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  • richardmitnick 2:52 PM on November 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Mosaic Jazz Gazette, Rudy Van Gelder: How He Pioneered the Ethos of Making Records, SOUNDFLY   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: “Rudy Van Gelder: How He Pioneered the Ethos of Making Records” 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    1

    Brad Allen Williams has written an apt tribute to the work of recording engineer Rudy Van Gelder and has even included the video interview that I did with Rudy in the early 2000s. By the way, let me put to rest the rumor that Rudy would sometimes change microphones so photographers would not capture what he really used. That would have been make work and he was more secretive of his equipment and recording techniques than of his mic choices.

    -Michael Cuscuna

    Rudy Van Gelder: The Optometrist Who Pioneered an Ethos in Record-Making

    August 29, 2016
    Brad Allen Williams

    Rudy Van Gelder died 25 August, 2016 at the age of 91, having made some of history’s most enduring sound recordings. If you’ve explored the variegated tapestry of 20th century recordings lumped together under the criminally reductionist banner of “jazz,” you probably know the name. If you’ve dug through crates and slid records out of jackets to look for the distinctive block-letter “RVG” in the dead wax, you understand that a name can be synonymous with an ethos of record-making — one that, when entwined in double helix around a complementary ethos of composing and performing, formed the DNA of some pretty significant recordings.

    With a tiny sapphire stylus, Rudy Van Gelder scribed a sizable chunk of the Rosetta Stone of American music, translating the genius of artists like Miles Davis, Wayne Shorter, John Coltrane, Lee Morgan, Hank Mobley, and scores of others for the masses.

    Rudy Van Gelder’s boyhood interests in amateur radio and trumpet naturally evolved into a passion for high fidelity audio. He began recording friends in his parents’ Hackensack home at age 22, and in 1959 (seven years after beginning a fruitful association with Blue Note Records), he quit his day job in optometry and opened a purpose-built studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. It was here that he recorded seminal works for Prestige, CTI, Verve, and Impulse!, including Coltrane’s landmark A Love Supreme, as well as nearly every classic Blue Note side before 1967.

    Just perusing through the discography of Van Gelder Studios is enough to induce a headache!

    Van Gelder recorded his most important 1950s and 1960s work direct to either mono or 2-track stereo tape (or both simultaneously). This technical and aesthetic high-wire act combines tracking and mixing into a simultaneous procedure in which numerous microphones are balanced by the recordist live to tape as the musicians play. To do this successfully, performers and mics must be positioned optimally in the room and equipment must be in impeccable repair and alignment. But most importantly, the recordist has to have it together from the first beat, because with artists of Blakey’s caliber, the very first run-through could be the final take.

    3
    A sample from Soundfly’s collection of albums touched by the skilled hand of Rudy Van Gelder.

    There is no “undo.” Any decisions (or non-decisions) are permanent. Equipment failure or human error could mar or render unsalvageable an otherwise brilliant performance. High stakes, immense responsibility, and innumerable pitfalls demand clear judgment, foresight, decisive action, and quick but measured reaction. This is how Rudy Van Gelder made records in the 1950s and ‘60s.

    But despite all of this, the recordings are so engaging, with focus so superbly directed to the artists, that it’s easy to forget that they’re Rudy Van Gelder performances as well. Although the record and mix were complete as soon as the last cymbal decayed, Van Gelder was no Lomax-style documentarian. Like so many of the artists he recorded, Rudy’s work had personality, and his performances were distinctive and individualistic for better or (occasionally) worse. Charles Mingus famously preferred not to record with Van Gelder, alleging that “he tries to change people’s tones… the way he sets [a player] up at the mic, he can change the whole sound.” And although he was famously opaque about technical details, most agree that Van Gelder probably incorporated some then-unconventional techniques, such as DI capture of Hammond organs in combination with microphones on the Leslie speaker, in the case of the wild organist Jimmy Smith.


    The title of Thelonious Monk’s Hackensack is a reference to RVG’s original home studio where many of Monk’s tracks (including this one) were recorded.

    These clues suggest that Van Gelder was most likely guided foremost by the goal of achieving good-sounding recordings, as opposed to any preoccupation with literal verisimilitude or procedural dogma.

    Secretive until the end (there’s an apocryphal legend that Mr. Van Gelder sometimes put up different microphones for photo shoots than he actually used on the sessions), we can only make informed guesses about what Van Gelder actually did. We know there are a lot of Schoeps M221b condensers in the photos (always with the windscreen installed!).

    There’s a famous shot of him posed in front of two Ampex 300 1/4” tape machines and a mono Altec 4322c limiter. A pair of U47s are in the frame with a pensive John Coltrane in a photo from the Blue Train session. We hear a fair bit of room and spill on the records, suggesting that the musicians were most likely allowed to perform more-or-less together, with minimal isolation — an impression supported by the fact that there are certainly no headphones in any of the session photos.

    But in the end, these are mostly superficial details of process, and to focus on the technical would be to miss what makes Van Gelder’s work great. So immediate are the recordings that even the occasional defects — the clipping distortion on the bass drum of an enthusiastic Idris Muhammad (née Leo Morris) during the breaks of Reuben Wilson’s original 1969 recording of “Hot Rod,” for instance — seem to become powerful signifiers of the moment and its authenticity. And when the flaws in your work become features, you are unquestionably an artist.

    For a deeper look into Van Gelder’s mind, check out this interview with producer Michael Cuscuna.


    RIP RVG.

    See the full SOUNDFLY article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:01 AM on October 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 'Trane, Are These the 10 Best John Coltrane Solos?, Jacob Adams 01 Feb 2012, , Mosaic Jazz Gazette   

    From Mosaic Jazz Gazette: “Are These the 10 Best John Coltrane Solos?” 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    1
    http://johncoltrane.com/

    Jacob Adams on PopMatters has taken on the impossible task of identifying what he thinks are John Coltrane’s ten best solos. I couldn’t narrow the list down to eighty! But I am pleased to see that Adams ranked as #1 Crescent, the title tune from the Coltrane quartet’s supreme and overlooked masterpiece.

    -Michael Cuscuna

    Read and Listen

    The process of deciding which John Coltrane solos are the best of the best gave me a good reason to go back and listen to his catalog once again, as if an excuse is even needed. I hope you do the same.

    Jacob Adams
    01 Feb 2012

    John Coltrane completely changed the face of music in a recording career that lasted only a little over ten years. He was so influential in so many ways that it’s impossible to list them all. Naturally, many of his compositions have become part of the standard jazz canon, tunes that all young jazz musicians must contend with in order to be considered legit. He completely redefined the vocabulary of the genre with his “sheets of sound” and modal approaches. Coltrane revolutionized the way people play the saxophone, from his adroit use of the upper registers (known as altissimo) to his popularization of the soprano saxophone in jazz. His classic 1960s quartet is considered the apotheosis of the modern jazz combo for many. Above all, though, Coltrane played some of the most innovative, sublime, poetic solos in the history of the music. Every jazz musician aspires to capture even an iota of Trane’s musical and spiritual energy.

    Ranking one Coltrane solo over another is an act of absurdist thinking. Nevertheless, the process of deciding which Trane solos are the best of the best gave me a good reason to go back and listen to his catalog once again, as if an excuse is even needed. I hope you do the same.

    10. “My Favorite Things” from My Favorite Things

    Coltrane popularized the use of the soprano saxophone in jazz, and this track had a lot to do with it. “My Favorite Things” demonstrates the broad appeal of Trane’s art. He managed to take a Rogers and Hammerstein tune that everyone has heard before and turn it into a pleasantly meandering epic, one that fellow musicians gawk at for its technical prowess — yet also became a radio hit (albeit in an edited form). Instead of soloing over the tune’s chord changes, Trane solos over an extended vamp of only two chords, thus cementing the modal approach that he had been working on for a while by 1960. There’s a mesmerizing, bewitching quality about it that’s a far cry from the original tune.

    9. “Oleo” from Relaxin’ with the Miles Davis Quintet (Miles Davis)

    Despite his gaining fame for the experimentalism of his later career, Trane could play straight-ahead bebop like none other as well. “Oleo”, a tune by Sonny Rollins based upon the ubiquitous “I Got Rhythm”, is the perfect vehicle for Coltrane to show off his chops and artistic creativity. “Oleo” is definitely one of the most sing-able solos in Trane’s catalog. During every chorus, he manages to throw out an improvised melody worthy of a pop song. This is Coltrane at his height with the Miles Davis Quintet. Straightforward jazz doesn’t get much better than this.

    8. “The Night Has a Thousand Eyes” from Coltrane’s Sound

    Standards have always been the hallmark of the jazz canon. As musicians learn how to play jazz, they always must contend with the repertoire of show tunes and American pop songs that often get called on the bandstand. Coltrane had a way of taking standards and twisting them to the point where they are sometimes barely recognizable. There are a multitude of examples of this phenomenon, but “The Night Has a Thousand Eyes” is definitely one of my favorites. This version features an Afro-Cuban-inflected groove and a chord structure that’s modified from the original to fit the modal sounds Coltrane was embracing in 1960. Trane’s solo moves in and out of keys, while keeping the essence of the standard tune intact. Here we have a primary example of Coltrane the masterful melodic manipulator.

    7. “Blue Train” from Blue Train

    Above all, Coltrane was a bluesman. He’s played so many amazing solo on blues tunes that I don’t even know where to start. There’s a reason “Blue Train” stands above the rest, though, and has become so famous. Trane’s solo on this title track swings like mad. The saxophonist is so locked in with the rhythm section that it seems like they’re inseparable. Coltrane blows his way through eight blustery choruses, rarely pausing to take a breath. “Blue Train” finds Trane at an intersection between the bebop of his early career, the blues that he would redefine throughout his life, and the technical “sheets of sound” approach that he was developing at the time. There’s something here for fans of each stage of Coltrane’s musical development.

    6. “Jupiter” from Interstellar Space

    Coltrane’s latter music, the stuff he was making right before his death in 1967, is controversial to say the least. Much like the final music of Beethoven, Coltrane was breaking through to something new at the end of his career, music that was wildly forward-looking and misunderstood by many. Interstellar Space was originally not released until 1974, and consists entirely of freeform duets with drummer Rashied Ali. Most of the tunes abandon principles of melodic and harmonic structure. Coltrane is playing with a kind of wild abandonment, making squeaks and squawks come out of his horn that nobody even knew existed. The interplay with drummer Ali is the glue that holds “Jupiter” together, though. It’s interesting to hear how Trane can make relevant art with essentially no parameters. In some ways, this is harder to do than when you are given many guidelines.

    5. “Alabama” from Live at Birdland

    “Alabama” was written as a memorial to the four girls killed by white supremacists during the 1963 16th Street Baptist Church bombing. Coltrane plays with the kind of sparseness and spiritual sensitivity appropriate to the subject manner. The music in and of itself serves as a eulogy. You can hear the emotions of sorrow, anger, and hope all coalescing into one solo. It’s also one of Coltrane’s most accessible solos, thus a really good place to start for anyone who’s not that familiar with his music. The opening and closing sections are out of time, with Coltrane and his band mates moving together at their own languid pace. The effect is wildly hypnotic.

    4. “Resolution” from A Love Supreme

    A Love Supreme is justifiably one of the most well-known records of all time, jazz or otherwise. Musicians and artists from all different genres and mediums have cited Coltrane’s 1965 masterpiece as an important influence. Trane’s creative juices were really flowing here, for he was making music that was both technically brilliant and spiritually relevant. It was like Trane was channeling something here, a sort of energy that only he possessed but was kind enough to share with the world. The entire album is essential, and there really are no standout tracks or solos. “Resolution” is as representative as any, though. Trane’s solo features equal influence from the blues and the more experimental, modal music that’s a hallmark of this record. Coltrane takes a melody and shifts it through several different keys, as if to prove its versatility.

    3. “Giant Steps” from Giant Steps

    You haven’t really made it as a jazz musician until you learn to play on “Giant Steps” a tour de force featuring a new chord change on virtually every beat. Although this type of song structure has the potential to yield boring, mechanical music, Trane’s solo goes beyond just breathtaking on a technical level. This was the pinnacle of Trane’s “sheets of sound” approach, wherein his goal was to create music vertically (focusing upon arpeggiating chords) rather than horizontally (focusing upon creating distinct melodies). Coltrane would explore the many implications of each chord, often substituting alternative chords for the more traditional one that the listener would expect. Within the barrage of notes, though, the shifting patterns create a kind of spellbinding effect. Coltrane brilliantly returns to certain key notes to create a sense of repetition, providing an anchor for the listener. Nobody can do this like Trane.

    2. “Blue in Green” from Kind of Blue (Miles Davis)

    When one thinks of Coltrane on the saxophone, one most likely thinks of flights of technical brilliance that leave one breathless. This is understandable, since Trane no doubt played a lot of notes during his career. However, he was also one of the greatest melodists in the history of the music. Never did his abilities to construct a beautiful melody shine through more than on “Blue in Green”, the most sublime, gorgeous track on Miles Davis’ landmark 1959 record Kind of Blue. Trane’s solo is short, but sweet. The chord changes to “Blue in Green” are complex, often shifting modalities and moods. Coltrane manages to construct a simple melody amongst all the harmonic complexity, one that is relentlessly sing-able. I often go to “Blue in Green” when I experience major events in my life, whether positive or negative. It always seems to speak to my current emotional state, and Coltrane’s sensitive solo deserves a lot of credit for the song’s power.

    1. “Crescent” from Crescent

    Here we find Coltrane at the height of his powers, playing with perhaps the greatest ensemble in jazz history. In 1964, Trane stood betwixt and between the tonal music that had made him well-known, and the experimental, free-form jazz that would define his latter career. “Crescent” employs definite chord changes, but Trane pushes the limits of what is possible in tonal music, often slipping in and out of the keys. He never loses his sense of melodic construction, though. The more abstract moments on the record are tempered with beautiful, bluesy melodies that sound as natural as anything Coltrane has ever played. The solo’s effectiveness is enhanced by the playing of fellow musicians Jimmy Garrison (bass), Elvin Jones (drums), and McCoy Tyner (piano). Their playing is remarkably tight and calm. No matter how animated Trane gets as a soloist, they keep the groove locked down. Tyner even drops out about halfway through the solo, giving Trane all the space he needs to do his thing. Saxophonist Dave Liebman has ranked this solo as amongst Coltrane’s most memorable, citing its uniquely poetic qualities. I agree with him.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:52 PM on October 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Horace Silver, , Mosaic Jazz Gazette   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: “Horace Silver” 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    October 21, 2018

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    September 2, 2018
    Charles Waring

    A pioneering hard bop pianist, the late Horace Silver was a founding member of The Jazz Messengers. He left an enormously important legacy.

    Horace Silver by Francis Wolff-Mosiac Images

    Charles Waring traces Horace Silver’s influential innovations in modern jazz that led among other things to what was called the Blue Note. Horace impacted the hard bop scene as a pianist, composer and bandleader. -Michael Cuscuna

    “2 September 2018 marks what would have been the 90th birthday of Horace Silver, one of jazz’s most significant pianists and composers.

    As co-founder of The Jazz Messengers, Horace Silver was a key architect of the popular bebop offshoot known as hard bop, which absorbed elements from blues and gospel music, and evolved in the early 50s to quickly become the dominant currency in modern jazz. A dexterous pianist renowned for his distinctive percussive style, Silver also distinguished himself as a composer, which resulted in several of his songs – among them ‘Song For My Father’, ‘Nica’s Dream’, ‘Doodlin’’ and ‘Peace’ – being adopted by the jazz community as standards. In addition to this, Silver had a profound influence on the way jazz was arranged, and his pioneering use of a two-horn frontline (saxophone and trumpet) in a quintet setting became the norm in the 50s and 60s.

    Originally from Norwalk, Connecticut, Horace Ward Martin Tavares Silver was born on 2 September 1928, into a family with Cape Verdean ancestry on his father’s side. He was drawn to music at an early age (his father was an amateur folk musician who played by ear) and started playing the piano when he was ten, initially in a boogie-woogie style. But it was when he first heard jazz – in particular Jimmie Lunceford’s orchestra – at the age of 11 that he first felt truly passionate about music.

    Young Horace’s interest in jazz, and in particular the big band sound, prompted him to start playing the tenor saxophone. Influenced by the smooth phrasing of noted horn man Lester Young, a teenaged Silver played in the brass section of his high-school orchestra. Outside of school, his versatility meant that he was in demand as a young musician, either playing piano or sax – or both – in a variety of local combos, though eventually he relinquished the saxophone to focus exclusively on the piano.

    “I had plenty of material. I was always recording”

    When he was 18, Silver got a job playing piano in Hartford, Connecticut, at a nightclub, and it was there, in 1950, that he and his band were recruited by saxophone star Stan Getz, with whom the young pianist made his recording debut later that same year. With his reputation burgeoning, the in-demand Silver was summoned to his first Blue Note Records session in 1952, backing saxophonist Lou Donaldson.

    After a second Blue Note studio date with Donaldson later that year, a third was arranged by the label’s boss, producer Alfred Lion, but the saxophonist was unavailable; instead, Silver was asked if he could step in and make a recording with a trio under his own name. “Naturally, I accepted,” wrote Silver in his 2007 autobiography, Let’s Get To The Nitty Gritty. “Luckily, I had plenty of material. I was always composing. I had three days to pick the material I wanted to record, get in the woodshed and practice.” What resulted was the 10” Blue Note LP, New Faces New Sounds (Introducing The Horace Silver Trio), an eight-track album featuring rising drummer Art Blakey and which announced Silver as an exciting new pianist and composer (he wrote six of the eight tunes on offer). It would mark the start of a fertile 28-year relationship between Silver and Blue Note Records.

    Though Silver didn’t record another LP under his own name until 1954, he wasn’t idle. The pianist appeared as a sideman on recordings by Coleman Hawkins, Al Cohn, Art Farmer and Miles Davis (he played on the trumpeter’s classic Walkin’ LP). More significantly, he appeared on the seminal hard bop manifesto A Night In Birdland, recorded in 1954 by the Art Blakey Quintet, which Blue Note intended as a showcase for trumpet sensation Clifford Brown.

    Jazz Messenger

    For his next Blue Note offering, Silver expanded his group from a trio to a quintet, adding two horn players (Kenny Dorham and Hank Mobley) to augment the rhythm section of bassist Doug Watkins and drummer Art Blakey. It was a move that would establish a template for hard bop groups. Blue Note recorded two sessions with the same line-up and released them as two separate 10” LPs attributed to the Horace Silver Quintet, in 1954 and ’55, respectively, but, a year later, combined both for a 12” album titled Horace Silver And The Jazz Messengers. The Messengers became the apostles for spreading the hard bop gospel but, after 18 months together, Silver quit, leaving its stewardship to Blakey, under whom the outfit would become a jazz institution dubbed The Hard Bop Academy.

    As the 50s moved towards the 60s, Silver continued to blossom as a recording artist and composer. By then, his quintet had evolved into its classic line-up – with trumpeter Blue Mitchell and saxophonist Junior Cook on board – and made a slew of classic albums together, including Finger Poppin’, Blowin’ The Blues Away and, in the 60s, The Tokyo Blues.

    The new decade gave birth to arguably Silver’s most popular album, 1964’s Song For My Father, which spawned the classic title song and saw the pianist move into more overtly gospel-influenced soul-jazz territory. As the 60s became the 70s, Silver continued to record regularly, though the decline in jazz’s popularity, at the expense of rock and pop, prompted him to experiment by adding vocals and electric piano, while also exploring spiritual concerns via concept albums.

    Hardbop grandpop

    In 1980, after 28 albums for the company, Horace Silver left Blue Note and then recorded five LPs for his own Silveto label between 1981 and 1988. The 90s witnessed a short stint at CBS, followed by a switch to Impulse! in 1996, which resulted in The Hardbop Grandpop, unanimously hailed as Silver’s best work for decades. Two years later, Silver, then 70, released what was to be his final studio album, Jazz Has A Sense Of Humour, on Verve. Comprised of all-original material, it revealed that, creatively, he was far from a spent force, capping what had been a remarkable career.

    Horace Silver, who had been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease since 2007, died on 14 June 2014, at the age of 85. He left behind an enormous legacy of historically important recordings, as well as memorable compositions that continue to be played by contemporary musicians. Though his own style bore the indelible mark of bebop pioneer Bud Powell, Silver was, nevertheless, a highly original and deeply influential pianist whose trademark was infectious melodic motifs flecked with humour and funkified grooves that brimmed with an energetic joie de vivre.

    He was, above all else, an intrepid pioneer. The repercussions from his musical innovations can still be felt in jazz today.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:32 PM on September 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Art Tatum: Genius in Prospect and Retrospect, , Mosaic Jazz Gazette, Thelonious Monk Defines Genius   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette a truly important… 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    Art Tatum: Genius in Prospect and Retrospect

    1
    No photo credit
    There’s so much in this Steven Cerra piece for jazzprofiles about Art Tatum to absorb and amaze that it baffles the mind why this man isn’t still talked about in more awe than he is. -Scott Wenzel
    http://jazzprofiles.blogspot.com/2018/05/art-tatum-genius-in-prospect-and.html

    Thelonious Monk Defines Genius

    2
    Sloane Crosley’s rumination on genius in the Los Angeles Review of Books stems almost entirely from a quote by Thelonious Monk. Here, eight words uttered by Monk trigger an outpouring of possibilities – so typical, on reflection, of the effect of Monk’s words and music. -Nick Moy
    https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/more-like-you/#!

    Much more at the Jazz Gazette

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:44 AM on September 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Charlie Parker, , , Mosaic Jazz Gazette, , Whitney Balliett   

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette: “Whitney Balliett on Charlie Parker, Ethan Iverson ‘Wayne Shorter’s 1964′” 

    From Mosaic Records Jazz Gazette , a truly important resource

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    Whitney Balliett on Charlie Parker

    1
    Charlie Parker. No image credit

    This posting of Whitney Balliett’s March 1, 1967 New Yorker review of Charlie Parker’s Savoy sessions is a welcome reminder of what an astute observer and creative writer he was. Who else would describe the sloppy execution of a theme by writing “the ensembles are smidged”?

    -Michael Cuscuna

    Read the article…

    2
    Wayne Shorter’s 1964. No image credit.

    Ethan Iverson is fast becoming as remarkable a journalist and historian and he is a pianist. On the eve of Wayne Shorter’s 85th birthday, Ethan examines the three masterpieces that Wayne recorded for Blue Note in 1964 and illustrates the very different musical arenas in which each project was created. A fascinating must-read.

    -Michael Cuscuna

    Read the article…

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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