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  • richardmitnick 4:10 PM on October 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Jeffrey Milarsky, John Corigliano, Nadia Sirota, , ,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “AXIOM | Muhly and Corigliano” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    Friday, October 26, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    Alice Tully Hall
    1941 Broadway
    New York, NY 10023

    Free Event
    Tickets

    Jeffrey Milarsky, conductor

    Jeffrey Milarsky music.columbia.edu

    Nadia Sirota, viola

    Nadia Sirota in Performance 2014 by Steven Pisano


    Matthew Pearce, tenor

    MUHLY No Uncertain Times (2017)
    CORIGLIANO Chiaroscuro (1997)
    MUHLY Keep in Touch
    CORIGLIANO Poem in October

    Nico Muhly by Samantha West

    John Corigliano by J. Henry Fair

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 12:21 PM on September 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Nadia Sirota, , , Nightcap, Sound On   

    From Nadia Sirota and New York Philharmonic: “I am EXTREMELY EXCITED for this” 

    From Nadia Sirota

    and

    New York Philharmonic

    From Nadia Sirota

    My friends! I am working with the New York Phil!

    I am EXTREMELY EXCITED for this

    Over the past eight-ish months I have had the pleasure of collaborating with a completely inspiring and kickass group of people over at New York Philharmonic on two brand-new series that feature new music in new venues:

    Nightcap and Sound ON

    The whole thing kicks off with our first Nightcap show curated by Conrad Tao and featuring Caleb Teicher (a phenomenal tap dancer) and Charmaine Lee (a phenomenal vocalist)

    Friday September 28th at 10:30pm. That’s in a little over two weeks, and attendance is totally mandatory. SEE YOU THERE!!

    Then, on Sunday October 7th, we debut Sound ON: Going Dutch starring Musicians of the New York Philharmonic and Louis Andriessen!! That’s 3pm Sunday! There shall be mimosas. And Jaap van Zweden.

    And there is SO MUCH MORE TO COME.

    Vanessa Lann, Martijn Padding, Gabriel Kahane, Caroline Shaw, Timo Andres, Miró Quartet, Chen Yi, Georg Friedrich Haas, Marcos Balter, Kinan Azmeh, Thomas Adès, Ariel Quartet, Donnacha Dennehy, Matthias Pintscher, JS Bach, György Kurtág, John Adams (Composer), Attacca Quartet, John Corigliano, David Lang, Gabriella Smith, Steve Reich

    Thanks a zillion to Isaac Thompson Adam Crane Vince Ford Deborah Borda Stephanie McGurren and so many others

    Please spread the word!!!!!

    xx

    From The New York Philharmonic

    September 11, 2018
    Katherine E. Johnson
    Vice President, Communications
    (212) 875-5700
    johnsonk@nyphil.org

    1

    3
    Nadia With Anjuli Fatima Raza Kolb.

    NEW MUSIC: NEW VENUES
    Hosted by Creative Partner NADIA SIROTA

    SOUND ON
    GRoW @ Annenberg Sound ON Series
    Curated by Nadia Sirota
    Three Chamber Concerts Performed by Musicians from the New York Philharmonic
    The Appel Room, Jazz at Lincoln Center, 3:00 p.m.

    NIGHTCAP
    Kravis Nightcap Series
    Curated by Composers of Today
    Six Late-Night Concerts Performed by Guest Musicians
    Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse, 10:30 p.m.

    The New York Philharmonic announces details for the two new-music series it is inaugurating in the 2018–19 season: GRoW @ Annenberg Sound ON and Kravis Nightcap. Both series present the music of today in casual settings, hosted by The Marie-Josée Kravis Creative Partner Nadia Sirota, who will engage in conversation with the composers and performers.

    As the Peabody Award–winning host and producer of the podcast Meet the Composer — which profiled contemporary composers — a soloist, and a member of the ensemble yMusic, violist Nadia Sirota is a leader in the new-music community. “Nightcap and Sound ON are designed for curious music lovers and newcomers alike,” said Nadia Sirota. “Our goal is to put together concerts that are smart and fun, and to explore music in conversation with the incredible people who bring it to life. I see my role as a cheerleader and proselytizer: I love this music, and I’m dying to get more people to listen to it.”

    “To be onstage with a living composer is one of the most inspiring experiences for me,” said Music Director Jaap van Zweden.

    Jaap van Zweden Director of the New York Philharmonic by Marco Borggreve

    “I can turn and say, ‘Tell me, what do you mean by this passage? What do you want to tell us with your music?’ For the audience, being in the same room as the composers and hearing their thoughts is also inspiring. I know that our public will love getting to know today’s composers during Nightcap and Sound ON.”

    The series are complemented by the Insights at the Atrium event “New York’s New-Music Landscape,” Monday, November 5, 2018, at 7:30 p.m.

    Sound ON
    The GRoW @ Annenberg Sound ON series — three Sunday afternoon chamber concerts at The Appel Room, Jazz at Lincoln Center — presents contemporary chamber repertoire performed by Philharmonic musicians. The concerts will dive deeper into the season’s key initiatives and explore the music of our time through the performer’s lens. Host and curator Nadia Sirota will lead conversations with the musicians, discussing what they love about the works they are performing — what is difficult, new, and unexpected.

    The series will begin on October 7, 2018, with “Going Dutch,” part of The Art of Andriessen, which spotlights the music of Dutch composer Louis Andriessen — recipient of The Marie-Josée Kravis Prize for New Music at the New York Philharmonic. “Going Dutch” will highlight the Netherlands new-music scene with music by Andriessen and his former students: Andriessen’s Image de Moreau, Hout, and Symphony for Open Strings, the last conducted by Music Director Jaap van Zweden; Dutch composer Martijn Padding’s Mordants; and the New York Premiere of The Key to the Fourteenth Vision by Vanessa Lann, an American composer living in the Netherlands.

    The series continues on January 27, 2019, with “Threads,” part of New York Stories: Threads of Our City, which looks at musical expressions of the immigrant experience in New York. “Threads” will examine how diverse communities lend their voices to the creative conversation in the US through performances of music by composers who have been influenced by their time in America. The program will feature the World Premiere of a New York Philharmonic commission by Syrian composer / clarinetist Kinan Azmeh, as well as Chinese-American composer / violinist Chen Yi’s At the Kansas City Chinese New Year Concert, Austrian composer Georg Friedrich Haas’s tria ex uno, Brazilian-American composer Marcos Balter’s Chambers, British composer / pianist / conductor Thomas Adès’s Darknesse Visible, and Irish composer Donnacha Dennehy’s Bulb.

    The inaugural season of Sound ON will conclude on June 2, 2019, with “Response,” part of Music of Conscience, which delves into composers’ responses to the social issues of their time. “Response” will examine works composers have written as a means of processing the world around them, from personal losses to sociopolitical events — both present-day and of the last century. The concert will feature the World Premiere of a New York Philharmonic commission by Gabriella Smith, as well as Caroline Shaw’s First Essay, selections from David Lang’s memory pieces, the US Premiere of Judd Greenstein’s The Seeming Disorder of the Old City, and Steve Reich’s Different Trains.

    GRoW @ Annenberg, which supports Sound ON, is a philanthropic initiative led by Gregory Annenberg Weingarten, a vice president and director of the Annenberg Foundation. GRoW @ Annenberg is dedicated to supporting humanitarian efforts across the globe as well as innovative projects in health, education, the arts, and civic and cultural life.

    Nightcap
    The Kravis Nightcap series presents six late-night, cabaret-style concerts curated by composers of today, who will engage in conversation about the music with host Nadia Sirota. Taking place at the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse after select subscription programs, the concerts will delve into themes related to those Philharmonic concerts in a casual setting.

    Composer / pianist Conrad Tao will curate the inaugural Nightcap concert, Friday, September 28, 2018, a semi-improvised set featuring Mr. Tao on piano, avant-garde vocalist Charmaine Lee, and tap dancer Caleb Teicher. This follows a Philharmonic concert featuring Mr. Tao’s Everything Must Go, which the Philharmonic commissioned and is premiering that week.

    Louis Andriessen will curate Nightcap on Saturday, October 13, 2018, part of The Art of Andriessen. The Dutch composer will spotlight his diverse musical interests, from Ravel to Miles Davis and John Cage, with performances by the Ariel Quartet. This follows a Philharmonic concert featuring Mr. Andriessen’s TAO.

    Composer / pianist / vocalist / raconteur Gabriel Kahane will curate Nightcap on Saturday, November 10, 2018, exploring the evolution of art song, from Schubert to the composers of today, with performances by composer / vocalist Caroline Shaw, the Miró Quartet, and composer / pianist Timo Andres. This follows a Philharmonic concert of works by Schubert and Beethoven.

    Composer / conductor Matthias Pintscher will curate Nightcap on Saturday, February 23, 2019, presenting music from his deepest influences, J.S. Bach and Kurtág. This follows a Philharmonic concert he will conduct featuring his mar’eh, receiving its New York Premiere that week.

    Composer John Adams will curate Nightcap on Saturday, March 23, 2019, featuring music by emerging composers he has championed, performed by the Attacca Quartet and composer / pianist Timo Andres. This follows a Philharmonic concert featuring Mr. Adams’s The Wound-Dresser.

    Composer John Corigliano will curate the season’s final Nightcap concert on Saturday, June 1, 2019, part of Music of Conscience. The program will feature music by composers whose voices were cut short by the AIDS epidemic. This follows a Philharmonic concert featuring Mr. Corigliano’s Symphony No. 1, his personal response to the AIDS crisis.

    Henry and Marie-Josée Kravis, whose generosity makes possible the Nightcap series and the Creative Partner position, have long supported new music at the New York Philharmonic. In 2009 they made a gift of $10 million to the Orchestra endowing, among other initiatives, The Marie-Josée Kravis Prize for New Music at the New York Philharmonic.

    See Nadia Sirota’s article here .
    See the full article New York Phil article here .

    Violist Nadia Sirota’s varied career spans solo performances, chamber music, curation, and broadcasting. In all branches of her artistic life she aims to open classical music up to a broader audience. Nadia’s singular sound and expressive execution have served as muse to dozens of composers, including Nico Muhly, David Lang, Bryce Dessner, Missy Mazzoli, and Marcos Balter. Nadia won a 2015 Peabody Award, broadcasting’s highest honor, for her podcast Meet the Composer, “the world’s best contemporary classical music podcast” (Pitchfork), which deftly profiles some of the most interesting musical thinkers living today.

    Next season, Nadia teams up with the New York Philharmonic as their first-ever Creative Partner, a position created for her. In this role, she will host nine contemporary music concerts over two new series: Nightcap and Sound ON, the latter of which she will also curate.

    As a soloist, Nadia has appeared with acclaimed orchestras around the world, including the Detroit Symphony, National Arts Centre Orchestra, Spanish National Orchestra, and the Orchestre National d’Île-de-France. To date, she has released four albums of commissioned music, most recently, Tessellatum, Donnacha Dennehy’s groundbreaking work for viola and microtonal viola da gamba consort, featuring Liam Byrne.

    Nadia is a member of the chamber sextet yMusic and has lent her sound to recording and concert projects by such artists and songwriters as Anohni, The National, Arcade Fire, and Paul Simon. In 2013 she won Southern Methodist University’s Meadows Prize, awarded to pioneering artists and scholars with an emerging international profile. She received her undergraduate and Master’s degrees from the Juilliard School, studying with Heidi Castleman, Misha Amory, and Hsin-Yun Huang.

    Nadia with ACME


    Nadia with yMusic

    Nadia with Bedroom Community Only photo I could find

    New York Philharmonic by Chris Lee


    Founded in 1842, the New York Philharmonic is the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States. Read a complete historical overview, visit the New York Philharmonic Leon Levy Digital Archives, or explore our history below.

    The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc.,globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra (NYPO) or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra based in New York City in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the “Big Five”. The Philharmonic’s home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York’s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

    Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the “Big Five” orchestras. Its record-setting 14,000th concert was given in December 2004.

    The New York Philharmonic was founded in 1842 by the American conductor Ureli Corelli Hill, with the aid of the Irish composer William Vincent Wallace. The orchestra was then called the Philharmonic Society of New York. It was the third Philharmonic on American soil since 1799, and had as its intended purpose, “the advancement of instrumental music.” The first concert of the Philharmonic Society took place on December 7, 1842 in the Apollo Rooms on lower Broadway before an audience of 600. The concert opened with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, led by Hill himself. Two other conductors, German-born Henry Christian Timm and French-born Denis Etienne, led parts of the eclectic, three-hour program, which included chamber music and several operatic selections with a leading singer of the day, as was the custom. The musicians operated as a cooperative society, deciding by a majority vote such issues as who would become a member, which music would be performed and who among them would conduct. At the end of the season, the players would divide any proceeds among themselves.

    After only a dozen public performances and barely four years old, the Philharmonic organized a concert to raise funds to build a new music hall. The centerpiece was the American premiere of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, to take place at Castle Garden on the southern tip of Manhattan. About 400 instrumental and vocal performers gathered for this premiere, which was conducted by George Loder. The chorals were translated into what would be the first English performance anywhere in the world. However, with the expensive US$2.00 ticket price and a war rally uptown, the hoped-for audience was kept away and the new hall would have to wait. Although judged by some as an odd work with all those singers kept at bay until the end, the Ninth soon became the work performed most often when a grand gesture was required.

    During the Philharmonic’s first seven seasons, seven musicians alternated the conducting duties. In addition to Hill, Timm and Étienne, these were William Alpers, George Loder, Louis Wiegers and Alfred Boucher. This changed in 1849 when Theodore Eisfeld was installed as sole conductor for the season. Eisfeld, later along with Carl Bergmann, would be the conductor until 1865. That year, Eisfeld conducted the Orchestra’s memorial concert for the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln, but in a peculiar turn of events which were criticized in the New York press, the Philharmonic omitted the last movement, Ode to Joy, as being inappropriate for the occasion. That year Eisfeld returned to Europe, and Bergmann continued to conduct the Society until his death in 1876.

    Leopold Damrosch, Franz Liszt’s former concertmaster at Weimar, served as conductor of the Philharmonic for the 1876/77 season. But failing to win support from the Philharmonic’s public, he left to create the rival Symphony Society of New York in 1878. Upon his death in 1885, his 23-year-old son Walter took over and continued the competition with the old Philharmonic. It was Walter who would convince Andrew Carnegie that New York needed a first-class concert hall and on May 5, 1891, both Walter and Russian composer Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky conducted at the inaugural concert of the city’s new Music Hall, which in a few years would be renamed for its primary benefactor, Andrew Carnegie. Carnegie Hall would remain the orchestra’s home until 1962.

    The Philharmonic in 1877 was in desperate financial condition, caused by the paltry income from five concerts in the 1876/77 season that brought in an average of only $168 per concert. Representatives of the Philharmonic wished to attract the German-born, American-trained conductor Theodore Thomas, whose own Theodore Thomas Orchestra had competed directly with the Philharmonic for over a decade and which had brought him fame and great success. At first the Philharmonic’s suggestion offended Thomas because he was unwilling to disband his own orchestra. Because of the desperate financial circumstances, the Philharmonic offered Theodore Thomas the conductorship without conditions, and he began conducting the orchestra in the autumn of 1877. With the exception of the 1878/79 season – when he was in Cincinnati and Adolph Neuendorff led the group – Thomas conducted every season for fourteen years, vastly improving the orchestra’s financial health while creating a polished and virtuosic ensemble. He left in 1891 to found the Chicago Symphony, taking thirteen Philharmonic musicians with him.

    Another celebrated conductor, Anton Seidl, followed Thomas on the Philharmonic podium, serving until 1898. Seidl, who had served as Wagner’s assistant, was a renowned conductor of the composer’s works; Seidl’s romantic interpretations inspired both adulation and controversy. During his tenure, the Philharmonic enjoyed a period of unprecedented success and prosperity and performed its first world premiere written by a world-renowned composer in the United States – Antonín Dvořák’s Ninth Symphony From the New World. Seidl’s sudden death in 1898 from food poisoning at the age of 47 was widely mourned. Twelve thousand people applied for tickets to his funeral at the Metropolitan Opera House at 39th Street and Broadway and the streets were jammed for blocks with a “surging mass” of his admirers.

    According to Joseph Horowitz, Seidl’s death was followed by “five unsuccessful seasons” under Emil Paur [music director from 1898 to 1902] and Walter Damrosch [who served for only one season, 1902/03].” After this, he says, for several seasons [1903–1906] the orchestra employed guest conductors, including Victor Herbert, Édouard Colonne, Willem Mengelberg, Fritz Steinbach, Richard Strauss, Felix Weingartner, and Henry Wood.

    In 1909, to ensure the financial stability of the Philharmonic, a group of wealthy New Yorkers led by two women, Mary Seney Sheldon and Minnie Untermyer, formed the Guarantors Committee and changed the Orchestra’s organization from a musician-operated cooperative to a corporate management structure. The Guarantors were responsible for bringing Gustav Mahler to the Philharmonic as principal conductor and expanding the season from 18 concerts to 54, which included a tour of New England. The Philharmonic was the only symphonic orchestra where Mahler worked as music director without any opera responsibilities, freeing him to explore the symphonic literature more deeply. In New York, he conducted several works for the first time in his career and introduced audiences to his own compositions. Under Mahler, a controversial figure both as a composer and conductor, the season expanded, musicians’ salaries were guaranteed, the scope of operations broadened, and the 20th-century orchestra was created.

    In 1911 Mahler died unexpectedly, and the Philharmonic appointed Josef Stránský as his replacement. Many commentators were surprised by the choice of Stránský, whom they did not see as a worthy successor to Mahler. Stránský led all of the orchestra’s concerts until 1920, and also made the first recordings with the orchestra in 1917.

    In 1921 the Philharmonic merged with New York’s National Symphony Orchestra (no relation to the present Washington, D.C. ensemble). With this merger it also acquired the imposing Dutch conductor Willem Mengelberg. For the 1922/23 season Stránský and Mengelberg shared the conducting duties, but Stránský left after the one shared season. For nine years Mengelberg dominated the scene, although other conductors, among them Bruno Walter, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Igor Stravinsky, and Arturo Toscanini, led about half of each season’s concerts. During this period, the Philharmonic became one of the first American orchestras to boast an outdoor symphony series when it began playing low-priced summer concerts at Lewisohn Stadium in upper Manhattan. In 1920 the orchestra hired Henry Hadley as “associate conductor” given specific responsibility for the “Americanization” of the orchestra: each of Hadley’s concerts featured at least one work by an American-born composer.

    In 1924, the Young People’s Concerts were expanded into a substantial series of children’s concerts under the direction of American pianist-composer-conductor Ernest Schelling. This series became the prototype for concerts of its kind around the country and grew by popular demand to 15 concerts per season by the end of the decade.

    Mengelberg and Toscanini both led the Philharmonic in recording sessions for the Victor Talking Machine Company and Brunswick Records, initially in a recording studio (for the acoustically-recorded Victors, all under Mengelberg) and eventually in Carnegie Hall as electrical recording was developed. All of the early electrical recordings for Victor were made with a single microphone, usually placed near or above the conductor, a process Victor called “Orthophonic”; the Brunswick electricals used the company’s proprietary non-microphone “Light-Ray” selenium-cell system, which was much more prone to sonic distortion than Victor’s. Mengelberg’s first records for Victor were acousticals made in 1922; Toscanini’s recordings with the Philharmonic actually began with a single disc for Brunswick in 1926, recorded in a rehearsal hall at Carnegie Hall. Mengelberg’s most successful recording with the Philharmonic was a 1927 performance in Carnegie Hall of Richard Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben. Additional Toscanini recordings with the Philharmonic, all for Victor, took place on Carnegie Hall’s stage in 1929 and 1936. By the 1936 sessions Victor, now owned by RCA, began to experiment with multiple microphones to achieve more comprehensive reproductions of the orchestra.

    The year 1928 marked the New York Philharmonic’s last and most important merger: with the New York Symphony Society. The Symphony had been quite innovative in its 50 years prior to the merger. It made its first domestic tour in 1882, introduced educational concerts for young people in 1891, and gave the premieres of works such as Gershwin’s Concerto in F and Holst’s Egdon Heath. The merger of these two venerable institutions consolidated extraordinary financial and musical resources. Of the new Philharmonic Symphony Society of New York, Clarence Hungerford Mackay, chairman of the Philharmonic Society, will be chairman. President Harry H. Flagler, of the Symphony Society, will be president of the merger. At the first joint board meeting in 1928, the chairman, Clarence Mackay, expressed the opinion that “with the forces of the two Societies now united… the Philharmonic-Symphony Society could build up the greatest orchestra in this country if not in the world.”

    Of course, the merger had ramifications for the musicians of both orchestras. Winthrop Sargeant, a violinist with the Symphony Society and later a writer for The New Yorker, recalled the merger as “a sort of surgical operation in which twenty musicians were removed from the Philharmonic and their places taken by a small surviving band of twenty legionnaires from the New York Symphony”. This operation was performed by Arturo Toscanini himself. Fifty-seventh Street wallowed in panic and recrimination.” Toscanini, who had guest-conducted for several seasons, became the sole conductor and in 1930 led the group on a European tour that brought immediate international fame to the orchestra. Toscanini remained music director until the spring of 1936, then returned several times as a guest conductor until 1945.

    That same year nationwide radio broadcasts began. The orchestra was first heard on CBS directly from Carnegie Hall. To broadcast the Sunday afternoon concerts, CBS paid $15,000 for the entire season. The radio broadcasts continued without interruption for 38 years. A legend in his own time, Toscanini would prove to be a tough act to follow as the country headed into war.

    After an unsuccessful attempt to hire the German conductor, Wilhelm Furtwängler, the English conductor John Barbirolli and the Polish conductor Artur Rodziński were joint replacements for Toscanini in 1936. The following year Barbirolli was given the full conductorship, a post he held until the spring of 1941. In December, 1942, Bruno Walter was offered the music directorship, but declined, citing his age (he was 67 years old).[20] In 1943, Rodziński, who had conducted the orchestra’s centennial concert at Carnegie Hall in the preceding year, was appointed Musical Director. He had also conducted the Sunday afternoon radio broadcast when CBS listeners around the country heard the announcer break in on Arthur Rubinstein’s performance of Brahms’s Second Piano Concerto to update them about the attack on Pearl Harbor. (The initial word of the attack was forwarded by CBS News Correspondent John Charles Daly on his own show before the Philharmonic broadcast.) Soon after the United States entered World War II, Aaron Copland wrote A Lincoln Portrait for the Philharmonic at the request of conductor Andre Kostelanetz as a tribute to and expression of the “magnificent spirit of our country.”

    Artur Rodziński, Bruno Walter, and Sir Thomas Beecham made a series of recordings with the Philharmonic for Columbia Records during the 1940s. Many of the sessions were held in Liederkranz Hall, on East 58th Street in New York City, a building formerly belonging to a German cultural and musical society, and used as a recording studio by Columbia Records. Sony Records later digitally remastered the Beecham recordings for reissue on CD.

    In February, 1947, Artur Rodziński resigned; Bruno Walter was once again approached, and this time he accepted the position but only if the title was reduced to “Music Adviser”; he resigned in 1949. Leopold Stokowski and Dimitri Mitropoulos were appointed co-principal conductors in 1949, with Mitropoulos becoming Musical Director in 1951. Mitropoulos, known for championing new composers and obscure operas-in-concert, pioneered in other ways; adding live Philharmonic performances between movies at the Roxy Theatre and taking Edward R. Murrow and the See It Now television audience on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Orchestra. Mitropoulos made a series of recordings for Columbia Records, mostly in mono; near the end of his tenure, he recorded excerpts from Prokofiev’s ballet Romeo and Juliet in stereo. In 1957, Mitropoulos and Leonard Bernstein served together as Principal Conductors until, in the course of the season, Bernstein was appointed Music Director, becoming the first American-born-and-trained conductor to head the Philharmonic.

    Leonard Bernstein, who had made his historic, unrehearsed and spectacularly successful debut with the Philharmonic in 1943, was Music Director for 11 seasons, a time of significant change and growth. Two television series were initiated on CBS: the Young People’s Concerts and Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic. The former program, launched in 1958, made television history, winning every award in the field of educational television. Bernstein continued the orchestra’s recordings with Columbia Records until he retired as Music Director in 1969. Although Bernstein made a few recordings for Columbia after 1969, most of his later recordings were for Deutsche Grammophon. Sony has digitally remastered Bernstein’s numerous Columbia recordings and released them on CD as a part of its extensive Bernstein Century series. Although the Philharmonic performed primarily in Carnegie Hall until 1962, Bernstein preferred to record in the Manhattan Center. His later recordings were made in Philharmonic Hall. In 1960, the centennial of the birth of Gustav Mahler, Bernstein and the Philharmonic began a historic cycle of recordings of eight of Mahler’s nine symphonies for Columbia Records. (Symphony No. 8 was recorded by Bernstein with the London Symphony.) In 1962 Bernstein caused controversy with his comments before a performance by Glenn Gould of the First Piano Concerto of Johannes Brahms.

    Bernstein, a lifelong advocate of living composers, oversaw the beginning of the Orchestra’s largest commissioning project, resulting in the creation of 109 new works for orchestra. In September 1962, the Philharmonic commissioned Aaron Copland to write a new work, Connotations for Orchestra, for the opening concert of the new Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. The move to Philharmonic Hall in Lincoln Center brought about an expansion of concerts into the spring and summer. Among the many series that have taken place during the off-season have been the French-American and Stravinsky Festivals (1960s), Pierre Boulez’s “Rug Concerts” in the 1970s, and composer, Jacob Druckman’s Horizon’s Festivals in the 1980s.

    In 1971, Pierre Boulez became the first Frenchman to hold the post of Philharmonic Music Director. Boulez’s years with the Orchestra were notable for expanded repertoire and innovative concert approaches, such as the Prospective Encounters which explored new works along with the composer in alternative venues. During his tenure, the Philharmonic inaugurated the Live From Lincoln Center television series in 1976, and the Orchestra continues to appear on the Emmy Award-winning program to the present day. Boulez made a series of quadraphonic recordings for Columbia, including an extensive series of the orchestral music of Maurice Ravel.

    Members of the New York Philharmonic string section are heard on the 1971 John Lennon album Imagine, credited as The Flux Fiddlers.

    Zubin Mehta, then one of the youngest of a new generation of internationally known conductors, became Music Director in 1978. His tenure was the longest in Philharmonic history, lasting until 1991. Throughout his time on the podium, Mehta showed a strong commitment to contemporary music, presenting 52 works for the first time. In 1980 the Philharmonic, always known as a touring orchestra, embarked on a European tour marking the 50th anniversary of Toscanini’s trip to Europe.

    Kurt Masur, who had been conducting the Philharmonic frequently since his debut in 1981, became Music Director in 1991. Notable aspects of his tenure included a series of free Memorial Day Concerts at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and annual concert tours abroad, including the orchestra’s first trip to mainland China. He presided over the 150th Anniversary celebrations during the 1992–1993 season. His tenure concluded in 2002, and he was named Music Director Emeritus of the Philharmonic.

    In 2000, Lorin Maazel made a guest-conducting appearance with the New York Philharmonic in two weeks of subscription concerts after an absence of over twenty years, which was met with a positive reaction from the orchestra musicians. This engagement led to his appointment in January 2001 as the orchestra’s next Music Director. He assumed the post in September 2002, 60 years after making his debut with the Orchestra at the age of twelve at Lewisohn Stadium. In his first subscription week he led the world premiere of John Adams’ On the Transmigration of Souls commissioned in memory of those who died on September 11, 2001. Maazel concluded his tenure as the Philharmonic’s Music Director at the end of the 2008/09 season.

    In 2003, due to ongoing concerns with the acoustics of Avery Fisher Hall, there was a proposal to move the New York Philharmonic back to Carnegie Hall and merge the two organizations, but this proposal did not come to fruition. On May 5, 2010, the New York Philharmonic performed its 15,000th concert, a milestone unmatched by any other symphony orchestra in the world.

    On July 18, 2007, the Philharmonic named Alan Gilbert as its next music director, effective with the 2009/10 season, with an initial contract of five years. In October 2012, the orchestra extended Gilbert’s contract through the 2016/17 season. In February 2015, the orchestra announced the scheduled conclusion of Gilbert’s tenure its music director after the close of the 2016/17 season.

    In January 2016, the orchestra announced the appointment of Jaap van Zweden as its next Music Director, effective with the 2018/19 season, with an initial contract of five years. van Zweden is scheduled to serve as Music Director Designate for the 2017/18 season.

    The current president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the orchestra is Deborah Borda. Borda had previously held the same posts, as well as the post of managing director, with the orchestra.
    (So, Wikipedia)

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:52 AM on September 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Nadia Sirota,   

    From Nadia Sirota: “Nadia Sirota is with Jonah Sirota and 4 others at Greenwood Music Camp.” 

    From Nadia Sirota

    I got to live out some serious chamber music fantasies at Abby Fischer’s gorgeous wedding at Greenwood yesterday: Brahms Op. 111 first movement with the Chiaras!! pic by Anthony Hawley

    1

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=741258136380&set=a.557895596380&type=3&theater”

    News:

    Violist Nadia Sirota’s varied career spans solo performances, chamber music, curation, and broadcasting. In all branches of her artistic life she aims to open classical music up to a broader audience. Nadia’s singular sound and expressive execution have served as muse to dozens of composers, including Nico Muhly, David Lang, Bryce Dessner, Missy Mazzoli, and Marcos Balter. Nadia won a 2015 Peabody Award, broadcasting’s highest honor, for her podcast Meet the Composer, “the world’s best contemporary classical music podcast” (Pitchfork), which deftly profiles some of the most interesting musical thinkers living today.

    Next season, Nadia teams up with the New York Philharmonic as their first-ever Creative Partner, a position created for her. In this role, she will host nine contemporary music concerts over two new series: Nightcap and Sound ON, the latter of which she will also curate.

    As a soloist, Nadia has appeared with acclaimed orchestras around the world, including the Detroit Symphony, National Arts Centre Orchestra, Spanish National Orchestra, and the Orchestre National d’Île-de-France. To date, she has released four albums of commissioned music, most recently, Tessellatum, Donnacha Dennehy’s groundbreaking work for viola and microtonal viola da gamba consort, featuring Liam Byrne.

    Nadia is a member of the chamber sextet yMusic and has lent her sound to recording and concert projects by such artists and songwriters as Anohni, The National, Arcade Fire, and Paul Simon. In 2013 she won Southern Methodist University’s Meadows Prize, awarded to pioneering artists and scholars with an emerging international profile. She received her undergraduate and Master’s degrees from the Juilliard School, studying with Heidi Castleman, Misha Amory, and Hsin-Yun Huang.

    Nadia with ACME


    Nadia with yMusic

    Nadia with Bedroom Community Only photo I could find

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:52 AM on March 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Nadia Sirota, , , , ,   

    From Nadia Sirota: “Jonah Sirota–STRONG SAD: Elegies for Everyday Loss” 

    Nadia Sirota

    News:

    Hey friends, my brother @jonahsirota is making a viola record and you should all pre-order it ASAP! It’s got music by @paolaprestini @nicomuhly @ValgeirS @RodneyLister @bobsirota AJ McCaffrey @kurtknecht & Jonah, plus I show up for a hot minute. Go!! Buy!!

    “Jonah Sirota–STRONG SAD: Elegies for Everyday Loss”

    6
    Jonah Sirota

    4
    The Sirotas Play Sirota The violists Jonah and Nadia Sirota play chamber works by their father, Robert Sirota, at Manhattan School of Music. Credit Hiroyuki Ito for The New York Times

    Violist Jonah Sirota asked 7 composers to write pieces for cellphone-in-the-toilet-grade everyday losses. STRONG SAD is the result.
    3

    Violist Nadia Sirota’s varied career spans solo performances, chamber music, curation, and broadcasting. In all branches of her artistic life she aims to open classical music up to a broader audience. Nadia’s singular sound and expressive execution have served as muse to dozens of composers, including Nico Muhly, David Lang, Bryce Dessner, Missy Mazzoli, and Marcos Balter. Nadia won a 2015 Peabody Award, broadcasting’s highest honor, for her podcast Meet the Composer, “the world’s best contemporary classical music podcast” (Pitchfork), which deftly profiles some of the most interesting musical thinkers living today.

    Next season, Nadia teams up with the New York Philharmonic as their first-ever Creative Partner, a position created for her. In this role, she will host nine contemporary music concerts over two new series: Nightcap and Sound ON, the latter of which she will also curate.

    As a soloist, Nadia has appeared with acclaimed orchestras around the world, including the Detroit Symphony, National Arts Centre Orchestra, Spanish National Orchestra, and the Orchestre National d’Île-de-France. To date, she has released four albums of commissioned music, most recently, Tessellatum, Donnacha Dennehy’s groundbreaking work for viola and microtonal viola da gamba consort, featuring Liam Byrne.

    Nadia is a member of the chamber sextet yMusic and has lent her sound to recording and concert projects by such artists and songwriters as Anohni, The National, Arcade Fire, and Paul Simon. In 2013 she won Southern Methodist University’s Meadows Prize, awarded to pioneering artists and scholars with an emerging international profile. She received her undergraduate and Master’s degrees from the Juilliard School, studying with Heidi Castleman, Misha Amory, and Hsin-Yun Huang.

    Nadia with ACME


    Nadia with yMusic

    Nadia with Bedroom Community Only photo I could find

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

    See the full article here .
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 5:56 PM on March 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Homeward Bound- The Farewell Tour, Nadia Sirota, , Tour schedule,   

    From yMusic and Nadia Sirota: “Homeward Bound- The Farewell Tour” 

    yMusic

    Nadia Sirota

    Nadia Sirota

    We are thrilled to announce that this summer we will be joining “Homeward Bound- The Farewell Tour,” as featured performers alongside Paul Simon and his band.

    In Paul’s own words: “I’ve often wondered what it would feel like to reach the point where I’d consider bringing my performing career to a natural end. Now I know: it feels a little unsettling, a touch exhilarating and something of a relief. I love making music, my voice is still strong, and my band is a tight, extraordinary group of gifted musicians. I think about music constantly. I am very grateful for a fulfilling career and, of course, most of all to the audiences who heard something in my music that touched their hearts.”

    The tour begins May 16 in Vancouver, and covers the US, Canada and Europe.For tickets and more details, visit Paul’s website (link below!)

    Paul Simon

    See the full Paul Simon Tour dates here .


    Alex Sopp
    C.J. Camerieri
    Gabriel Cabezas
    Hideaki Aomori
    Nadia Sirota
    Rob Moose

    Hailed by Performance Today’s Fred Child as “one of the groups that has really helped to shape the future of classical music,” yMusic is a group of six New York City instrumentalists flourishing in the overlap between the pop and classical worlds. Their virtuosic execution and unique configuration (string trio, flute, clarinet, and trumpet) has attracted the attention of high profile collaborators—from Paul Simon to Ben Folds to Jose Gonzalez—and inspired an expanding repertoire of original works by some of today’s foremost composers, including Nico Muhly and Andrew Norman.


    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 3:53 PM on March 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Nadia Sirota, , ,   

    From Nadia Sirota: Bio and Events 

    Nadia Sirota

    News:

    1
    Nadia Sirota at Moogfest

    Thu, May 17, 2018 1:30 PM Sun, May 20, 2018 2:30 PM
    Durham, NC (map)

    Details TBA!

    2
    Sound ON: Going Dutch

    Sunday, October 7, 2018
    3:00 PM 5:00 PM
    The Appel Room (map)

    Sound ON is the new-music series where both sound and stimulation are set to “on,” with views of Central Park from The Appel Room. At “Going Dutch,” get a closer look at the rebellious spirit of Louis Andriessen. Hosted and curated by Nadia Sirota, and featuring Jaap van Zweden.

    3
    Sound ON: Threads

    Sunday, January 27, 2019
    3:00 PM 5:00 PM
    The Appel Room (map)

    Sound ON is the new-music series where both sound and stimulation are set to “on,” with views of Central Park from The Appel Room. At “Threads,” explore how immigrants have shaped the world of today’s music. Hosted and curated by Nadia Sirota.

    Part of New York Stories: Threads of Our City

    Violist Nadia Sirota’s varied career spans solo performances, chamber music, curation, and broadcasting. In all branches of her artistic life she aims to open classical music up to a broader audience. Nadia’s singular sound and expressive execution have served as muse to dozens of composers, including Nico Muhly, David Lang, Bryce Dessner, Missy Mazzoli, and Marcos Balter. Nadia won a 2015 Peabody Award, broadcasting’s highest honor, for her podcast Meet the Composer, “the world’s best contemporary classical music podcast” (Pitchfork), which deftly profiles some of the most interesting musical thinkers living today.

    Next season, Nadia teams up with the New York Philharmonic as their first-ever Creative Partner, a position created for her. In this role, she will host nine contemporary music concerts over two new series: Nightcap and Sound ON, the latter of which she will also curate.

    As a soloist, Nadia has appeared with acclaimed orchestras around the world, including the Detroit Symphony, National Arts Centre Orchestra, Spanish National Orchestra, and the Orchestre National d’Île-de-France. To date, she has released four albums of commissioned music, most recently, Tessellatum, Donnacha Dennehy’s groundbreaking work for viola and microtonal viola da gamba consort, featuring Liam Byrne.

    Nadia is a member of the chamber sextet yMusic and has lent her sound to recording and concert projects by such artists and songwriters as Anohni, The National, Arcade Fire, and Paul Simon. In 2013 she won Southern Methodist University’s Meadows Prize, awarded to pioneering artists and scholars with an emerging international profile. She received her undergraduate and Master’s degrees from the Juilliard School, studying with Heidi Castleman, Misha Amory, and Hsin-Yun Huang.

    Nadia with ACME


    Nadia with yMusic

    7
    Nadia Sirota ~ On Drones & Viola
    Nadia Sirota w/Valgeir Sigurðsson (Photo courtesy of Manic Owl Works)


    Nadia plays Nico

    6


    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 2:32 PM on March 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Nadia Sirota, , , ,   

    From Nadia Sirota- Robert Sirota and Victoria Sirota: Immigrant Songs 

    Nadia Sirota

    News:

    Robert Sirota with Victoria Sirota

    World Premiere of Composer Robert Sirota’s Immigrant Songs
    Libretto by Victoria Sirota

    Performed by Rose of the Compass and the
    Cathedral Choir of St. John the Divine
    Kent Tritle, Music Director

    Monday, April 9, 2018 at 7:30pm
    The Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine
    1047 Amsterdam Ave. at 112th St | New York, NY

    Tickets ($25 general, $60 preferred seating) and information on how to sign up for a pre-concert tour of the Cathedral’s Chapels of the Tongues available at http://www.stjohndivine.org

    Robert Sirota: http://www.robertsirota.com

    New York, NY – On Monday, April 9, 2018 at 7:30pm, composer Robert Sirota’s new work Immigrant Songs, with libretto by Victoria Sirota, will be premiered at the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine (1047 Amsterdam Ave. at 112th St). Immigrant Songs is commissioned by the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and the family of Marina Friedenberg Stern. Instrumental ensemble Rose of the Compass, led by Friedenberg Stern’s daughter Nina Stern, will perform the work along with the Cathedral Choir of St. John the Divine and Kent Tritle, Music Director. This diverse program, Immigrants – A Celebration of What Makes New York Great, pays homage to New York’s identity as a melting pot of humanity.

    Immigrant Songs is dedicated to Marina Friedenberg Stern, who immigrated to New York City along with her family in 1941. Scored for choir, soloists, organ, recorder, chalumeau, oud, kanun, harp and frame drum, the libretto of Immigrant Songs, by Victoria Sirota, celebrates the lives and work of three immigrants to New York:
    • Spanish builder and engineer Rafael Guastavino, whose distinctive method of tiling produced over 1000 vaults and ceilings in 40 states, including the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, Grand Central Station and the New York Subway System.
    • Internationally renowned painter Marina Friedenberg Stern, born in Venice of Jewish heritage, immigrating to New York in 1941 via England and Brazil. Her paintings are in the permanent collections of dozens of museums and galleries, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Hirshhorn Museum, and the National Portrait Gallery.
    • Trinidadian native Ravi Ragbir, Executive Director of the faith-based New Sanctuary Coalition of New York City, a hero for immigrants’ rights who works courageously as an advocate for immigrants while himself under threat of deportation.
    In addition to Immigrant Songs, instrumental ensemble Rose of the Compass will perform music from the cultures represented by the cathedral’s seven Chapels, while the Cathedral Choir will answer with pieces by immigrants who composed in America, sharing their culture and their art. Composers will include Vincent Persichetti, whose parents came from Italy and Germany; F. Melius Christiansen, the great founder of the St. Olaf Choir; Rebecca Clarke and Tarik O’Regan, who both emigrated from the British Isles; Jean Berger from Germany; and Igor Stravinksy from Russia.

    Over four decades, composer Robert Sirota has developed a distinctive voice, clearly discernible in all of his work – whether symphonic, choral, stage, or chamber music. Writing in the Portland Press Herald, Allan Kozinn asserts: “Sirota’s musical language is personal and undogmatic, in the sense that instead of aligning himself with any of the competing contemporary styles, he follows his own internal musical compass.”

    Robert Sirota’s works have been performed by orchestras across the US and Europe; ensembles such as Alarm Will Sound, Sequitur, yMusic, Chameleon Arts, and Dinosaur Annex; the Chiara, American, Ethel, Elmyr, and Blair String Quartets; the Peabody, Concord, and Webster Trios; and at festivals including Tanglewood, Aspen, Yellow Barn, and Cooperstown music festivals; Bowdoin Gamper and Bowdoin International Music Festival; and Mizzou International Composers Festival. Recent and upcoming commissions include the American Guild of Organists, the American String Quartet, Alarm Will Sound, the Naumburg Foundation, Concert Artists of Baltimore, and yMusic.

    Recipient of grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, United States Information Agency, National Endowment for the Arts, Meet the Composer, and the American Music Center, Sirota’s works are recorded on the Capstone, Albany, New Voice, Gasparo and Crystal labels. His music is published by Muzzy Ridge Music, Schott, Music Associates of New York, MorningStar, Theodore Presser, and To the Fore.

    A native New Yorker, Sirota studied at Juilliard, Oberlin, and Harvard and divides his time between New York and Searsmont, Maine with his wife, Episcopal priest and organist Victoria Sirota. They frequently collaborate on new works, with Victoria as librettist and performer, at times also working with their children, Jonah and Nadia, both world-class violists.

    Victoria R. Sirota, Episcopal priest, lecturer, author and organist, holds degrees from Oberlin Conservatory of Music, Boston University and Harvard Divinity School, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College. She has taught at Yale Divinity School, Yale Institute of Sacred Music, The Ecumenical Institute of Theology at St. Mary’s Seminary and University, and Boston University. Former National Chaplain for the American Guild of Organists, Chair of the Professional Concerns Committee for the Association of Anglican Musicians, and Coordinator of the 1990 National AGO Convention in Boston, she is the author of articles, reviews and texts for hymns, cantatas and song cycles. She is recorded on Northeastern, Gasparo and Albany Records and her book Preaching to the Choir: Claiming the Role of Sacred Musician is available from Church Publishing. Previous positions include Vicar of the Church of the Holy Nativity in Baltimore, MD, and Canon Pastor and Vicar at The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine. She has given recitals in Paris, Germany and the United States, and has preached and given workshops at AGO, AAM, UCCMA and ALCM conventions. Recent collaborations with her husband composer Robert Sirota include “Prelude and Spiritual for Mother Emanuel” for soprano, chorus, piano and strings (2015), and “A Call for the Battle to Cease” (2017) for piano, orchestra and choir. The Reverend Canon Sirota is currently Priest-in-Charge at Saint John’s Episcopal Church in Getty Square, Yonkers, NY.

    The 16-voice Cathedral Choir of St. John the Divine sets the standard for music-making at the Cathedral. Its members include some of New York City’s finest choral performers, who are also accomplished soloists in their own right. The Cathedral Choir provides music for the Sunday 11am Eucharist and 4pm Evensong services throughout the year and also sings for other major feast days of the Christian calendar, such as Christmas, Holy Week, and Easter. In addition, the choir serves as the core ensemble for the Cathedral’s Great Music in a Great Space concert series.

    Rose of the Compass was founded in 2010 by recorder virtuoso and early music specialist Nina Stern in collaboration with luminaries of New York’s world scene. The ensemble, which released its first CD in 2011, explores repertory from diverse traditions, and creates a musical space unifying East and West. For the past several years, the ensemble has collaborated with Kent Tritle and the Cathedral Choir of St. John the Divine, presenting innovative programs such as “The Ornament of the World: Music of multicultural Spain,” “The Wingèd Lion: Venice and the Orient”, “The Glory of Constantinople” and “The Four Quarters of Jerusalem” which was also released as an album on the Pro Organo label in 2015.


    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 9:23 PM on March 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , James McVinnie, Nadia Sirota, , , Paul Corley, Puzzle Muteson, ,   

    From Bedroom Community: Latest Releases 

    Bedroom Community

    Latest Releases

    12
    Ben Frost The Center Cannot Hold

    13
    Nadia Sirota Tessellatum

    14
    Ben Frost Threshold Of Faith EP

    15
    The Crash Ensemble Ghosts

    16
    Valgeir Sigurðsson DISSONANCE

    17
    James McVinnie Cycles_1

    See the full article here .

    Bedroom Community is an Icelandic record label/collective formed in 2006 by Valgeir Sigurðsson, with Nico Muhly and Ben Frost, later adding Sam Amidon, Daníel Bjarnason, Puzzle Muteson, Paul Corley, Nadia Sirota and James McVinnie to the intimate roster. 2015 saw two new additions to the family being: Emily Hall & Jodie Landau and wild Up.

    11

    4
    Valgeir Sigurðsson

    4
    Nico Muhly

    63
    Ben Frost

    5
    Sam Adidon

    7
    Daniel Bjarnason

    8

    9
    Nadia Sirota

    Like-minded, yet diverse individuals from different corners of the globe all creatively orbit around an inconspicuous building and its inhabitants on the outskirts of Reykjavík Iceland – Greenhouse Studios – where the music is mostly created.

    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 4:17 PM on March 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ACME at Kennesaw State, , , , Nadia Sirota,   

    ACME at Kennesaw State: “Signature Series: American Contemporary Music Ensemble” 

    The American Contemporary Music Ensemble

    1

    2

    The American Contemporary Music Ensemble (ACME), champions of modern American music, perform at Kennesaw State on Friday, March 9 as part of the School of Music’s 2017-18 Signature Series.

    We’re looking forward to Kennesaw State University’s Festival of New Music next week! Excited to play Caleb Burhans’ gorgeous Jahrzeit string quartet, plus works by Timo Andres, Caroline Shaw, John Luther Adams, and Arvo Part.
    More info: arts.kennesaw.edu/music/concerts-and-events/acme.php

    On March 9, ACME will perform works inspired by the group’s debut portrait album, Thrive on Routine, which highlights ACME’s make-up of performers who are also composers. ACME will perform Caleb Burhans’ Jahrzeit, Caroline Shaw’s Gustave la Gray, and Timo Andres’ Thrive on Routine. The ensemble will also perform John Luther Adams’ moving string quartet The Wind in High Places and Arvo Pärt’s Fratres. Thrive on Routine was proclaimed by Gramophone as “a bounty of appealing recent works,” while The Strad raved “Warmth and care are fully evident in the ensemble’s immaculate, considered performances – the four composers could hardly wish for more committed, convincing accounts of their music.” Thrive on Routine was also featured as “Album of the Week” on New York Public Radio’s New Sounds/Q2 Music and was one of the top albums of the year in such diverse media outlets as Yahoo! Music, Iowa Public Radio, Classical Dark Arts, the Chicago Reader, and more.

    Tickets for this performance are $18-25.

    The American Contemporary Music Ensemble (ACME), led by Artistic Director Clarice Jensen, is dedicated to the outstanding performance of masterworks from the 20th and 21st centuries, primarily the work of American composers. The flexible ensemble presents fresh work by living composers alongside the classics of the contemporary. ACME’s dedication to new music extends across genres, and has earned them a reputation among both classical and rock crowds. NPR calls them “contemporary music dynamos,” and Strings reports, “ACME’s absorbing playing pulsed with warm energy. . . Shared glances and inhales triggered transitions in a flow so seamless it seemed learned in a Jedi temple.” ACME was honored by ASCAP during its 10th anniversary season in 2015 for the “virtuosity, passion, and commitment with which it performs and champions American composers.”

    ACME’s instrumentation is flexible, and includes some of New York’s most sought-after, engaging musicians. Notable highlights of ACME’s 2017-2018 season include a performance with Meredith Monk as part of Lincoln Center’s White Light Festival, Auckland Arts Festival with Max Richter performing his 8-hour work Sleep, and performances presented by the Festival of New American Music at Sacramento State, Kennesaw State’s Festival of New Music, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Kitchen, The Lot Radio, and The Kennedy Center.

    ACME has performed at leading international venues including Carnegie Hall, BAM, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Kitchen, (Le) Poisson Rouge, National Sawdust, Columbia University’s Miller Theatre, St. Ann’s Warehouse, Symphony Space, The Morgan Library, The Stone, Joyce Theater, Montclair’s Peak Performances, Washington Performing Arts, UCLA’s Royce Hall, Stanford Live, Constellation Chicago, Chicago’s Millennium Park, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Jordan Hall in Boston, Harvard’s Sanders Theatre, The Library of Congress in DC, Virginia Tech, Newman Center at the University of Denver, Flynn Center, Duke Performances, South Milwaukee Performing Arts Center, Dartmouth’s Hopkins Center, The Satellite in Los Angeles, Triple Door in Seattle, Cedar Cultural Center in Minneapolis, Melbourne Recital Hall and Sydney Opera House in Australia, and at festivals including the Sacrum Profanum Festival in Poland, All Tomorrow’s Parties in England, and Big Ears in Knoxville, TN.

    World premieres given by ACME include Ingram Marshall’s Psalmbook, Jóhann Jóhannsson’s Drone Mass (commissioned by ACME), Caroline Shaw’s Ritornello, Phil Kline’s Out Cold, William Brittelle’s Loving the Chambered Nautilus, Timo Andres’ Senior and Thrive on Routine, Caleb Burhans’ Jahrzeit, and many more. In 2016 at The Kitchen, ACME premiered Clarice Jensen’s transcription of Julius Eastman’s The Holy Presence of Joan d’Arc for ten cellos, the score of which had been lost since the premiere in 1981. Jensen transcribed a recording of the work to re-create the score. ACME has since performed Joan at the Met Breuer and will perform it at The Kennedy Center in spring 2018.

    ACME’s recordings appear on the Deutsche Grammophon, New World, Butterscotch, and New Amsterdam labels. ACME released its first portrait album on Sono Luminus in 2017, featuring music by members Caroline Shaw, Timo Andres, and Caleb Burhans, plus John Luther Adams. The Strad raved, “Warmth and care are fully evident in the ensemble’s immaculate, considered performances – the four composers could hardly wish for more committed, convincing accounts of their music.”

    ACME’s many collaborators have included The Richard Alston Dance Company, Wayne McGregor’s Random Dance, Gibney Dance, Satellite Ballet, Jóhann Jóhannsson, actress Barbara Sukowa, filmmaker Jim Jarmusch, Blonde Redhead, Grizzly Bear, Low, Matmos, Jeff Mangum, A Winged Victory for the Sullen, Roomful of Teeth, Lionheart, and Theo Bleckmann.
    ACME Roster:

    Clarice Jensen Artistic Director, cello
    Timo Andres, piano
    Hideaki Aomori, clarinet
    Emily Brausa, cello
    Caleb Burhans, violin/viola
    Peter Dugan, piano
    Isabel Hagen, viola
    Alicia Lee, clarinet
    Laura Lutzke, violin
    Caitlin Lynch, viola
    Grey Mcmurray, guitar
    Andrew Rehrig, flute
    Yuki Numata Resnick, violin
    Ben Russell, violin
    Caroline Shaw, violin
    Chihiro Shibayama, percussion
    Alex Shiozaki, violin
    Nadia Sirota, viola
    Brian Snow, cello
    Mary Jo Stilp, violin
    Chris Thompson, percussion

     
  • richardmitnick 12:31 PM on February 6, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Nadia Sirota, , , ,   

    From Nadia Sirota at Q2: “Composers-Who-Like-Other-Composers” 

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    Nadia Sirota on Q2 streams weekdays at 12:00 noon and midnight at Q2

    “We hear a lot of composers, and artists in general, bemoaning their being lumped into some category or another. Some are irate over some genre classification that sounds trite or inappropriate, or frustrated at being mentioned in the same breath as colleagues of theirs with whom perhaps they are less-than-thrilled to be associated.

    This kind of complaint is in fact so common that I find myself being curiously drawn to those composers who actively display community, associating themselves strongly with other musicians, even other composers! This week is all about composers-who-like-other-composers, and we’re devoting programming to the Composers Collective.

    Performing is inherently a community-based endeavor. I like working with other musicians and I like the kind of elegant interpretations that are only possible after hashing things out grittily in rehearsal. Composing, on the other hand, can seem to be a lonely practice; one must, at some point sit down in solitude and put notes on paper. Many, many composers are very happy to work in relative isolation (think Xenakis). From time to time, though, composers seek out or stumble upon a sort of community (think Les Six). We’ll explore a bunch of different composer collectives this week, namely Bang On a Can, the NOW Ensemble, Sleeping Giant, Ears Open!, and Common Sense.”

    See the full article here.


    Nadia Sirota

     
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