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  • richardmitnick 6:01 PM on April 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , National Sawdust, , Oracle Hysterical, Song Cycles   

    From National Sawdust: “Oracle Hysterical “Hecuba” Album Release Sunday, May 13th – 8pm 

    National Sawdust

    Oracle Hysterical Hecuba Album Release Sunday, May 13th – 8pm

    Oracle Hysterical

    Tickets

    About the Show

    Composer-collective Oracle Hysterical celebrates the group’s newest project, Hecuba, an experimental rock-leaning album based on Euripides’ tragedy of the same name. The album will be released on National Sawdust Tracks, the in-house record label formerly known as VIA Records that presents a carefully curated selection of new music from bold voices.

    Written around 424 BCE in Athens, Hecuba is a savage story of revenge in which the disgraced queen of Troy, Hecuba, with her city razed and her children murdered, descends from nobility to primal violence.

    Oracle Hysterical is made up of twin brothers Doug Balliett (double bass, viola da gamba) and Brad Balliett (bassoons), Majel Connery (vocals, keyboards), Elliot Cole (vocals, guitars, keyboards), and Dylan Greene (percussion). Part band, part book club, Oracle Hysterical combines eclectic musical influences with literary breadth, with all members of the group contributing as both performers and composers.

    Oracle’s works occupy the fluid space between classically-inclined song-cycle and art-rock concept album. The group’s songwriting illuminates fragments of great literary works like a child in a dark forest with a flashlight. Text sources have ranged from Grimms’ Fairy Tales to Greek tragedy, and falsely-attributed Shakespeare, all in collections of songs that distill centuries-old writing through a unique contemporary lens.

    Oracle Hysterical is twin brothers

    Doug Balliett


    Doug Balliett (double bass, viola da gamba)

    Brad Balliett


    Brad Balliett (bassoons)

    Majel Connery


    Majel Connery (vocals, keyboards),

    Elliot Cole


    Elliot Cole (vocals, guitars, keyboards)

    Dylan Greene


    Dylan Greene (percussion).

    Part band, part book club, Oracle Hysterical combines eclectic musical influences with literary breadth. All members of the group perform and compose, with each project developed collectively.

    Other touring projects include The Sea, a collaboration with the Grammy-nominated orchestra A Far Cry, which commissioned and premiered the work at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in 2016. In the song-cycle, Oracle Hysterical weaves music from texts by history’s greatest seafarers, explorers, and aquatic fabulists, from Shakespeare to Homer, and John Donne to the Book of Jonah. In 2017, Oracle Hysterical collaborated with period-instrument ensemble New Vintage Baroque on Passionate Pilgrim. The album, released on Naxos/Vision into Art, was called “music that is unstuck in time” by the Wall Street Journal, and what it would sound like if “Belle and Sebastian were to cut a record of Baroque-inspired folk songs,” by the New Yorker.

    Other ongoing projects include Cleopatra with the Metropolis Ensemble, and The Brothers Grimm with New Vintage Baroque. Oracle has appeared at the MATA Festival, the Berkshire Fringe Festival, The Stone (NYC), The Hideout (Chicago), (Le) Poisson Rouge (NYC), National Sawdust (NYC), the Toledo Museum of Art, and at the Lucerne Festival Academy, where they were Spotlight Artists in 2011.

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Space waiting

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 4:16 PM on April 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Emily Wells, National Sawdust,   

    From National Sawdust: “Emily Wells Saturday, May 5th — 7pm” 

    National Sawdust

    Emily Wells

    About the Show

    “Quietly transfixing” composer / producer Emily Wells is known for her varied use of classical and modern instrumentation, deft approach to live sampling, and “dramatic, meticulous and gothic songs” (New York Times) that blend “traditionalism with electronic ambiance” (NPR). Fresh off a new album, Wells steps out of the studio this May for an intimate show at National Sawdust where she experiments with songs old and new.

    On stage Wells’ builds a “new instrument” out of acoustic and electronic drums, synth, violin, and her evocative solo performances leave audiences equal parts dancing and grieving. Her latest work, This World is Too _____ For You, arranged for chamber ensemble by composer Michi Wiancko, was commissioned by Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra’s Liquid Music Series premiered in November 2017. This work is being expanded and recorded as a studio LP, out January 2019.

    “The new songs are the rub between desire for, and desire to strip oneself of all wanting” Wells says of the new material, which clamors around all the edges, and sometimes into the center of our collective uncertainties. “I grew up with hymns and I often find myself drawn to a form that seeks redemption, even for transgressions unknown.” Wells’ video work will accompany the performances of which she says, “the video and the songs are mirrors of one another: human failing, desire, grace, the body, repetition, muted gutting, and the natural world, beating against our windows, drunk with the answer.”

    Tickets

    About the Artist

    Emily Wells is a performer, producer, singer, and composer known for her varied use of classical and modern instrumentation as well as her deft approach to live sampling. Classically trained as a violinist, she also performs using drums, synths and beat machines and has toured worldwide. Wells released her most recent full studio album Promise to critical acclaim on her label “Thesis & Instinct” January 2016 with a follow up EP In The Hot in March of 2017. Wells lives and works in New York City.

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Space waiting

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:59 PM on April 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Brooklyn Youth Chorus, Dianne Berkun Menaker, , National Sawdust,   

    5 Questions to Dianne Berkun Menaker (Founder and Artistic Director, Brooklyn Youth Chorus) via National Sawdust 

    National Sawdust

    1

    April 17, 2018
    Jarrett Goodchild

    Dianne Berkun Menaker is the Founder and Artistic Director of the Brooklyn Youth Chorus. Under her direction, she has helped the chorus become one of the most highly regarded ensembles in the country and has prepared the choir to perform with conductors like Alan Gilbert, Marin Alsop, Gustavo Dudamel, Robert Spano and many others. On April 27-28, the chorus will perform the second installment of their Silent Voices concert series at National Sawdust. Silent Voices: If You Listen includes music by Julia Adolphe, Olga Bell, Anna Clyne, Paola Prestini, Toshi Reagon, Shelley Washington, Bora Yoon, guest artist Shaina Taub. Other artists like the International Contemporary Ensemble, R. B. Schlather, video and projection designer S. Katy Tucker, and sound designer Garth MacAleavey are also involved on the project. We were able to ask her some questions about the choir and the Silent Voices series.

    What was the driving force for you to form the Brooklyn Youth Chorus and what do you think makes the chorus as successful as it is?

    I was first compelled to create the Chorus because of my own deep love for the distinctive sound of the young treble voice. Apart from developing that sound ideal, I have always believed strongly in the value of music literacy and technical training for children, and felt that voice was the best vehicle in that it is unique to each person–an expression of one’s individuality–and accessible to all. Finally, I wanted to create a program that was truly representative of our larger community (geographically and demographically), without boundaries or barriers to participation based on economics or background.

    I believe the Chorus has been successful for three primary reasons. First, because it is built upon the highest standards of excellence, in training, professionalism and performance. Next, because our programming is a reflection of the singers themselves–their strengths, diversity of ideas and perspectives–and the time and place in which we are performing. And finally, because of the spirit of collaboration between the singers, composers and artists we work with, allowing the young people to take part in the creation of the work as well as its performance.

    As the loud cry for diversity in concert music seems to be at a fever pitch, how do you hope Silent Voices will affect other ensembles and artist in American concert halls?

    I don’t believe diversity should be regarded as a programmatic theme but rather as a reflection of an artist or organization’s core values. As in all areas of our society, it matters whose voices, and whose stories are being heard, and that representation is as broad and far-reaching as possible–including women, people of color, the young, the old, etc. We need to hear their stories, their points of view, their poetry, their melodies, in all their creative forms, and expand the narrative.

    There are a multitude of reasons why there has been a lack of representation in concert programming, which makes it an even greater responsibility now to seek out those underrepresented voices. I hope Brooklyn Youth Chorus can serve as a model in this regard, putting forth some lesser known or heard composers and venturing from the well-worn programmatic pathways. For us, diversity includes the composers whose music is being performed, who is doing the performing, and the range of themes and ideas being expressed. Contemporary music programming has helped to make this possible because we can learn from the composers and artists directly and fill in the gaps in our own knowledge or experience. We can be coached in different musical styles, explore new vocal techniques, help shape the subject matter, and be free of fixed ideas, standards or judgement.

    3
    Dianne Berkun Menaker–Photo by Jill Steinberg

    How did the International Contemporary Ensemble become involved and what do you think they add to the project?

    Our first collaboration with ICE was for the project Hagoromo, composed by Nathan Davis, and featuring dancer Wendy Whelan. I was taken by their extraordinary musicianship and the expanded playing techniques of these remarkable players. Their personal investment in both the music and the collaborative nature of the performance shines through. The other important factor in our ongoing collaboration with ICE is their respect for, and investment in, working with our young people. These musicians are so open and generous, and truly appreciate the role they are playing in accompanying these young lives on their artistic journey.

    What do you hope the members of the choir get out of this experience? Also, what do you hope the audience takes away from the performance?

    For the choristers, I hope they come away with a deeper understanding of themselves as musicians, artists and human beings. I want them to understand that they have been given a fairly unusual platform to have their voices heard–literally and figuratively–and with that, comes both opportunity and responsibility. I want them to feel safe, encouraged, proud, and hopeful in expressing their thoughts and feelings and in allowing themselves to be vulnerable. I want them to be more open to new ideas and people–but to learn to listen to themselves, as well–to trust their own instincts.

    I hope audiences come away moved, in their own way, by the power of the music, the beauty of the voices, and the importance of the ideas expressed. I hope they discover a composer they didn’t know before and an appreciation for the artistry of these young singers. I hope the audience recognizes the importance of the voices and perspectives of young people in tackling the issues of our time. Finally, I hope we all discover that, if we listen, and have the courage to speak our minds, we can all be agents of change and a needed voice for those who have fallen silent.

    Even though this program is the second installment of the Silent Voices project, what makes this performance different? What do you hope the third installment will bring?

    The musical program for If You Listen is completely new, with seven of the eight concert works as world premieres, and all by women composers. All of the spoken word elements in this production are drawn directly from the students own writing and conversations in response to the current repertoire and themes. This is also our first collaboration with director R.B. Schlather and video designer Katy Tucker, who have taken advantage of the unique space at National Sawdust in creating a truly immersive experience for the audience.

    Space waiting

    With the premiere of Silent Voices last season, we endeavored to give voice to those individuals and groups, perhaps our own selves, who had been silenced or marginalized. With Silent Voices: If You Listen, we are amplifying those voices, gathering even greater momentum in exploring the issues, while also pointing the spotlight on women composers, often underrepresented in contemporary classical music. Next season, we will premiere Silent Voices: Lovestate, which will draw on highlights from the first two seasons and also include new premieres (Bryce Dessner, David Lang, Angelica Negron–to name a few), while we seek to affirm our vision for a more inclusive and compassionate future–a world we can all look forward to.

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:43 PM on April 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Aberdeen, Bianca Muñiz, Brittany Campbell, National Sawdust, The Revolution Vol. 26   

    From National Sawdust: “The Revolution Vol. 26” 

    National Sawdust

    1

    Bianca Muñiz, Aberdeen, and Brittany Campbell

    Saturday, April 28th — 10pm

    About the Show

    THE REVOLUTION is a performance series highlighting Brooklyn & Harlem based artists + musicians that not only represent the core of independent pop culture but who currently stand in the breeding ground of evolution within their genre.

    This local musical movement empowers community, change, and activism through performance and unity amongst the arts. Once a month, three different artists showcasing three different genres have a chance to spread love, light, and awareness through their music and their stories. This series supports revolutionary artistry and how important music is to healing, in all aspects of life.

    As a part of VOL. 26, The Revolution will feature three incredible live performances

    from local artists;

    Bianca Muñiz, Aberdeen, and Brittany Campbell

    Bianca Muñiz
    2
    Bianca Muñiz is a 23 year old singer, songwriter, and pianist; living in Manhattan, New York, who has taken flight on the music scene. Bianca has a truly unique way of captivating the unspoken; she takes her listeners inside of her mind, painting unapologetic pictures of vulnerable yet passionate truths, while entangling them into her uplifting experiences, without any refrains. With music of such originality, it makes it difficult to categorize into one genre, she calls it avant-pop.
    In 2016, Bianca released her first EP, Scary Dreams. She has since released two singles, two music videos and is currently working on her first full length album, entitled For You.
    She has a daunting arsenal of life experience from which she draws inspiration to create powerful music. She is an individual with a drive to do good and spread love throughout the world through music.

    Aberdeen
    4
    Aberdeen is an indie rock brass band based out of Brooklyn, NY. They create an overwhelming wall of sound with soaring, horn-driven melodies, supported by a bed of distorted guitars and raucous drums. Think a Trombone Shorty/Explosions in the Sky/Kamasi Washington super group. Brian Plautz is the primary songwriter in the band, along with Alex Conroy and Shubh Saran. The eight-piece band, featuring two saxophones, trombone, trumpet, two guitars, bass and drums never ceases to fill a room with energy.

    Brittany Campbell
    6
    “Brittany Campbell is the artist people dream to be.” – Deli Magazine. Blending elements of RnB, Pop, Electronic Soul, and Rock, Campbell is a true Avatar of the new direction of today’s music industry. With independent artist breakthroughs such as Odd Future, Chvrches, Banks, and Macklemore, never was there a more opportune time for the DIY artist to break through the “glass ceiling” nor has there ever been a time where the ability to wear many hats was more vital to an artist’s career. An award winning singer, songwriter, producer and visual artist, Campbell is unequivocally equipped to tackle the industry’s ever-changing climate exemplifying the virtues of musical reverence, visual innovation, curated collaboration, and pure raw talent. Boasting 4 studio releases, her debut EP Nerd (2011) reaching the Top 10 NYC pop charts, her second studio album Heroes (2014) claiming an Independent Music Award for best pop album, has made her unarguably an artist to watch but perhaps even more exciting, is her newfound merging of music and animation. “An inspired audio-visual experience”, according to Paper Magazine, Brittany has captured the attention of both the music and art world. Her animated music videos appearing in a multitude of festivals such as The Portland Oregon Women’s Film Festival (2016) and Legends of Hollywood Film Festival (2016). Currently, Brittany is in studio, working on a 4 part series called Stay Gold that she calls her “personal fantasia”. The first of the series, released Feb 2016, received positive reviews – Complex Mag calling her the “future of soul”.

    Tickets, you will have to visit the web page, https://nationalsawdust.org/event/the-revolution-vol-26/#toggle-id-3, because they cannot manage to put up a link that can be copied.

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:00 PM on April 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Christy & Emily, National Sawdust, TransAtlantic Ensemble   

    From National Sawdust: Christy & Emily & TransAtlantic Ensemble 

    National Sawdust

    1
    Christy & Emily
    Christy Edwards & Emily Manzo

    Experimental folk-pop duo Christy & Emily is comprised of Christy Edwards, a self- taught indie-rocker and Emily Manzo, a classically trained pianist. Formed in Brooklyn in the mid 2000’s their first album, Gueen’s Head was released on the The Social Registry in 2007, displaying all the core elements of the C&E sound – raw emotional songwriting coupled with sonic experimentation. Since that time they have toured extensively in Europe and recorded several albums produced by Faust keyboardist Joachim Irmler.

    Christy & Emily have forged a songwriting style that melds haunting vocal harmonies with jagged guitar swells and vintage electric piano/organ dreaminess. A piece such as Erik Satie’s Gymnopédie does not feel out of place during a live rendition of their tune “Lover’s Talk.” Conversely, the crowd favorite, “Thunder & Lightning” evokes the reckless rock of the Velvet Underground. Unusual songs such as “Tidal Wave” are a nod to punk band, the Electric Eels, while also displaying their fearless approach to structure and humor. Country and folk stylings are at home as well, reflected in the John Fahey like fingerstyle of “Railroad” or the Crazy Horse looseness of “Something Easy.”

    Experimental folk-pop duo Christy & Emily, a sublime blend of haunting vocal harmonies with electric piano and organ dreaminess, collaborates with the TransAtlantic Ensemble, a clarinet and piano duo “redefining classical music” (Feast of Music) to bring an evening of folk, classical music, and jazz unlike any other.

    Christy & Emily play a set with collaborators from the Indie-rock scene, while the TransAtlantic Ensemble will perform selections from their latest album “Havana Moon” (Best of Sirius XM Symphony Hall 2016) including Paquito D’Rivera, Roberto Sierra, and Miguel del Aguila.

    Pianist Emily Manzo, as one half of Christy & Emily, will open with a set of solo piano works written by fellow composer/performers.

    2
    TransAtlantic Ensemble
    Mariam Adam – clarinet Evelyn Ulex – piano

    The TransAtlantic Ensemble’s innovative repertoire, dynamic sound and engaging stage presence attracts and inspires audiences from the contemporary, crossover, classical, and jazz worlds.

    Celebrated music website Feast of Music declares, “TransAtlantic Ensemble is redefining classical music, making it accessible and relevant to our times. By adding elements of jazz and Latin music, they create a global sound that everyone can relate to.”

    Hailing from Berlin and New York with “talent that can only be described as transformative,” the TransAltantic Ensemble has been making music on both sides of the Atlantic since 2005. As a forum for two dynamic leaders in today’s generation of chamber musicians, this ensemble of clarinet and piano is dedicated to directing the course of classical music’s evolution.



    Central to the TransAtlantic Ensemble’s mission is collaborating with living composers. Their ongoing relationships with Paquito D’Rivera, Miguel del Aguila, Valerie Coleman, Jeff Scott, Mohammed Fairouz, J.P. Jofre and Richard Padron have resulted in significant contributions to the clarinet and piano repertoire. Interaction with audiences is a hallmark of TransAtlantic performances. The multilingual ensemble enthusiastically communicates their love of live chamber music to music lovers of all ages and from diverse backgrounds.

    In addition to their strong presence in Europe, this duo has toured extensively throughout the continental US performing at such distinguished halls as Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Symphony Space and Le Poisson Rouge. TransAtlantic Ensemble also remains dedicated to their music community as demonstrated through extensive Master Class offerings held at Universities and Festivals across the country including Juilliard, New School and the Imani Winds Festival.

    TransAtlantic Ensemble can be heard on E1 Entertainment (Koch classics) and Eroica. The highly anticipated release of their new CD for the Steinway label will be arriving summer of 2016. Their collaborations with the phenomenal Argentine Bandoneon player JP Jofre and renowned violinists Liana Gourdjia is expected to be their finest work to date.

    “Transatlantic Ensemble’s superb musicianship combined with their comfortable and cool stage presence makes them a joy to behold.”

    Visuals for the evening will be contributed by Brock Monroe of the Joshua Lightshow.

    Fri, May 4, 2018, 7:00 PM

    Tickets- visit the web page https://nationalsawdust.org/event/christy-emily/ and navigate to tickets, which I cannot copy and paste.

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:34 AM on March 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , National Sawdust, , , , On Pitom, , , , ,   

    From National Sawdust: “On Pitom” 

    National Sawdust

    David Krakauer Presents: On Pitom

    Friday, April 20th @ 7pm

    Buy tickets

    About the Show

    “A dazzling debut”
    The Wall Street Journal

    “A rocking band performing catchy, hooky compositions that both pay tribute to and challenge the Jewish tradition…Pitom is a hard-edged new addition to the legacy of Radical Jewish Culture.”
    John Zorn

    Avant-garde rock meets the Jewish tradition in On Pitom, a shredding instrumental band led by guitarist Yoshie Fruchter.

    This fiery quartet combines influences from Frank Zappa, The Melvins and Masada into an exciting band performing catchy compostions that both pay tribute to and challenge its heritage. With two releases on John Zorn’s Tzadik Records, the Radical Jewish Culture series, and more music on the way, On Pitom continues their exploration of the New Jewish rock sound.

    About the Artists

    Pitom is a Jewish jazz-punk-sludge-metal hybrid – the kind of music that could only come from a culture known for wandering. With two successful albums on Tzadik records, the first of which the Wall Street Journal called a “dazzling debut,” Pitom continues to evolve their unique brand of musical adventure. With its cacophonic guitar, surly heavy-metal bass and a soaring violin, their music is so ethereal that the listener needs those mosh-pit drums to rocket them back down to Earth.

    Pitom’s bandleader, guitarist/composer Yoshie Fruchter has been making his mark on the downtown community since 2005.

    2
    Yoshie Fruchter

    Born into a cantorial family, his unique background in Jewish music, jazz and rock give his guitar sound and approach a flavor that is both extremely musical and yet out of control. The other three members of Pitom – bassist Shanir Blumenkrantz, drummer Kevin Zubek and violinist Jeremy Brown, all amazingly talented musicians in their own right, bring influences from traditional klezmer to noise rock to make this thoughtful and groundbreaking music.

    4
    Shanir Blumenkrantz

    5
    Kevin Zubek

    6
    Jeremy Brown

    Tzadik records founder, John Zorn, described Blasphemy as “a fiery and soulful album that you will listen to again and again” and audiences around the world, Jewish or not, have felt the same way. Pitom has performed all over the country and in Eastern and Western Europe including the Atlantique Jazz Festival in France, Otwarda Twarda festival in Warsaw, and Jewish music festivals in Washington DC, Detroit and New York City.

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director


    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz

    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00AM-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 2:14 PM on March 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Jeffrey Zeigler, John King, , National Sawdust, , , , , TAKA KIGAWA, ,   

    From National Sawdust: “John King” 

    National Sawdust

    John King Premieres works for cello and piano, featuring Jeffrey Zeigler and Taka Kigawa
    Friday, March 30th – 7pm

    For tickets visit https://nationalsawdust.org/event/john-king-premieres-works-for-cello-and-piano-featuring-jeffrey-zeigler-and-taka-kigawa/#toggle-id-1

    About the Show
    1
    John King

    Composer John King, praised by The Paris Review as “extraordinary” for his intimate knowledge of Arabic music and improvisatory brilliance, will present three world premieres of works featuring cellist Jeffrey Zeigler and pianist Taka Kigawa.

    Time Curves for solo cello (2017) is a composition in 3 continuous sections where the solo cellist elides blues-based material with massive and expansive extended techniques. This work explores time, tempo, timbral journeys and highly demanding skills perfectly suited for the acclaimed cellist, Jeffrey Zeigler.

    Taka Kigawa will perform the premiere of King’s 13 Preludes for piano, also written in 2017. Each piece is a delicate reflection on sound, nature, overlapping ephemeral textures and exquisite journeys of the imagination.

    The final work, Threads of Bronze, is a duo for cello and piano. It has a forward-driving rhythmic energy and power, creating an alchemical mixture blending the two performers’ unique talents. There are swirling moments of improvisation which are quickly exchanged back and forth by each performer, ricocheting off one another in an ever-increasing dramatic arc.

    JOHN KING, composer, guitarist and violist, has received commissions from the Kronos Quartet; Face The Music, the Belgrade Philharmonic (co-commission with Aleksandra Vrebalov), Ethel; the Albany Symphony/“Dogs of Desire”, Bang On A Can All-Stars; Mannheim Ballet; New York City Ballet/Diamond Project, Stuttgart Ballet, Ballets de Monte Carlo; as well as the Merce Cunningham Dance Co. His string quartets have also been performed by the Eclipse Quartet (LA) and the Mondriaan Quartet (Amsterdam), in addition to the Secret Quartet which has premiered many of his compositions at The Stone (June 2007, May 2015), The Kitchen (April 2009), Lincoln Center Festival (July 2011); and Roulette (Oct. 2014).

    He has written 7 operas: ping and WHAT IS THE WORD, with texts by Samuel Beckett, premiered at the Experiments in Opera Festival, spring 2014 and the Avant Music Festival, February 2016; impropera, which used randomly selected text msg’s from the singers’ cell phones; SapphOpera, a chamber opera with text-fragments by Sappho translated by Anne Carson; herzstück/heartpiece, based on the text of Heiner Müller, premiered at the 1999 Warsaw Autumn Festival and presented at the Kitchen NYC in 2000 (a double-opera, co-written with Krzysztof Knittel); la belle captive based on texts by Alain Robbe-Grillet, premiered at Teatro Colon/CETC in Buenos Aires in 2003, and toured to London’s ICA (Fronteras Festival) in 2004 and The Kitchen in 2005; and also his most recent opera, Dice Thrown, based on the Stéphane Mallarmé poem, an excerpt of which was performed by New York City Opera as part of its VOX series in May 2008. The complete staged version was presented at CalArts April 23-24, 2010. And in May of 2015, Piano Vectors, for 6 grand pianos in a large space was premiered at the beautiful 40,000 sq. ft Knockdown Center space in Queens, NY.

    He has written songs and incidental music for five plays (The Tempest, Faust, The Trial, Steppenwolf and Wings of Desire) at the Ludwigburg TheaterSommer directed by Peter Kratz. He has been commissioned numerous times by the Brooklyn Youth Chorus, and collaborated with them on their Black Mountain Songs project, which premiered at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on Nov. 20, 2014 and went on to tour in Europe.

    He has 3 recent CD releases of music for string quartet; 10 Mysteries and AllSteel (Tzadik); and Ethel (Cantaloupe). He was Music Curator at The Kitchen from 1999-2003 and from 2002-2011 was a co-director of the Music Committee at the Merce Cunningham Dance Co. He received the 2014 Award for Sound/Music from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, and is also the recipient of the 2009 Alpert Award in the Arts for Music. He has been a Rockefeller Foundation/Bellagio Center Fellow in March 2016, as well as in residence at the Emily Harvey Foundation in Venice, Italy in July 2015.

    2
    Critically acclaimed pianist TAKA KIGAWA has earned outstanding international recognition as a recitalist, soloist, and chamber music artist since winning First Prize in the prestigious 1990 Japan Music Foundation Piano Competition in Tokyo, and the Diploma Prize at the 1998 Concurs Internacional Maria Canals De Barcelona in Spain, with such accolades from The New York Times as “Phenomenon. There’s no denying that he is something special,” “The extraordinary pianist.” and from The New Yorker “Unbelievably challenging program. Kigawa is an artist of stature.” and from La Nacíon (Buenos Aires) “Taka Kigawa is a stupendous virtuoso.” His New York City recital in 2010 was chosen as one of the best concerts of the year by The New York Times. Also his New York City recital in August 2011 was picked as one of the most notable concerts in the first half of the 2011-2012 season by Musical America.

    He has performed extensively as a recitalist and soloist in New York, Washington DC, Boston, Cleveland, Paris, Milan and Barcelona, with appearances in Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall, Kosciuszko Foundation, Severance Hall in Cleveland, Cité de la Musique, and Salle Gaveau in Paris, Plau de la Música Catalana in Barcelona, and Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires. He frequently tours in his native Japan, appearing in Tokyo, Osaka, Nagano and Kyoto, both as a recitalist and a soloist with orchestra and in chamber music groups. He has performed with such distinguished institution as The Cleveland Orchestra. He has been a featured artist on many television and radio networks throughout the U.S., Europe and Asia.

    His repertoire is extremely large and varied, ranging from the baroque to avant-garde compositions of today. He has collaborated closely with such renowned musicians as Pierre Boulez, Myung-Whun Chung and Jonathan Nott.

    Mr. Kigawa grew up in Nagano, Japan, where he began piano studies at the age of three, winning his first competition at the age of seven. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Shinsyu University, and his Master of Arts degree from Tokyo Gakugei (Liberal Arts) University, graduating with honors in Piano Performance. During both his undergraduate and graduate years, he also studied composition and conducting, receiving high honors in both disciplines. He furthered his studies in the United States at The Juilliard School in New York, where he earned his Master of Music degree. Mr. Kigawa currently lives in New York City, U.S.A. For more information, visit: http://www.takakigawa.com

    3
    Jeffrey Zeigler is one of the most versatile cellists of our time. Acclaimed for his independent streak, he has commissioned over three dozen works, and is admired as a potent collaborator and unique improviser. Zeigler has been described as “fiery”, and a player who performs “with unforced simplicity and beauty of tone” by the New York Times.

    Jeffrey Zeigler was the cellist of the internationally renowned Kronos Quartet for eight seasons. During his tenure, Zeigler had the opportunity to collaborate with a wide range of luminaries from John Adams to Noam Chomsky, from Damon Albarn (Gorillaz) to Trimpin and from Henryk Gorecki and Steve Reich to Tom Waits.

    Since moving on from Kronos, Zeigler has enjoyed a wonderfully multifaceted career which has led to collaborations from Yo-Yo Ma and Laurie Anderson to Hauschka and Roomful of Teeth, from Philip Glass and Foday Musa Suso to John Corigliano and Vijay Iyer, from Tanya Tagaq and Terry Riley to Vladimir Feltsman and John Zorn. Zeigler has also collaborated with members of the Eroica Trio and the Cleveland and St. Lawrence Quartets.

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director


    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00AM-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 7:24 PM on March 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , National Sawdust, , , , Robyn Bollinger, , ,   

    From National Sawdust: Robyn Bollinger 

    National Sawdust

    Sun, Apr 8, 2018, 7:00 PM
    For tickets visit https://nationalsawdust.org/event/ciaccona-the-bass-of-time-robyn-bollinger-violin/

    1
    by Kristin Hoebermann

    Daring, versatile, and charismatic, American violinist Robyn Bollinger is a young artist on the rise recognized for her musical creativity, rich tones, and technical mastery. A soloist and chamber musician, she is the recipient of a prestigious 2016 Fellowship from the Leonore Annenberg Arts Fellowship Fund for her multimedia performance project, CIACCONA: The Bass of Time. Ms. Bollinger made her Philadelphia Orchestra debut at age twelve, and has since performed in recital, with orchestras, in recital and at festivals nationwide and abroad, among them the Boston Pops, the Grand Tetons Music Festival Orchestra, Japan’s Phoenix Hall, Oji Hall, and Tokyo National Arts Center, and the music festivals of Aspen, Lake Champlain, Maui, Marlboro, and Rockport. A member of the Grammy-nominated string ensemble A Far Cry, she collaborates with musicians in chamber music regularly.

    Her solo tour, CIACCONA: The Bass of Time,is a multi-media concert that tells the story of one of the oldest musical ideas, the repeating bass line, through solo violin music. Announced tour performances include the Lake Champlain Chamber Music Festival, Emory University, National Sawdust, and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

    Ms. Bollinger’s talent has been recognized with numerous awards, among them top prizes at international competitions, including the International Fritz Kreisler Competition in Vienna, the Yehudi Menuhin International Competition for Young Violinists in France, and the Louis Spohr International Competition in Germany. She came to national attention with her 2014 residency on PRI’s “Performance Today” and several appearances on NPR’s “From the Top.” She holds Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees with honors from Boston’s New England Conservatory of Music.

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director


    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00AM-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 5:16 PM on March 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Gyan Riley "Sprig", , , , National Sawdust, , , , , ,   

    From National Sawdust: “Gyan Riley “Sprig”: a solo guitar album release show and reforestation effort” 

    National Sawdust

    Sprig: a solo guitar album release show and reforestation effort
    Thursday, March 29th – 7pm

    For tickets visit https://nationalsawdust.org/event/gyan-riley-sprig-album-release/

    1
    Gyan Riley

    Gyan Riley, described by The New Yorker as a “one-man American-music machine,” hosts the release party of his fifth album, Sprig, where he will perform from the record. The album will be released on National Sawdust Tracks, the in-house record label formerly known as VIA Records that presents a carefully curated selection of new music from bold voices.

    Album Notes from Gyan Riley:

    Sprig is a solo acoustic guitar record about growth and transformation. As an artist, most of my ideas begin as small cells, little snippets that sometimes develop and transform into something greater than their original embryonic forms. By extension of that concept, what started out as the release of a guitar album has become an opportunity for me to help raise awareness about deforestation and help fund reforestation efforts across the country and worldwide. Through http://AmericanForests.org, I will plant a tree for each physical album sold, helping them to reach their goal to plant 3 million trees in 2018!

    I grew up in the rural Sierra Foothills of Northern California, surrounded by the beautiful pine, madrone, oak, and manzanita trees of Tahoe National Forest. It is an area rich in beauty and teeming with life. But each year these trees are seriously threatened by the hundreds of perilous fires that sweep through California’s forests. In 2017 alone, 9,133 CA fires burned a whopping 1,248,606 acres of land. I now live in NYC, but each year travel to CA several times to reconnect with my roots, and each dry season I am reminded of the devastation fire can bring. But fire is far from being the sole culprit in the deforestation equation. Illegal and unsustainable logging, fuelwood harvesting, mining, climate change, and forest conversion are all posing an enormous threat toward the global health of our forests. With 80% of the world’s forests are already destroyed, the depletion of our forests is rapidly leading to massive species extinction and is the largest source of carbon dioxide emissions after fossil fuel burning. Our forests protect our watersheds, absorb harmful greenhouse gases, and provide habitat, clean drinking water, food, and medicine for all of us. Quite simply, their preservation is absolutely essential.

    Sprig is dedicated to my mother Ann. She was an avid supporter of conservationist movements, and lost her life to cancer a little over 2 years ago. My mom lived out her last painful weeks with great strength and grace, setting an indelible example of great courage for all her surrounding family and friends. Amidst these trying political times that greatly threaten our planet, it is increasingly important to maintain conviction and double our efforts in supporting our conservation organizations and those individuals who devote their lives toward the betterment of the planet and its inhabitants. For me this endeavor is just one small way to help, which happens to be personally significant. But if the music and message can reach enough people, I’m hoping that my small sprig of effort could turn into a profound positive impact on our global environment.

    Recorded in-residence at the Harrison House in Joshua Tree, CA.

    CONTACT

    (646) 779-8455

    80 NORTH 6TH ST
    BROOKLYN, NY 11249

    INFO@NATIONALSAWDUST.ORG

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director


    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00AM-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 11:55 AM on March 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , LP Release Show Monday April 9th – 7pm, National Sawdust, , , , Rafiq Bhatia, , ,   

    From National Sawdust: “Rafiq Bhatia” 

    National Sawdust

    1
    Rafiq Bhatia

    LP Release Show
    Monday, April 9th – 7pm

    About the Show

    Tickets on sale Friday, February 16th at noon.

    This show celebrates Breaking English, the Anti-Records debut of New York composer and guitarist Rafiq Bhatia. Hailed as “miles apart from the vast majority…of jazz musicians” by The New York Times, Bhatia will shatter preconceptions about how much can be said without a word—and, for that matter, who can say it. After an illustrious career as part of Son Lux and collaborations with artists like Lorde and Sufjan Stevens, Bhatia’s audacious first album as a producer sets out to challenge existing musical vocabulary with a language of its own.

    More About The Album

    In 2012, Bhatia issued two improvisation-driven recordings whose surreal sonics “set them miles apart from the vast majority of records by jazz musicians” (New York Times). These releases earned immediate acclaim; The Washington Post observed, “Instead of haggling over jazz’s traditional perimeters, both recordings employ the sonic language of hip-hop and electronic composition to press toward a more interesting future.” But with his next project, Bhatia felt compelled to find a more personal path forward. For most of his listening life, he’d loved records in which familiar sounds were refashioned into wonderfully alien strains, where iconoclastic ideas met cutting-edge technology to yield a new lexicon. Making music like this would mean reaching beyond his six strings and customarily collaborative approach, especially his reliance on outside producers. To get where he needed to go, he would need to learn how to sculpt sound for himself.

    It was during this period of reinvention that Bhatia joined Son Lux, a studio-centered project in which producer Ryan Lott used software to warp found sounds into dazzling electronic experiments. Son Lux afforded Bhatia the chance to record with the likes of Lorde and Sufjan Stevens, but, more important, it gave him the support he needed to develop his voice as a producer—the process that ultimately yielded Breaking English.

    The resulting album ruptures the hermetic vernacular of ambient sculpturalism with the emotional intensity of avant-garde jazz, using the techniques of the former to achieve the feeling of the latter. Its language is centered on contrast, with opposing strains juxtaposed in order to throw each other into sharper relief—the organic feels more vibrant in the context of the mechanical, the otherworldly more ethereal in light of the ordinary. Throughout, Bhatia’s guitar is just one part of a teeming, much bigger picture. Tense violin, exhaled gospel vocals, ricocheting drums and foreboding bass also populate Breaking English, all characters in an enveloping piece of musical cinema.

    Bhatia is the first-generation American son of Muslim immigrant parents who trace their ancestry to India by way of East Africa. Early influences such as Jimi Hendrix, John Coltrane, and Madlib—as well as mentors and collaborators including Vijay Iyer and Billy Hart—prompted him to see music as a way to actively shape and represent his own identity, not limited by anyone else’s prescribed perspective. Bhatia’s embrace of the electronic realm bolsters his ability to express hybridity. At times, he uses the studio to destabilize, twisting the stereotypes of Indian music he heard as a child into noise beyond recognition. But frequently, he exaggerates the human qualities of the sound he mines, conveying intimacy and tension through elements many producers would scrub clean.

    All told, Bhatia seamlessly integrates dozens of different ideas throughout Breaking English. Take the title track, a marvelous chimera of deconstructed soul, where skittering drums dodge explosions of white noise as a detuned choir gasps for air. Trips to the Great Rift Valley of Africa and the mosques of Istanbul inspired the swirl of sculpted noise that begins the album. His horror with the news of these last several American years and his empathy for the Black Lives Matter movement supercharge the menacing Hoods Up. A fascination with avant-garde cuisine actually helped to shape The Overview Effect, a breathtaking piece that expresses the overwhelming fragility of the Earth as seen from outer space. The contaminated orchestra of Olduvai II — We Are Humans With Blood In Our Veins bottles the nightmare of waking up brown in America on November 9, 2016.

    From start to finish, Breaking English suggests one very deep breath, one instant capable of carrying so much. Beauty, violence, death, rebirth—it’s all tucked into the two-movement Perihelion, an eight-minute descent into the sun that uses distance and perspective to ponder the line where what dazzles us can destroy us, where something so sustaining can turn sinister. That Icarus-like enticement speaks to Breaking English, an album that required an already-accomplished musician to abandon what he knew and test his own limits. That risk rewards repeatedly here, on a record that funnels a universe of anxiety, hope, and inspiration into one singularly provocative and mesmerizing statement.

    Anti- Records will release Breaking English on April 6, 2018.

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director


    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00AM-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
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