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  • richardmitnick 9:10 AM on August 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Mosaic Gazette, Remembering Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: “Remembering Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane” 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    Remembering Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane

    1
    Nick Spitzer focuses his excellent public radio program American Routes on John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk and their brief but resonating musical relationship with help from historian Lewis Porter and T.S. Monk. -Michael Cuscuna

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 8:17 AM on August 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: BOOKER ERVIN – THE GOOD BOOK, , John Kirby & his Orchestra, Mosaic Gazette   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: Current issue of the Gazette 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    John Kirby & his Orchestra: Anitra’s Dance

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    It was popular for bands, especially during the ban of ASCAP material during the early 1940s, to make swing arrangements of the classics. Here is a marvelous example with the John Kirby band with arrangement by Charlie Shavers on the Edvard Grieg composition Anitra’s Dance from the Peer Gynt Suite. -Scott Wenzel

    BOOKER ERVIN – THE GOOD BOOK

    2
    BOOKER ERVIN. Mosaic images

    In a correspondence to the editorial staff at JazzProfiles, Simon Spillett put forth the following explanation about how this piece came about:

    “It was written to accompany a 2017 release on the Acrobat label – Booker Ervin: The Good Book (Acrobat ACQCD 7121) which compiled his three earliest albums – The Book Cooks, Cookin’ and That’s It! together – with sideman appearances on recordings led by Teddy Charles, Mal Waldron and Bill Barron.

    This boxed set received favourable reviews in several English jazz publications (Jazzwise, The Jazz Rag) and one nationally circulated newspaper, The Financial Times, who gave the collection a four star rating, praising Ervin’s “passion with a positive vibe”.

    Although this is essentially the same piece included in the booklet for the Acrobat box, I have corrected some minor errors and added a small amount of significant “new” information. I believe this may be the first extended essay on Ervin and his work.”

    In addition to fronting his own quartet, Simon has won several awards for his music, including the tenor saxophone category of the British Jazz Awards (2011), Jazz Journal magazine, Critic’s Choice CD of the Year (2009) and Rising Star in the BBC Jazz Awards (2007).

    Simon has his own website which you can visit via this link.

    3

    ©Simon Spillett, copyright protected; all rights reserved, used with the author’s permission.

    “I suppose I’ll go on striving until I die…Every time I play I try to play as if it’s the last time I’m ever going to blow”
    Booker Ervin, Melody Maker, January 30th 1965

    There is much more. Please visit the full article.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:52 AM on August 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Dick Cavett, , , Mosaic Gazette   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: “Miles Davis: the Legendary 1986 Dick Cavett Appearance” 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    Visit The Jazz Gazette


    This is very cool extended footage from a 1986 Dick Cavett Show with a wonderful interview and intense performance from Miles Davis. Incidently, drummer Vince Wilburn identified the guitarist as Garth Weber who was subbing for Robbin Ford who could not make the telecast.-Michael Cuscuna

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:51 AM on August 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Branford Marsalis Interviewed, , Mosaic Gazette, Ravi Coltrane on Discovering the “Lost” John Coltrane Album, Sonny Rollins   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: Today on the Gazette 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    1
    Sonny Rollins at Café Montmartre 1968

    Marc Myers of JazzWax has unearthed a real gem from the millions of videos on YouTube. It’s a half-hour September 19, 1968 video of the Sonny Rollins Quartet at the Café Montmartre in Copenhagen, taped by Danish television. Kenny Drew, Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen and Tootie Heath complete the band.-Michael Cuscuna

    Watch

    2
    Branford Marsalis Interviewed
    George Varga interviews Branford Marsalis in the San Diego Union-Tribune about his decision to leave the Tonight Show, his eclectic playing experience and the ambitious project that he is now working on. It’s great to catch up his many activities.

    Read the article

    3
    Ravi Coltrane on Discovering the “Lost” John Coltrane Album
    This CBC interview with Ravi Coltrane, by way of WBEZ in Chicago, focuses on the discovery and imminent release of the lost John Coltrane album Both Directions At Once and his relationship with his father’s music.
    -Michael Cuscuna

    Listen

    There is much much more.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:25 PM on June 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Mosaic Gazette   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: Miles and Teddy Wilson 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    1
    Each Sunday, Pitchfork takes an in-depth look at a significant album from the past, and any record not in our archives is eligible. Today, we explore 1974’s black funk dreamscape from Miles Davis.

    One autumn in New York, in 1972, the most famous jazz musician in the world tried to take a right turn at 60 mph off the West Side Highway and totaled his Lamborghini Miura. A bystander found Miles Davis with both legs broken, covered in blood and cocaine. Even after the crash, Miles had a bleeding ulcer, a bad hip, nodes in his larynx, and a heart attack while on tour in Brazil. He spat blood onstage, his legs in so much pain he had to work his wah-wah and volume pedals with his hands, and offstage, he self-medicated with Scotch and milk, Bloody Marys, Percodan, and more cocaine. “Everything started to blur after that car accident,” Miles later wrote.

    His trajectory up to that point was a blur of a different hue. From teen sideman to Charlie Parker’s bebop revolution to a solo career that’s better compared to Pablo Picasso than other jazz musicians, Miles instigated entire paradigm shifts in music. Or, as he hissed to a matron at a White House dinner in the 1980s: “I’ve changed music five or six times.” Most narratives point to iconic albums like Birth of the Cool, Relaxin’ With the Miles Davis Quintet, Kind of Blue, Sketches of Spain, Miles Smiles and Bitches Brew, but his 1974 album Get Up With It hangs like an ominous storm cloud over them all, the one that fans of his other works might hesitate to name, his last studio album before he fell mute for the rest of the decade. Like Orpheus grieving in the underworld or Marlow going up the river, Miles went to a place that forever altered his DNA. When he finally returned to the studio, he never sounded the same.

    Starting with Bitches Brew in 1970, Miles proceeded to drop eight double albums as well as audacious efforts like A Tribute to Jack Johnson and On the Corner, each one deploying a strategy that undercut his audiences’ expectations. With Get Up With It, Miles began the most defiant shift of his storied career, dropping a totemic yet untidy leviathan that rebuffed jazz fans and critics alike. Each song careens between extremes, as Miles presages everything still to come: ambient, no wave, world beat, jungle, new jack swing, post-rock, even hinting at the future sound of R&B and chart-topping pop. For many modern fans, it’s his heaviest era, but Miles himself offers little insight into his mindset of that period, the music barely mentioned in his 1989 book Miles: The Autobiography. Instead, he writes: “I was spiritually tired of all the bullshit…I felt artistically drained, tired… And the more I stayed away, the deeper I sank into another dark world.”

    Mosaic Records – Teddy Wilson transfers

    2
    YouTube


    The legendary Columbia producer Michael Brooks listens in to a previously unissued performance for Columbia Records of Teddy Wilson’s small group (along with J.C. Heard on drums) from July 31, 1942. The tune has a number of titles but an early shellac test pressing has it listed as “Stomp” Pt. 2 (this had been mistakenly thought to be “Something To Shout About” with a vocal by Helen Ward). Matt Cavaluzzo is the engineer and Scott Wenzel the producer of this new set for Mosaic: Classic Brunswick & Columbia Teddy Wilson Sessions 1934-1942.

    Mosaic’s Teddy Wilson Sessions: A Look Behind the Scenes (Part 2)

    Another quick glimpse into the transfer process at Battery Studios during our work on the Teddy Wilson set. Michael Brooks, producer for Columbia producer, joins Matt Cavaluzzo and myself as we hear for the first time a previously unissued performance on our newly released Wilson set.
    -Scott Wenzel

    Visit The Jazz Gazette


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:57 AM on May 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Mosaic Gazette   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: “May 20, 2018” 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette is a truly important resource

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    Walter Page
    Basie Anchor and Pioneer of the Jazz Bass

    1
    The four members that made up the original Count Basie band’s “All American Rhythm Section” were unique in their approach to swing, and their sound together heralded a fresh new voice that still resonates today.

    Lewis Porter writes of them on WBGO’s website, and focuses in particular on Walter Page: a real pioneer in jazz bass. -Scott Wenzel

    Jackie McLean Quintet
    Blues Inn 1988

    2
    Jackie McLean’s appearance at the third annual Mt. Fuji/Blue Note Jazz Festival in 1988 featured a quintet with Wallace Roney, Horace Parlan, Peter Washington and Kenny Washington performing tunes by Jackie associated with his Blue Note output of the late ’50s and early ’60s.

    Blues Inn comes from his session for the label which produced half of Jackie’s Bag. -Michael Cuscuna

    A Lifetime of Carla Bley
    3
    Ethan Iverson’s New Yorker profile of Carla Bley is essential reading. Iverson has brilliantly drawn from Carla’s life and thoughts, and her litany of musical achievements, to fill this beautifully wrapped package that cajols you immediately to take another listen to her recordings. Don’t linger. -Nick Moy

    Much much more.
    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    stem

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:23 PM on May 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 41st Annual Pitt Jazz Seminar, , Mosaic Gazette, , Pittsburgh CityPaper   

    From Pittsburgh CityPaper via Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: “Michael Cuscuna: Unabridged interview” Nov 2, 2011 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette is a truly important resource

    Pittsburgh CityPaper

    On Thurs., Nov. 3, he speaks at the 41st Annual Pitt Jazz Seminar, in the William Pitt Union at 7 p.m.

    Michael Cuscuna: Unabridged interview

    1
    Michael Cuscuna from Open Sky Jazz

    Michael Cuscuna set the standard on box-set reissues when he launched Mosaic, a mail-order label that works in deluxe, comprehensive jazz re-releases. Released in limited editions, each set compiled a complete overview of a particular period in an artist’s career, packing it in a 12-inch-by- 12-inch box, with a detailed booklet full of information that jazz geeks relish. Today, Mosaic still releases that package, though nearly all the sets appear on CD only. They’ve also branched out to include Mosaic Select and Mosaic Singles, which cover smaller scopes of releases. In addition to this extensive work, Cuscuna became the go-to guy for the numerous labels re-releasing their jazz back catalog.

    On Thurs., Nov. 3, he speaks at the 41st Annual Pitt Jazz Seminar, in the William Pitt Union at 7 p.m. This is the long version of the interview that Mike Shanley did with Cuscuna.

    You’re the guy who listens to all the alternate takes to decide what goes on box sets and reissues. After hearing all that stuff, how do you keep from getting jaded?

    Well, I don’t think you ever get jaded when it’s something you really love. But there is an overkill period. After almost every Mosaic set, there’s a period of time after I finish working on a box where I don’t want to hear that artist for at least four months. Ironically the only two artists I didn’t feel that way about were two of the largest sets that I produced. One was the 18-CD Nat “King” Cole trio set. I got so deep into him that I never got tired of it. I just kept listening to him from the end of the project onward. And Count Basie. I did that complete Roulette [Records] live and studio boxes. Man, I love that band. It just swung like no other band. I can never get enough Basie, from the Lester Young-Jo Jones period, but also from the ’50s and ’60s.

    For the most part, I experience overkill but I always bounce back. You never get jaded. What you do get is very exhausted, in the sense that [you’re] listening intently. With reissues, the most exhaustive part is the decision making process — listening to unreleased alternate takes and deciding if any are worthy of release. If they are, why? And then you have to play devil’s advocate and say why not. Which is one reason I always try to get somebody who played on that record, or a younger musician who idolized that musician, to listen to any alternate takes that I want to put out, to see if they agree that it’s worthy of release or if it shouldn’t be.

    That’s one of the bigger responsibilities. If I put out music that is really unworthy or would embarrass the artist or make an artist unhappy, then I think that’s the worst sin I could commit. I take the responsibility of what has been unissued, what has never come out. If I’m going to cause it to come out, I better have a very good reason.

    The thing I love about Mosaic boxes is listening to the alternate takes and knowing what to listen for, because of what is written in the liner notes. Figuring that out must require a lot of concentration. Not so much with a Thelonious Monk set, where the songs where all three minutes, but with albums where the songs were longer.

    Yeah, like a later Blue Note session. I think it’s a soloist’s phenomenon. With Chu Berry or Coleman Hawkins or Lester Young [all saxophonists from the ’30s and ’40s], we have plenty of alternates, but if you’re addressing a big band — Maynard Ferguson or Count Basie or Duke Ellington — alternate takes don’t come into play that much because everyone is striving for the perfect take. And guys are replaying what worked on the previous take but making it better. So there’s usually one good master take unless you have a really extraordinary soloist, like a Lester Young or a Wayne Shorter, where every time is something new and amazing.

    The whole thing about alternate takes is that when CDs first came out, I started — originally on Blue Note CDs — to put an alternate take after the master take, because that’s the way I like to listen to them, so I could compare them with a fresh memory. And I almost got lynched for that. So I eventually had to start putting them at the end of the disc. Which is fine because you can fast forward quickly if you want to hear them that way. I understand that a lot of people put the CD on and walk away and hear the album as it was. That’s one thing that changed drastically.

    You’ve worked on a lot of re-releases for pianist Andrew Hill.

    Andrew’s been one of my passions since the mid 1960s. And it’s great because through Blue Note and even more so thru Mosaic, I’ve been able to get so much of his stuff out.

    I remember talking to [Blue Note founder] Alfred Lion about [how there were] so many of the albums that I put out that [Lion] had produced 20 years earlier. I’d say, “Why didn’t you put this out?” And he’d say, “I don’t know, they sound great. I have no idea why I didn’t get around to putting them out.”

    The same thing happened to me with Andrew Hill’s material. There was a Mosaic Select with the rest of the unissued stuff, it was like a clean up project. Some of that stuff was like man this stuff is so great why didn’t I want to put this out [on 19TK Hill box set]. And Andrew agreed. It’s strange, but it’s when you hear stuff. Your opinions change. There’s no absolute in any decisions.

    And there’s so much of that stuff, it can be hard when you’re weighing this sessions versus that session, and thinking about budgets too.

    Oh yeah, well there’s that! [Laughs] That didn’t used to be the case but that’s certainly the case now.

    Rudy van Gelder [who engineered most of the sessions for labels like Blue Note, Prestige and Impulse!] once said that he’s recorded so much music that he can’t enjoy listening to it casually. Do you ever get that feeling?

    Yeah. I rarely will go home and put on music if I’m working with it all day. I need a break from it. Or the other thing to do is if you’re working on [progressive trumpeter] Charles Tolliver all day, the good thing to do is go home and listen to Aretha [Franklin]. Something that’s really very different and always something that you’ve had nothing to do with. Then you can relax.

    Sometimes if I’m driving in the car with the radio on, a song will have a tick in it, and when I hear that tick, every muscle in my body tightens. Then I realize, it’s not my problem. I’m not listening to a test pressing. My body relaxes.

    Speaking of Andrew Hill, do you think the Mosaic reissues helped regenerate his career in the final years of his life?

    I think it helped, yeah. It was a confluence of a bunch of things. In the late ’90s he put together this sextet that did Dusk on Palmetto [Records]. And it was just magical combination of people. It harkened back in the textures to Point of Departure [his best-known Blue Note album from 1964], but he just started writing music again like crazy. All wonderful. That really started a renaissance in his career and his work opportunities.

    In 2000 Andrew called me out of the blue and said, “Remember that 11-piece band record we did? You listened to the tapes and said it was a train wreck? We’ve got to revisit that.” And I said okay because a couple people who played on that record, Lenny White [drums] and Howard Johnson [tuba, bass clarinet], have always been asking me if they could hear it. So I ordered CD-Rs of this session. They sent them to me and I sent one to Andrew. And he called me and said, yeah you’re right this is a mess. But I said let me listen one more time. And I listened and the reason it sounded like a mess was because only half of the stereo was feeding into the machine. You could hear a bunch of other instruments in the echo. I said, “This isn’t the complete thing!” It was one of those rare Rudy Van Gelder [sessions] recorded on eight-track. I got the eight-tracks and put them on and it was great.

    That was the album that became Passing Ships [released in 2003]. For better and for worse it was named album of the year everywhere from the New York Times to the jazz magazines. And I say for worse because it’s kind of sad when a record made 30 years ago becomes record of the year. But that really helped him too. And that let me to revisit everything that’s in the can. That’s what that Mosaic Select was about. And I’m happy to say it was a 25-30 year odyssey but that’s how long it took me to get every Andrew Hill session out, but I finally got them out.

    Going back to the original tapes – where were they? Did Rudy keep them?

    Cuscuna: No. Rudy never keeps tapes. I wish he did because there’s some John Coltrane Impulse! stuff that’s lost forever.

    They were all at Blue Note in New York in the ’60s and early ’70s. Then around 1973 they all got shipped out to California because [the label] it was owned by United Artists. They’ve been in five different locations since that time, around the LA area. For the most part I’ve found every tape that should exist with five or six exceptions.

    When you come to Pittsburgh, the title of your lecture is The Business of Jazz, right?

    Cuscuna: I called Nathan [Davis, head of the Pitt Jazz Seminar] this morning and said, “There’s a million different directions I could go on this.” He said, “I want you to talk about reissues. How you do them, why you do them, all the stories about how they sell.” That’s basically what I’m going to talk about. It’ll start with the Blue Notes and the Mosaics and the Columbia stuff with the Miles Davis sets, and also John Coltrane on Impulse!, which I worked on in the ’70s and back to in the early ’90s. There’s a lot to talk about.

    I’m sure I’ll get bored with what I’m saying and veer off into other little anecdotes or opinions. [laughs] I’ll probably just have a 10-word outline and go from there and encourage people to interrupt. There’s no point in talking if people want to hear something else from you other than what you’re talking about. I like feedback, you know.

    Where is the jazz business – in a precarious state?

    Cuscuna: The recorded music aspect of it is in extremely dire straits. But I find that there are more talented young musicians, top level musicians, coming up every day. And they’re all finding work. And not just in New York clubs. They’re getting sidemen gigs, going on tours and I think the state of jazz itself is very healthy. When you think of downbeat, JazzTimes, Jazzis, the amount of press that the jazz world supports is quite amazing to me.

    The record companies are ailing. And there will be consequences for artists as a result of that. But the consequences for them will be, as well as mastering your instrument, you’ll have to know how to record and produce your own record, have them pressed and sell them off the bandstand and on the internet, and you’ll have to learn how to maintain your own website. Those are now as rudimentary as scales for a musician who wants to have a fulltime career. They’ll become more and more important as time goes on. I don’t know what the future will be, but I know that the skill set for musicians is going to triple.

    With Mosaic are you still seeing people who are still interesting in the tactile experience of music, rather than just listening to downloads?

    I don’t know. Certainly for people my age and older, it’s a big part of it. It took me three years without a functioning turntable in my house before I got rid of my record collection.

    Nooooooooooooo! Even then I still have every Blue Note album.

    OK. And everything I’ve worked on. But other than that, I got rid of everything. And I had country, blues, I had everything. But I miss the 12 X 12 field for cover art. I miss the 12X12 field for information and prose. Not just information and prose, but information and prose that you can actually read in a typeface that’s legible, that’s black type on white paper instead of orange type on green paper. I swear every art director in the CD world is completely illiterate because they have no respect for words or information. I miss that.

    They keep talking about a resurgence of vinyl in all genres of music but it’s still a very small select group. A lot of it is kids who like to make mix tapes and use turntables that way, like DJs. And then there’s the other end of the spectrum, which is overly wealthy people who have $35,000 sound systems who want original pressings or 200-gram pressings. Those are two marginalized groups. I don’t think vinyl’s going to make a real comeback in any sense. I miss it. And I think anyone that was raised on it does too.

    I’ll tell you what I miss most from the LP era, is the lack of burnout. When you bought an LP, or just pulled it off your shelf, rarely did you play both sides. If you played one side, you’d play an 18, 20-minute program of music. When you get a new CD you pop it and when I see 74 minutes pop up, I think woah this is unbelievable. And unless I’m listening to a set that I’m working on, I’ve never gotten through a whole CD of anything! It’s just a different way of listening now, and more exhaustive. I think a lot of young musicians don’t help themselves. If I’ve never heard of you, but I heard something on the radio that I like, don’t give me 74 minutes of originals, brand new music, with no anchors to compare you to someone else and get a fix on. Give me 60 minutes and make 20 minutes of it compositions I know, so I hear how you deal with something that I know.

    s re-releasing their jazz back catalog.

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    stem

    Stem Education Coalition
    See the full article here .

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:32 AM on May 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: East Coast vs West Coast, JazzWax, Mosaic Gazette,   

    From JazzWax via Mosaic: “East Coast v. West Coast” March 13, 2018 

    Mosaic is a truly important resource

    1

    JazzWax

    [This post is dedicated to K.F. of Boston for his enduring passion of New Orleans based second line Jazz. I just hope he sees it.]

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    1
    2

    Back in the early 1950s, New York and Los Angeles had mildly different jazz styles. The West Coast sound tended to be more melodic and contrapuntal. The East Coast’s sound was denser and more bluesy. By mid-decade, as the LP became an increasingly profitable format, major New York-based labels such as RCA, Decca, MGM and Bethlehem placed greater emphasis on their Los Angeles jazz divisions. Naturally, competition heated up as jazz A&R chiefs on each coast scrambled to sign regional artists. Before long, the two coasts were jazz rivals—or at least that’s how music publications began writing about them.

    In truth, the music wasn’t that different other than the feel, as you will hear in four albums that pitted one jazz region against the other:

    3
    East Coast-West Coast Scene (RCA). In this square-off, trumpeter Shorty Rogers fronted a tentet in L.A. in September 1954 called the Augmented Giants while tenor saxophonist Al Cohn recorded with a similarly sized group in New York a month later with his Charlie’s Tavern Ensemble. Each ensemble recorded three songs. While producer Jack Lewis insisted in his liner notes that the album wasn’t a contest, virtually everything about the LP’s packaging was meant to show off the differences. Here’s Rogers’s group: Shorty Rogers (tp); Milt Bernhart and Bob Enevoldsen (tb); Jimmy Giuffre (cl,ts,bar); Lennie Niehaus and Bud Shank (as); Zoot Sims (ts); Pete Jolly (p); Barney Kessel (g); Curtis Counce (b) and Shelly Manne (d). Here’s Cohn’s group: Joe Newman (tp); Billy Byers and Eddie Bert (tb); Hal McKusick and Gene Quill (as); Al Cohn (ts,arr); Sol Schlinger (bar); Sanford Gold (p); Billy Bauer (g); Milt Hinton (b) and Osie Johnson (d).

    2
    Blow Hot/Blow Cool (Decca). On September 1954, saxophonist Herbie Fields led an East Coast ensemble and recorded six songs. The group featuring Billy Byers, Kai Winding and Eddie Bert (tb); Bart Varsalona (b-tb); Herbie Fields (cl,as,sop,ts); Joe Black (p); Rudy Cafro (g); Peter Compo (b); Harvey Lang (d) and Marcy Lutes (vcl). The West Coast group was called the Melrose Avenue Conservatory Chamber Orchestra and featured Stu Williamson (tp,v-tb) Herb Geller (as) Jack Montrose, Buddy Collette (ts) Bob Gordon (bar) Marty Paich (p) Curtis Counce (b) Chico Hamilton (d). Four songs were recorded.

    5
    Leonard Feather’s West Coast Stars & Leonard Feather’s East Coast Stars (MGM). This West Coast contingency was recorded first in January 1956. The band featured Don Fagerquist (tp); Bob Enevoldsen (v-tb,ts); Buddy Collette (fl,as,ts); Andre Previn (p,vib-1); Pete Rugolo (p); Curtis Counce (b) and Stan Levey (d). The East Coast band recorded shortly after and included Thad Jones (tp); Benny Powell (tb); Frank Wess (fl,ts); Dick Hyman (p,org); Oscar Pettiford (b) and Osie Johnson (d).

    6

    The Trombones Inc. (Warner Bros). This is the bad boy of trombone albums. The East Coast session featured Eddie Bert, Jimmy Cleveland, Henry Coker, Bennie Green, Melba Liston, Benny Powell, Frank Rehak, Bob Brookmeyer, Dick Hickson and Bart Varsalona—all in one trombone section. They were backed by Hank Jones (p); Wendell Marshall (b) and Osie Johnson (d). The arranger was J.J. Johnson. (Substitutions on the three different dates included Milt Hinton in for Marshall, and Bob Alexander in for Henry Coker).

    On the West Coast, two different sets of trombonists were used for the two dates. The sliders included Milt Bernhart, Bob Fitzpatrick, Joe Howard, Lewis McGreery, Frank Rosolino and Dave Wells (tb); Bob Brookmeyer (v-tb); John Kitzmiller (tu); Marty Paich (p,arr); Red Mitchell (b) and Mel Lewis (d). The second band featured Marshall Cram, Herbie Harper, Joe Howard, Ed Kusby, Dick Nash, Murray McEachern, Tommy Pederson andFrank Beach (tb); George Roberts and Ken Shroyer (b-tb); Marty Paich (p); Barney Kessel (g); Red Mitchell (b); Mel Lewis (d); Mike Pacheco (bgo) an Warren Barker (arr).

    JazzWax tracks: East Coast-West Coast Scene can be found here. Blow Hot/Blow Cold is out of print but the West Coast tracks (Skip to My Loot, Speak Easy, I’m Forever Counting Geigers and Id) can be found here; Leonard Feather’s West Coast v. East Coast is out of print but three of the five (The Goof and I, Here’s Pete and Beverly Hills) can be found here; and The Trombones Inc. can be found here.

    A special thanks to David Langner.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    stem

    Stem Education Coalition

    See the full article here .

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:30 PM on April 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Hank Mobley in Europe: 1968-70, Mosaic Gazette, , The Complete Bee Hive Sessions (MD12-161), What Miles Davis Means to Sixteen Musicians   

    From Mosaic: “The Complete Bee Hive Sessions, Hank Mobley in Europe: 1968-70, What Miles Davis Means to Sixteen Musicians” 

    Mosaic is a truly important resource

    April 22, 2018

    We Will Be Repressing This Set

    Last week we notified you that we are currently out of stock and cannot afford to repress the set without a substantial number of advance orders for it. Thank you very much for your strong response and we expect to be repressing and shipping this set in June.

    Last Chance to place an order will be this Wednesday. The set will then be removed from the site and no additional orders will be able to be filled.

    1
    The Complete Bee Hive Sessions (MD12-161), is a marvelous collection of superb hard bop albums recorded between 1977 and 1984 with artist like Curtis Fuller, Clifford Jordan, Sal Nistico, Dizzy Reece, Nick Brignola Junior Mance and Johnny Hartman among others.

    Hank Mobley in Europe: 1968-70
    2

    Steven Cerra has seen fit to reprint Simon Spillett’s extensive and detailed essay on Hank Mobley in the late ’60s, especially his years in Europe [sorry, no link provided.].

    It first appeared in the January 2004 issue of Jazz Journal International and it is essential reading for those (and they are plentiful) who love Hank’s music. His life was a sad and unfulfilled as his music was rich and celebratory. -Michael Cuscuna -Michael Cuscuna

    What Miles Davis Means to Sixteen Musicians

    Miles Davis January 1955 Express Newspapers Getty Image

    Miles Davis means many things to many people. This June 2005 piece in The Fader polled 16 diverse artists from Reggie Lucas to Madlib to John Legend on what his allure and influence was for them. -Michael Cuscuna

    16 Musicians On The Everlasting Influence Of Miles Davis

    In this piece from our June 2005 Photo Issue, David Banner, John Legend, Damon Albarn, DJ Premier, and more share the impact Davis’s music had on them.

    BRIAN CHASE (of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs): I took private drum lessons when I was young and my teacher introduced me to the jazz tradition and Miles. I transcribed all of Milestones and he had be transcribing Tony Williams’s part on Miles Smiles. So my relationship with Miles is a very technical one, as a student of the jazz tradition.

    I think of Miles as someone who was definitely not avant-garde, but he was cutting edge. For all his cutting edge-ness, Miles never challenged the traditional principles of jazz. But his bands redefined the repertoire of jazz music — instead of having the blues, like Gershwin-based song form, you have more complex harmonies and more complex melodies. More complex solo forms. A lot of that is Wayne Shorter’s doing.

    As far as fashion is concerned, I sense that Miles had a fear of being ugly. Anything mundane or lowbrow would offend him.. Mr. Slick Urbanite. It relates to his music too, this fear of ugliness. Ornette or Cecil Taylor’s music is so far left of Miles that it can be unattractive to anyone in the middle. But he’s different from people on the right side too — people like Lee Morgan or Jimmy Smith, who rely on blues-isms in their solos. That style never suited Miles. He had that hipper, intellectual quality to his music rather than something so down home and fundamental.

    MOS DEF: The first Miles song I thought of was “Little Church.” It’s not an original, which is one of the things that makes it special — it’s his interpretation of someone else’s material. Everything that Miles did bears his mark, but “Little Church” is simple but lyrical, it’s majestic but small. But majestic and small make for an exciting balance. It’s delicate and strange and eerie and enchanting. And the thing about “Little Church” is that, it’s not just a big solo — there’s a dominant theme that he repeats over and over.

    I miss Miles a lot and I wish he was here. A lot of the time it feels like I’m just here… I miss the creative context Miles might have provided. If anything we just need some new contexts to work in because the ones that are already well-established have been run into the ground. Now you just either subscribe to the existing contexts or you get out and stand outside, you know?

    See the full article on Miles here.


    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    See the full article here .

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:20 PM on April 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Earl Hines, , Mosaic Gazette, Teddy Wilson   

    From Mosaic Jazz Gazette: “Teddy Wilson & Earl Hines All of Me” 

    Mosaic is a truly important resource


    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    1
    Here we have a rare chance to see both Earl Hines and Teddy Wilson trading ideas in Berlin during a 1965 European tour and jamming on All Of Me.

    An interesting contrast of styles that works very well. -Scott Wenzel

    More where this came from

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    See the full article here .

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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