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  • richardmitnick 9:56 AM on July 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Dispatches From the Bang on a Can Summer Festival 2018: Part 4, , MASS MoCA, ,   

    From New Sounds: “Dispatches From the Bang on a Can Summer Festival 2018: Part 4” 

    From New Sounds
    Hand-picked music, genre free. 24/7 radio from New York City.

    1
    Joan Tower. Photo credit: Maggie Molloy/Bang on Can Media Fellows

    John Schaefer by Marco Antonio

    MASS MoCA by Jessica Rinaldi-Globe

    Profile of a Composer In Five Quotes and a Laugh
    By Stan Tymorek

    “Imagine me at Bang On a Can! They’re so cutting edge,” composer Joan Tower said to a MASS MoCA audience on Thursday night. “I’m elderly, but I guess I’m adventurous.”

    Tower was being modest. She comically screwed up her face at the word “elderly,” but this year the music world is happily celebrating her 80th birthday with a number of performances dedicated to the adventurous composer. At the Bang On a Can concert of her music, her quick wit and enthusiastic encouragement of the musicians were on display.

    “I love percussion and percussionists. They’re the salt of the earth,” Tower said when introducing her piece DNA for five of these instrumentalists. It shows how she treats percussion instruments like people, because she said the title refers to the DNA of cymbals, drums and woods.

    2
    Percussionists For Joan Tower’s “DNA”
    (Maggie Molloy/Bang on Can Media Fellows )

    As she began to talk about her next composition, Sixth Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman for solo piano—part of a series of acclaimed works riffing on the title of Copland’s famous Fanfare that have been performed by dozens of groups around the world”—she looked at the program and saw the misprint “Common.” Some composers would have been outraged; Tower laughed it off.

    When Piano Fellow Fei Nie finished playing the Sixth Fanfare, Tower embraced her. “I love the intimacy of music,” she told the audience. “I know a lot about her after hearing her play that piece. But she knows a lot more about me.”

    Next up was another piece demonstrating Tower’s affection for percussionists. Small was written for about a dozen small percussion instruments that she wanted to fit in one, easily carried bag. “That way the musicians can pack up quickly after a performance and not miss the party,” she explained. “Percussionists have always been delayed by having to take down big instruments like marimbas.”

    The final selection on the program was Noon Dance, for flutes, clarinet, violin, cello, percussion and piano. In his introduction, Nick Photinos, Bang On a Can’s Faculty cellist, recalled an earlier performance of the piece. When Photinos and the other members of the popular new music ensemble Eighth Blackbird were still in school, Noon Dance was the first sextet they played. “It meant so much to us that Joan was there,” he said. “When she came up to us after the performance, tears were in her eyes.”

    Less nostalgically, Tower quipped, “I never really liked that piece.” She turned to Photinos and added, “but your ensemble’s commitment made it sound so special.”

    Alicia Jane Turner: A Composer of Contradictions
    By Sarah Lindmark

    Composer Alicia Jane Turner has spent the last three weeks dragging her friends (and in this case an almost complete stranger) with her into the Turrell Gallery at MASS MoCA. The first stop on Turner’s impromptu gallery tour, an installation titled Afrum, was a bright white projection in the corner of a dark room that looked strangely like a 3-D object. The second stop, titled Guardian, looked at first like a flat projection, but after close inspection was actually a cavernous hole cut into the side of the gallery. The other installations in the Turrell exhibit feature disorienting washes of color in complete darkness.

    The performance art she is known for in London, where she grew up and still resides today, expresses the sexuality and gender politics involved with listening. Many of her works are interactive, and she highly values being involved in every aspect of the production process. “I collaborate with lighting designers and sound designers, or I work as a sound designer on other artists’ projects,” she said while talking about her most recent performance art project titled Breathe. The intimate piece has the listener tune in to Turner’s heartbeat and breath while she experiences fear and anxiety.

    Turner’s fascination with Turell’s work stems from her interdisciplinary background. “I’m really interested in putting new music into different contexts, mainly theater and performance art,” she said. She doesn’t typically write concert music, in part because her education didn’t take place at a music conservatory like many of her counterparts. “I haven’t been around a lot of really expensive instruments,” she stated matter-of-factly. The resources at Bang on a Can have allowed her to experiment with a wider variety of instruments. The piece she premiered Thursday night, titled Valves, for example, utilizes a violin, vibraphone, and a cymbal. During the concert, the violinist danced on the fine line that separates a clear, distinct tone from a distorted, crunchy, sul-ponticello sound in true Alicia Jane Turner style.

    In stark contrast to her bright, welcoming personality, she’s worn exclusively black over the last five days of the Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival, and greatly admires the similarly friendly attitudes of the festival’s storied founders Julia Wolfe, Michael Gordon, and David Lang. “A lot of people writing contemporary classical music or new music are really patronizing when they talk about things and they’re really elitist,” she said. The Bang on a Can founders, however, “talk about things in a really matter-of-fact way, so that they don’t alienate people.” On the other hand, Turner loves their music because they utilize many of the same sounds and techniques that she works with in her own interdisciplinary compositions.

    “I like Marilyn Manson, and I really like Arvo Pärt,” said Turner while talking about how she doesn’t quite see herself fitting in to the world of new music. Nervous about being an outsider among composers she admires for their accepting attitude, she and her work live in a beautiful world of contradictions.

    The Celestial Music of Samn Johnson
    By Maggie Molloy

    It’s 9pm on a Thursday and Samn Johnson is sitting at a picnic table outside MASS MoCA talking about the cosmos. He pushes his curly blonde hair back from his forehead as he excitedly describes a new app on his phone that allows him to map the constellations. Later tonight at an after-hours concert, one of his pieces will be performed under a different set of stars: Spencer Finch’s glimmering LED light installation Cosmic Latte.

    Johnson is one of nine composer Fellows at the Bang on a Can Summer Festival, where he’s spent the past three weeks writing and rehearsing new music with performers from around the world. For the festival he has composed three new works, each one inspired in some way by time, space, or the celestial spheres.

    Tonight’s premiere is an ethereal, three-minute saxophone quartet which will be performed by Dylan Ward, Luke Carbon, Ken Thomson, and Susan Summers. The piece, which is not yet titled, unfolds through broad washes of harmony that seem to hang suspended in mid-air, slowly spinning below the stars.

    3
    Spencer Finch’s light sculpture, Mass MOCA
    (John Schaefer/ NYPR)

    “There’s something very comforting about music’s ability to manipulate time,” Johnson says. A good composer, he points out, can make time move faster or slower, allowing certain moments to pause or repeat. Sometimes an hour-long piece can pass by in the blink of an eye, or a three-minute miniature can stretch on for an eternity. By altering the audience’s perception of time, he believes music can address the transitory nature of humanity.

    In fact, Johnson’s music often juxtaposes different historical forms and styles as a way of circumventing the linear march of time. Blue Aurora, his string chamber work performed on Monday, employed an abstracted concerto grosso form to depict a cloudy nocturnal scene drifting in and out of focus. A gallery performance on Tuesday featured a celestial motet he wrote based on a medieval chant titled Ave Maris Stella (Hail Star of the Sea). Johnson’s rendition reversed the traditional roles of voice and accompaniment and softened the modal harmonies of the Gregorian chant, highlighting its haunting and ephemeral qualities.

    “It feels like the ghosts of forgotten centuries,” he says. “I’m fascinated by this idea of trying to bring back something that’s irreparably broken.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    NewSounds.org infuses the eclectic spirit of the radio show into a full online and live event experience. Combining the New Sounds radio show, WNYC’s Soundcheck podcast and the adventurous spirit of WQXR’s Q2 Music, NewSounds.org will be a place for discovery, conversation, insights into the creative process, and of course 24/7 music.
    The centerpiece is New Sounds Radio, an online station hosted by New Sounds founder and long-running host John Schaefer, but infused with new, emerging voices including experimental musicians Kelly Moran, Eliza Bagg and Lora-Faye Åshuvud, and tastemakers Gamall Awad and Matt Werth, along with WQXR’s Helga Davis and Terrance McKnight, and composer-guitarist Phil Kline. The station will feature an array of styles and genres – from singer Courtney Barnett to contemporary classical music ensemble Kronos Quartet, from jazz icon Henry Threadgill to the Nordic folk music of Wardruna, from electronic composer and bandleader Anna Meredith to the stunning vocals of Puerto Rico’s Ileana Cabra.
    “With almost everything ever recorded anywhere now available online, where do you start? New Sounds might be the place,” said John Schaefer. “We try to be friendly and jargon free, and gleefully oblivious of genre. Our goal is to find the artists, the songs, and the sounds that you might love – if only you get a chance to hear them. And we believe that algorithms won’t give you the same experience as a set of recommendations from real people. A friendly guide is the best way to discover new music, or music that defies easy categorization; and some of that music just might change your life.”
    “For three decades, New Sounds was one of the last bastions of free form FM programming; completely genre-free and dictated solely by the impeccable and irresistible tastes of its host,” said Alex Ambrose, Senior Producer, New Sounds. “NewSounds.org will usher that sense of discovery and unpredictability into the digital age, drawing on the best of New York’s curatorial and taste-making power.”

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:18 AM on July 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , MASS MoCA, ,   

    From New Sounds: “Dispatches From the Bang on a Can Summer Festival 2018: Part 3” 

    From New Sounds
    Hand-picked music, genre free. 24/7 radio from New York City.

    1
    Untitled (2012) by Anish Kapoor at Mass MOCA

    John Schaefer

    The Bang On A Can summer festival at Mass MOCA offers a chance to explore one of the country’s leading exhibitors of contemporary art – IF you can find the time. Yesterday I finally had a chance to wander around a bit. Of course there were still music events, and the Media Faculty, myself and Will Robin, did an evening talk about the role of the media in the contemporary music scene. Don’t worry – the Media Fellows ignored the latter and focused on the former. Here are their latest reports.

    -John Schaefer

    MASS MoCA by Jessica Rinaldi-Globe

    Vicky Chow Mesmerizes MASS MoCA (And She’s Just Warming Up)

    Vicky Chow by Kaitlin Jane – Cantaloupe Music

    By Maggie Molloy

    “Please do not touch or play this piano” reads the sign atop a shiny Yamaha grand standing in the center of the Wardwell Gallery at MASS MoCA. That sign, of course, doesn’t apply to Vicky Chow.

    She’s seated at the keyboard, warming up for her afternoon concert of Philip Glass’s virtuosic Piano Etudes, the composer’s rolling arpeggios echoing through the cavernous galleries of the museum. It’s over an hour before her concert begins, but she’s already attracted a crowd of nearly two dozen curious museum-goers: some standing, a few watching from a nearby stairwell, a couple perched in a balcony high above, and one woman seated on the floor at the foot of the piano.

    2
    Vicky Chow plays Philip Glass in a gallery recital, “Banglewood, 2018”
    (John Schaefer/ NYPR)

    “The recital officially starts at 4:30,” Chow tells them softly, with a smile, between excerpts. Her concert is part of Bang on a Can’s three-week summer music festival—Chow is a faculty member at the annual gathering and the resident pianist of the Bang on a Can All-Stars, the collective’s amplified chamber ensemble.

    But even all-stars have to practice. And that’s precisely the function of etudes: they are short musical compositions designed to develop (and, once learned, demonstrate) the skill and technique of the player. Glass is part of a long lineage of composers such as Chopin, Rachmaninoff, and Ligeti who have taken the etude to new heights.

    “Glass’s Etudes are just extraordinary examples of how even studies of certain techniques can become musical gems,” Chow tells me in an interview before the concert.

    Despite its brevity, her program is an impressive feat of endurance: the first six preludes plus No. 12, each its own mesmerizing web of interlocking melodies and restless momentum. When played well, Glass’s circling motives can induce a trance—hence the crowd of museum patrons who stopped in their tracks to watch her practice. But she doesn’t mind the impromptu audience. In fact, the open gallery performances are part of what make the Bang on a Can Summer Festival so inviting to new listeners.

    “Musicians are not these magical creatures, we’re just people doing the thing that we love doing,” she says. “Sometimes people catch us in the middle of the work in progress—and that might be more interesting.”

    The warm-up may have been more intimate, but the concert itself was every bit as mesmerizing: two standing ovations, three curtain calls, and a literal encore of No. 6.

    “I guess I’ll just try that one again,” Chow muttered to herself as she swiped through the sheet music on her iPad before launching into another blistering performance.

    Connecting with Others in the Art World and Beyond
    By Stan Tymorek

    Timothy Peterson likes writing chamber music because the small group fosters cooperation.“If someone plays a wrong note, it can sometimes sound better than what I wrote, so I just leave it in,” he said in an interview yesterday, adding jokingly, “I can always acknowledge the musician with an asterisk in the program.”

    A composer in Bang On a Can’s Summer Music Festival at MASS MoCA, Peterson has even collaborated physically on his piece Duet for Body Percussion, scored with his own form of notation. By rapidly clapping, tapping their chests and thighs, clicking their fingers and stomping their feet, Peterson and his partner did their own take on classical Indian percussion, which fascinated Peterson while studying Carnatic music in South India.

    “When I was asked to compose a work that could be performed in the close quarters of a coffee shop,” he recalled, “I realized there was no instrumentation more portable than body percussion.”

    Pivoting from Indian percussion to Greek mythology, Peterson collaborated with poet Sara Fetherolf on a song cycle about the myth of Philomela, Harp My Bones. At MASS MoCA yesterday, he accompanied mezzo-soprano Cara Search on piano as she sang the Becoming Nightingale movement of the cycle. The high notes of the piano help launch an image of the mute Philomela as she transformed into a bird to “find a flightpath…all/inarticulate…and go (all song).”

    Like many artists, Peterson has a strong commitment to social justice throughout the world. During college he held an internship at Bellevue Hospital, in New York, translating for victims of torture from French-speaking African countries. Though the Bang On a Can program has “made me even more invigorated to succeed as a composer,” he sees himself volunteering for such socially conscious work in addition to his career.

    Peterson also has a clear approach to another common artistic dilemma, finding an audience for your work. “If I write music from my heart,” he says, “I know someone else will believe in it.”

    Vicky Chow Performs Philip Glass’ Etude No. 2
    By Sarah Lindmark

    The audience immediately began to clap after Vicky Chow’s evocative performance of Philip Glass’s restless Etude No. 1 for Solo Piano. But as soon as the slow, rising arpeggios from Glass’s Etude No. 2 drifted up through the applause, a hush fell over the crowd. Chow was dressed in black and bathed in soft white light from the windows behind her, elegantly contrasted against the faded brick walls of the Wardwell Gallery at MASS MoCA. Apparently, Chow herself asked for the piano to be moved from the far end of the performance space to the middle, in front of the windows. It had the desired effect: after a concert featuring seven different etudes back to back, Chow’s performance of Etude No. 2 quietly refused to leave the back of my mind.

    As the piece progressed through its slow, rising, mid-range arpeggios, a single low note would drop from the tips of Chow’s fingers, one at a time, like she was simply touching the surface of a puddle. Each pitch would resonate up and out of the piano, into the high ceilings of the Wardwell Gallery, reflecting off the faded brick walls and wood floor. In the third repeated phrase, Glass introduces notes from the piano’s highest register, again one at a time, peaking out of the constant, repeated arpeggio figure. I was poised at the edge of each note, listening intently for the next rise and fall of the phrase.

    The second etude in Philip Glass’s first book of Etudes for Solo Piano is soft and pensive, as if the composer needed to come up for air after working through the fast-paced Etude No. 1. Chow’s rendition of this particular Etude struck me as the clear highlight of the show – it was a moment of absolute peace before the flurry of leaps and scales to come in the next five etudes.

    Even the engineer recording the event, after adjusting the three microphones situated near the inside of the Yamaha baby grand piano during the first Etude, sat down on the floor and shut his eyes to listen.

    Entirely spellbound, the audience didn’t clap at the end of Etude No. 2 – and then she was on to No. 3.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    NewSounds.org infuses the eclectic spirit of the radio show into a full online and live event experience. Combining the New Sounds radio show, WNYC’s Soundcheck podcast and the adventurous spirit of WQXR’s Q2 Music, NewSounds.org will be a place for discovery, conversation, insights into the creative process, and of course 24/7 music.
    The centerpiece is New Sounds Radio, an online station hosted by New Sounds founder and long-running host John Schaefer, but infused with new, emerging voices including experimental musicians Kelly Moran, Eliza Bagg and Lora-Faye Åshuvud, and tastemakers Gamall Awad and Matt Werth, along with WQXR’s Helga Davis and Terrance McKnight, and composer-guitarist Phil Kline. The station will feature an array of styles and genres – from singer Courtney Barnett to contemporary classical music ensemble Kronos Quartet, from jazz icon Henry Threadgill to the Nordic folk music of Wardruna, from electronic composer and bandleader Anna Meredith to the stunning vocals of Puerto Rico’s Ileana Cabra.
    “With almost everything ever recorded anywhere now available online, where do you start? New Sounds might be the place,” said John Schaefer. “We try to be friendly and jargon free, and gleefully oblivious of genre. Our goal is to find the artists, the songs, and the sounds that you might love – if only you get a chance to hear them. And we believe that algorithms won’t give you the same experience as a set of recommendations from real people. A friendly guide is the best way to discover new music, or music that defies easy categorization; and some of that music just might change your life.”
    “For three decades, New Sounds was one of the last bastions of free form FM programming; completely genre-free and dictated solely by the impeccable and irresistible tastes of its host,” said Alex Ambrose, Senior Producer, New Sounds. “NewSounds.org will usher that sense of discovery and unpredictability into the digital age, drawing on the best of New York’s curatorial and taste-making power.”

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:51 AM on July 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , MASS MoCA, ,   

    From New Sounds: “Dispatches From the Bang on a Can Summer Festival 2018: Part 2 

    From New Sounds
    Hand-picked music, genre free. 24/7 radio from New York City.

    1
    Eve Beglarian Photo credit: Carolyn Yarnell

    7/25/2018
    William Robin

    It isn’t surprising that each day at the Bang on a Can Summer Festival at Mass MoCA thus far has felt like a marathon, given the new-music collective’s reputation for curating concerts of extreme durations.

    MASS MoCA by Jessica Rinaldi-Globe

    But despite the long hours of rehearsals and concerts, John Schaefer and I haven’t felt all that tired. Perhaps it’s because we begin each morning by making a ruckus of uncanny sounds utilizing home-made instruments; or perhaps it’s because the conversations we’ve had with the four aspiring writers that we are coaching this week have been so energizing.

    Yesterday, our intrepid media Fellows attended two concerts, a seminar for composition Fellows led by the three Bang on a Can founding composers, and that aforementioned original instrument workshop guided by guitarist Mark Stewart. They also interviewed a slew of musicians, and somehow managed to fit in writing and discussing the essays you will read below. Maggie Molloy heard in Eve Beglarian’s music a subversive and compelling personality; Stan Tymorek saw the same all-Beglarian concert, but arrived at an entirely different take on the composer’s work. Sarah Lindmark sat down with three effusive flutist Fellows and discovered a bourgeoning friendship, and Lasse Hansen recognized the larger implications of a composer’s musings on instrumentation.

    It’s been just as fascinating to watch these events unfold as it has been to read such diverse takes on what they have meant.

    Eve Beglarian at Bang on a Can
    By Maggie Molloy

    There are 40,320 different ways to make music like a girl. Or at least, that’s how many ways you can perform Eve Beglarian’s piece Play Like a Girl. It’s comprised of eight variations on a Bulgarian women’s folk song that can be played in any combination, simultaneously or successively. The instrumentation is a mix of piano, toy piano, bells, celestas, and other “girly” instruments, according to the composer.

    We were treated to one lively iteration of the piece Tuesday evening during a concert of Beglarian’s works held at MASS MoCA, one of dozens of performances hosted at the museum over the course of Bang on a Can’s annual three-week summer music festival. Around 150 people (including the composer) filled the gallery where the concert took place, standing and sitting in rows on chairs, floors, and window sills along an audacious 146-foot wall mural by Joe Wardwell.

    This particular Beglarian piece featured a combination of faculty and student performers: Vicky Chow and Maire Carroll on piano four-hands, Karl Larson on synthesizer, and Adam Holmes on glockenspiel. The unusual collection of timbres made for a modern take on the distinctively close harmonies of Bulgarian folk music, with a restless stream of piano and glockenspiel melodies circling above a growling synth drone. While the driving rhythms propelled the piece closer to the world of minimalism, the more subtle modal ornaments embodied the emotive folk traditions of Eastern Europe. The title is of course subversive: Beglarian is forcing the audience to think critically about the language we use to describe music created by women.

    Also featured on the program was Beglarian’s heart-wrenching mixed chamber work Waiting for Billy Floyd, based on a short story by Eudora Welty about a vulnerable young woman who is raped at a fishing camp along the Mississippi River while waiting for her lover. Push the Dust, performed by Adam Holmes, featured the surrealist poetry of Henri Michaux spoken amid the meandering melodies of both live and pre-recorded vibraphone. The program, so wide-ranging in style and tone, ended with The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, a groove-driven setting of three proverbs by William Blake.

    From a Long Story to a Short Musical Gem
    Stan Tymorek

    This is a story about different ways of telling a story.

    At Bang On a Can’s Summer Music Festival at MASS MoCA on Tuesday, the prominent new music composer Eve Beglarian knew her piece Waiting For Billy Floyd required an introduction. She told the audience at the all-Beglarian recital that it was based on Eudora Welty’s short story At The Landing, about a young woman named Jenny who falls in love for the first time with Billy Floyd. While trying to find this wandering fisherman after he deserts her, she is raped repeatedly.

    Beglarian said she was inspired to write Waiting For Billy Floyd during a boat trip down the Mississippi to Rodney, Miss., where the story is set. She even camped out in Rodney’s town square to make a field recording of local sounds, mostly an unaccompanied chorus of barking dogs.

    Yet even with her own evocative score, five highly accomplished musicians (playing flute, clarinet, violin, cello, percussion and piano), and the field recording, it would be impossible for any composer to directly translate eighteen pages of Welty’s imagistic, dreamlike prose—which could take well over an hour to read—in a 10-minute piece of music. Instead, Beglarian’s approach is poetic, using the power of her music to focus on the emotional crux of the story, the rape scene.

    Waiting for Billy Floyd progressed from a soft piano and vibraphone duet to a full-blown love song when the rest of the sextet joined in. The violence of the assault was loudly announced when the piano turned dissonant, almost drowning out the other instruments. In a post-concert interview, Beglarian said she bluntly refers to this in rehearsals as “the rape music.” In discussing the piece with other musicians, she said, some have questioned her score for indicating that the piano be played so loudly in triple forte. “They say you can’t hear the other instruments,” she said. “I know that!” The pianist’s violent music rightly dominates the others’ “joyous music,” which, she pointed out, is all we hear at the quiet conclusion. That, and the barking dog, which Beglarian hears as a sign that Billy is coming back to Jenny. “The joyous music fucking wins that piece!” she said, proving her words can be as forceful as her music.

    Flutes of a Feather Flock Together
    Sarah Lindmark

    How often is the phrase “Flute party!” shouted into the summer breeze? Not enough, apparently, according to the three flutists at the Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival at MASS MoCA. Alexis Letourneau, Philip Snyder, and Jennifer Timmins shout the phrase at top volume whenever they run into each other in the seemingly endless halls of the contemporary art museum.

    Although frequent rehearsals can be tough for the festival’s performance Fellows, Jennifer Timmins smiled as she mentioned how much she’s gained from the experience. “We’re not here to learn to be flutists. We’re here to learn to be musicians and citizens of this community,” she said.

    Michael Gordon’s Yo Shakespeare, one of the pieces they’ve had to grapple with together, calls for the three of them to play sets of hand-made pan pipes. According to Jennifer, “the piece is a banger,” but it has a series of intricate rhythms that are hard to master on an instrument that is played so differently than the flutes they’re used to. She added, “it takes more air, and it takes longer for the air to produce a sound.”

    2
    hand-made pan pipes
    (John Schaefer/ NYPR)

    A sense of true camaraderie shone through as the conversation turned to their fast friendship, and Philip and Alexis laughed about playing orchestral excerpts together before rehearsals. Jennifer spoke to how easy it was “to naturally gravitate towards each other” upon meeting people who “just want to play music but just happen to play the flute.” “There are a lot of stereotypes about flute playing,” she continued, just as Alexis interrupted her to add, “which the three of us all defy.” At any other summer music festival, one might expect these three to viciously compete for top spot or principal chair, but it’s clear that these performance Fellows value community over competition.

    Putting it together: Brooks Frederickson at the Bang on a Can Summer Festival
    by Lasse D. Hansen

    Given the opportunity to work with noted conductor Brad Lubman, composer Brooks Frederickson did not think twice: This was the ensemble he was going to write a new piece for. It was in spring 2018, and the Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival asked him to choose one of three different instrumentations for the commission work he was about to write for the festival’s Musician Fellows.

    Giving the unusual instrumentation a second look it struck him: “Oh no! What am I going do with four percussionists and two singers?” Realizing that this configuration of instruments would probably never be accessible again, Frederickson decided to focus his attention on making the most out of this particular event by not worrying about usual concerns for a classical composer, such as whether the music would be suitable for every other hall or playable for every other musician. Instead he joined the Festival Ensemble on stage at the World Premiere Composer Concert this Monday – the only one of the nine Composition Fellows to do so.

    “I didn’t intend to write myself into the piece in the beginning,” Frederickson recalled in an interview at MASS MoCA Wednesday afternoon, “but as I was working on it I started to get really interested in vocoders. It’s an instrument that basically creates a new sound by taking two existing sounds and putting them together, and voices are really good for that.” Using the two singers as source material he wrote himself a vocoder part.

    3
    Brooks Frederickson (Julie Rooney)

    When he lived in New York, surrounded by highly skilled musicians for eight years, Frederickson didn’t perform much. Now, having just moved to Durham, NC, where there are fewer musicians around, he is getting more involved in the performance of his music.

    “I want to be a participant in my music rather than just write it, send it off, show up at the rehearsal, say ‘It’s good!’ and sit in the audience,” he said. “This piece is a continuation of that feeling. I’m still getting comfortable with being back on stage and I have to relearn how not to be afraid of it or to have stage fright again, and that feels good.”

    Stratus-embedded waves moving against mean flow received its world premiere performance by the 2018 Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival Ensemble and Brooks Frederickson this Monday evening at MASS MoCA.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    NewSounds.org infuses the eclectic spirit of the radio show into a full online and live event experience. Combining the New Sounds radio show, WNYC’s Soundcheck podcast and the adventurous spirit of WQXR’s Q2 Music, NewSounds.org will be a place for discovery, conversation, insights into the creative process, and of course 24/7 music.
    The centerpiece is New Sounds Radio, an online station hosted by New Sounds founder and long-running host John Schaefer, but infused with new, emerging voices including experimental musicians Kelly Moran, Eliza Bagg and Lora-Faye Åshuvud, and tastemakers Gamall Awad and Matt Werth, along with WQXR’s Helga Davis and Terrance McKnight, and composer-guitarist Phil Kline. The station will feature an array of styles and genres – from singer Courtney Barnett to contemporary classical music ensemble Kronos Quartet, from jazz icon Henry Threadgill to the Nordic folk music of Wardruna, from electronic composer and bandleader Anna Meredith to the stunning vocals of Puerto Rico’s Ileana Cabra.
    “With almost everything ever recorded anywhere now available online, where do you start? New Sounds might be the place,” said John Schaefer. “We try to be friendly and jargon free, and gleefully oblivious of genre. Our goal is to find the artists, the songs, and the sounds that you might love – if only you get a chance to hear them. And we believe that algorithms won’t give you the same experience as a set of recommendations from real people. A friendly guide is the best way to discover new music, or music that defies easy categorization; and some of that music just might change your life.”
    “For three decades, New Sounds was one of the last bastions of free form FM programming; completely genre-free and dictated solely by the impeccable and irresistible tastes of its host,” said Alex Ambrose, Senior Producer, New Sounds. “NewSounds.org will usher that sense of discovery and unpredictability into the digital age, drawing on the best of New York’s curatorial and taste-making power.”

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:51 AM on July 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , MASS MoCA, ,   

    From Cantaloupe Music: “A magical performance of the Philip Glass etudes by Vicky Chow! at MASS MoCA” 

    From Cantaloupe Music the recording arm of Bang On a Can, the original New Music DIY organization.

    1

    at MASS MoCA

    MASS MoCA by Jessica Rinaldi-Globe

    Vicky Chow by Kaitlin Jane – Cantaloupe Music

    Philip Glass by Timothy Judd

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:10 PM on July 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , MASS MoCA, ,   

    From New Sounds: “Dispatches From the Bang on a Can Summer Festival 2018: Part 1” 

    From New Sounds
    Hand-picked music, genre free. 24/7 radio from New York City.

    7/24/2018
    John Schaefer

    The Bang On A Can collective, which has championed new music since 1987, decamps every summer to Mass MoCA, the vast complex of former industrial buildings in North Adams, Massachusetts that now houses one of the country’s largest contemporary art museums. Since 2002, Bang On A Can has hosted Fellowship programs for emerging composers and musicians – a way of allowing a younger generation of creators and performers to essentially grow up together. This year, for the first time, they included a Fellowship program for aspiring music writers, and invited me and the writer/musicologist Will Robin to serve as the faculty.

    This week, we are reporting back from the Berkshires with our writing Fellows’ impressions of the concerts, rehearsals, and unusual concert settings they’re experiencing. It all leads up to the big event this weekend – the Bang On A Can Marathon at Mass MoCA, this year featuring composer Steve Reich. Follow our writers as they follow the musicians and composers who may be the next generation to change the sound of contemporary music.

    -John Schaefer

    Folk Songs from the Bang on a Can Festival
    By Maggie Molloy

    Ailie Robertson loves a good folk tale—and the spookier, the better. One of her favorites is The Two Sisters, a Scottish murder ballad recounting the tale of a girl who drowns her sister in the river. When the sister’s body washes ashore, a townsperson crafts a harp from her bones and strings it with her golden hair.

    A Scottish harpist and composer, Robertson was inspired by that very piece of folklore when she began writing music for this year’s Bang on a Can Summer Festival. Robertson is one of nine composers from around the world who was selected to attend the annual festival this year in North Adams, Massachusetts. Last night’s concert featured world premieres from each of them, an explosion of wide-ranging works that embodied the eclectic nature of the festival.

    For three weeks each July, the experimental music collective Bang on a Can brings together some of the most innovative young performers and composers in the field for an immersive three weeks of outside-the-box music-making. The festival is housed at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA), a sprawling complex of 19th-century mill buildings whose rich history is beautifully contrasted against the bold and brazenly modern art that now fill its rooms.

    Robertson’s new premiere was perfectly at home in this setting: the piece, titled Binnorie, draws connections between a 400-year-old Scottish folk tune and a modern day news story of a UK woman who murdered her sister last year. Conducted by faculty member Brad Lubman, the performance featured a mixed ensemble of voice, winds, strings, percussion, and a haunting sound collage of recordings from the UK police case.

    “Often the things we think of as folklore are actually still so relevant today,” Robertson said in an interview following the concert. “The themes in folk music are basically love and jealousy and war—and they always come around no matter what age we live in.”

    Binnorie captured the immediacy of these folk music themes but employed a more intricate timbral palette. Two female singers evoked the sisters on stage, singing the text of the original ballad in a ghostly modal melody amid a sea of string harmonics and quarter tones. Jet whistles and breathy murmurs in the flutes suggested the sister’s desperate gasps for air, and musicians bowed the strings of two grand pianos with long yellow strands of twine that were reminiscent of her hair. Along the back of the stage four percussionists bowed marimbas and dunked cymbals in bowls of water. Woven throughout this gripping sound world were wailing police sirens, news reports, laughing children, river waves, and radio calls from the police. The result was a fresh take on a ballad that has inspired a number of modern reincarnations, including Bang on a Can co-founder Julia Wolfe’s Cruel Sister and Nico Muhly’s The Only Tune.

    An earlier concert in the MASS MoCA galleries that afternoon featured another of Robertson’s pieces: a string trio titled The Black Pearl that was inspired by Bach’s Goldberg Variations and another folk tune called The Pretty Maids of Galway. Performed in a dark room next to the muted landscape of a Patrick Bermingham oil painting, the piece evoked a similarly somber mood. Short melodic fragments of Bach’s three minor key variations emerged from the rhythmic, circular bowing of the violin and viola, with the cello plucking a steady bass ostinato throughout. The effect was that of a distant memory, brief flashes of recognition shining through from just beyond our reach.

    “I like music to have a narrative,” Robertson said. “It doesn’t have to be melodic, it doesn’t have to directly tell a story, but there has to be some type of emotional thread that the audience can latch onto.”

    A Museum That Opens The Eyes And the Ears
    By Stan Tymorek

    Scat singing rarely takes center stage. For the most part it tends to be a substitute for lyrics that a jazz singer resorts to after singing the words of a few verses. That’s one reason why Stephanie Orlando’s composition Scatterbrain, consisting entirely of scat singing, was a bold move. It was performed by a theatrical soprano and underscored almost syllable for syllable by a soaring flute.

    1

    Lunch Recital under Spencer Finch’s light sculpture meant to evoke the Milky Way.
    (John Schaefer/ NYPR)

    Then there was the performance space: we heard this music below 150 specially fabricated LED fixtures suspended from the ceiling over an expanse of an 80-foot long gallery in the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art. According to the MASS MoCA website, in this installation by artist Spencer Finch titled Cosmic Latte, lights are “arranged in the gently arching shape of the Milky Way as it is observed in the Northern Hemisphere in March.” Now scat was thrust into the cosmic spotlight.

    These are the types of multimedia dynamics that happen at the North Adams museum every summer when the music collective Bang On a Can comes to town for a three-week festival of new music, presented by their Faculty and Fellows. MASS MoCA and Bang On a Can both specialize in large-scale experimentation: the museum in its 16-acre campus of the vast brick buildings of a former electrical plant. and the musicians with their signature 12-hour marathons and limits-pushing, seemingly limitless repertoire. When the composer and musician fellows select one of the galleries available to them, to present their work, the sheer scale and audacity of the art can’t help but affect how the audience hears their music.

    3
    Sol LeWitt’s wall art is the backdrop for a work by Tim Hansen, “Banglewood” 2018
    (John Schaefer/ NYPR)

    After the single 30-minute slot in which Scatterbrain was performed, the museum-goers who heard it were led to one of the three floors filled with Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawings, a quintessential part of MASS MoCA’s collection. There they heard North Head, by Tim Hansen, a piece for vibraphone and and bass clarinet commemorating, as vibraphonist Thea Hassen movingly explained in her introduction, the deaths of several gay men who had been murdered on a beach of that name in Australia. The duet sounded more contemplative than funereal, perhaps due to the spirit of LeWitt’s bold colored shapes—including a bull’s eye and a long wavy line that suggested the ocean in this context.

    Contemplation abruptly ended when the audience moved on to another take on young men’s spirit, as our Name Brand society, an electrified improvisation performed on synthesizers and drums that did its damnedest to fill Mass MoCA’s largest gallery—almost a football field in size with 18-feet-high catwalks. This was the site of The Archaeology of Another Possible Future, by Liz Glynn, a sprawling collection of pyramid-shaped caves formed by factory pallets, multi-colored shipping containers and hospital-type gurneys. When the trio stopped playing we could hear a soprano perched on a catwalk, singing words on sheets of paper that she blithely tore in pieces and cast down. If the exhibit was a scene from the future, an audience member might think, the howling music was a valid protest against it, and why even bother to recycle the torn-up paper?

    Having a Bang On A Can staffer lead the viewers to the widely dispersed gallery performances created a kind of indoor pilgrimage promising new discoveries. Our final way station was the Lure Of The Dark exhibit, a variety of artists’ responses to the mysteries of the night displayed in dimly lit galleries. The art pilgrims trekked all the way to the farthest one, where a string trio played The Black Pearl, by Ailie Robertson, which drew inspiration from Goldberg Variation #25 and a Scottish folk tune.

    The Scottish-tune influence conjured up the image of a cottage dimly lit by a peat fire. And if you got close enough to one of the gallery painting’s placards, you could read that Patrick Bermingham’s scene of a moonlit path is titled Midway on our path in life— a reference to the first line of Dante’s Inferno. For a museum visitor without a Bang On a Can staffer to guide them through the maze-like MASS MoCA, a follow-up line in the poem would be more apt: For the straightforward pathway had been lost.

    In Search Of Dan Rhode
    by Sarah Lindmark

    With my last bit of crumbling dessert, I sat down at a small round table in MASS MoCA’s café, Lickety Split. The man I assumed to be composer Daniel Rhode sat across from me, clean shaven, wearing a dark blue button-down shirt, with slick hair and a genuine smile.

    He reached out to shake my hand. “Hi, I’m Philip Snyder.”

    At that moment, it dawned on me that not only had I mistakenly asked the wrong person for an interview, but that I had somehow managed to start the interview before realizing it. At the Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival each July, MASS MoCA is teeming with bright, young musicians from around the world. They’ve all gathered to make friends and new music under the guidance of the Bang on a Can organization, a group of established musicians that have been writing, performing, and recording experimental music for over twenty years. I hadn’t considered the possibility that in the process of meeting everyone as quickly as I could in between concerts, rehearsals, and seminars, I might accidentally mix two of them up. Yet there I was, trying to be as pleasant as possible, talking to the wrong person.

    In my defense, I had experienced quite the myriad of colors, sounds, and people earlier that day. MASS MoCA is packed with the work of some of the best in visual art (Liz Glynn, James Turrell, Natasha Bowdoin, and Sol LeWitt just to name a few), and combining it with a diverse array of music can be a little overwhelming. One of the concerts I attended had the audience walk to a different gallery space between each piece, making the hour and a half show feel similar to an art walk or a musical scavenger hunt. Called a lunch time recital, this type of multimedia experience is not new to either MASS MoCA or Bang On a Can. Nor is it new to composer Daniel Rhode, whose piece titled As Our Name Brand Society was performed at the recital.

    Featuring drum set, keyboard, and synthesizer, Rhode’s As Our Name Brand Society had a distinct punk rock flavor that stopped suddenly when a vocalist appeared out of thin air on a raised metal platform – part of Glynn’s installation – around which the performance took place, reading something in a severe, urgent tone. She later tore her sheet of lyrics to shreds and sprinkled them onto the heads of the bemused audience. Although it was difficult to make out most of the vocalist’s text from my position below, her timbre blended well with the ensemble and added a distinctly human element to an altogether cold and hardcore piece. The only line I was able to make out occurred at the very end: “right in the middle of it comes a smiling mortician.” I was left both bewildered and fascinated – the piece stopped just as suddenly as it began, and I couldn’t keep myself from laughing.

    The second of the two Rhode works was introduced by the composer: in pre-performance remarks, he stated that he’s particularly fascinated by the Liz Glynn gallery and “how our humanity changes as we go from working with physical objects to swimming in some digital ether.” His words clarified some of my suspicions about As Our Name Brand Society, and the piece that unfolded after his short preface continued to pull back the curtain. Titled Zero System, the piece is about “human movement.” He said, “I’m using some of the ideas from my electronic music, but really trying to make it human. You’re going to hear a lot of these mechanical rhythms that come together in some giant human, robot whole.” With driving, interwoven rhythmic lines punctuated intermittently by the piccolo and xylophone, the composer’s mechanical influence in Zero System is unmistakable. The ensemble dropped out periodically, leaving the pianist alone with a repeated polyrhythmic figure. The human element fought back in the low tones of the bass, but was eventually swallowed by the rest of the ensemble once again. Despite having little programmatic context outside of a single forty-five second pre-concert talk by the composer, Rhode’s two works felt thematically linked. Both grapple with hard-hitting subject matter – our dependence on technology and our materialistic culture – and both are musically drawn from noise rock. This link led me to my desire to interview him and spend more time engaged with his work this week, even if it meant handling a few bumps along the way.

    After fifteen minutes or so of excellent conversation from flutist Philip Snyder, I decided to close out the interview with, “One last thing – I’m looking for a composer by the name of Daniel Rhode for another interview, do you know where he might be?”

    His ears decide what we are hearing: amplifying the Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival
    by Lasse D. Hansen

    “Okay, what do you guys need to be different?,” sound engineer Andrew Cotton asks from the back of the empty hall as soon as the ensemble stops playing. The time is 3:30pm, Monday afternoon, and it’s the first day of the final week of the three-week Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival.

    For the past two weeks, the musicians have worked intensively with the festival’s nine composition Fellows at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art campus to realize nine new works written for the occasion.

    Right now, eight of the Musician Fellows are on stage, rehearsing Zero System – a groovy piece by composition Fellow Daniel Rhode consisting of waltzing melodic fragments – for the last part of the process: the sound rehearsal for the World Premiere Composer Concert in just one hour.

    Cotton’s fingers rest on ten of the 32 faders on the extensive mixer desk at which he is seated. On a small monitor screen he can follow the sound levels of all the individual instruments and with a microphone he is able to speak directly to the musicians on stage. Most of the time, however, he shouts through the hall. It works perfectly fine.

    4

    Mission control – where Sound Engineer Andrew Cotton works the audio magic
    (John Schaefer/ NYPR)

    The sound engineer has been working with the Bang on a Can All-Stars since 1996, and he is introduced as “the seventh member of the band” by Bang on a Can co-founder Julia Wolfe. “It’s a long-term relationship,” she points out.

    “A lot less guitar, please,” one of the percussionists answers. “And if possible, can I get a little more bass clarinet?” At this time, it’s not so much about actually rehearsing the pieces as it is about setting the right levels of amplification for the musicians on stage.

    “We should probably kill the monitors for this,” the clarinetist and faculty member Ken Thomson suggests as they decide to move on to the next piece on the program, Heron and the Bell by composition fellow Guusje Ingen Housz. This means that Andrew Cotton gets a brief but much needed break on a very long work day.

    The piece is about simplicity, stillness and movement, according to the Dutch-born Housz, and for the entire piece the two percussionists are moving calmly and almost processionally across the stage. One is playing a singing bowl, the other is playing shackles.

    The piano and bass players join by adding simple, meditative harmonies to the percussion, quickly followed by woodwinds playing short two-note melodies. The piece is slowly assembled from these musical elements, both free floating and structured like planets in a solar system.

    In a brief moment of silence an unexpected creaking sound appears. First, it is not clear where the sound comes from, but it quickly turns out that it is the stage floor that creaks, amplified through the microphones on stage. The musicians interrupt music to discuss different solutions, and Cotton is called to the stage to help. So much for that break.

    The solution, he says, is to move the percussionists to the floor in front of the stage, along with the strings that are taped to the floor to guide the musicians’ walk. “Can we move the stairs?,” one of the musicians shouts through the room, and three stage hands quickly enters to move it.

    “I just broke my golden rule,” Andrew Cotton says walking across the room to take his seat again with the audience now entering the room. “I changed something five minutes before the concert.”

    Now another unexpected sound appears, this time from above. From the roof, a deep and soft rumble moves down the walls, amplified by the whole room. The musicians are looking up. A member of the audience turns to me, saying “Wow, the rain on the roof sounds amazing!” There is no way to fix that. It will be part of the concert.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    NewSounds.org infuses the eclectic spirit of the radio show into a full online and live event experience. Combining the New Sounds radio show, WNYC’s Soundcheck podcast and the adventurous spirit of WQXR’s Q2 Music, NewSounds.org will be a place for discovery, conversation, insights into the creative process, and of course 24/7 music.
    The centerpiece is New Sounds Radio, an online station hosted by New Sounds founder and long-running host John Schaefer, but infused with new, emerging voices including experimental musicians Kelly Moran, Eliza Bagg and Lora-Faye Åshuvud, and tastemakers Gamall Awad and Matt Werth, along with WQXR’s Helga Davis and Terrance McKnight, and composer-guitarist Phil Kline. The station will feature an array of styles and genres – from singer Courtney Barnett to contemporary classical music ensemble Kronos Quartet, from jazz icon Henry Threadgill to the Nordic folk music of Wardruna, from electronic composer and bandleader Anna Meredith to the stunning vocals of Puerto Rico’s Ileana Cabra.
    “With almost everything ever recorded anywhere now available online, where do you start? New Sounds might be the place,” said John Schaefer. “We try to be friendly and jargon free, and gleefully oblivious of genre. Our goal is to find the artists, the songs, and the sounds that you might love – if only you get a chance to hear them. And we believe that algorithms won’t give you the same experience as a set of recommendations from real people. A friendly guide is the best way to discover new music, or music that defies easy categorization; and some of that music just might change your life.”
    “For three decades, New Sounds was one of the last bastions of free form FM programming; completely genre-free and dictated solely by the impeccable and irresistible tastes of its host,” said Alex Ambrose, Senior Producer, New Sounds. “NewSounds.org will usher that sense of discovery and unpredictability into the digital age, drawing on the best of New York’s curatorial and taste-making power.”

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:46 PM on April 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , MASS MoCA,   

    From Bang On a Can: “Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival 2018” 

    Bang On a Can is the original DIY New Music Organization

    Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival 2018

    Brilliant musicians and composers inhabit the MASS MoCA campus from July 12 – July 28 for three rollicking weeks of innovative, unexpected, and ear-expanding music.

    The annual festival includes daily performances in the museum galleries (free with museum admission), a concert with the Bang on a Can All-Stars, and concludes with a six-hour blow-out Marathon Concert performed by the festival ensembles and special guests. The festival also features African and Latin music workshops, late-night concerts, free events in North Adams, and more. This year features special festival guest composer Louis Andriessen.

    Louis Andriessen

    Bang On A Can All-Stars

    Bang on a Can Marathon with

    Steve Reich

    The best way to Bang is with a MASS MoCA membership, which offers free gallery admission and $5 concert tickets.

    Learn more about Bang on a Can.

    This program is supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

    See the full article here.

    Bang On A Can David Lang- Michael Gordon- Julia Wolfe © Peter Serling

    Bang On A Can All-Stars Members Ashley Bathgate, cello
    Robert Black, bass
    Vicky Chow, piano
    David Cossin, percussion
    Mark Stewart, guitars
    Ken Thomson, clarinet

    Formed in 1992, the Bang on a Can All-Stars are recognized worldwide for their ultra-dynamic live performances and recordings of today’s most innovative music. Freely crossing the boundaries between classical, jazz, rock, world and experimental music, this six-member amplified ensemble has consistently forged a distinct category-defying identity, taking music into uncharted territories. Performing each year throughout the U.S. and internationally, the All-Stars have shattered the definition of what concert music is today.

    Together, the All-Stars have worked in unprecedented close collaboration with some of the most important and inspiring musicians of our time, including Steve Reich, Ornette Coleman, Burmese circle drum master Kyaw Kyaw Naing, Tan Dun, DJ Spooky, and many more. The group’s celebrated projects include their landmark recordings of Brian Eno’s ambient classic Music for Airports and Terry Riley’s In C, as well as live performances with Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Don Byron, Iva Bittova, Thurston Moore, Owen Pallett and others. The All-Stars were awarded Musical America’s Ensemble of the Year and have been heralded as “the country’s most important vehicle for contemporary music” by the San Francisco Chronicle.

    Current and recent project highlights include the touring performances and recording of Julia Wolfe’s Pulitzer Prize winning Anthracite Fields for the All-Stars and guest choir, the record release of Wolfe’s acclaimed Steel Hammer, featuring Trio Mediaeval, plus a moving theatrically staged collaboration with SITI Company and director Anne Bogart; Field Recordings, a major multi-media project and CD/DVD now featuring 30 commissioned works by Tyondai Braxton, Mira Calix, Anna Clyne, Bryce Dessner, Florent Ghys, Michael Gordon, Jóhann Jóhannsson, David Lang, Christian Marclay, Steve Reich, Todd Reynolds, Julia Wolfe, and more; the Lincoln Center Festival 2017 world premiere of Cloud River Mountain, a new collaboration featuring Chinese superstar singer Gong Linna; the world premiere performance and recording of Steve Reich’s 2×5 including a sold-out performance at Carnegie Hall, and much more. With a massive repertoire of works written specifically for the group’s distinctive instrumentation and style of performance, the All-Stars have become a genre in their own right. The All-Stars record on Cantaloupe Music and have released past recordings on Sony, Universal and Nonesuch.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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