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  • richardmitnick 11:09 AM on April 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Mosaic Records   

    From Mosaic: Newsletter 

    Mosaic is a truly important resource


    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    April 8, 2018

    New Releases!

    These releases are produced by Sony Music. Periodically we offer music that is available from other record companies that may be of interest to you. We do not keep stock on these but place a one-time order for this music.

    Orders For These Items Will Ship End of April.

    Last Day to Order
    Monday April 9th

    1
    Miles Davis & John Coltrane: The Final Tour – The Bootleg Series Vol. 6 (4 CDs) $49.98

    The latest entry in the award-winning Miles Davis Bootleg Series focuses on the final chapter in the landmark collaboration between Davis and saxophonist John Coltrane: their last live performances together, in Europe in the spring of 1960. These historic performances with Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers and Jimmy Cobb marked Miles and Trane’s last outing together and showcased both musicians’ incredible influence on the changing sound of jazz. The beautiful music they made together is presented here officially for the very first time. The 4-CD set The Final Tour: The Bootleg Series Vol. 6 includes concerts recorded in Paris, Copenhagen and Stockholm in sound far superior to previous bootlegged editions. The set closes with a rare contemporaneous audio interview with John Coltrane on Stockholm radio.

    2
    Miles Davis & John Coltrane: The Final Tour:: Copenhagen, March 24, 1960
    (150-gram LP) $24.98

    This 150-gram vinyl LP includes the complete Copenhagen concert in sound far superior to previous bootlegged editions.

    Previous Releases By Sony Music

    Orders For These
    Will Ship End of April

    Last Day to Order
    Monday April 9th

    These sets are produced by Sony Music. Periodically we offer music that is available from other record companies that may be of interest to you. We do not keep stock on these but place a one-time order for this music.

    4
    Miles Davis Live In Europe 1967 – The Bootleg Series Vol. 1
    (3 CDs & 1 DVD) $49.98;
    (2 LPs) $29.98

    In 1967, the Miles Davis Quintet with Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter and Tony Williams was at the peak of its powers, reinventing itself and scaling new heights night after night. This box set features three concerts on three CDs from October-November 1967 in excellent sound and complete form plus a DVD of the band at a German and a Swedish concert. 44 years later, jazz doesn’t get any better or deeper than this.

    5
    Miles Davis: Freedom Jazz Dance – The Bootleg Series Vol. 5
    (3 CDs) $39.98

    This 3-CD box set chronicles Miles’ musical evolution in the studio from 1966-1968 working with his “second great quintet.” The latest edition in Columbia/Legacy’s Miles Davis Bootleg Series provides an unprecedented look into the artist’s creative process. Celebrating the 50th anniversary of Miles Smiles, the groundbreaking second studio album from the Miles Davis Quintet with Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter and Tony Williams–this definitive new collection includes the master takes of performances which would eventually appear on the Miles Smiles (1967), Nefertiti (1968) and Water Babies (1976) albums alongside more than two hours worth of previously unreleased studio recordings from original sessions.

    Many many more here .

    3

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    See the full article here .

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 1:15 PM on April 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Mosaic Records   

    From Mosaic: “Now Available! Classic Brunswick & Columbia Teddy Wilson Sessions 1934-42 

    Mosaic is a truly important resource.

    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    1
    This Is What Swing Is
    From The Moment Teddy Wilson Defined It

    “His improvisatory genius at the keyboard, and the inspiration that his artistry and deportment radiated – for that alone, Teddy Wilson remains a seminal influence on jazz well into its second century.” – Loren Schoenberg, liner notes.

    Mosaic Records is proud to announce the release of “Classic Brunswick and Columbia Teddy Wilson Sessions 1934 -1942.” It’s the most massive volume we’ve ever released featuring Wilson, and it’s a greater selection than we’ve been able to offer previously because we weren’t limited to just his trio work.

    Teddy Wilson just flat-out swung, with a left hand that suggested greater harmonic complexity, and a right hand that was truly virtuosic. His command? Elegant. His tempos? Impeccable. His ear, and his ability to anticipate and respond in an ensemble? Almost other-worldly.

    There are so many different small “orchestras” featured. One includes Roy Eldridge, Ben Webster, John Kirby, and Cozy Cole. Another features Jonah Jones and Harry Carney. Johnny Hodges makes an appearance in another group setting, as does Benny Goodman with Lionel Hampton. Other all-stars include Pee Wee Russell, Bobby Hackett, Bennie Morton, Bill Colman, Ben Webster, Frankie Newton, and more.

    There is so much mre available.

    VISIT THE JAZZ GAZETTE

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    See the full article here .

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:18 AM on March 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , Mosaic Records, , , , , ,   

    From Mosaic Records: “Revisiting Elevator to the Gallows and its iconic Miles Davis soundtrack” 

    Mosaic is a truly important resource


    Visit The Jazz Gazette

    1

    Louis Malle’s debut feature is a thrilling precursor to the French New Wave.

    At its core, film noir inverts the detective genre, taking tales of analytically ingenious investigators solving impossibly elaborate cases and turning them inside out. The hardboiled stories of Prohibition that birthed it brought stark realism to the world of the whodunit, or, as Raymond Chandler wrote of Dashiell Hammett’s brooding and morally ambiguous adventures, “gave murder back to the kind of people that commit it for reasons, not just to provide a corpse; and with the means at hand, not with hand-wrought duelling pistols, curare, and tropical fish.”

    Released 60 years ago, Elevator to the Gallows (aka Lift to the Scaffold) had all the grit that the nocturnal streets of 1950s Paris could offer, but Louis Malle’s directorial debut also inverted the classic whodunit structure. The suspense in Edgar Allan Poe’s Murders on the Rue Morgue – published in 1841 and credited as the first detective story – hinges on the proto-detective C Auguste Dupin steadily unravelling the mystery of a double homicide committed in a room locked from the inside (spoiler alert: an escaped orangutan did it).

    But Elevator begins by taking us inside the locked room where protagonist Julien Tavernier murders his arms dealer boss Simon Carala with the intention of running away with his wife, Florence. Opening with a phone call in which Florence repeated tells Julien “Je t’aime,” and a full of view of him arranging Carala’s body to look like a suicide before descending by grappling hook back to his own office on the floor below, Malle gives us means and motive in the first ten minutes. How, then, does he hold our attention for the next 80?

    Partly through a series of incidents that sees each of the film’s characters hurtle off in his or her own unhappy direction, partly through withholding if and when they’ll be brought to justice. Arriving at his car following the murder Julien realises he left his grappling hook at the scene, and in a turn worthy of Hitchcock gets trapped in the elevator as he goes to retrieve it and a security guard shuts the building’s power off for the night.

    Finding that Julien has left the engine of his flashy Chevrolet Deluxe running, young couple Louis and Véronique take a joyride that ends up with Louis murdering an older German couple with whom they spend the night partying. Meanwhile, having seen Julien’s car pass by with a young woman in the passenger seat, Florence assumes the worst and spends the film wandering the streets of Paris, accidentally incriminating Julien for the murder of the German couple when – having been picked up by the police in the early hours – she mistakenly identifies him as the driver of his own stolen car.

    None of this amounts to much of a plot, though, and certainly not to the airtight storytelling of your typical hard boiled tale or psychological realism that characterised French cinema previously. Instead, Malle performs another inversion, turning his characters inside out and using the means at his disposal to splay their moods across the screen. He does this in large part thanks to the legendary soundtrack by Miles Davis, improvised around sparse harmonic sketches the King of Cool made during a private screening [above image]. In the minimal modal jazz harmonies that characterised records like Kind of Blue (released the same year), rather than the more complex Bepop or Cool sounds he had championed previously, Davis simultaneously brought style and depth to the film’s most significant scenes.

    Miles Davis January 1955 Express Newspapers Getty Image


    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00AM-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 12:07 PM on March 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Mosaic Records, , Open House,   

    From Mosaic Records: ” Mosaic Records Open House” 

    Mosaic is a truly important resource

    For the first time in our 35-year history, we are having an open house on March 22 to 25 at our Stamford, Connecticut headquarters. We are in the process of sorting out and assembling a number of Mosaic collectibles (no lists are yet compiled or available). Items will include.

    OUT OF PRINT CD SETS

    PARTIAL SETS

    TEST PRESSINGS

    OUT OF PRINT MOSAIC BOOKLETS

    MOSAIC SLICKS SUITABLE FOR FRAMING

    FRAMED PHOTOS & JAZZ ART

    AND OTHER RARETIES & COLLECTIBLES

    ALL AT SPECIAL PRICES.

    FIRST COME, FIRST SERVE.

    CASH, CHECKS, CREDIT CARDS AND PAYPAL ARE ACCEPTABLE.

    DATES & HOURS:

    Thursday March 22 & Friday March 23 from 11 am to 6 pm

    Saturday March 24 & Sunday March 25 from 11 am to 5 pm

    LOCATION:

    Mosaic Records

    425 Fairfield Avenue

    Stamford CT 06902

    (off I-95 exit 6)

    Directions available upon request


    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 11:09 AM on March 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Mosaic Records, ,   

    From Mosaic: “Back In Stock!” 

    Mosaic is a truly important resource

    Back In Stock!

    Blue Note Stanley Turrentine
    Quintet & Sextet Sessions

    1
    The Six Blue Note Dates
    Are In A Class By Themselves

    “Stanley Turrentine had a sound. Until his death in 2000, he was the master of a tenor saxophone tone that demanded attention from the first note. A throwback to the brawny tenor stylists of the swing era – Ben Webster, Illinois Jacquet, Don Byas – as well as the funky R & B players of the late ’40s and ’50s. Turrentine took no prisoners, no matter the tempo.” – Steve Futterman, Washington Post.

    Running Low!

    Chick Webb & Ella Fitzgerald Decca Sessions
    (1934-41)

    2
    He Was The King. She Was The Queen
    And This Was Their Reign

    “If the old New Orleans drummers had given jazz its first pulse, it was Chick Webb who gave the music its first taste of raw, sovereign power from the drum chair. After years in the shadows, the drums suddenly pushed front and center with the big swing bands. But even before swing took the national stage, Webb had become the first great drummer-bandleader to saturate a spotlight with star power and charisma.” – John McDonough.

    Eddie Condon & Bud Freeman
    Complete Commodore & Decca Sessions

    From Chicago To New York, They Brought The Party.

    3
    This collection of mostly bracing and upbeat music celebrates two rugged individualists of jazz and their like-minded circle of friends… – Dan Morgenstern , liner notes

    So much more. Please visit the web site.


    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 12:35 PM on November 20, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Mosaic Records   

    From Mosaic Records: Basie, Rich, More 

    Mosaic is a a truly important resource

    Highlights for November 2011. There is much more here at the web page.

    i4

    i1
    Complete Clef, Mercury and Verve Studio Recordings of Count Basie and his Orchestra (1952-1957)
    (#229- MD-CD) 8 CD Limited Edition Collection – $136

    “‘An eight-disc reissue shows that the transformation Basie and his new band underwent was subtle and gradual. When the box begins, in 1951, Count (1904-84) had just reunited his band for a one-shot tour with the singer Billy Eckstine.

    This group sounded much more like the rough-and-ready edition of the 1940s than the slick machine of the 1960s. That’s partly because many of the players were the same. The rhythm section of Basie, guitarist Freddie Green, and drummer Gus Johnson was intact. Several of the early band’s chief arrangers, including Buck Clayton and Buster Harding, were still contributing new works to the library.

    The Count also maintained his trademark innovation of two contrasting tenor saxophone soloists, though the original team of Lester Young and Herschel Evans had been replaced with Paul “The Vice-Pres” Quinichette and Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis. By 1953, the latter two would be followed by Frank Wess and Frank Foster, who along with singer Joe Williams would help define the 1950s version of the Basie band. ‘ – Will Friedwald, New York Sun”

    “When Count Basie reformed his big band in the 1950s, he managed to become entirely new by sticking with what had made him great from the start. And in the process, Basie achieved some of the most extraordinary success of his career.

    From his beginnings in the 1930s, Basie was doing something different. His band had always been about how the arrangements forced you to listen to the improvising. Financial problems forced Basie to disband the group, but by 1952 he was ready to give it another go. With a new breed of players in the 1950s, and the period’s most accomplished arrangers doing the writing, Basie re-invented himself.

    By now, top arrangers knew how to write to accentuate the most distinctive elements of the Basie sound – brevity, call and response, and lilting melodies that balanced on the precipice of syncopation. Basie loved the crowd-pleasing effect of dramatic dynamics, so his writers used it liberally, though you never felt you were being walloped just for the effect.

    He employed the era’s best composers and arrangers, and they left their mark not only on the orchestra but on musical history as well. They included Ralph Burns, Wild Bill Davis, Frank Foster, Freddie Green, Thad Jones, Johnny Mandel, Frank Wess, Ernie Wilkins and the amazing Neal Hefti.

    A new breed of soloists became stand-outs in what was known as “The New Testament” band. Names such as Joe Newman, Ernie Wilkins, Paul Quinichette, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, Joe Wilder, Frank Wess, Frank Foster, Thad Jones, and Sonny Payne became known during their tenure with Basie. Guest stars included Al Hibbler, Ella Fitzgerald, Buddy Rich, and Oscar Peterson.

    Another name that became a household word thanks to his association with Count Basie is the inimitable Joe Williams. ‘Everyday I Have the Blues,”‘ All Right, Okay, You Win,” and “Smack Dab in the Middle” weren’t just jazz sensations, they were huge hits. Instrumental hits included “Shiny Stockings” and “April in Paris”.

    i2
    Buddy Rich: Classic Argo, Emarcy and Verve Small Group Sessions
    Mosaic Records (#232) $119

    “With all the international fame and his musical legacy, it’s amazing that there was never a major retrospective on CD. This limited edition collection is a complete look at Rich when he was, without question, a top star. The seven-CDs features studio dates and live performances from 1953 to 1961 in quartet, quintet, sextet, septet, and octet settings – plus, an 11-piece orchestra. A few tracks only issued in Japan.

    There are delightful surprises from a sea of known talents that include Harry ‘Sweets’ Edison, Benny Carter, Thad Jones, Ben Webster, Oscar Peterson, and more:
    • A 1954 session includes inspired playing by Harry “Sweets” Edison.
    • Webster’s and Peterson’s presence on a 1955 date with borrowed Basie-ites; Thad Jones, Joe Newman, Frank Wess, and Freddie Green, make for exciting listening.
    • The ‘orchestra’ assembled in 1956 includes two sets of great Basie tunes with a all-star band featuring Frank Rosolino, Pete Candoli, Buddy Collete, Jimmy Rowles, and others.
    • A highlight of the set is a 1957 quartet with fabulous blowing by Flip Phillips.

    Buddy Rich created a sound that is unmistakable, set standards that were unshakable, and achieved a level of stardom rare in any style of music. Rarely will you find such agility and power, simultaneously.”

     
  • richardmitnick 9:31 AM on October 19, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Mosaic Records   

    New Mosaic Records Release Jazz Icons Series 5… 

    i1
    New Mosaic Records Release
    Jazz Icons Series 5

    Six Stunning Historically Significant Performances
    Jazz Icons 6 DVD Box Set – $99.98

    Available Exclusively From Mosaic Records
    Reserve Your Copy Today!

    Michael Cuscuna Tells us:

    “In the 28 years since Mosaic’s first release, life has been interesting, to say the least, and had its share of surprises. But this year, we were presented with one that I never saw coming. David Peck and Tom Gulotta from Reelin’ In The Years, who introduced their amazing Jazz Icons DVD line in 2003, called us up and asked us to collaborate with them on their fifth release in the series.
    When Tom told me that they were thinking about the 1965 Antibes concerts by the John Coltrane Quartet that included the only public performances of “Ascension” and “A Love Supreme” and a little known 1969 color program of Thelonious Monk alone and free-associating in a Paris TV studio, I said sign us up!
    i2

    The Thelonious Monk performance is astounding. Just Monk, a grand piano and two cameras – no audience, no sidemen, no emcee, no clock-watching stage manager, no set list, no distractions. The result was an astonishingly intimate and revealing portrait of a man and his music. Monk sits at the piano and plays whatever occurs to him.
    i4

    Art Blakey was a wonder to behold live. He shaped and colored each tune from the drum stool and when he hit fifth gear in the final chorus of each solo, it was as organically exciting as music can be. I saw dozens of incarnations of the Messengers over the decades. And Art’s power, dynamics and thunderous swing were as exciting in 1989 as they were in 1963.

    When I was about 14 years old, I wrote Roland Kirk a fan latter. After a return letter from Roland’s wife, I began going down to see him at the Five Spot on St. Marks Place and spend afternoons in his Central Park West apartment. As much as I treasured those afternoon tutorials with his impressive record collection, it was the nights at The Five Spot that are burned into my mind. Every set he played was an adventure for him as well as the audience.

    And then there are masters Freddie Hubbard and Johnny Griffin at the top of their game…..I could go on.”

    mc
    Michael Cuscuna

    Visit Mosaic’s page for the full story.

    Mosaic is Your Source For Exclusive Jazz Collections

     
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