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  • richardmitnick 1:33 PM on May 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Freiburg Baroque Orchestra, Kristian Bezuidenhout, Lincoln Center NYC USA   

    From Lincoln Center: “Freiburg Baroque Orchestra” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    From Lincoln Center

    Saturday, May 19, 2018 at 7:30 pm Alice Tully Hall

    Tickets

    The Artists

    Freiburg Baroque Orchestra

    Kristian Bezuidenhout, fortepiano and director

    The inimitable fortepianist Kristian Bezuidenhout, described as “Mozart reincarnated” (De Telegraaf, Netherlands) and the new artistic director of Freiburg Baroque Orchestra, joins the esteemed ensemble for two high-spirited Mozart concertos. The period-instrument ensemble applies its “lithe, articulate” interpretations (New York Times) to symphonies by Haydn and Johann Christian Bach to round out this elegant, all-Classical evening.

    The Program
    Freiburg Baroque Orchestra
    1
    Patrick Seeger
    4
    Marco Borggreve
    Kristian Bezuidenhout, Fortepiano and Director
    HAYDN Symphony No. 74 in E-flat major (1781)
    Vivace assai
    Adagio cantabile
    Menuetto & Trio
    Allegro assai

    3
    Kristian Bezuidenhout. Marco Borggreve

    MOZART Piano Concerto No. 17 in G major, K.453 (1784)
    Allegro
    Andante
    Allegretto—Presto
    Mr. Bezuidenhout will perform Mozart’s cadenzas.

    Intermission
    JOHANN CHRISTIAN BACH Symphony in G minor, Op. 6, No. 6
    Allegro
    Andante più tosto
    Allegro molto

    MOZART Piano Concerto No. 9 in E-flat major, K.271 (“Jenamy”)
    (1777)
    Allegro
    Andantino
    Rondo: Presto
    Mr. Bezuidenhout will perform Mozart’s cadenzas.

    This performance is made possible in part by the Josie Robertson Fund for Lincoln Center.

    “What made their concert so gratifying was the vitality and imagination of their playing—qualities that transcend any era.”

    The New York Times

    “The finest living exponent of the fortepiano.”

    Herald (U.K.) on Kristian Bezuidenhout

    Saturday, May 19, 2018, at 7:30 pm
    Chamber Orchestras

    See the full article here .

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    stem

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 11:20 AM on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , José James, Lincoln Center NYC USA, Samora Pinderhughes, Sun Ra Arkestra   

    From Lincoln Center: “Sun Ra Arkestra, José James and Samora Pinderhughes “ 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    From Lincoln Center

    1
    Sun Ra Arkestra

    2
    José James by Janette Beckman

    3
    Samora Pinderhughes

    Wednesday, August 8, 2018 at 6:30 pm Damrosch Park

    Seating is first come, first served, and gates typically open one hour prior to the performance.
    Free

    Sun Ra Arkestra live score to Space Is the Place
    Lean On Me: José James Celebrates Bill Withers
    Samora Pinderhughes: The Transformations Suite

    “The music is different here. The vibrations are different here.” So opens the 1972 Afrofuturist sci-fi film Space Is the Place by jazz cult-icon Sun Ra. But these words could also apply to (Le) Poisson Rouge, the Bleecker Street club known for its diverse, open-minded programming.

    (Le) Poisson Rouge


    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise 3-16-2016

    This cosmic evening, part of LPR’s 10th-anniversary celebrations, builds up to the Sun Ra Arkestra’s live performance of the score to the film, in which Black people create their own paradise on Saturn, transported there by music. Getting us to that place tonight are the beloved songs of Bill Withers (Ain’t No Sunshine When She’s Gone, Just the Two of Us) performed by Blue Note jazz and R&B artist José James. Jazz pianist and composer Samora Pinderhughes opens with The Transformations Suite, a musical examination of the radical history of resistance within communities of the African diaspora.

    For guests unable to stand in line due to a disability, please visit the accessible entrance policy.

    For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact access@lincolncenter.org or 212.875.5375.

    For ticketing information and general questions, please call 212.721.6500.

    See the full article here .

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:06 AM on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bertrand Chamayou- Piano, , Lincoln Center NYC USA, Sol Gabetta- Cello   

    From Lincoln Center: “Great Performers-Sol Gabetta, cello, Bertrand Chamayou, piano” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    From Lincoln Center

    Great Performers- Sol Gabetta, cello Bertrand Chamayou, piano

    q
    Sol Gabetta, cello, Uwe Arens

    2
    Bertrand Chamayou, piano, Marco Borggreve, Warner Classics

    Saturday, May 12, 2018 at 7:30 pm Alice Tully Hall

    Tickets- you will need to access the full article for tickets, as there is no link available.

    Following a series of spellbinding international debuts, Sol Gabetta has seen a meteoric rise to her current status as a leading cello virtuoso. After captivating audiences with her “rich musical personality” (New York Times) at Mostly Mozart in 2015, the charismatic soloist returns to Lincoln Center for a recital steeped in her trademark “wit, aristocratic poise and elegance” (Herald, U.K.) with Chopin’s melodic marvel, the Cello Sonata in G minor, at its heart.

    The Program
    Beethoven: Cello Sonata in F major, Op. 5, No. 1
    Adagio sostenuto—Allegro
    Rondo: Allegro vivace

    Britten: Sonata in C major, Op. 65
    Dialogo
    Scherzo-pizzicato
    Elegia
    Marcia
    Moto perpetuo

    Chopin: Sonata in G minor, Op. 65
    Allegro moderato
    Scherzo: Allegro con brio
    Largo
    Finale: Allegro

    Chopin: Grand Duo on themes from Meyerbeer’s Robert le diable

    “Gabetta’s dramatic sweep—her bow high up above her head on the final note—struck me like an arrow pointing to the future.”

    Bachtrack

    “[Gabetta] commands the sort of technique that unravels even the fiercest knot with apparently nonchalant savoir-faire.”

    Financial Times

    See the full article here .

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:09 PM on April 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Free events in May 2018, Lincoln Center NYC USA,   

    From Lincoln Center: “Must-See Free Events at Lincoln Center in May” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    Lincoln Center

    1
    No image credit
    Each spring for more than two decades, schools from throughout the US present their bands, jazz ensembles, choirs, choruses and orchestras on Lincoln Center’s outdoor plazas as part of Lincoln Center’s Young Music Makers series. Performances by the school groups are free to the public and usually occur around lunchtime, when the plazas are crowded with visitors and Lincoln Center neighbors. Lincoln Center provides the venue, chairs, and electricity if needed. Schools bring their own instruments, music stands, and amplifiers. Schools from outside the NY-NJ-CT tri-state region are eligible for this program if they schedule a tour of the Lincoln Center campus. The tour component is optional for schools within the NY-NJ-CT tri-state area. We are eager to expand this opportunity to the many developing musicians of New York City and hope to hear from more NYC music educators soon!

    No Tickets Required

    Mon, Apr 30,11:00 am , Mon, Apr 30 12:00 pm

    May 2018
    Tue, May 1 2:00 pm
    Wed, May 9 10:00 am
    Mon, May 21 12:00 pm
    Wed, May 23 10:00 am
    Wed, May 23 11:00 am
    Wed, May 23 1:00 pm
    Fri, May 25 10:00 am
    Fri, May 25 11:00 am

    Participating Schools:

    Teachers College Community School, New York, NY, Park Center High School and Osseo High School, Brooklyn Park, MN
    El Diamante High School and Redwood High School, Visalia, CA, Manhasset High School, Manhasset, NY Grove City Christian High School, Grove City, OH, Amani Public Charter School, Mt Vernon, NY
    Philadelphia High School, New Philadelphia, OH, Lincoln-Way Central High School, New Lenox, IL, Apex High School, Apex, NC, Foothill High School, Palo Cedro, CA, Lakewood High School,St. Petersburg, FL
    South Paulding High School, Douglasville, GA, Central Linn High School, Halsey, OR, Bluffton High School, Bluffton, SC, Bergen Catholic High School,Oradell, NJ, Hopewell Valley Central High School Pennington, NJ, Central Valley Academy,Ilion, NY, St Augustine’s College, Brookvale, New South Wales, AU, P.S 132 The Conselyea School, Brooklyn, NY, Convent of Sacred Heart, Greenwich, CT
    North Tonawanda High School, North Tonawanda, NY, South Mecklenburg High School, Charlotte, NC, Westlake High School, Waldorf, MD, Nazareth Area High School, Nazareth, PA, Kurn Hattin Homes for Children, Westminster, VT, Algona High School, Algona, IA, Sacred Heart Academy, Hamden, CT, CT Future Musicians, Portland, CT, Notre Dame High School, Alberta, Canada
    Tuckahoe Middle School, Eastchester, NY, Lynnfield Middle School, Lynnfield, MA, Lycée Français de New York, New York, NY, Cliffside Park Middle School, Cliffside Pk, NJ, SAR Academy Riverdale, NY, Severn School, Severna Park, MD, Mark Twain I.S. 239, Brooklyn, NY, P.S. 84, Brooklyn, NY, Secaucus High School, Secaucus, NJ, Greater Hartford Academy of the Arts, Hartford, CT

    May 3
    2
    Imarhan at the David Rubenstein Atrium
    Led by Sadam, the youngest member of the trailblazing band Tinariwen, Imarhan is one of the best emerging Tuareg bands in Algeria. Reflecting both the members’ cultural and generational background, the band’s dry guitar riffs, pop melodies, and pan-African rhythms draw on traditional Tuareg music, African ballads, and the modern pop and rock music they heard growing up. The band’s “ear-opening” debut album (Guardian, U.K.) set out to dismantle preconceived notions about Tuareg music. This new wave of Tuareg musicians finds a calm and passionate soul in sumptuous slow burners, and compositions of uncommon complexity.

    May 9
    3
    VICE Media Watch & Learn at the David Rubenstein Atrium
    Get a fresh perspective on today’s most pressing issues at a special screening and talk-back with some of the great minds behind VICE.

    May 10
    4
    Thornetta Davis at the David Rubenstein Atrium
    Detroit’s Queen of the Blues brings her powerful voice, tight band, and electrifying live show to New York City. A major force in the Detroit music scene since the mid-1980s, she has won a total of 30 Detroit Music Awards; been inducted into the Detroit Music Hall of Fame; opened for B.B. King, Ray Charles, Etta James, and Bonnie Raitt (to name just a few); and performed alongside Kid Rock and Bob Seger.

    May 14
    5
    The History of the World in 100 Performances with Adam Gopnik: The Infamous Premiere of The Rite of Spring at the David Rubenstein Atrium
    Pagan sacrifice! Dissonance! A riot! The premiere of Igor Stravinsky’s ballet The Rite of Spring by Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes on May 29, 1913, is perhaps the most famous onstage scandal in the history of the performing arts. Was the riot spontaneous or a planned anti-Russian protest? Were people arrested? Was someone actually challenged to a duel? Discover the true story behind the mythical performance with New Yorker writer and host Adam Gopnik and special guests, including dancer and the Founder/Director of The Center for Ballet and the Arts at NYU Jennifer Homans.

    May 17
    6
    Voices of a People’s History of the United States at the David Rubenstein Atrium
    Voices seeks to educate and inspire a new generation working for social justice. This free performance marks the culmination of a yearlong project with New York City students at the Maxine Greene High School for Imaginative Inquiry, a New York City public school located at the Martin Luther King Jr. Educational Campus, cofounded by Lincoln Center Education. After studying the speeches, letters, and songs of the brave people who inspired Howard Zinn’s seminal work, A People’s History of the United States, the students will perform their selections along with actors Brian Jones and Susan Pourfar and special musical guests Celisse Henderson and Falu Shah.

    May 19
    7
    LC Kids Storytime at the Atrium: Doll-E 1.0 by Shanda McCloskey at the David Rubenstein Atrium
    When a tech-savvy girl is given a doll, she programs it into the perfect friend in this debut novel from visual artist and author Shanda McCloskey. AGES 2–5 Connect to the Facebook event page for extra insights on this program. Presented in collaboration with Little, Brown Books for Young Readers.

    May 24
    10
    ¡VAYA! 63: Gerardo Contino y Los Habaneros at the David Rubenstein Atrium
    Selected as the “Best Cuban Band” by New York Latin Magazine in 2017 and “Best Band in Manhattan” by WNYC in 2017, the explosive Los Habaneros are a force to behold onstage—and for tonight’s party, on the dance floor. Mixing musical styles from their home in Cuba with the diversity of sounds they encountered when they made New York City their home, Los Habaneros transcend traditional musical genres to create a real fusion that provokes fans into hip-shaking abandon. The band is made up of a young generation of Havana-trained musicians, including director and singer Gerardo Contino, artistic director and pianist Axel Tosca Laugart, and percussionist Yusnier Sanchez Bustamante. The band’s first album, Somos Latinos (2013), was released to very high critical acclaim. It was produced by Latin Grammy-nominated Luisito Quintero, and included five-time Grammy Award–winning bassist John Benitez. Their second album, Los Habaneros, will be released in 2018.

    May 29
    11
    Telling Care Café: Veterans’ Journeys Home at the David Rubenstein Atrium
    What does it mean to come home after military service? Does military service and war change the idea of home forever? This storytelling event presents a poignant exploration of these and other questions that resonate with many veterans. In addition to a talk by Dr. Max Rayneard, co-creator of The Telling Project, veterans share their military experiences—whether in Vietnam, Iraq, or on the home front—and how their service continues to shape them. The discussions will include issues ranging from mental health to raising families to finding one’s purpose.

    May 31
    12
    Zeshan B at the David Rubenstein Atrium
    Tempestuous soul arias, urban love dramas, Memphis blues, and civil rights anthems are interpreted with an Indo-Pakistani feel during this evening of music by Zeshan B. Born to Muslim Indian immigrants in Chicago, Zeshan uses his powerful voice—singing in English, Urdu, and Punjabi—to tell tales of instability, ambiguity, loss, injustice, unrequited love, urban despair, and youthful ecstasy. His debut album Vetted, produced by legendary soul arranger Lester Snell and recorded in Memphis with a wrecking crew of Stax Records sidemen, was released in 2017. He has opened for Mos Def, A Tribe Called Quest, and Rakim, and performed at venues across the world, including the White House at the invitation of President Obama.

    See the full article here .

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:15 AM on April 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Gustav Mahler's three final symphonies, Lincoln Center NYC USA, London Symphony Orchestra, Simon Rattle   

    From Lincoln Center: Great Performers – Simon Rattle – Mahler Transcending 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    Lincoln Center

    Simon Rattle, in his first New York appearance as music director of the London Symphony Orchestra, reveals the sheer beauty of Mahler’s final three works.

    5
    Gustav Mahler. Gustav Mahler (1860-1911), Austrian composer. Photography by Moriz Naehr. 1907. (Photo by Imagno/Getty Images) [Gustav Mahler (1860-1911)

    Buy all three concerts and save 15%

    1
    Photo by Stephan Rabold

    Friday, May 4, 2018 at 8:00 pm

    David Geffen Hall

    Tickets

    The Artists

    London Symphony Orchestra

    3
    Photo by Ronald Mackechnie

    Simon Rattle, conductor

    Sunday, May 6, 2018 at 3:00 pm

    David Geffen Hall

    2
    Photo by Kevin Yatarola

    Tickets

    Monday, May 7, 2018 at 8:00 pm

    Tickets

    See the full article here .

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:50 PM on April 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Gerald Finley - Bass-baritone, Julius Drake - piano, Lincoln Center NYC USA, Selection of favorite folk songs   

    From Lincoln Center: “Gerald Finley, bass-baritone Julius Drake, piano” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    Lincoln Center

    1
    Gerald Finley-bass-baritone. Image credit N/A

    2
    Julius Drake-piano. Image credit N/A

    Wednesday, May 2, 2018 at 7:30 pm Alice Tully Hall

    Bass-baritone Gerald Finley is “a master” of the art of song (New York Times), epitomized by his readings of Schubert with collaborator Julius Drake, a pianist known for the “vast palette of colors” (New York Times) he draws from his instrument. The renowned Canadian vocalist once again brings the poet’s touch to Schubert in this compelling recital that spirals out from the German lieder tradition to include Russian art songs by Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff alongside other surprises.

    The Program
    Beethoven: Neue Liebe, neues Leben, Op. 75, No. 2; Wonne der Wehmut, Op. 83, No. 1; Mit einem gemalten Band, Op. 83, No. 3; Aus Goethes Faust, Op. 75, No. 3
    Schubert: Prometheus Geistes-Gruss, D. 142; An den Mond, D. 259; Rastlose Liebe, D. 138; An Schwager Kronos, D. 369; Schäfers Klagelied, D. 121; Wandrers Nachtlied II, D. 768; Erlkönig, D.328
    Tchaikovsky: Don Juan’s Serenade, Op. 38, No. 1; At the ball, Op. 38, No. 3; None, but the lonely heart, Op. 6, No. 6; Over burning ashes, Op. 25, No. 2
    Rachmaninoff: O stay, my love, Op. 4, No. 1; V molchan’i nochi taynoy (“In the Silence of the Secret Night”) Op. 4, No. 3; Fate, Op. 21, No. 1; On the Death of a Linnet, Op. 21, No. 8; Christ is Risen, Op. 26, No. 6; Spring Waters, Op. 14, No. 11
    Selection of favorite folk songs.

    “One of the finest male singers in the world.”

    Telegraph (U.K.)

    “Among the outstanding baritones of today.”

    Sunday Telegraph (U.K.)

    “Mr. Finley and Mr. Drake delivered an intensely felt and richly shaded account of Schubert’s lovelorn and life-weary song cycle.”

    New York Times

    Tickets

    See the full article here .

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:06 AM on April 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Edgard Varèse -Amériques, Esa-Pekka Salonen -Pollux, Gustavo Dudamel-Conductor, Lincoln Center NYC USA, Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, Shostakovich -Symphony No. 5 in D Minor   

    From Lincoln Center: “Los Angeles Philharmonic” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    Lincoln Center

    1
    Gustavo Dudamel

    2
    L.A. Philharmonic

    “Classical-music rock star” Gustavo Dudamel (New York Times) brings the Los Angeles Philharmonic[ arguably the best symphonic orchestra in the United States after the leadership of Esa-Pekka Salonen , currently Composer in Residence at the New York Philharmonic] in for an exhilarating program of exploration and intrigue. The evening is anchored by Shostakovich’s searing and ultimately triumphal Fifth Symphony, craftily described by the Soviet-era composer as “a lengthy spiritual battle, crowned by victory.” A new piece by Esa-Pekka Salonen and Edgard Varèse’s powerful modernist showpiece Amériques round out the program.

    The Program

    Friday, April 27, 2018, at 8:00 pm

    Tickets

    Pre-concert lecture by Harlow Robinson at 6:45 pm in the
    David Rubenstein Atrium

    Symphonic Masters
    Los Angeles Philharmonic
    Gustavo Dudamel, Conductor

    ESA-PEKKA SALONEN Pollux (2018) (New York premiere)

    VARÈSE Amériques (ca. 1918–21/rev. 1927)

    Intermission

    SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 5 in D minor (1937)
    Moderato
    Allegretto
    Largo
    Allegro non troppo

    See the full article here .

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:05 PM on April 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Brooklyn Raga Massive, Lincoln Center NYC USA, , Outside (In)dia: Martha Redbone   

    From Lincoln Center: “Outside (In)dia: Martha Redbone” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    Lincoln Center

    1

    Fri, Apr 13 7:30 pm Free
    Location – David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center

    Appalachian and Native American song is at the root of American music. Today, their song and struggle is particularly relevant and Martha Redbone is a clear and beautiful voice that represents these deep musical traditions. Her music flows equally from her own unique, award-winning blend of Native American elements with funk and her deep roots in Appalachian folk and Piedmont blues favored by the matriarchy that raised her on a rich sojourn from Clinch Mountain, Virginia, to Harlan County, Kentucky, and beyond to Brooklyn’s Dodge City-esque mean streets.

    Tonight (Apr 13), Martha’s ensemble joins with Brooklyn Raga Massive’s community of Indian music–inspired artists to highlight both the roots and contemporary interpretations of these traditions.

    2

    This evening’s (Apr 13)performance will feature a visual score by artist Nitin Mukul. Nitin Mukul (born in Lawrence, Massachusetts) has lived and worked in New Delhi, New York, D.C., and Los Angeles. He currently shows and curates with Aicon Gallery in New York. His interdisciplinary work bridges the mediums of painting, video, sound, photography, and printmaking.

    With Martha Redbone, vocals; Aaron Whitby, keyboards and piano; Marvin Sewell, guitar; Charlie Burnham, violin; Tony Mason, drums; Fred Cash, bass; Sameer Gupta, tabla; Pawan Benjamin, bansuri; Neel Murgai, sitar

    Special guests Soni Moreno, vocals; Michael Gam, sarod and percussion

    Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Martha Redbone

    About the Series

    Outside (In)dia is a four-part concert series produced by The India Center Foundation and curated by Brooklyn Raga Massive that pushes the boundaries and conceptions of Indian classical music. With commissions of new works bringing raga into play with musical traditions spanning Cuba to Iraq, the series will position Indian classical music as a space for inclusion, collaboration, and conversation in a revolutionary new way.

    Presented in collaboration with The India Center Foundation and Brooklyn Raga Massive

    Martha Redbone and The Art of Remembrance
    Interview by Michael Gam April 4, 2018

    Michael Gam: How did this collaboration come about?

    Martha Redbone: Sameer [Gupta] got in touch because he liked the idea of “India and Indian,” and finding some musical connections with that. Where I come from, a lot of the music is American mountain music, and when we were comparing it to mountain music from India, a lot of those stringed instruments are very similar—made of different materials, but the overall sound and execution of it and the stories of mountain tribal people seem very similar.

    MG: Your music is referred to as Americana. What does that mean to you?

    MR: Americana starts with the first people. It starts with the land, and then from there it starts with the people brought here, and who have been here. In many ways what we think of as Americana is actually Native and Black, and that’s why I’m here. This is why I do it. That’s where it begins. The foundation is in the land and the people who were connected to this land. And Americana is also the sound of the colonizers. That’s included in it as well.

    I call our music “mountain music” because I’m all these things, I’m not just Black and Native, I’m also Irish and English, and that’s also there in those mountains. I’m made of all those people in those mountains.

    It’s interesting how the music began and then morphed and kind of got claimed—blues became Black and country music became White, and it didn’t used to be that. They used to just call them string bands. But because of Jim Crow things got segregated, and the music got segregated. There became a knee-jerk reaction to this mountain music because it’s connected to colonization and slave ownership, so of course to Black people today it immediately feels like racist and KKK music. But it isn’t. Bluegrass, for example, actually comes from African music. The banjo’s African. And I think that people of color need to claim this instrument that came from our people, to claim it and make it our own.

    MG: Can you speak a little bit more about the similarities you found as you were working with BRM?

    MR: With regard to India, the music of the mountains has huge similarities musically, and there’s also music for every function: work songs, songs for healing, songs for prayer, songs for death, for mourning, all of that. When you hear these kind of bowed instruments, when you hear percussive instruments, they are different yet very similar in their use and their sound. For indigenous people around the world, that’s always been a form of communication. We also have nature that we’re trying to sound like—trees, wind, water, birds. These things are intrinsic to all people, no matter where they are. I mean, when you listen to Irish folk music or Klezmer music, or any Middle Eastern music, or Nomadic music, you hear that connection. I personally feel that all of it goes together because it’s everyone bringing something to the table.

    The show with BRM is going to be good fun. It’s going to be really beautiful. We were listening to how we were going to put the songs together and I think it’ll be really, really glorious.

    _______________________________________________________
    “Everybody has a different journey, everybody has a different path, but all you can do to learn about each other is to hear what someone’s individual story is and then you share yours.” _______________________________________________________

    MG: Do you feel that there’s a role that we play as artists in trying to show connections between cultures, or creating this new American identity of people from all over?

    MR: Part of the history of this country has been a kind of propaganda that was put forward for people to find an ideal of what America is, and in a way almost forget where they come from. That kind of mindset can serve some people well, if you know what I’m saying, but for other people, where there are particular laws in place absolutely equivalent to apartheid, it’s a different story. So, for musicians I think—especially musicians of different cultures—it’s part of our own personal journey that we want to try to share with people. There are plenty of musicians who don’t want to touch on culture at all, they just want to play some really great music that turns them on and has nothing to do with any cultural connection or spiritual journey.

    MG: What about for you?

    MR: For me, it’s everything. My journey is one where I feel like the older I get the more I want to just go back home and be a part of my home culture and to celebrate these people, these elders who I’ve learned everything from in a place that is now under imminent threat of the land being taken away, or the land disappearing. For me it’s my own sense of urgency for the fear of losing a homeland.

    What people forget is that this has been happening for centuries. People have been from everywhere coming here for centuries now. Colonization is in great effect for like 500 years. This is nothing new, but all we can do is tell our own stories. We can only share our own family story because that’s all we know. Everybody has a different journey, everybody has a different path, but all you can do to learn about each other is to hear what someone’s individual story is and then you share yours.

    MG: Your individual story is something that can be explored on a macro level for many people.

    MR: Yeah, and it can touch other people who have something similar.

    Both Native and Black people have a long history of survival here. Enslaved people, oppressed people—we’ve survived it to the point where it’s almost like we have to be careful that we don’t end up bumping heads. You also have to understand that there’s been a lot of brainwashing over the years. And the oppressed start oppressing others. It’s like the whole cycle of abuse. So, there’s a lot of that that has to be worked out, there’s a lot of healing, there’s a huge healing process.

    In my experience, for the most part Black people are always very proud to claim their Native heritage. I do not see it the other way around, and that’s a huge problem. Most of the Native people that I know who are part Black don’t want to acknowledge it, and I think that’s because there was a time in American history where if you had any degree of Black blood, or African blood, it was considered tainted.

    My friend wrote this recently: “Racism in this country did not start with slavery. There was systemic oppression and genocide before slaves were brought here. Where do you think they got the land and wealth that they used to oppress others by forcibly bringing them here to increase that wealth? It wasn’t by treating the nations already here as equal to themselves. I guess what really makes me tired is the erasure of indigenous history on Turtle Island by others and by ourselves.”

    MG: So many of our imbalances today are about the erasure of what’s happened before.

    MR: Exactly. And that’s why I have a big mouth today, musically, creatively, because I think it’s important. And this is why I say, “I am Black, I am Native, I am Southeastern, I am Choctaw, I am Shawnee.” I was raised by my mother, who is indigenous, and I refuse to take sides. I refuse anyone else trying to classify me, and, most important, I refuse to be a participant in my own people’s genocide. There’s no way that I will ever negate a huge part of my family. I will never, ever negate that. Then I’m contributing to the erasure. I will not just wipe everything away, nor do I think any White person should just say “I’m White.” Right, but from where, you know?

    _______________________________________________________
    “You always have to be careful when there’s a society who’s trying to make you forget who you are.”
    _______________________________________________________

    MG: Why is that remembrance so important?

    MR: Because it’s who we are. It’s not even remembering, it’s who we are. We’re here today. It’s not just celebrating the past—we’re living, we are alive. We’re here.

    I’m sharing this in my music expression not because I’ve lost it but because I know that over the years it’s opened the conversation for other people to find out who they are. So, when that conversation is opened up, it’s like other people are wanting to learn more about themselves. If my music can inspire people to look within themselves to find some peace and some answers and open a dialogue and reconnect with their families and all of that, then I feel like the music is touching someone on a really spiritual level, and that’s what makes me happy.

    MG: Other than the BRM collaboration, are there similar projects you’re working on?

    MR: This spring and summer, my partner and I are going to Sichuan, China. We’ve been asked to compose music for a project over there working with one of the mountain tribes. So, we’re doing an East meets West mountain tribal music for a theater piece. And again, like the project with BRM, the tribe in China, they’re mountain people as well, they’re the Yi people, and they’re at the foot of the Himalayas. Their instruments are extremely similar to our mountain instruments, like the equivalent to a dulcimer, banjo, jaw’s harp, just made with different materials but used exactly the same way. So, we’re playing around with that. And also, their work songs, their fishing songs, their celebration songs, they sound the same, just in a different language. I mean, it’s absolutely remarkable. We’re really thankful to be able to play in this project.

    MG: What do you feel like you’ve learned from these types of things?

    MR: What I’ve learned is, like the Lakota saying, Mitákuye Oyás’iŋ, “We are all related.” And I think we’re more alike than we give ourselves credit for. We really have to remind ourselves not to get caught up in the politics of race because those politics change with every administration. And these are social constructs that exist to serve a particular purpose, like government control. You always have to be careful when there’s a society who’s trying to make you forget who you are.

    When people look at Black people and say, “Why are you guys always so angry? Why do you have a chip on your shoulder?” Think about their path. Think about what happened 500 years ago. Think about being taken away and sold from your parents. Think about the horrors that your ancestors watched. Think about not knowing where your tribe is or where your home is. Think about that legacy. Think about your name, not even knowing your original name, your family name. Every Black person in this country has the name of whoever owned them, and almost every Native person has exactly the same thing. So, when you think about those things, when you look at Black and Native people, just think about that.

    We need to understand who we are, where we came from, respect our journey, respect our survival, and respect the time that we need to heal from the bullshit brought on everyone in this country. And it’s the same thing for new people who are coming in who are trying to hold onto who they are and where they come from. They have to hold onto that, and it’s up to us to respect that.
    _______________________________________________________________
    Michael Gam is a bass player and percussionist in New York City and is a member of Brooklyn Raga Massive, a collective of musicians rooted in and inspired by Indian classical music.

    See the full article here .

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:37 PM on March 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Christian Tetzlaff, , , , , Lincoln Center NYC USA, , , , , , ,   

    From Lincoln Center: Christian Tetzlaff 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    Lincoln Center

    1

    Wednesday, March 28, 2018 at 7:30 pm
    Alice Tully Hall

    For ticketing information and general questions, please call 212.721.6500.

    “Untouchable” violinist Christian Tetzlaff (Telegraph, U.K.) presents selections from the zenith of the repertoire: Bach’s sonatas and partitas.

    ALL-BACH PROGRAM
    Sonata No. 2 in A minor
    Partita No. 2 in D minor
    Sonata No. 3 in C major
    Partita No. 3 in E major

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer


    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz


    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00Am-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:19 AM on March 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Lincoln Center NYC USA, , , , , , ,   

    From Lincoln Center: “Lincoln Center debut performance of jazz pianist and composer Tarek Yamani” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    Lincoln Center

    1
    Tarek Yamani

    Fri March 23, 2018 7:30 PM · David Rubenstein Atrium

    FREE! Experience the ecstatic fusion of jazz and Arabic rhythm and harmonies at the Lincoln Center debut performance of jazz pianist and composer Tarek Yamani.

    Born and raised in Beirut, Tarek is an American-Lebanese New York based award winning composer and a self-taught jazz pianist who got exposed to jazz around the age of 19.

    Since the release of his debut Ashur in 2012, Tarek has been dedicated to exploring relationships between African-American Jazz and Arabic rhythms/maqams which are most evident in his second album Lisan Al Tarab: Jazz Conceptions in Classical Arabic.

    In 2016, Tarek was commissioned by the Abu Dhabi Music & Arts Foundation (ADMAF) to write new work based on the rhythms of the Arabian Gulf. The new work entitled Peninsular was released in March 2017 and had it’s world premiere at the Abu Dhabi Festival ’17.

    In 2010, Tarek won the “Thelonious Monk Int’l Jazz Composer’s Competition” for his composition “Sama’i Yamani” featuring singer Rasha Rizk.

    On April 30th 2012, Tarek was invited to be among the 32 musicians from 13 countries to perform in the inaugural of the “International Jazz Day” held at the UN headquarters in New York – along with Wayne Shorter, Richard Bona, Zakir Hussein & Vinnie Colaiuta- a celebration announced by UNESCO and Herbie Hancock to proclaim jazz as an international language. On the same day in 2017, Tarek was invited again for the 6th edition of the International Jazz Day which took place in Havana, Cuba at the historic Gran Teatro de la Habana theater and where he performed with Youn Sun Nah, Regina Carter, Esperanza Spalding and Antonio Sanchez.

    Tarek has performed in prestigious venues such as the Smithsonian Institute (Washington, DC), MuCEM museum (Marseille), the United Nations Assembly Hall (NYC), Gran Teatro de la Habana (Cuba), New York University (Abu Dhabi Festival), Dar Al Athar Al Islamiyyah (Kuwait), the Blue Whale (Los Angeles), the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Bibliotheca Alexandrina (Alexandria), and the Ennejma Ezzahra (Tunis) to name just a few. Since moving to NYC in 2011, Tarek has played as a leader or sideman, in New York’s renowned jazz clubs such as the Lenox Lounge, Iridium, Smoke, Smalls, Cornelia Street Cafe, Bill’s Place, The Stone, Cleopatra’s Needle, Le Poisson Rouge, Shapeshifter Lab, Nublu, Somethin Jazz Club & 55 Bar.

    In April 2013, Tarek founded, organized & produced a cutting-edge performance called Beirut Speaks Jazz which aims to promote jazz in Lebanon by igniting adventurous collaborations between artists from the worlds of rock, pop, tarab, rap and blues over the foundations of jazz. So far the event has been an incredible success gathering 36 musicians on one stage and in different combinations. Among the invited artists were Hamed Sinno (Mashrou’ Leila), Oumeima El Khalil, Erin Mikaelian (Pindoll), Tania Saleh, Poly, Aziza, Mazen El Sayed (El Rass), Chady Nashef, Wassim Bou Malham (Who Killed Bruce Lee), Elie Afif, Makram Abol Hosn and many more.

    Tarek is the recipient of many awards such as the Givanas Foundation grant, the Huygens scholarship, the Andrea Elkenbracht award, the Prins Bernhard Culture fund, the Thelonious Monk Composers Competition prize, the Betty Carter Jazz Ahead residency, the New Dutch composition contest, and the Composer’s Platform Commission by the Abu Dhabi Festival.

    Apart from music, Tarek has co-written, with Darine Hotait, a feature film entitled Decoding Bach which was selected by the New York Foundation for the Arts for their fiscal sponsorship program.

    He recently scored the music of I SAY DUST, a film by Darine Hotait which screened in 70+ festivals around the world and was shown on BBC, Sundance TV and AMC Network.

    Tarek has recently self-published an eBook about practicing rhythm entitled Duple vs Triple: A Melodic Approach to Mastering Polyrhythms in Jazz and other Groove-Based Music in 56 Steps and is about the publish a new book entitled The Percussion Ensemble of the Arabian Peninsula.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer


    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00Am-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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