players (Kenny Dorham and Hank Mobley) to augment the rhythm section of bassist Doug Watkins and drummer Art Blakey. It was a move that would establish a template for hard bop groups. Blue Note recorded two sessions with the same line-up and released them as two separate 10” LPs attributed to the Horace Silver Quintet, in 1954 and ’55, respectively, but, a year later, combined both for a 12” album titled Horace Silver And The Jazz Messengers. The Messengers became the apostles for spreading the hard bop gospel but, after 18 months together, Silver quit, leaving its stewardship to Blakey, under whom the outfit would become a jazz institution dubbed The Hard Bop Academy.

    As the 50s moved towards the 60s, Silver continued to blossom as a recording artist and composer. By then, his quintet had evolved into its classic line-up – with trumpeter Blue Mitchell and saxophonist Junior Cook on board – and made a slew of classic albums together, including Finger Poppin’, Blowin’ The Blues Away and, in the 60s, The Tokyo Blues.

    The new decade gave birth to arguably Silver’s most popular album, 1964’s Song For My Father, which spawned the classic title song and saw the pianist move into more overtly gospel-influenced soul-jazz territory. As the 60s became the 70s, Silver continued to record regularly, though the decline in jazz’s popularity, at the expense of rock and pop, prompted him to experiment by adding vocals and electric piano, while also exploring spiritual concerns via concept albums.

    Hardbop grandpop

    In 1980, after 28 albums for the company, Horace Silver left Blue Note and then recorded five LPs for his own Silveto label between 1981 and 1988. The 90s witnessed a short stint at CBS, followed by a switch to Impulse! in 1996, which resulted in The Hardbop Grandpop, unanimously hailed as Silver’s best work for decades. Two years later, Silver, then 70, released what was to be his final studio album, Jazz Has A Sense Of Humour, on Verve. Comprised of all-original material, it revealed that, creatively, he was far from a spent force, capping what had been a remarkable career.

    Horace Silver, who had been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease since 2007, died on 14 June 2014, at the age of 85. He left behind an enormous legacy of historically important recordings, as well as memorable compositions that continue to be played by contemporary musicians. Though his own style bore the indelible mark of bebop pioneer Bud Powell, Silver was, nevertheless, a highly original and deeply influential pianist whose trademark was infectious melodic motifs flecked with humour and funkified grooves that brimmed with an energetic joie de vivre.

    He was, above all else, an intrepid pioneer. The repercussions from his musical innovations can still be felt in jazz today.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:10 PM on October 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Experimental improv, , Jazz, , Paul Elwood "Emissions Transparents"'   

    From Innova: “Paul Elwood ‘Emissions Transparents'” 

    From Innova the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1

    Composers: Paul Elwood, Christian Wolff
    Performers: Paul Elwood, The Callithumpian Consort, Stephen Drury, Eddie Prevost, Iowa Percussion, Daniel Moore, Aly Olson, Rose Chancler, Cary Fridley

    Catalog Number: #1 005
    Genre: Experimental Jazz
    Collection: Americana improvisation

    Location: Marseille, France

    Release Date:
    Jan 25, 2019

    Liner notes

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:36 AM on October 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Fog x FLO: Fujiko Nakaya on the Emerald Necklace", "Lavender Ruins", and Ellington, Architecture II: Fog, Boston’s Emerald Necklace- a five-and-a-half-mile chain of parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, Jazz, , Ruins, Sound   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Sound, Architecture II: Fog, Ruins, and Ellington” 

    New Music USA


    From NEWMUSICBOX

    October 16, 2018
    Neil Leonard

    1

    My last post, “Sound, Architecture, and Necromancy,” shared thoughts about recording at ancient sites in Greece and Italy. This post examines the development of Lavender Ruins, a four-channel sound composition created in collaboration with artist Fujiko Nakaya and experimental lighting designer Shiro Takatani. (Lavender Ruins plays simulatneously with Nakaya’s fog sculpture Fog x Ruins at Franklin Park, Boston, through October 2018.)

    In celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, curator Jen Mergel commissioned Nakaya to create five site-responsive fog sculptures to be installed along Boston’s Emerald Necklace, a five-and-a-half-mile chain of parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted (FLO). Experiencing the sculptures is immersive and wet. Changes in the wind, humidity, temperature, and light transform the sculptures. Speaking of her work, Nakaya says, “The atmosphere is my mold and the wind is my chisel to sculpt in real time.” The exhibition, titled Fog x FLO: Fujiko Nakaya on the Emerald Necklace turns the 1,100-acre Emerald Necklace park system into a platform for artistic creation, celebrating both Olmsted’s foresight to connect the city with greenspace and Nakaya’s fifty-year practice. The exhibit included an open call for artists to propose on-site interventions, in response to Nakaya’s sculptures. Fog x FLO is a first for Boston and Nakaya’s most expansive exhibition in her 50-year career. It is expected to attract more than 800,000 visitors over twelve weeks.

    I experienced Nakaya’s work before we ever met. In 2014, I wrote about the futuristic Pepsi Pavilion which was covered by a fog veil of Nakaya’s design and created by the group Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.) for Expo ’70, Osaka. In 2017, I saw Nakaya’s mesmerizing performance collaboration with Shiro Takatani, composer Ryuichi Sakamoto, and dancer Min Tanaka at Ten Days Six Nights at the Tate Modern. Nakaya also saw my performance with Phill Niblock the following day at the same festival. On the eve of her arrival in Boston from Tokyo in February 2018, Nakaya came to my concert at the ICA Boston called “Sounding the Cloud,” with Scanner and Stephen Vitiello. By April, when Nakaya again visited me, we already had a clear understanding of each other’s practice. She invited me to create sound for her Fog x FLO fog sculpture at the Overlook Shelter Ruins, a pavilion designed by Olmsted that was destroyed by fire in the 1940s, leaving only the stone remains.

    2

    For me, the Overlook Shelter Ruins are the Necklace’s most evocative site for an installation. The remaining stone archway feels like a timeless relic. Three stairways that once flanked the building’s entrance now lead to open sky. The corner walls are overgrown with wild foliage. An added allure is that, beginning in 1966, the ruins were used by famed Bostonian Elma Lewis to host annual concerts by the Duke Ellington Orchestra. I imagined the sound of Ellington’s reed section lingering in the air. Lead alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges and baritone saxophonist Harry Carney, both born within miles of the ruins, probably played with Ellington on-site. I’ve spent countless hours in Franklin Park and the nearby Arnold Arboretum. These are parks where I fell in love, taught my son to bike, and still visit to replenish myself. The commission became an opportunity to revisit the personal importance of Olmsted, Ellington, and E.A.T.

    3

    The size of this installation, production logistics, and changing weather presented a number of challenges and opportunities. For Fog x Ruins, Nakaya designed a 96 x 40-foot rectangular structure comprising scaffolding and an array of 900 mist nozzles perched atop the perimeter. A nearby fire hydrant emits a 90-PSI stream of water, regulated by computer-controlled pumps, to produce cycles of fog that intensify for a minute or two and then stop entirely, allowing for the fog to dissipate. When visitors walk into this pavilion, they see their friends disappear in the mist, strangers emerge, a ceiling of fog above obscures the sky. Takatani’s lighting design gives the sculpture a spectacular presence as night falls.

    Creating sound for a large outdoor installation has been a dream of mine for years. This installation was a challenge because there were a lot of unknowns, including elements that could not be tested until the sculpture was finished and I could hear my audio on location with the fog. I also knew that the timing of fog and light projections were subject to change, even after I finished the music.

    As composing started, I sought to link Ellington and Nakaya’s work. I listened to related themes by Ellington, including Lady of the Lavender Mist, The Kissing Mist, Atmosphere (Moon Mist), A Blue Fog That You Can Almost See Through (Transblucency), and The Fog That Clouds It (Schwiphti). I chose the first three ethereal chords of Lady of the Lavender Mist as a point of departure for writing the music.

    4

    For this project, I booked a five-day recording session at the Tank, a 65-foot-tall empty metal water treatment tank in Langley, Colorado. The Tank has a convex floor, concave roof, cylindrical walls, and a 40-second reverb. A container just outside the Tank is outfitted with recording gear. The size of the Tank expands and contracts based on temperature changes. Heat, windstorms, howling dogs, and the noise of trucks dictated when I could record. However, when conditions were right, I heard saxophone notes linger in the cavernous space above like a cloud of sound, with specific harmonics coming in and out of focus. The room responds like an old band mate who knows your music well and plays your performance back in harmonic variations.

    Engineer Bob E. Burnham came on the final day and set up four stereo pairs of microphones surrounding the saxophone. We multi-tracked both alto and tenor parts to get more of an ensemble sound. I thought of the audio recording process as something like a four-camera shoot. The four mics could be used to construct a 360-degree panoramic sound field, or used individually to highlight specific angles of listening. My thinking was to create a quadraphonic piece surrounding listeners inside the fog, where the alto saxophone played from one end of the sculpture and tenor played from the opposite side. Much of the actual sound of the saxophone would be edited out, and the resonant harmonies of multiple notes lingering in the Tank would be emphasized.

    In the end, I composed a fifteen-minute quadraphonic piece to play at the Overlook Shelter Ruins. I used waterproof JBL speaker arrays placed in the four corners of the structure. There are no electronic effects on the saxophone and, as visitors wander freely inside the structure, there is no “best” listening point. In that way, the listening space is designed after my experience in the Tank.

    At our first sound check, presenting the draft with pride, Nakaya responded, “It is so serene. Should I make the fog more serene?” At first, I admittedly took this to be her way of saying, “Not turbulent enough.” During the same auditions, Mergel pointed to the perimeter of the scaffolding where nozzles cut a line of fog upward and wondered if the sound could reflect the contrast of solid architectural shapes and soft ethereal droplets. Listening to Nakaya and Mergel, I added vignettes of impulsive computer-regulated clicking and noise bursts that gave a sense of turbulence, which Mergel equated with “an Arctic icebreaker cutting through.” In the end, Nakaya requested that the sound be extended from the originally planned sunset hours and be heard for the entire day as an “integral part” of the collaborative work. It also turned out that the music was not subordinate to the fog. As Nakaya noted, when the cloud is thickest, “the sound gives a form to the installation.”

    Despite having done a number of outdoor projects, this was my first opportunity to create sound for a long-duration, outdoor piece in a widely accessible urban site. As much as any work I have been involved with, the audience is in dialog with the art. Some visitors return daily, while others make a single pilgrimage to the site. I hear them talk about their experience amongst themselves. As Mergel has noticed, “While Nakaya’s fog is set at the former roofline of the building to float like a cloud dome that fills the space, Leonard’s clarion sax sounds in Lavender Ruins reverberate on invisible walls, surrounding us with echoing generations of genius: of Olmsted, Ellington, Nakaya, and Leonard, the past and future fading into each other.”

    6
    Fujiko Nakaya and Neil Leonard at the opening. Photo by Jen Mergel

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:36 PM on October 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Billy Childs, , , Igor Levit, Jazz, , Senegalese music, Youssou N'Dour   

    From Carnegie Hall: Events 


    From Carnegie Hall

    Igor Levit WRTI


    Friday, October 19 at 7:30 PM
    Zankel Hall
    Igor Levit, Piano

    Works by Bach, Busoni, Schumann, and Liszt
    Tickets

    Youssou N’Dour. Photo- Afrikaportal

    Saturday, October 20 at 8 PM
    Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

    Youssou NDOUR performs mbalax, Senegalese music that fuses classic African praise-singing, percussion, and guitar-based pop.
    Tickets

    Billy Childs. Photograph by Raj Naik.

    Monday, October 22 at 7 PM
    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture | Manhattan
    Carnegie Hall Citywide
    Billy Childs Quartet

    Billy Childs has performed with an honor roll of jazz luminaries that includes Freddie Hubbard, J. J. Johnson, Joe Henderson, and Wynton Marsalis.
    Free Event

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:42 PM on October 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Jazz   

    From ECM: Art Ensemble of Chicago 

    New from From ECM

    From ECM which might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    1
    2

    This very special and numbered edition brings together the ECM recordings of Lester Bowie and Roscoe Mitchell with the Art Ensemble of Chicago and related projects including Bowie’s Brass Fantasy, Mitchell’s Note Factory and the Transatlantic Art Ensemble, as well as groups led by Jack DeJohnette and Wadada Leo Smith.

    Art Ensemble of Chicago: Nice Guys (1978), Full Force, (1980), Urban Bushmen (2 CD, 1980), The Third Decade (1984) Leo Smith: Divine Love (1978) Lester Bowie: The Great Pretender (1981), All The Magic (2 CD, 1982), I Only Have Eyes for You (1985), Avant Pop (1986), Tribute to Lester (2001), Roscoe Mitchell & The Note Factory: Nine To Get Ready (1997), Transatlantic Art Ensemble/Mitchell: Composition/Improvisation 1, 2 and 3 (2004), Transatlantic Art Ensemble/Parker: Boustrophedon (2004), Roscoe Mitchell & The Note Factory: Far Side (2007), Roscoe Mitchell: Bells for the South Side (2 CD, 2015) Jack DeJohnette’s New Directions (w Lester Bowie) (1978), Jack DeJohnette’s New Directions: In Europe (w Lester Bowie) (1979), Jack DeJohnette: Made In Chicago (w Mitchell, Abrams, Threadgill) (2013)

    PRE-ORDER

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:31 PM on October 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Jazz, , Makaya McCraven’s Universal Beings, ,   

    From Red Bull Music and LPR Red Bull Music: “Makaya McCraven’s Universal Beings” 

    From Red Bull

    and

    LPR

    1

    Red Bull Music Presents: Makaya McCraven’s Universal Beings

    2
    Drummer Makaya McCraven has a new leader album, Highly Rare.
    (Photo: Jude Goergen)

    Shabaka Hutchings, Dezron Douglas, Brandee Younger, Miguel Atwood-Ferguson, Jeff Parker, Nubya Garcia, Joel Ross, Carlos Niño, Josh Johnson,Junius Paul, Malik Abdul-Rahmaan

    Tickets ranging from 20 USD to 25 USD
    Doors open at 7:00 PM · December 2, 2018 – 18+ Only
    (Le) Poisson Rouge
    Tickets

    About the event
    Makaya McCraven is an accomplished jazz composer and drummer. Born in Paris, he developed his unique hybrid of jazz and hip-hop at UMass Amherst before moving to Chicago and embedding himself in the local music scene, releasing several critically acclaimed albums and touring his genre-defying music around the world. For his 2018 album Universal Beings, McCraven worked in Chicago, London, New York and Los Angeles to record jam sessions with musicians from each locale. He then pieced together portions of each session to create a collection of brilliantly smooth and sometimes muted suites that erase any division between jazz and hip-hop.

    Makaya McCraven is a beat scientist. The cutting edge drummer, producer, and sonic collagist is a multi-talented force whose inventive creative process & intuitive style of performance defy categorization.

    Called “a sound visionary” (jazzinchicago.org) who is “not your everyday jazz drummer” (thewordisbond.com), McCraven brilliantly moves between genres and pushes the boundaries of jazz and rhythm to create forms of his own.

    “You are listening to one incredible musician. His style and sound is unique, a heady, skillful, sophisticated and boldly uncompromising mix of jazz and hip hop…” (UK Vibe)

    His breakthrough album In the Moment was released with International Anthem Recording Co. (IARC) in January of 2015 and quickly named “Album of the Week” on BBC 6 Radio by influential DJ Gilles Peterson. By the end of the year it was a “Best of 2015” selection for Los Angeles Times, Pop Matters, NPR Music’s Jazz Critics Poll, and Apple Music. In 2016, In The Moment was hailed by Turntable Lab as “one of the most important recordings to date in the modern Jazz world.” In The Moment was a dramatic statement by McCraven, where he debuted a unique brand of “organic beat music” that quickly launched him into the vanguard of not only Internationally-known jazz artists, but also a niche genre of next-wave composer-producers blurring the boundaries of jazz & electronic music.

    “While Teo Macero’s work with Miles [Davis] might seem the obvious reference point, In The Moment is closer in spirit to Madlib and J Dilla.” (WIRE Magazine)

    French-born but raised in the Pioneer Valley of Massachusetts by expatriate musician parents, McCraven went on to develop his chops in Chicago and now represents a rising generation of globally-minded, genre-bending music makers as an artist as well as band leader. Through his unique, rarified performances and collaborations he unapologetically affirms our right to re-think and re-write the rules, any rules, and affirms other artists in their own exploratory evolutions.

    “No longer are we seeing jazz musicians experimenting with a new genre (hip hop) that they find interesting (or vice versa). Now what we’re seeing are jazz musicians who were heavily influenced by hip hop in their most formative years, just as much as they were influenced by jazz or any other genre. This creates a different kind of music. These cats aren’t ‘blending’ jazz and hip hop; for them, these genres are inseparable. They can’t play one without playing the other.” (thewordisbond.com)

    Born in Paris, France in 1983 to jazz drummer Stephen McCraven (Sam Rivers, Archie Shepp) and Hungarian singer Agnes Zsigmondi, McCraven was exposed to broad ranges of influences from a young age. At age 3, in 1986 his family moved to the Pioneer Valley of Western Massachussetts, a time and place that afforded him the mentorship of his parents’ community of friends and collaborators, which included jazz luminaries Marion Brown, Archie Shepp and Yusef Lateef.

    His earliest gig memories include playing alongside students in his father’s drum ensemble, the CMSS Bashers, at age five and in middle school forming a band with friends to backup his mother’s Jewish folk songs. In high school, McCraven cofounded Cold Duck Complex, a jazz hip hop band that developed a strong following in the American Northeast, opening for acts like Wu-Tang Clan, Rhazel, Digable Planets, The Pharcyde, Mixmaster Mike, and The Wailers.

    “I grew up studying jazz as a way to be masterful at my craft as a drummer. But as a young person, I was listening to A Tribe Called Quest, Busta Rhymes, Nas, and Biggie just like everybody else. That was just our generation.” (Chicago Magazine)

    McCraven stayed close to home (and his working band) to study music at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, but prioritized the development of his professional music career, and never completed his degree (although he was part of the University Jazz Orchestra and earned various Downbeat student awards). In 2007 he made a move to Chicago, where he immersed himself in the city’s gigging and creative music scenes. He took on as many gigs as he could, whether small, big, or bizarre, and gave music workshops to students from elementary to university level. While music has been in his blood from a young age, he’s been steadily humble & hungry, sure to always be distilling his various learnings and influences into an identity and groove of his own.

    “People think music is just a gift and it’s born out of nothing — that it’s in your genes. No: Musicians work hard. You practice for hours and hours and hours. For me, with my parents being musicians, it wasn’t that they genetically bestowed on me the gift of music, but that they were willing to let me put many, many hours of my life into it.” (In These Times)

    Through years of hard work and deepening kinships with artists from both ends (straight ahead & avant garde) of Chicago’s jazz scene, by 2012 he had “established himself as one of the city’s most versatile and in-demand drummers” (Chicago Reader) doing regular sideman gigs for Bobby Broom, Corey Wilkes, Willie Pickens, Occidental Brothers, Marquis Hill, Jeff Parker, and others. All the while he’d been developing a new kind of statement with the announcement and release of his leader debut Split Decision (Chicago Sessions, 2012), about which Dan Bilawsky wrote:

    “This is no take on standards with sparkling cocktail party élan or loose, amorphous three-way conversation. This is music made by a 21st century man who sees no need to suppress his hip hop chops or rock spirit in an effort to fit in and be dubbed a jazz drummer. McCraven marries his love for music other than jazz with a more jazz-oriented spirit built around in-the-moment, improvisational cunning and driving grooves throughout this program of original music.” (All About Jazz)

    Imbued with a new confidence, McCraven began work with IARC, performing alongside Marquis Hill & Matt Ulery twice as part of their “Trio in Curio” series. The shows’ success prompted a new IARC collaboration at The Bedford with McCraven at the helm as artist-in-residence. The new series, called “Spontaneous Composition”, was an incubator for McCraven to improvise with new collaborators weekly and develop concepts for an unnamed future album. From January 2013 to early 2014, every session of the series was recorded for reference, but rather than merely reviewing the improvisations for compositional inspiration, McCraven began tinkering with the stereo mixes in Ableton, doing what he referred to as “fixing” the music – editing, looping, pitching, layering, and ultimately producing the tracks that were released on his 2015 breakthrough album In The Moment (IARC).

    The critical and communal reception of In The Moment led to greater breakthroughs in the live setting for McCraven, including a historic co-headlining Chicago performance with Kamasi Washington in Fall of 2015 and a major showing at the New York City Winter Jazz Festival in January of 2016, where he was named a “Top 5 Artist to Watch” by both NPR and Billboard, and garnered glowing reviews from the Wall Street Journal[take that, Terry Teachout, I have a long memory] New York Times, and Downbeat Magazine. Afterwards he signed with European booking agency Good Music Company and spent most of 2016 touring the European circuit, capped off by a London Jazz Festival set broadcast live on Boiler Room TV in November of 2016.

    Right upon returning from that London show, McCraven did a special Chicago performance at Danny’s Tavern in support of touring Belgian DJ LeFtO. Joined by fellow Chicago-based IARC artists Junius Paul, Nick Mazzarella, and Ben LaMar Gay, McCraven captured an inspired set of high-energy improvisation to 4-track tape, and used those recordings to post-produce and create his first DJ-style mixtape Highly Rare (IARC). Originally released cassette only, the lo-fi free-jazz-meets-hip-hop mixtape eventually made it onto vinyl & digital formats, and at the end of the year was lauded as one of the “Best Albums of 2017” by The New York Times, UK’s EZH Mag, and Gilles Peterson, in addition to highly favorable reviews by PASTE Magazine, Stereogum, and Pitchfork.

    The latter end of McCraven’s 2017 was also highlighted by an October stint in London, where he headlined IARC’s ‘CHICAGOxLONDON’ showcase, and over the course of two nights improvised, performed & recorded with a handful of leading-edge UK-based musicians (including Joe Armon-Jones, Theon Cross, Nubya Garcia, Soweto Kinch, and Kamaal Williams). The recordings from those shows made source material for another mixtape that McCraven would produce and release on IARC in June of 2018, called Where We Come From (CHICAGOxLONDON Mixtape). In the words of Will Schube, for his feature in Passion of the Weiss:

    “While Where We Come From follows in the footsteps of McCraven’s previous releases, he moves far outside his Chicago circle on the release, taking a performance from London in October 2017 and using it as the structure from which he builds the tape… The result is unlike anything else coming out of the Chicago jazz or rap scene, an exploration of the different iterations jazz has introduced globally, and how these sounds are more similar than we often realize. Makaya McCraven is a Chicago staple, owing some of his rise to the city’s fervent jazz community, but with Where We Come From, McCraven and his band have transcended locale. Jazz belongs to the world, it exists wherever we come from.”

    McCraven has toured nationally and internationally, and produced 4 critically acclaimed releases as a lead artist in the last 4 years. Yet despite the performances and accolades, McCraven’s focus remains on both creating music and moving the culture forward.

    “As a person of mixed race, nationality, and ethnicity I want my identity and contributions to paint a world not bound by genre, race or national boundaries but unified through a love of music culture and community. Tethered by legacies of the past but looking towards a new, more universal future.”

    Makaya McCraven continues the development of his “organic beat music” as well as the work of (what Schube described as) “transcending locale” on his forthcoming Fall 2018 release Universal Beings. A 2xLP album that was recorded at 4 sessions in New York, Chicago, London & Los Angeles, Universal Beings features an A-list of “new” jazz players from those hotbed cities: Brandee Younger, Tomeka Reid, Dezron Douglas, Joel Ross, Shabaka Hutchings, Junius Paul, Nubya Garcia, Daniel Casimir, Ashley Henry, Josh Johnson, Jeff Parker, Anna Butters, Carlos Niño and Miguel-Atwood Ferguson.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    (le) poisson rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    LPR

    LPR is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

     
  • richardmitnick 1:44 PM on October 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Happy hundredth birthday Thelonious Monk, Jazz,   

    From Ethan Iverson via The New Yorker: “Think of Thelonious Monk” 

    From Ethan Iverson

    Ethan Iverson 2016 photo by Jimmy Katz at http://www.jimmykatz.com, with permission

    via

    new-yorker-bloc-rea-irvin
    Rea Irvin

    The New Yorker

    October 10, 2017
    Ethan Iverson

    Thelonious Monk, Minton’s Playhouse, New York, ca. September 1947. Photograph by William P. Gottlieb

    1
    There are sixty-odd Thelonious Monk pieces still in the active repertoire, something that cannot be said of any other composer’s work.
    Photograph by Gai Terrell / Redferns / Getty

    There was always something to talk about. The avant-garde music that verged on conceptual art but was delivered at a relaxed and buoyant foxtrot. The memorable melodies that sat atop a virtuosic harmonic conception, emphasizing unexpected dissonances. The blues that were an unchanging constant. For those who couldn’t tell he was an unusual musician simply from listening, the visuals were a helpful guide: outrageously idiosyncratic percussive piano techniques and long, spastic dances, not to mention a wardrobe of impeccable flash and taste.

    At the beginning, Thelonious Monk was a shadowy figure known only to fellow-innovators. To help generate publicity, the Blue Note label dubbed him “the high priest” for his first records, as a bandleader, in the late nineteen-forties. After Monk spent a few more years in penniless obscurity, suddenly, most of New York City went to the Five Spot, where he was in residence for multiple months in 1957. From there he became a household name and one of the biggest draws on the European circuit. In 1964, he even appeared on the cover of Time magazine, and was profiled by Lewis Lapham, in the Saturday Evening Post, although most of the mainstream press during Monk’s lifetime made unhappy allusions to craziness, infantilism, and negroid primitivism. Eventually, the record companies decided that he wasn’t a religious icon (“the high priest”) but a warrior instead, and his last significant major-label release, “Underground,” depicted him on the cover with guns, grenades, and a captured Nazi.

    During Monk’s ascendency, his style was so different from that of any other bebop or modern-jazz pianist. It was stubborn, incantatory, utterly African. Occasionally, when his left hand opened up and gave an accurate quotation of glorious Harlem stride, it became downright anachronistic. Some of the cognoscenti were bewildered, at least at first. Most of the skeptics ended up admiring his compositions, although certain great musicians, like Miles Davis, Lennie Tristano, and Oscar Peterson, would continue to dislike aspects of his playing. Ironically, Davis began his ascendency with a performance of Monk’s “ ’Round Midnight.” The ironies are compounded when you remember that Monk would always be irritated about how Davis used incorrect chord changes, not just on “ ’Round Midnight” but on “Well, You Needn’t,” as well.

    After his death, in 1982, scholars and fans settled down and began doing the serious work of parsing the complexities and clearing away the controversies. In 1983, the boutique label Mosaic Records launched with “The Complete Blue Note Recordings of Thelonious Monk.” The quietly stunning cinéma-vérité documentary “Straight, No Chaser,” directed by Charlotte Zwerin, was released, in 1989. In 2002, “The Thelonious Monk Fake Book” collected accurate lead sheets, edited by Steve Cardenas and Don Sickler. In 2009, Robin D. G. Kelley published “Thelonious Monk: The Life and Times of an American Original,” a hefty, family-authorized, and definitive factual biography, which declared that Monk was bipolar and offered clues, if not final answers, about why Monk spent his last years withdrawn and silent.

    There are sixty-odd Monk pieces still in the active repertoire, something that cannot be said of any other composer’s work. Monk has varied musical tributes from Charles Mingus (“Jump Monk”), Sonny Rollins (“Disco Monk”), Eric Dolphy (“Hat and Beard”), Andrew Hill (“Monastery”), McCoy Tyner (“The High Priest”), and hundreds of others. Many of the remaining jazz celebrities are on the board of the Thelonious Monk Institute, which, for almost three decades, has sponsored the world’s biggest jazz contest.

    Monk’s perfect package of accessible surrealism has proved to be catnip to a long line of painters, critics, modern dancers, novelists, and, especially, poets. A collected set of the complete poems written about Monk would fill a small library, most on a theme similar to Abbey Lincoln’s lyric to “Blue Monk”:

    Going alone
    life is your own
    but the cost sometimes is dear.
    Being complete
    knowing defeat
    keeping on from year to year.

    The poets are correct. Monk will always challenge conventional jazz. In “Straight, No Chaser,” Tommy Flanagan and Barry Harris offer duo performances of “Well, You Needn’t” and “Misterioso.” Flanagan and Harris are swinging, but both are far from their magical best, and the result (intentionally or unintentionally—only Zwerin knows) shows how tame and unexciting “normal” bebop piano can be when compared to Monk.

    He is a smooth object that spins out of one’s grasp, as easily as a ball bearing shaped like his middle name, Sphere. The minute you pin him down, he’s dancing in another corner. A child can march to his 4/4 time, yet so many of his internal minimal rhythms are fantastically complex Afro-Cuban derivatives, confusing to all but the initiated. He’s one of the original Afro-futurists—a noble lineage that includes Sun Ra (“Space Is the Place”) and the Art Ensemble of Chicago (“Black Music: Ancient to the Future”)—yet he also programmed campy and sentimental parlor piano songs from the days of yesteryear.

    Jazz musicians began playing “standards” from the American popular songbook to generate a specific feeling, neither a blues nor a musical but some mysterious intersection of the two. After Louis Armstrong, the artist who gave the most early energetic life to this essential chiaroscuro was Billie Holiday. As a young man, Monk would lie in bed and stare at a photo of Holiday taped to his ceiling, illuminated by a single red light bulb.

    In his maturity, Monk would always play a standard redone in harmonic and melodic terms just as specific as an original Monk composition. The most absurd of those standards might be “Just a Gigolo,” a song about being a male escort, which was originally written as an Austrian tango, by the Italian composer Leonello Casucci, before being popularized in America with lyrics by the Romanian-Jewish Broadway great Irving Caesar. Monk is all the way inside the tune while simultaneously impossibly distant. His reading of the original melody is relentlessly accurate, so it must be the manipulation of tone and accompaniment that produces such a complex final product.

    The composer James Newton says that “Timbre is the least investigated and most misunderstood element of African music.” In “Just a Gigolo,” the sonority is as un-European as a piano can possibly be (and perhaps a good reminder that Picasso and his fellow-Cubists were deeply influenced by African art). But the rules and regulations concerning voice-leading in European music are not discarded. Indeed, Monk understands the pure harmonic potential of “Gigolo” better than Cascucci or Caesar, offering a sweet-and-sour palette that heightens the song’s solemn ambivalence. In the end, while Monk’s “Just a Gigolo” remains absurd, it can also reduce one to tears.

    Video footage can help when assessing the performing arts, but not always. There is nothing more boring than decent jazz on a flawed video. However, in the case of Monk, videos are always a true bonus, especially the videos of the working quartet with Charlie Rouse, in the nineteen-sixties. Rouse is a stoic gladiator, the bands swing so hard, and Monk’s pianistic physicality and interpretive dance explode through the screen. One date in particular is glorious: in Tokyo, on May 23, 1963, a crew of smart visual and audio technicians placed one of Monk’s greatest bands, with Rouse, Butch Warren, and the incandescent Frankie Dunlop, against a simple modernist backdrop and let them blow. The version of “Just a Gigolo” from that performance is in “Straight, No Chaser,” and the rest of the songs are available on YouTube.

    Although nobody was more laconic than Monk, none of the twentieth-century jazz greats were especially verbose when an outsider asked them about their music. They didn’t say much, because how could they start? Where to begin? Either you get the perfect balance of references and realities contained in that May 23, 1963, video—race, blues, swing, melody, harmony, time, fashion, clave, avant, folklore, academy, mystic, complex, simple—or you don’t. If you do get it, then, as Monk himself said, “Always know.” In case “Always know” isn’t clear, there’s another line of Monk’s that was copied down by his student Steve Lacy: “You’ve got to dig it to dig, you dig?”

    The dozens of cryptic Monk aphorisms are key. Here’s one that isn’t yet in print. My friend Dean Estes hung out with him in Minneapolis in the sixties, and Monk spent the week saying, “White is right. Two is one.” Years later, Dean realized that Monk was talking about the civil-rights images dominating the television news. Two isn’t one, so white wasn’t right.

    His wife, Nellie, called him Melodious Thunk. Happy hundredth birthday, Thelonious Monk.

    See the full article here .

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist, composer, and critic best known for his work in the avant-garde jazz trio The Bad Plus with bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King.

    The original Bad Plus Ethan Iverson, Reid Anderson and Dave King https//www.aladdin-theater.com

    Iverson was born in Menomonie, Wisconsin. Before The Bad Plus, he was musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group and a student of both Fred Hersch and Sophia Rosoff. He has worked with artists such as Billy Hart, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Tim Berne, Mark Turner, Ben Street, Lee Konitz, Albert “Tootie” Heath, Paul Motian, Larry Grenadier, Charlie Haden and Ron Carter.

    He currently studies with John Bloomfield and serves on the faculty at New England Conservatory.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:48 AM on October 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Jazz, , , Only in Los Angeles?, Piano Spheres, The Evenings on the Roof chamber series   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Only in Los Angeles?” 

    New Music USA


    From NEWMUSICBOX

    October 9, 2018

    1
    Image credit -Bronfman,Cheng,Ax,Salonen

    It could be said that Los Angeles has conspired, by countless means and for many decades, to make itself into as hospitable an environment for new music as possible.

    L.A. has had a freewheeling attitude from its inception.

    As early as 1925, around the time when John Cage was about to enter Los Angeles High School, the downtown Biltmore Hotel was playing host to Henry Cowell’s “New Music Society of California,” which championed works by Carl Ruggles, Leo Ornstein, Dane Rudhyar, Arnold Schoenberg, and Edgard Varèse. By the late ’20s even the Hollywood Bowl was programming performances of “shockingly new music” by Béla Bartók, Arthur Honegger, Schoenberg, and Igor Stravinsky.

    John Cage by Bogaerts, Rob – Anefo

    In the 1930s a vibrant jazz scene coalesced around Central Avenue, fostering talents such as Charles Mingus and Buddy Collette.

    Charles Mingus by Tom Marcello, Webster, New York, USA

    At the same time, as a sanctuary city for some of Europe’s most celebrated artists and intellectuals fleeing Germany and eventually Europe, scores of exiled musicians were transplanting themselves into the film industry, local orchestras, and conservatories. With people like Schoenberg, Lotte Lehmann, and Ernst Krenek came a progressive outlook that persists to this day.

    Arnold Schoenberg by Florence Homolka

    The Evenings on the Roof chamber series was founded in 1939 on the Rudolph Schindler-designed rooftop of Peter and Frances Yates’s Silverlake home, renamed the Monday Evening Concerts in 1954. It’s there that Schoenberg and Stravinsky famously avoided each other.

    Igor Stravinsky public domain

    Today MEC is still thriving and presenting uncompromising programs to capacity crowds. And yet it represents just one of the many Los Angeles contemporary music success stories.

    I am a transplant to L.A, having grown up in New Jersey. As a child I studied with a painstakingly thorough and patient teacher, Isabelle Sant’Ambrogio, of Bloomfield. She assigned me exercises from Old World technical treatises such as Tobias Matthay’s The Act of Touch in All Its Diversity and readings from Josef and Rosina Lhévinne’s Basic Principles in Pianoforte Playing, plus weekly drills from George Wedge’s Applied Harmony and Keyboard Harmony. She also gave me my first assignments in the newest music from her era: pieces by Paul Creston, Walter Piston, and, most presciently, Aeolian Harp by Henry Cowell.

    Walter Piston public domain

    Henry Cowell from BBC

    I came to L.A. for the prospect of UCLA and working with Aube Tzerko, a former student and assistant to Artur Schnabel whose analytical insight into scores of any era was legendary. Though it was the canonic works of the 18th through early 20th century that I focused on with him during my studies, I later sought Mr. Tzerko’s wisdom just before auditioning for Pierre Boulez’s Paris-based Ensemble Intercontemporain.

    Pierre Boulez from Michael Latz -AFP=Getty Images

    My intention was to play just three of their required works for him: Bach’s C#-minor Fugue in five voices, the first movement of Beethoven’s Op. 111, and Ravel’s Scarbo. After a few hours on that came the question, “What else is on the list?” Only after several more hours at the piano would he let me go, only after I had made sense—for him and for myself—of the remaining audition repertoire: the opening cadenza to Boulez’s Éclat, Stockhausen’s Klavierstúcke vii, Schoenberg’s Op. 33a and b, and the third of Bartók’s Op. 18 Studies.

    Karlheinz Stockhausen October 1994 in the Studio for Electronic Music of WDR Cologne by Kathinka Pasveer

    Even more enduring for me than Mr. Tzerko’s insights into works that he had never heard before (with the exception of the Schoenberg) was his resolute quest to understand the rhetoric of music and how best to express it. I made it into a group of three finalists, but ultimately did not win the EIC job. So I stayed in L.A.

    In the early ’80s I received an invitation from Monday Evening Concerts directors Lawrence Morton and Dorrance Stalvey to perform with the MEC ensemble, giving me my first professional opportunity to play new music. The engagement marks the beginnings of a lifetime dedicated to collaborating with composers and playing, then commissioning, their music. I now wonder if it may have been the pianist Leonard Stein, longtime assistant and editor to Arnold Schoenberg, who recommended me to the venerated series, since I had recently performed the Op. 19 Sechs kleine Klavierstücke for a concert he had produced at the Arnold Schoenberg Institute.

    If so, it would be Leonard who some decades later would come to plot a second life-changing opportunity for me and three of his other protégés in the form of the Piano Spheres concert series. More on that later.

    Leonard Stein by Betty Freeman

    As much as I “took” to deciphering difficult new scores (I came of age when tonality had not yet begun its reascendence), my life’s course has been largely about Los Angeles having simply imposed its will on me. As an “extra” with the Los Angeles Philharmonic for twenty years, I played beside the indomitable principal keyboard Zita Carno and effectively coincided with the tenures of team Esa-Pekka Salonen, as conductor, and Steven Stucky, as resident composer and new music advisor. Given their rather frequent programming of works that required two keyboards, this means that I was there for Witold Lutosławski’s Symphony No. 3 with Salonen in 1984 on his first visit to the orchestra. I was there to work with György Ligeti in Aventures, with Luciano Berio when he conducted Sinfonia, with Kaija Saariaho, Pierre Boulez, and John Adams every time they came to town, and on countless Green Umbrella programs. The orchestra took me on international tours, enlisted me on recordings of Lutosławski’s Third, Salonen’s L.A. Variations, and Bartók’s Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta, and engaged me as a Messiaen soloist first with Zubin Mehta and then with Pierre Boulez. These were extraordinary experiences for me as a young pianist. As I became steeped in the culture of the LA Phil, I took pride in being part of its boldly progressive ethos—and adopted it, as did the city as a whole.

    Gyorgy Ligeti by Marcel Antonisse – Anefo

    Luciano Berio public domain

    Kaija Saariaho by Merrin Lazyan Mar 6, 2017 ·

    The monthly salons hosted in the 1980s by the music patron Betty Freeman in her Beverly Hills home were rarefied yet wonderfully informal affairs. Surrounded by artworks of Sam Francis, Roy Lichtenstein, David Hockney, Frank Stella, Dan Flavin, and more, young local composers would present their music, and then, after a brief interval comprising cocktails and homemade pasta, an established composer would do the same, each in conversation with the crusty late critic Alan Rich.

    Alan Rich from Orange County Register

    The storied conductor, composer, pianist, and lexicographer Nicolas Slonimsky reportedly did not miss a single salon, at which the likes of John Harbison, Joan La Barbara, Conlon Nancarrow, Elliott Carter, Steve Reich, Anthony Davis, John Adams, William Kraft, György Ligeti, Pierre Boulez, Witold Lutosławski, younger composers Carl Stone, Rand Steiger, Laura Karpman, and many others shared their music as they did nowhere else. As new music benefaction goes, Betty was legendary (she even funded my first commission for a piece by Mark Applebaum), and her salons cemented an enduring community of hardcore new music devotees in L.A. But she was just one of a number of generous new music lovers in this city whose patronage then and now has made big things possible.

    Los Angeles continues to imprint its forward-looking ideology on unsuspecting patrons, musicians, and audiences. In recent years, the city has become even more of a mecca for composers and musicians with its well-documented status as a place where new music is created, cultivated, and embraced. I remember the Australian composer Brett Dean being stunned at walking out to address a packed Green Umbrella crowd in Walt Disney Concert Hall, saying that it was largest audience for a new music concert he had ever seen, and by far the most enthusiastic. That was 2006, and things have only gotten better.

    For their current centennial season the LA Phil is presenting no fewer than 54 commissions, 58 premieres, and music by 61 living composers. Employment opportunities are still plentiful in film and TV (and now video games), and these draw diverse, multifaceted composers, while area orchestras and opera companies beyond the deeply rooted LA Phil and LA Opera fill their ranks from the local freelance pool. There is work to be had and new music to played with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Long Beach Symphony, Long Beach Opera, Kaleidoscope Chamber Orchestra, Pasadena Symphony, New West Symphony, Pacific Symphony, Southeast Symphony, and Santa Monica Symphony. Orchestras and chamber series alike restrict their rehearsal schedules to evenings in order to accommodate the sort of musician who records a Star Wars soundtrack with John Williams by day and attends a Harrison Birtwistle rehearsal for the Jacaranda series that night.

    The Santa Monica-based Jacaranda series is prominent amongst L.A.’s adventurous presenters of contemporary chamber music and draws big audiences for its imaginative programs of contemporary fare. Now in its 16th season, the fall concerts feature pianist Kathleen Supové playing music of Dylan Mattingly and the Lyris Quartet playing works by Pavel Haas, Georg Friedrich Haas, and Jörg Widmann. New music thrives as well at venues such as Monk Space, in recent initiatives such as The Industry, HEAR NOW festival, and WasteLAnd, and with the inspired programming of young ensembles wild Up, Hocket, Brightwork, Aperture Duo, and Panic Duo.

    Piano Spheres, a recital series devoted to new music for the piano, was the creation of Leonard Stein, the founding director of the Arnold Schoenberg Institute.

    Piano Spheres @LAPianoSpheres

    Leonard taught seminars about Schoenberg for the University of Southern California, where four new music-minded pianists—Vicki Ray, Mark Robson, Susan Svrcek, and myself—were enrolled as doctoral students. (The ASI was housed in a jewel of a modernist structure, where, especially affecting, was the replica of Schoenberg’s study, complete with piano and writing desk on which sat his bulging Rolodex.). It was the four of us whom he invited to join his new venture with the mission of exploring the far reaches of the repertoire and creating the piano literature of the future. Leonard died in 2004, but Piano Spheres has continued on and is now celebrating its 25th season. Our programs are as varied as we are, and by now we have presented more than 80 world or U.S. premieres and commissioned a minimum of one new work per year. For the four of us, the significance of Piano Spheres in our artistic lives, and the fulfillment it has given each of us, cannot be overstated. At this quarter-century milestone, we have a growing list of emerging pianists whom we are now welcoming to the series, as Leonard did for us.

    Having spent all of my working life and more in Los Angeles, I recall that during my coming-of-age a frequent topic of conversation was the friendly feud between Los Angeles and New York for primacy in the music world. L.A. has long borne the indignity of being broadly dismissed as hopelessly uncultivated. Many continued to feel as Otto Klemperer did, who upon his 1933 arrival as the new conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic had lamented, “My God, my God, I didn’t know that such a lack of intellectuality existed.”

    As the city and its musical institutions began maturing into what they are today, I recall bold new initiatives frequently responded to with a self-congratulatory “this could only happen in L.A.” By now it is accepted wisdom that L.A. is adventurous, ambitious, and generous towards new music.

    The gloating has diminished. Our new music calendar is indeed full, lively, and provocative, but I doubt that this progress could have happened “only in L.A.” Let’s hope not. But luckily for L.A., the seeds were planted long ago for its eventual transformation from “cultural desert” into a target destination for composers and musicians. The word is out that L.A. can provide not just a bounty of opportunities in new music, but a city-wide sensibility that inspires its musicians to create new ones.

    [The preeminence of the L.A. Philharmonic today is the result of the work of Esa-Pekka Salonen]

    Esa-Pekka Salonen MulPix.com

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:31 PM on October 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Jazz,   

    From Cuneiform Records: New Releases 

    From Cuneiform Records

    Autumn Announcement:

    Cuneiform Records resumes releasing new recordings
    &
    The Music Outpost begins offering publicity & promo services to musicians

    1

    Phillip Johnston & The Coolerators
    DIGGIN’ BONES

    2
    Diggin’ Bones is a jazz album by Johnston’s Australia-based quartet, The Coolerators [composer/saxophonist Johnston (The Micros), bassist Lloyd Swanton (The Necks), organist Alister Spence (Alister Spence Trio), drummer Nic Cecire]. Produced by Lloyd Swanton and featuring some of Australia’s finest jazz/multi-genre improvisers, Diggin’ Bones shows a new side of Johnston’s music, combining funky organ combo jazz with modernist jazz composition and a touch of klezmer.
    Listen to & buy (digital or CD) on Bandcamp:
    https://phillipjohnston.bandcamp.com/album/diggin-bones

    November 27, 2018 Concert in NYC:
    On Saturday, November 27, 2018, Johnston celebrates Diggin’ Bones‘ release in New York City with his NY-group The Silent Six [Johnston– soprano sax, Joe Fiedler– trombone, Mike Hashim– baritone sax, Neal Kirkwood– piano, Dave Hofstra– bass, Rob Garcia– drums], who will perform tunes from The Coolerators’ album at SMALLS JAZZ CLUB, 183 West 10th St, Greenwich Village, NYC.

    Phillip Johnston
    THE ADVENTURES OF PRINCE ACHMED
    3
    Johnston composed this album of film music as a soundtrack to The Adventures of Prince Achmed, the world’s first feature-length animated film, which was based on The Arabian Nights and created by groundbreaking female film pioneer and silhouette animator Lotte Reiniger. For this recording, the music is performed by Johnston (soprano sax) with James Greening (trombone), Alister Spence and Casey Golden (organ, keyboards) and Nic Cecire (drums), and divided into twelve separate tracks.
    Listen to & buy (digital or CD) on Bandcamp:
    https://phillipjohnston.bandcamp.com/album/the-adventures-of-prince-achmed

    Both of Johnston’s new albums will also be available for sale worldwide via Wayside Music when released on October 26th. Packaged in stunningly designed digi-packs, each CD – whether sold via Wayside or Bandcamp – is hand-signed by Phillip Johnston.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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