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  • richardmitnick 4:21 PM on November 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Die Nacht", "In Concert - Beethoven / Liszt", "Lebroba", "Lucent Waters", , , Jazz   

    New from From ECM: Four Releases 

    New from From ECM

    From ECM which might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    1
    Die Nacht
    Anja Lechner, Pablo Márquez

    Release date: 02.11.2018
    ECM 2555
    Format : CD

    German cellist Anja Lechner and Argentinean guitarist Pablo Márquez met in 2003 and have since explored the most diverse repertoire and modes of expression in their concerts. For their first duo album, a conceptual context is provided by the strong tradition of songs with guitar accompaniment prevalent in 19th century Vienna, as Lechner and Márquez play some of Schubert’s most beloved songs (including Die Nacht, Nacht und Träume and Der Leiermann), elegantly framing the album’s centrepiece: Schubert’s expansive Arpeggione sonata. Many of Schubert’s songs were published in alternative versions with guitar during the composer’s lifetime; in some cases, the guitar version appeared even before the one for piano. Interspersed on the recording, as an echo and commentary to Schubert’s spirit and language, are the graceful Trois Nocturnes originally written for cello and guitar by Friedrich Burgmüller (1806-1874). Die Nacht is issued as Lechner and Márquez embark on a European tour with concerts in Germany, Austria, France, Hungary and Romania.

    “Art does not reproduce the visible but rather makes things visible.” This statement of Paul Klee’s, from his Creative Confession of 1920, is valid not only as a watchword of modernity; for the Romantics, too, stirred themselves to render visible what is often hidden from us, appearing at most as an emotion.
    Schubert’s music offers a particular instance. His works poeticize whatever is real, allowing reality to become dream and , by means of music, the dream of a better world to become reality. All that is earthly is metamorphosed into a function of soul and spirit. Themes such as night, aloneness, silence and longing are the fundamental leanings not just of the composer’s songs but of his soundscapes generally.
    For the cellist Anja Lechner, Schubert’s music has been an aesthetic lodestar since childhood, when she became familiar with the songs and piano works in the parental home.
    From the early 1990s on, the Rosamunde Quartett, of which she was a founding member, delved deeply into Schubert´s quartets and late quintet alongside a spectrum of repertoire from Haydn to the modern day. Since the quartet disbanded in 2009, she has made a name for presenting programmes that bridge styles and cultures, numerous composers entrusting her with the first performances of their works.
    For Die Nacht she has returned to her early passion: the music of Schubert. Completely in the spirit of the composer, whose compositions were to be performed principally in private among friends, she and the Argentinian guitarist Pablo Márquez have recorded a programme that gives the feeling of a musical dialogue taking place in Schubert’s house.
    Playing song accompaniments on the quieter guitar instead of the piano, strengthens the impression of intimate music-making. Moreover, singing to the guitar was a widespread practice in the 19th century. Some of Schubert´s songs, who also played the guitar, were, already during his lifetime, published in arrangements for the instrument. The song arrangements in the present recording (with the exception of Der Leiermann and the Romance from Rosamunde, which Anja Lechner and Pablo Márquez have themselves newly transcribed) come from manuscripts found in the collection of the Bohemian poet Franz Xaver Schlechta von Wschehrd, who belonged, together with Franz von Schober and the brothers Spaun, to the innermost circle of Schubert’s friends.
    At the centre of the recording, alongside five songs and the romance, stands the Sonata in A minor, D. 821, originally written for, and subsequently named after, the arpeggione. Almost forgotten today, this instrument, often referred to as a guitar d’amour or bowed guitar, is customarily replaced by the cello, and is so here, while the transparent piano part has been subtly arranged for guitar. Three nocturnes, originally composed for the cello/guitar combination by a Schubert contemporary, Friedrich Burgmüller, add a gentle echo to the music of Schubert.
    The album is Anja’s Lechner first purely classical recording since that of Haydn’s Seven Last Words, Hob. XX:2, with the Rosamunde Quartet in 2001.

    Featured artists
    Anja Lechner Violoncello
    Pablo Márquez Guitar

    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    2
    In Concert – Beethoven / Liszt
    Till Fellner

    Release date: 02.11.2018
    ECM 2511

    Speaking to the New York Times in 2007, Alfred Brendel said of fellow pianist Till Fellner: “It has impressed me how ambitiously he has developed his repertory, being equally at home in solo and concerto repertoire, chamber music and lieder… I heard him do the best live performance of Liszt’s Années de pèlerinage”. Fellner’s insightful playing of the Premiere année from that collection of suites, underlines the contention, vividly conveying Franz Liszt’s literal and imaginative journeys. “Having recently travelled to many new countries,” wrote the composer in 1855, “through different settings and places consecrated by history and poetry, and having felt that the phenomena of nature and their attendant sights stirred deep emotions in my soul, I have tried to portray in music a few of my strongest sensations and most lively impressions”. Fellner’s account of Liszt was recorded at the Musikvereien in Vienna in 2002. It is paired here with a concert recording of Beethoven’s Sonata No 32, recorded at the Mahaney Center for the Arts in Middlebury, Vermont in 2010, the year in which ECM released Fellner’s interpretation of Beethoven’s Piano Concertos Nos 4 and 5 to a chorus of critical acclaim.

    Featured artists
    Till Fellner Piano
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    3

    Lebroba
    Andrew Cyrille, Wadada Leo Smith, Bill Frisell

    Release date: 02.11.2018
    ECM 2589
    Format : CD
    LP

    Andrew Cyrille’s 2016 release The Declaration of Musical Independence gave notice that one of the drumming innovators of new jazz had taken his conception of group playing to another level of development, and the space-conscious Lebroba, with Wadada Leo Smith and Bill Frisell, applies further fine-tuning. The album’s title is a contraction of Leland, Brooklyn and Baltimore, birthplaces of the protagonists of a recording which brings together three of creative music’s independent thinkers.

    Each of them made his first ECM appearance long ago. Drummer Andrew Cyrille appeared on Marion Brown’s Afternoon of a Georgia Faun in 1970, trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith on his own Divine Love in 1978, and guitarist Bill Frisell in 1979 on Eberhard Weber’s Fluid Rustle, with his leader debut In Line following in 1982; these are, of course, players of enduring influence. In recent seasons, Cyrille has been heard on Ben Monder’s Amorphae, Wadada has recorded with Vijay Iyer on A Cosmic Rhythm With Each Stroke and Frisell has introduced a duo with Thomas Morgan on Small Town.

    Andrew Cyrille and Wadada Leo Smith first played together in the early 1970s in a period when some of the trailblazers of Chicago’s AACM were relocating to the New York region. In the late 1990s they came together again in the quartet of bassist John Lindberg. Their reunion in the Lebroba trio with this recording – made at New York’s Reservoir Studio – was suggested by the album’s producer, Sun Chung.

    Always a generous leader, Cyrille gives plenty of room to his cohorts, who also bring in compositions, with Wadada’s elegant four-part suite dedicated to Alice Coltrane unfurling slowly over its 17-minute duration. Written and open sections are interlaced, with a free role for the drums in the closing moments. “I didn’t want to play all the time,” Andrew explains. “I wanted to play rhythms with spaces between them, and to play melodically, in relation to what Wadada and Bill were doing…” Creative energies are pooled also on the spontaneously created TGD, credited to all three players,

    Reviews of Cyrille have often emphasised the elemental strength of his playing (“his energy is unflagging, his power absolute”, the All Music Guide notes). Yet even in contexts calling for unconditional drive – such as Cecil Taylor’s celebrated trio with Jimmy Lyons (of which Andrew was a member for more than a decade) – there always was a differentiated methodology at work in the drumming. Still, as Kevin Whitehead writes in the CD booklet, the release of The Declaration of Musical Independence in 2016 “took some listeners by surprise. There Andrew’s new elliptical style unfolded – a style, he says ‘where the meter is implied but not inferred’.”

    Bill Frisell contributed to the Declaration album, but Lebroba marks a first-time meeting for the guitarist and Wadada Leo Smith. “If there is a continuity of concept between the Declaration quartet and this trio,” Says Cyrille in the liner notes, “the linchpin is Frisell. The music is different, but the concept is about the same. And then Wadada brings in his voice and his philosophy.”

    With no bass and no keyboards this time, the ensemble texture is more transparent than on Declaration and with Cyrille sometimes reducing his sound to a discontinuous groundswell, there are plenty of the charged silences and open spaces that Wadada Leo Smith loves to play into. Bill Frisell’s history includes extensive work with another bassless trio, Paul Motian’s trio with Joe Lovano. “Andrew does remind me of Paul in a way,” says Frisell. “People describe their playing as free or abstract and overlook the feel: the deep, deep beat coming from a deep, deep place.”

    Even unstated, its presence is felt on Lebroba, not least on Andrew’s tunes, the bluesy title piece, and the graceful ballad “Pretty Beauty”.

    Featured artists
    Andrew Cyrille Drums
    Wadada Leo Smith Trumpet
    Bill Frisell Guitar
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    4

    Lucent Waters
    Florian Weber, Ralph Alessi, Linda May Han Oh, Nasheet Waits

    Release date: 02.11.2018
    ECM 2593

    Florian Weber’s second ECM appearance, following a critically-acclaimed duo recording (Alba, 2016) with Markus Stockhausen, finds the gifted German pianist leading a newly formed quartet through a programme of his compositions. Openness is key here: whether paying tribute to mentor Lee Konitz on Honestlee, impressionistically conveying the glittering Melody of a Waterfall, or generating impactful outcomes from fragments of material on a conceptual piece like Butterfly Effect, the intention is to encourage fresh responses from the participants.

    “I see this album as a meeting of very independently-minded musicians,” says Weber. “It’s the first time I’ve had a band where what particularly interests me is the difference between the players and their approaches to improvising.” He cites the contrast between the soulful, grounded quality of Linda May Han Oh’s bass playing and Nasheet Waits’s fleet, free-flowing drums. “Linda and Nasheet are very different characters, but they balance each other in their exchanging of energies.” The Lucent Waters line-up marks a first collaboration between Weber and Waits, the drummer being recommended by producer Manfred Eicher for the project. “I liked very much Nasheet’s playing on Ralph Alessi’s ECM albums [Baida and Quiver], those are great recordings, so the idea resonated with me.”

    Linda May Han Oh and Florian Weber first worked together in trio with Lee Konitz a decade ago. “That was the beginning of a vivid exchange of ideas that has continued in other contexts. For myself, working with Lee night after night taught me what it really means to be spontaneous in the music.” There’s a difference, Weber suggests, between the contemporary emphasis on “self-expression” and “exploring what is actually there, implied in the material and in the interaction of the players.”

    Weber and Ralph Alessi have been in and out of each other’s groups for more than 15 years. Latterly, Weber’s been playing in Alessi’s trio with Dan White. “If I look at my career to date, I’ve mostly tried to play with people that I feel close to, that I understand where they’re coming from, emotionally.” Friends, of course, can still challenge each other: “Ralph always says that my writing and playing pushes him to play differently.” This is strikingly evident on Fragile Coccoon, where an initially gentle piece bursts open to feature the trumpet in a blazing admixture of lyricism and intensity, framed by Waits dramatically powerful drums.

    There are, says Weber, several factors influencing the pieces gathered here. “Pieces emerge, a lot of times, as a feeling or a perspective on some aspect of my life – in this case the twilight atmosphere of the touring musician’s world, and all the ups and downs of that. Then there’s the compositional aspect: I’m always trying to create or shape something which hasn’t, to my knowledge, been there before.”

    The degree of freedom given to the players differs from piece to piece. “On Brilliant Waters, for instance, I didn’t give them much more than the title: that’s a free, open piece, although we end organically on one note, which does sound composed. I did tell the group that I wanted the album to have a sense of narrative, with interconnecting links, of some kind. A motif that appears in one piece might recur in another piece, perhaps reversed. Atmospheric ideas return, two pieces may have a similar instrumental emphasis at certain points, or a soundscape may be similar. As a bandleader I think there’s a fine line between giving musicians too much information and not giving them enough: I wanted the musicians to make their own thing, too.”

    Nasheet Waits has the freest role in Melody of a Waterfall, which takes its inspiration partly from traditional Japanese drum ensembles: “I like the clarity and focus of that music, its stillness as well as its passion and energy. I find Japanese culture and its ideas fascinating and have tried to understand it – insofar as one can, as a westerner.”

    From Cousteau’s Point Of View references some recent diving experiences: “The changed three- dimensional perspectives and transparency are central to this tune. Musically it’s 3 against 7, both times going on at the same time, and you’re not sure which one you should follow. I like transparency, but too much of it can make the mystery disappear. And I also like the mystery, just as I like the things that are not said, and the notes not played.”

    Honestlee, dedicated to Lee Konitz (“every time I meet Lee I learn something new” says Florian), incorporates “some Lennie Tristano School ideas, but not Tristano-style playing. It explores some ideas he had about lines and counterpoint.” The piece also takes impetus from drawings which Karlheinz Stockhausen made at Darmstadt. “The drawings illustrate some polyphonic concepts. I looked at them and immediately wanted to write a tune. Wanting to dedicate something to Lee, the ideas converged. So we start with lines and then go into open mode.” Weber’s playing, exemplary throughout, is particularly affecting here.

    (Konitz, on hearing this recording, has said “Florian is one of the most creative piano players I have ever played with. His music is totally free. He has got the texture, the feeling, just beautiful. I am very touched by this music. It feels divine to me.“)

    • Born into a musical family in Detmold, Germany, in 1977, Florian Weber began playing piano at the age of four, and by the time he graduated high school was appearing with both jazz and classical ensembles. In Cologne he studied with Hans Ludemann and John Taylor, before heading to the USA and further studies with teachers including Paul Bley, JoAnne Brackeen, Danilo Pérez and Richie Beirach. In 2002 Weber founded Trio Mensarah with bassist Jeff Denson and drummer Ziv Ravitz. By 2006, Lee Konitz was playing with the group which subsequently formed the basis of his New Quartet, touring widely and recording a prizewinning album at New York’s Village Vanguard. In 2011 Weber founded the group Biosphere with guitarist Lionel Loueke, bassist Thomas Morgan and drummer Dan Weiss. Florian Weber also continues to play with trumpeter Markus Stockhausen. The intuitive music of their ECM album Alba was praised for its “natural warmth and character” by The Times of London. For further details, including details of upcoming dates, visit http://www.florianweber.net and http://www.ecmrecords.com

    Lucent Waters was recorded at Studios La Buissonne in the South of France in September 2017 and produced by Manfred Eicher.

    Featured artists
    Florian Weber Piano
    Ralph Alessi Trumpet
    Linda May Han Oh Double Bass
    Nasheet Waits Drums
    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:16 PM on November 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Artists on Tour November, Choir, , , Jazz   

    From ECM: Artists on Tour November 

    New from From ECM

    From ECM which might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    1

    Nik Bartsch’s Ronin

    November 1 New York, NY
    (Iridium)

    ______________________________________________
    Shai Maestro
    November 6 New York, NY
    (Jazz Standard)

    ______________________________________________
    Danish String Quartet

    November 3 Kingston, ON
    (Queen’s University)

    November 4 Toronto, ON
    (Royal Conservatory of Music)

    November 5 Quebec
    (Club Musical de Quebec) *

    November 8 Richmond VA
    (University of Richmond)

    November 9 Winston-Salem NC
    (Wake Forest University)

    November 10 Durham NC
    (Duke University)

    November 12 Washington DC
    (Washington Performing Arts Society) *

    November 13 Houston TX
    (Da Camera Houston)*

    November 14 Indianapolis IN
    (Ensemble Music Society)

    November 15 Ann Arbor MI
    (University Musical Society)

    November 17 New York NY
    (92Y)

    November 18 Rockport MA
    (Rockport Chamber Music Festival)

    ______________________________________________
    Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir

    Nov 11 Troy, NY
    (Troy Savings Bank Music Hall)

    Nov 12 New York, NY
    (St. Ignatius Loyola Church)

    Nov 14 Stanford, CA
    (Bing Concert Hall – Stanford University)

    Nov 16 Santa Barbara, CA
    (Campbell Hall, UC Santa Barbara)

    Nov 17 Los Angeles, CA
    (UCLA Royce Hall)
    Latvian Radio Choir

    Nov 13 New York, NY
    (St. Mary the Virgin Church, presented by Lincoln Center)

    Nov 15 Durham, NC
    (Duke Chapel – Duke University)

    Nov 16 Washington, DC
    (Coolidge Auditorium – Library of Congress)

    Nov 17 Toronto, ON
    (Metropolitan United Church)

    ______________________________________________
    Vijay Iyer Sextet

    Nov 30 – Dec 1 New Orleans, LA
    Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans (Sextet)

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:55 AM on November 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "New Jawn", , Jazz, ,   

    From JAZZCORNER: “Christian McBride’s ‘New Jawn'” 

    From JAZZCORNER

    1

    Released on the Bassist’s new Mack Avenue Music Group Imprint:
    Brother Mister Productions

    Vinyl Available November 16, 2018

    Jawn [jän]: noun. A slang terminology from Philadelphia. All-purpose term for a person, place or thing.

    Christian McBride by Brian Callahan

    Sure, Christian McBride could have called his new ensemble the Christian McBride Quartet or the Christian McBride Group, or any number of other, somewhat more straitlaced variations on that basic theme. But this new chordless quartet – with trumpeter Josh Evans, saxophonist Marcus Strickland, and drummer Nasheet Waits – arrives with a bit too much grit under its fingernails to warrant a name quite that buttoned up!

    If there’s one thing the acclaimed bassist knows, it’s that when it comes to grit there’s no better resource to draw from than his own hometown, Philadelphia. So, McBride turned to one of the city’s most beloved colloquialisms to launch his latest project, Christian McBride’s New Jawn. The release is available now via Brother Mister Productions, McBride’s own newly launched imprint of his longtime record company, Mack Avenue Music Group.

    Call something a “jawn” in Philly, and everyone will know that whatever you’re talking about has a certain hip cachet, a heavy dose of soul, and a generous helping of what in the City of Brotherly Love is known as “atty-tood.” Christian McBride’s New Jawn has all of that and more!

    2

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    http://www.jazzcorner.com/ is the largest portal for the official websites of hundreds of jazz musicians and organizations. New features on JazzCorner include the jazz video share where you can upload and share jazz and blues videos, JazzCorner Jukebox, surf the net with Jazz always on, submit your latest jazz news, and check out what’s hot at JazzCorner’s Speakeasy, the busiest bulletin board for jazz. Be the first to know where Jazz artists are performing in our gigs section, and be sure to listen to our podcasts with established and up and coming jazz musicians in our Innerviews section.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:27 PM on November 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Billy Strayhorn, , Jazz   

    From BAM Brooklyn Academy of Music: “A lively tribute to an extraordinary jazz virtuoso” 

    From BAM-Brooklyn Academy of Music

    1

    2

    DANCE | MUSIC
    Halfway to Dawn

    Dec 5—8
    BAM Harvey Theater
    Tickets start at $25

    This jubilant dance-theater celebration is inspired by the openly gay jazz composer and arranger Billy Strayhorn, perhaps best known as Duke Ellington’s main collaborator.

    Billy Strayhorn Credit Jazz Times

    David Roussève’s choreography sets nine dancers to various movement styles with video elements and a score that features Strayhorn’s music, channeling the spirit of the virtuoso through past, present, and fantasy.

    BUY TICKETS

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition


    The Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) is a performing arts venue in Brooklyn, New York City, known as a center for progressive and avant garde performance. It presented its first performance in 1861 and began operations in its present location in 1908.

    Today, BAM has a reputation as a leader in presenting “cutting edge” performance and has grown into an urban arts center which focuses on both international arts presentation and local community needs. Its purpose is to provide an environment in which its audiences – annually, more than 775,000 people – can experience a broad array of aesthetic and cultural programs. From 1999 to 2014, BAM was headed by Karen Brooks Hopkins, President, and Joseph V. Melillo, Executive Producer. Katy Clark is now president, succeeding Hopkins who retired in spring 2015.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:01 PM on October 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Bun Ching Lam // Tana Quartet, , Darius Jones, Elliott Sharp, , Jazz, , Roulette in November   

    From Roulette: “NOVEMBER AT ROULETTE” 

    Roulette Intermedium

    From Roulette

    1
    Elliott Sharp: IrRational Music
    Thursday • November 1
    Tickets: $18 online / $25 door

    Seminal composer and multi-instrumentalist Elliott Sharp returns to Roulette to mark two important forthcoming releases: IrRational Music, Sharp’s memoir and rumination on thought, music, and art published by Terra Nova Books with Found Sound Nation, and the release of his latest album Dispersion, a collaboration with the VENI ACADEMY on Mode Records.

    Tickets

    ___________________________________________________

    2
    Darius Jones:
    For The People
    Monday • November 5
    Tickets: $18 presale / $25 door

    ___________________________________________________

    ICE-International Contemporary music Ensemble – Photograph,SquareMoose New York

    International Contemporary Ensemble:
    100 for 100 Musical Decades of Freedom
    Sunday • November 11
    Tickets: $18 presale / $25 door

    ___________________________________________________
    3
    Interpretations: Bun Ching Lam // Tana Quartet
    Wednesday • November 16
    Tickets: $20

    ___________________________________________________

    More at the full article

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Mission

    Roulette’s mission is to support artists creating new and adventurous art in all disciplines by providing them with a venue and resources to realize their creative visions and to build an audience interested in the evolution of experimental art.

    History

    Roulette Intermedium was founded in 1978 at the height of the Downtown Experimental Arts revolution by three young composers: trombonist/composer Jim Staley, composer/producer David Weinstein, and Intermedia artist Dan Senn. The informal concerts they presented in a small loft space in TriBeCa in Manhattan soon attracted an audience and critical attention. The first donation – an unsolicited and unexpected check for $1,000 – arrived in the mail from the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, suggested by noted composer, John Cage. By the mid-1980s, Roulette had emerged as “a landmark for New York’s downtown new music composers.”

    Over the next three decades, Roulette attracted a steadily growing audience and worldwide reputation as a center for musical innovation. Seminal pioneering figures who have presented their work at Roulette, oftentimes early in their careers, include Maryanne Amacher, Robert Ashley, Anthony Braxton, Simone Forti, Bill Frisell, Philip Glass, Yusef Lateef, Christian Marclay, Meredith Monk, Ikue Mori, Pauline Oliveros, Zeena Parkins, Arthur Russell, Kaija Saariaho, Wadada Leo Smith, Henry Threadgill, and John Zorn. Roulette continues to make a mark as a venue where scores of promising avant-garde artists make their first professional statements. Representatives of the latest generation of composing artists who have recently developed and presented works at Roulette include Aaron Burnette, Maria Chavez, Phyllis Chen, Jennifer Choi, Mario Diaz de Leon, Mary Halvorson, Darius Jones, Mary Kouyoumdjian, Alfredo Marin, Tristan Perich, Matana Roberts, Tyshawn Sorey, Ben Stapp, C. Spencer Yeh and many more.

    As audiences grew and rents in lower Manhattan began to rise, the staff and Board members began the search for a larger, more flexible and affordable home. On September 15th, 2011, Roulette opened a new chapter in its history when it moved into the 1928 Memorial Hall in the Downtown Brooklyn Cultural District. The new 400-seat theater allows us to expand our presentations along with our services to artists and our community; each season, we now present more than 100 music, dance, and intermedia performances. Our annual attendance now tops 60,000.

    In recent years, Roulette has effected a major transition, expanding programs, audiences and community, but it is still an artist-driven space, valued for its payment of professional guaranteed fees, its insistence on the best presentation conditions, and the provision of other critical artists’ services. Our GENERATE Program, supported for more than 30 years by the Jerome Foundation and other private and public support, awards emerging and established composers commissions and/or monetary stipends along with extensive rehearsal time in Roulette’s theater, access to audio and lighting equipment and technical staff to help them with their experiments, and full production support for performances of the work created during the residency.

    Our programming has expanded globally through Roulette’s online and television broadcast programs where audiences all over the world can explore the treasures of our archives. Roulette TV features senior figures of the avant-garde movement and their young successors.

    Roulette is one of the few surviving organizations to maintain its identity as an Artists’ Space and its commitment to bring the experimental performing arts to a wider public; its history of performances (preserved in an archive that contains nearly 3,000 hours of recordings and videos), leaves a detailed and distinguished record of almost four decades of artistic development, experimentation, and achievement.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:30 PM on October 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: and soul, , , Jazz, Joni Mitchell, KADHJA BONET,   

    From The Hum: Two New Events 

    From The Hum

    Next week, The Hum returns with not one, but two original, collaborative evenings featuring exclusively all female artists on stage…
    TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6
    PUBLIC ARTS (215 Chrystie St, NYC)
    7:30PM DOORS ✧ 8:30PM SHOW

    Tickets
    The Hum Presents:
    ❀ BEYOND BLUE ❀
    A Birthday Celebration of Joni Mitchell

    Joni Mitchell from jonimitchell.com

    Featuring TEEN and special guests…
    Jessica Ackerley, Boshra AlSaadi, Angelica Bess, Sophia Brous, Melanie Charles, Lucy Clifford, Denitia, Jen Goma, Cassandra Jenkins, Liz Maynes-Aminzade, Adi Meyerson, Angela Morris, Dida Pelled, Mickey Vershbow ++more!

    In celebration of Joni Mitchell’s 75th birthday on November 7th, The Hum brings you Beyond Blue, a collaborative evening paying tribute to the legend’s great body of work with a focus on her later recordings.

    _____________________________________________________

    THE HUM PRESENTS:
    ❀ AN EVENING WITH KADHJA BONET

    KADHJA BONET by Sinziana Velicescu-Courtesy of the artist

    FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9
    NATIONAL SAWDUST (80 N 6th St, BK)

    National Sawdust


    7:30PM DOORS ✧ 8:00PM SHOW

    Tickets

    Bonet is a skilled singer, songwriter, and arranger whose debut album blends folk, jazz, and soul into a sound that is “as familiar is it is haunting”, and her latest release is “expansive and engulfing” (Pitchfork). The evening will feature Bonet with all female collaborators on stage.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Hum is an all female and non binary concert series that celebrates, instigates, and nourishes the community of female and non binary musicians in New York City and beyond.

    Hum concerts feature exclusively women and non binary artists on stage, and all walks of life in attendance.

    Since its formation in April 2015, the series has fostered collaborations between 300+ musicians including Kimbra, Rachael Price of Lake Street Dive, Thao and the Get Down Stay Down, Yuka Honda and Miho Hatori of Cibo Matto, Adrianne Lenker of Big Thief, Kelsey Lu, members of Tune-Yards, The Cranberries, Cat Power, The Julie Ruin and more.

    Every show invites a group of female and non binary musicians to form impromptu “dream bands” bands, shedding the usual dynamics of their main projects and exploring new avenues of their creativity. Long-lasting friendships, creative relationships, and even bands have emerged from these collaborations – not to mention magical results on our stage. The music crosses a constellation of genres and influences, all coming together to form a space where women are linked – not ranked – and celebrated for their artistry on its own terms.

    The Hum has been presented at Pioneer Works, Le Poisson Rouge, House of Yes, National Sawdust Brooklyn Bazaar, Manhattan Inn and more.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:40 PM on October 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Jazz, ,   

    From Downbeat: “Kandace Springs Motors Forward” 

    From Downbeat

    Oct. 22, 2018
    Bob Doerschuk

    Kandace Springs Getty Images

    Kandace Springs isn’t the kind of performer most fans think of when they hear the phrase “Nashville-based artist.”

    At a typical concert, decked out in elegant attire that complements the sophistication of her jazz-meets-soul aesthetic, she offers a vocal intonation rich and sultry on ballads, playful and improvisational at more sprightly tempos. Her singing is impeccable. Accompanying herself on piano, she sprinkles in sly quotes from the American Songbook, as well as elements from the classical repertoire.

    The 29-year-old daughter of vocalist Scat Springs has been building an international fan base for a few years, and the release of Kandace’s new album, Indigo (Blue Note), is certain to expand her following.

    Kandace’s house sits on a rural road, near a tiny, white-framed Apostolic church outside of Nashville. On this August afternoon, her neighbor’s donkey occasionally brays. Keyboards dominate her living room: vintage Rhodes and Wurlitzer suitcase-model electric pianos, a spinet and a nine-foot Baldwin concert grand. But model cars define the decor. These, too, are vintage, the kind of Revell products her dad might have collected when he was young.

    A door opens from the kitchen into her garage, where her Corvette Stingray and MG, a replica of a ’52, are parked. “And over here,” she says, leading the way outside and to the backyard, “is a Jeep I just bought from Tanya Tucker. It’s got a four-inch TeraFlex lift, 37-inch tires, all the bells and whistles. It can go anywhere; I could drive it up a wall.”

    Kandace is in her element, beaming as she shows off her fleet. Yet her love for music, particularly classic jazz, runs just as deep. How do her two passions coexist? Do they fulfill different needs in her life or somehow run parallel to each other?

    “They’re both art projects,” she answers. “Cars are art on wheels. My dad gave me a Hot Wheels car when I was 3. My mom gave me a Barbie. I played with it a little bit and then I was like, ‘Do I really have to?’ So I set the Barbie aside—but I still have that little Matchbox car.

    “Cars are like music, too, in the way they sound,” Kandace continues. “I love exhaust systems. They sound so good. And when I’m cruising down the road, it’s like therapy for me. Say I’m working on a new song. I’m looking at something that maybe wasn’t there a while ago. I’m building on it. Then I have another artist come in to produce. We put it out on iTunes or a CD. When I hear it playing back on the radio for the first time, it’s like hearing a car I’ve been working on run for the first time. Watching how people react when they hear me perform a song I wrote is like watching people turn their heads when I drive by in a car that really looks different to them.”

    Her father gave her a lot more than that fateful toy car. He instilled in her an awareness of music and of her gift for being able to express herself through it. When Kandace was growing up, Scat worked in the studio as a backup vocalist for Aretha Franklin, Brian McKnight, Chaka Khan and other headliners, and he did voice-over work for radio spots. At night, he rocked Nashville clubs with his own band as one of the city’s most energetic and entertaining performers.

    Still, it took awhile for the lesson to sink in. “I wasn’t dreaming of music as I was growing up,” Kandace recalls. “But I certainly knew what it was. My dad started taking me to gigs and to the studio when I was maybe 5 years old. He’d do a jingle session or a festival or kill it at someone’s wedding, which was just normal for me, like, ‘That’s my dad. This is what he does.’”

    But cars, sports and drawing were her priorities until the day that Scat decided to do a favor for a friend who had fallen into hard times and had to move his family out of their place. “They had an upright piano, probably a hundred years old,” Kandace recalls. “My dad offered to keep it for a while. He helped move it in. It was dusty and had keys missing. My mom was like, ‘Get this thing out of our house!’ But I remember the first time I saw it, after waking up and coming downstairs. To me, it was beautiful.”

    A precocious child, Kandace immediately began picking out tunes. “One day, this commercial came on with Moonlight Sonata playing in the background,” she says. “My dad has a really strong ear; he has perfect pitch. So, when he overheard me using my ears to try to find the key and play it back, he came over and started playing it in his ghetto way.”

    Kandace laughs at the memory. “He made stuff up because he didn’t know the whole piece. I played it back really quick and he said, ‘This ain’t normal! Baby girl, you want lessons?’ I said, ‘Uh, I guess so.’”

    So, he called one of his good friends, guitarist Regi Wooten of the Wooten Brothers, who played keys as well. “I went to his apartment,” Kandace says. “He had all these old guitars, posters and stuff from all over the world. He also had a beatbox and this little-ass Casio with 64 keys or something like that. The first song he showed me was ‘Soul Train’; I didn’t read music yet, so I played by listening. Regi called my dad and I played it over the phone. Pops was so happy—he started laughing his ass off!”

    Lessons progressed quickly, with Wooten introducing her to suspended chords and swing on her second visit. “I was like, ‘What is this?’ He’s like, ‘That’s jazz, baby!’ And I went, ‘I want to learn more of this stuff.’”

    Scat helped out by broadening her awareness of various types of music. He began by giving his daughter albums by Norah Jones and Diana Krall, and followed that up with some Nina Simone. After that came albums by Oscar Peterson, Bill Evans and George Shearing.

    When Scat’s friend reclaimed the piano, Kandace’s mother went to a music store and returned with an upright electric piano. Kandace dug into it, playing Chopin and Liszt compositions by ear until she developed her reading skills. At 14, she bought her first sheet music, Chopin’s Fantaisie-Impromptu, memorizing it in less than a month and being handed off by Regi to his brother Joe Wooten for more advanced jazz studies.

    Kandace began singing in public around that time as well. She had been attending Kids On Stage, a summer camp in Tennessee, on scholarship. For two years she had played piano in the annual showcase. The year after that, she decided to try something different. “I was like, ‘Maybe I ought to sing this time.’ So, I got Norah Jones’ lyric book, learned ‘The Nearness Of You’ and developed my own interpretation of it. I led into it with Oscar Peterson’s ‘Chicago Blues.’ And everybody was like, ‘What? Kandace, you sing, too?’”

    Shortly after that, Scat sent a recording of Kandace to Evan Rogers and Carl Sturken, producers who have worked with Rihanna and Christina Aguilera. “Things started to get a little more complicated,” she says. “I had just turned 18 and was working as a valet at the Renaissance Hotel in Nashville, parking cars for country stars like Wynonna Judd, Carrie Underwood and Rascal Flatts. Evan texted me and talked about wanting to make me a pop star. I texted him back from the bathroom in the Renaissance, like, ‘I’m still trying to figure out what to do!’”

    The dilemma for Kandace was whether to accept Rogers and Sturken’s plan to mold her into an r&b star or to be true to her roots in jazz. As she mulled over her options, word about her spread throughout the music industry. David Foster, then chairman of the Verve Music Group, flew her out for an audition and immediately offered to sign her. The day she received the contract from Verve, she heard from producer/executive L.A. Reid and agreed to audition for him as well. This led to a third offer, this time from Epic Records, which similarly promised to target a commercial pop market.

    Then came an opportunity she was eager to accept, from Don Was, president of Blue Note Records. With his commitment to allow her to build her identity on a jazz foundation, she gracefully declined the previous offers and signed on with Blue Note. Since then, Kandace’s ascension has been as quick as a cruise in her Corvette. Blue Note released a self-titled EP in 2014 and Soul Eyes, her full-length debut, two years later. Concert promoters and festival organizers booked her for gigs around the globe.

    Kadance crafted Soul Eyes to be a work of art that stands on its own, but even as she was recording it, she viewed the album as a deliberate step toward a follow-up.

    “With that last album, I was laying down a foundation of who I was growing up,” she reflects. “It wasn’t pure jazz, but I love jazz and Soul Eyes captured that. It’s almost like the feel of Norah Jones’ first album. And that was cool. I stayed in that box because I needed to say, ‘Hey, this is me! I play the piano and sing. I’m Kandace!’”

    Indigo was conceived to expand on that statement. “The new album captures that, too, but it’s a little more soulful. I’ve always had this other side, but now it’s out for the world to see. It captures all of my influences, starting with Nina Simone, Ella Fitzgerald, Roberta Flack … but also Luther Vandross, Eva Cassidy, Erykah Badu, even D’Angelo. And lots of Chopin.”

    This meant following a new, more holistic, approach. Key to this was finding a producer who could help bring them to fruition. By pure chance, she found him, or rather he found her, one night in New York.

    On Jan. 6, 2017, Kandace was booked into the Bowery Ballroom as part of Winter Jazzfest. “I was sick with the flu and high on Robitussin,” she says. “I left [the venue] right after I was done, because I was feeling shitty.”

    Drummer, producer and composer Karriem Riggins was in the audience, and he didn’t sense that Kandace was ill. “She was incredible,” he recalls. “I didn’t have a chance to meet her, because I had to do a DJ set after her show. So, the next day, I looked her up on Twitter. It turned out we were already following each other! I [contacted her and] told her I thought her show was amazing and that I’d love to work with her. She hit me back with a message that said, ‘That’s great, because I was just talking to my manager about asking you to produce my album.’”

    The two artists clicked as soon as they got together. “He talked about how into this project he was,” Kandace says. “But really, all I needed to see was which artists he’d worked with. He said to me, ‘Hey, I’m playing at the Hollywood Bowl with Diana Krall and an orchestra. Why don’t you come down? I’ll give you a special booth.’ I got to meet Diana that night—she’s my idol. I was like, ‘OK, you’re the one! Anybody that plays for her, yeah, that works for me.’”

    Riggins, in turn, appreciated the creative space she gave him when they started collaborating. “That’s what I love about Kandace,” he says. “She left the responsibility on me to just do what I do. I hear where she’s going: She’s pushing the envelope, doing innovative music. There were no boundaries. We didn’t put Indigo in a box.”

    Casting musicians wasn’t too difficult; each agreed that Krall’s guitarist Anthony Wilson and bassist Bob Hurst would fit right in, with Kandace on piano and Riggins playing or programming drums. Then they began considering the best ways to arrange the songs they had selected. For Kandace, this was an exhilarating opportunity, a freedom she hadn’t allowed herself while intentionally staying “inside the box” on her first album.

    “We did Soul Eyes almost completely live,” she points out. “We were all in a circle, looking at each other as we tracked. We cut two or three songs a day for a week straight that way—before [doing any] editing and overdubs. That’s how I wanted it. Indigo goes to a lot more places. I was thinking about Nina Simone as we worked because she played everything—a Beatles song, a classical piece, some jazz stuff. That’s who I am. That’s what I wanted to show this time.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    DownBeat is an American magazine devoted to “jazz, blues and beyond”, the last word indicating its expansion beyond the jazz realm which it covered exclusively in previous years. The publication was established in 1934 in Chicago, Illinois. It is named after the “downbeat” in music, also called “beat one”, or the first beat of a musical measure.

    DownBeat publishes results of annual surveys of both its readers and critics in a variety of categories. The DownBeat Jazz Hall of Fame includes winners from both the readers’ and critics’ poll. The results of the readers’ poll are published in the December issue, those of the critics’ poll in the August issue.

    Popular features of DownBeat magazine include its “Reviews” section where jazz critics, using a ‘1-Star to 5-Star’ maximum rating system, rate the latest musical recordings, vintage recordings, and books; articles on individual musicians and music forms; and its famous “Blindfold Test” column, in a which a musician listens to records by other artists, tries to guess who they are, and rates them using the 5-star maximum rating system.

    In April 1979, DownBeat went to a monthly schedule for the first time since 1939.

    DownBeat was named Jazz Publication of the Year in 2016 and 2017 by the Jazz Journalists Association

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:56 PM on October 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ambrose Akinmusire & Jazz Small Group I, , Jazz,   

    From Department of Music at Princeton: “Ambrose Akinmusire & Jazz Small Group I” 

    Department of Music at Princeton


    From Department of Music at Princeton

    Ambrose Akinmusire by Eva Hambach AFP Getty
    Images

    Jazz at Princeton University
    Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018 8:00 pm
    Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

    Tickets

    Blue Note Records trumpet star Ambrose Akinmusire joins Jazz at Princeton University’s Small Group I in a program including a commissioned suite in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of W. E. Du Bois’ birth.

    About the Artist:

    Born and raised in Oakland, California, Ambrose Akinmusire (pronounced ah-kin-MOO-sir-ee) was a member of the Berkeley High School Jazz Ensemble when he caught the attention of saxophonist Steve Coleman. Akinmusire was asked to join Coleman’s Five Elements, embarking on a European tour when he was just a 19-year-old student at the Manhattan School of Music. After returning to the West Coast to pursue a master’s degree at the University of Southern California, Akinmusire went on to attend the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz in Los Angeles, where he studied with Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter and Terence Blanchard.

    In 2007 Akinmusire won the prestigious Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition, decided by a panel of judges that included Blanchard, Quincy Jones, Herb Alpert, Hugh Masekela, Clark Terry and Roy Hargrove. That year Akinmusire also won the Carmine Caruso International Jazz Trumpet Solo Competition and released his debut album Prelude…To Cora on the Fresh Sound label. He moved back to New York and began performing with the likes of Vijay Iyer, Aaron Parks, Esperanza Spalding and Jason Moran. It was also during this time that he first caught the attention of another discerning listener, Bruce Lundvall, President of Blue Note Records.

    Akinmusire’s Blue Note debut When The Heart Emerges Glistening was released in 2011 to rave reviews. The Los Angeles Times praised his “chameleonic tone that can sigh, flutter or soar,” adding that “Akinmusire sounds less like a rising star than one that was already at great heights and just waiting to be discovered.” DownBeat described his playing as “spectacular and not at all shy — muscular, driving, with a forward sound, pliant phrasing and a penchant for intervallic leaps,” concluding that “clearly something very special and personal is at work here, a vision of jazz that’s bigger than camps, broader and more intellectually restless than blowing sessions.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Princeton’s Department of Music is at the epicenter of a musical culture that is broad and deep, reaching from edge to edge of the campus, from the classroom to the concert hall, and from faculty-led groups to those run exclusively by students.

    There are several levels of involvement that students can have with the Department of Music: Graduate students can earn a Ph.D. in one of the two main areas of our Graduate program – composition or musicology – including opportunities to focus on theory or ethnomusicology. Undergraduate students can major in music, in a program with emphasis on writing music or writing about music. Undergraduates can also earn certificates in the Program in Musical Performance, both as Music Majors and as majors of other departments. Those who do not plan to pursue a degree or certificate in music are of course welcome to take courses with world-renowned composers and music historians, take instrumental or voice lessons in the private studios of top professionals, and audition to perform with our many ensembles: six jazz groups, three choruses, two orchestras, a wind ensemble, an opera theater, a musical comedy troupe, at least a dozen chamber music ensembles, a laptop orchestra, and almost twenty small a cappella singing groups.

    Community members can attend numerous concerts throughout the academic year. In addition to student performances, world-renowned artists appear on the Princeton University Concerts series; leading performers of contemporary music showcase compositions by faculty and graduate composers through the Princeton Sound Kitchen; Sō Percussion, the Edward T. Cone Artists-in-Residence, perform and engage with the community. The student-run radio station WPRB: 103.3 FM broadcasts many styles of music, often featuring Princeton student performances.

    An important feature hard to discern from a list of courses and ensembles is the Music Department’s emphasis on collaboration. This manifests not only within the department (graduate composers composing for the undergraduate orchestra, graduate musicologists making a performance edition for an undergraduate opera production), but in collaboration with other departments as well. Frequent interdisciplinary collaborators with the music department include students and faculty from Architecture, African American Studies, Computer Science, Irish Studies, and the programs in Theater, Dance, Visual Art, Music Theater, and Creative Writing all housed within the Lewis Center for Arts.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:12 PM on October 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Time Like This" Album Release Concert, Jazz, Michael Formanek Elusion Quartet, ,   

    From The Jazz Gallery NYC: “Michael Formanek Elusion Quartet with Tony Malaby, Kris Davis, and Ches Smith “Time Like This” Album Release Concert” 

    The Jazz Gallery @thejazzgallery

    From The Jazz Gallery NYC

    Michael Formanek Elusion Quartet from NewMusicUSA

    Event Details

    Sunday Oct 28, 2018

    Michael Forminack photoTony Malaby – tenor & soprano saxophones
    Kris Davis – piano
    Michael Formanek – double bass & compositions
    Ches Smith – drums, vibes & Haitian Tanbou

    sets at 7.30pm + 9.30pm
    $25/$10 for members
    reserved table seating: $35/$20 members
    (click here to become a supporting member today!)

    Tickets

    This concert will coincide with the Elusion Quartet’s new album Time Like This out on Intakt October 19th!

    “In putting together the Elusion Quartet, interpreting his music with these specific musicians, Michael Formanek says he sought “a more direct connection to emotions: mine, theirs and the listener’s.” Hank Shteamer writes in the liner notes: “As one zeroes in on the details of Time Like This, it’s clear that this sort of emotional immediacy permeates the album. You hear it in Kris Davis’ flowing, balletic solo on “A Fine Mess”; in Tony Malaby’s ululating tenor cries on “The Soul Goodbye”; in Ches Smith’s raucous grooves on “That Was Then”; or the leader’s poised, sinewy lines on “Culture of None.” Elusive? Certainly. But as this album proves, under the right conditions, with the right personnel, it’s still out there.”” – Intakt

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Jazz Gallery from Time Out

    The Jazz Gallery serves as an international cultural center where the youngest generation of emerging professional jazz musicians are nurtured with opportunities to collaborate with their peers, discover and refine their creativity, and perform in front of eager audiences. We take pride in our world-renowned reputation as a key player in the NYC jazz community by sustaining a tradition of artistic excellence in jazz and fostering artistic growth, presenting both major and established figures in jazz alongside a younger generation of artists. Since 2002, The Gallery has also been actively engaged in commissioning new work by emerging composers, many of whom have gone on to be recognized with MacArthur Foundation “genius” grants (4), Doris Duke Performing Artist Awards, Grammy Awards and more. 12 Thelonious Monk Competition winners got their start on our stage.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:27 PM on October 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Jazz, , TD James Moody Jazz Festival   

    From JAZZCORNER: “TD James Moody Jazz Festival” 

    From JAZZCORNER

    1

    Hear the best in jazz, presented with that extra-special touch of sophistication in NJPAC’s elegant Prudential Hall – it’s all part of the prestigious TD James Moody Jazz Festival, celebrating its seventh year from November 4-18!

    Here are just a few of the many highlights:

    Dianne Reeves and Gregory Porter, two of the greatest voices in jazz today in one unforgettable night …

    Congas y Canto: An Evening of Latin Jazz, featuring superstars Sheila E., Eddie Palmieri, Tito Rojas and the Christian McBride Big Band …

    Marcus Miller with special guest David Sanborn and the extraordinary vocals of Lalah Hathaway.

    NJPAC’s Victoria Theater offers an intimate setting for the big sound of the Count Basie Orchestra, with the talents of Kurt Elling, Jon Faddis, Stefon Harris and Catherine Russell. Also at “The Vic,” drummer Antonio Sánchez, composer of the score to Birdman, provides the live accompaniment for a unique screening of that Oscar-winning film.

    Click below for information about this year’s TD James Moody Jazz Festival.

    view the full schedule

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    JazzCorner.com is the largest portal for the official websites of hundreds of jazz musicians and organizations. New features on JazzCorner include the jazz video share where you can upload and share jazz and blues videos, JazzCorner Jukebox, surf the net with Jazz always on, submit your latest jazz news, and check out what’s hot at JazzCorner’s Speakeasy, the busiest bulletin board for jazz. Be the first to know where Jazz artists are performing in our gigs section, and be sure to listen to our podcasts with established and up and coming jazz musicians in our Innerviews section.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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