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  • richardmitnick 1:57 PM on June 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Seed Triangular", , New Amsterdam Records, , Robbie Lee and Mary Halvorson   

    From New Amsterdam Records: Robbie Lee and Mary Halvorson “Seed Triangular” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam Records

    ANNOUNCING:

    Seed Triangular

    First collaborative album from
    Robbie Lee and Mary Halvorson

    1

    Adventurous multi-instrumentalist Robbie Lee and virtuosic guitarist Mary Halvorson announce their first collaborative album, Seed Triangular, which will be released Sept. 7 on New Amsterdam Records. It will be available in digital, CD and LP formats and is available for pre-order through Bandcamp here.

    Seed Triangular features Halvorson and Lee not only improvising together on a rarely-heard combination of instruments for the very first time, but also documents Halvorson touching these instruments for the very first time. She explores the extended high and low strings of an 18-string Knutsen harp guitar (circa 1899), the vintage quirks of a 1930 Gibson L-2 guitar, and the gut strings of an 1888 SS Stewart 6-string banjo as Lee performs on equally unusual woodwinds, such as baroque flute and the world’s smallest saxophone.

    The project began as a casual jam session between old friends one day in Brooklyn. Although Lee and Halvorson have not often appeared side-by-side professionally, they have improvised together for more than a decade, creating a mutually-understood musical language that draws on their respective musical backgrounds — Halvorson as a prolific solo artist and bandleader, Lee as an in-demand studio and live musician who has played with artists ranging from Jozef van Wissem and Neil Hagerty to Cass McCombs and Glasser.

    Seed Triangular defies genre, floating in a space between early music, folk, free jazz and more. The pieces on the album are edited versions of the improvisation session, “composed” in a way that tells the story of the duo’s discovery. The music is naturalist and responsive, with each performer continually taking turns generating or responding to each other as they explore the instruments, creating a magnetic pull with their catch and response as Halvorson learns about the instruments as she plays them. Despite the unusual and (for Halvorson) unfamiliar instrumentation, the duo’s rich history performing with each other creates a baseline of ease that allows their signature styles to shine through, giving new life and textures to age-old sounds.

    Seed Triangular was recorded by Elisha Wiesner at Studio Drewtube in Brooklyn, NY. The album was mixed by Robbie Lee and mastered by Bob Weston. Album art and design by David Stith, with Tintype by Jolene Lupo at Penumbra Tintype Studio.

    Halvorson and Lee will tour the project in the US this fall, including a date in NYC. More details coming soon.

    Lee recently released an early woodwind album with Norbert Rodenkirchen and James Ilgenfritz, entitled Opalescence on Telegraph Harp Records. Halvorson’s latest album, Code Girl, is out now on Firehouse 12 Records.

    2
    Mary Halvorson and Robbie Lee. Credit: Amy Mills

    Instruments played on Seed Triangular:

    Mary Halvorson: 18-string Knutsen harp guitar circa 1899, 1930 Gibson L-2 guitar, 1888 SS Stewart 6-string banjo

    Robbie Lee: Baroque flutes after Eichentopf and Quantz by Stefan Beck, 1829 8-key flute by Rudall and Rose, chalumeau (Renaissance clarinet), soprillo saxophone, melodica, bells

    Seed Triangular tracklisting:

    1. The Booming
    2. Seven of Strong
    3. Pondeteria
    4. A Forest Viol
    5. The Tawny Orange
    6. sing o-gurgle-ee this evening
    7. Shoots Have Shot
    8. Rock Flowers
    9. Spring Up There
    10. the stuttering note of probably
    11. Fireproof-brick dust
    12. Potamogeton
    13. like a ripple made by the wind
    14. Early Willows

    In all of our presenting and recording activities, NewAm holds firmly to its mission to support artists whose work lies outside of traditional music industry infrastructure – whether that be classical, pop/rock/indie, jazz, world, or experimental. In pursuit of this calling, NewAm often collaborates with like-minded organizations. Our past and ongoing partnerships with the River to River Festival, Ecstatic Music Festival, Art of Elan, the Indianapolis Symphony (multi-year residency), MoMA PS 1, Liquid Music, Galapagos Artspace and National Sawdust have yielded high-profile opportunities for our artists to present their work. On the records side, we often partner with other labels in order to offer our artists the best possible representation for their projects. Partner labels have included Bedroom Community (Iceland), Nonclassical (UK), One Little Indian (UK), Sono Luminus (USA), Cantaloupe (USA) and NNA Tapes (USA).

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 10:38 AM on June 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Arooj Aftab, , New Amsterdam Records,   

    From New Amsterdam Records: “Arooj Aftab’s Siren Islands” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam Records

    NOW AVAILABLE:

    Arooj Aftab’s
    Siren Islands

    available exclusively through
    New Amsterdam’s Bandcamp Subscription
    as part of new Windmill Series

    1

    Siren Islands is the new album from Pakistan-born, Brooklyn-based composer and performer Arooj Aftab. The record is available exclusively through New Amsterdam’s Bandcamp subscription as part of the Windmill Series, a new digitally-focused set of releases for subscribers in addition to our regular release schedule. Subscribe today to receive the album, which will be released on all other platforms on July 13.

    Siren Islands is a raw collection of ambient, experimental electronic music, carrying strong themes of female empowerment, and taking inspiration from the mythology of Sirenum Scopuli. While working on the project, Aftab spent many winter nights in a very deep musical meditation, experimenting with analog synthesizers, loop pedals, electric guitar, and her own deeply enchanting voice. It is an immersive work filled with “spiraling soundscapes for lo-fi dreaming.”

    Written and performed by Aftab alone, each track is recorded live and tracked to a single mono input, creating an intimate world that is difficult to escape, balanced between the ancient and contemporary.

    2
    Arooj Aftab

    from distant waters, from parallel worlds,
    concealed by the drifting mists of floating islands
    come the siren songs
    beckoning the spirit to submerge and submit

    Written and performed by Arooj Aftab
    Mixed and mastered by Damon Whittemore
    Artwork Miss Rockaway courtesy of Swoon Studio
    Liner notes by Radhika Singh

    About the NewAm Bandcamp Subscription:

    For the first time ever, you can get all New Amsterdam Records albums as they are released, plus a selection of releases from our groundbreaking back catalog.

    Join today and you’ll receive the following:

    Siren Islands – the new album from Pakistan-born, Brooklyn-based composer and performer Arooj Aftab (available exclusively through NewAm subscription as part of NewAm’s new Windmill Series).

    Until My Last – the new album (and NewAm debut) from Indianapolis-based composer, performer, and multimedia artist Jordan Munson (available exclusively through the NewAm subscription).

    Without Chasms – the new electronic EP from composer William Brittelle (available exclusively through the NewAm subscription)

    ► New albums from Aizuri Quartet, Robbie Lee and Mary Halvorson, Brooklyn Youth Chorus, and many others to come! We average 8-10 releases per year.

    On top of all that, you’ll also get some exclusive content intended only for our cherished subscribers, including live recordings and other special goodies! You’ll also get immediate access to a selection of back-catalog releases, 20% off everything in our store, and exclusive access to subscriber-only communications directly from the label, including news about forthcoming releases.

    In all of our presenting and recording activities, NewAm holds firmly to its mission to support artists whose work lies outside of traditional music industry infrastructure – whether that be classical, pop/rock/indie, jazz, world, or experimental. In pursuit of this calling, NewAm often collaborates with like-minded organizations. Our past and ongoing partnerships with the River to River Festival, Ecstatic Music Festival, Art of Elan, the Indianapolis Symphony (multi-year residency), MoMA PS 1, Liquid Music, Galapagos Artspace and National Sawdust have yielded high-profile opportunities for our artists to present their work. On the records side, we often partner with other labels in order to offer our artists the best possible representation for their projects. Partner labels have included Bedroom Community (Iceland), Nonclassical (UK), One Little Indian (UK), Sono Luminus (USA), Cantaloupe (USA) and NNA Tapes (USA).

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:11 PM on June 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A wonderful history of the New York Music scene, New Amsterdam Records, , Vulture   

    From New Amsterdam Records via Vulture: “On 10 Years of the New “New-Music Scene”, and 30 Years of My Own” This History of the New York New Music scene is not to be missed by any serious listener or reader 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam Records

    1

    Vulture

    June 8, 2018
    Justin Davidson

    2
    Clockwise from upper left: Bang on a Can founders Lang, Wolfe, and Gordon; (Le) Poisson Rouge; Judd Greenstein, composer and co-founder of New Amsterdam Records; and composer Milton Babbitt. Photo: George Etheredge/The New York Times/Redux, Getty, Courtesy of Judd Greenstein

    I don’t know her name, but a young composer has just shown up in New York. Maybe she’s a singer or a cellist, or both, and also a whiz with the editing software on her laptop. She’s got a playlist full of Latin hip-hop and early minimalism and Iranian kamancheh music and for a while she played bass in a punk bluegrass band. You might run into her this weekend at the joint tenth-anniversary celebrations for two institutions that drew her to the city: (Le) Poisson Rouge and New Amsterdam Records.

    (Le) Poisson Rouge


    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise 3-16-2016

    Even from a distance, she saw that the existence of the Bleecker Street venue and the composer-run label meant that New York had a place for musicians like her, who assemble their tastes from a global menu rather than a teacher’s dogmas. She may not stay long, but for now, this crowded, competitive, crushingly expensive metropolis is the place she needs to be.

    Little of that description would have made much sense to me in 1988 when I too arrived in New York, eager to become a professional composer. Thirty years ago, the American contemporary music world was a macrocosm of Manhattan geography. Uptown composers, cerebral members of the avant-garde guild, clustered around Columbia and dreamed of taking curtain calls at Lincoln Center. Downtown composers spun out ecstatically leisurely works in lofts and art galleries, or at the Kitchen. These divisions reached across thousands of miles: uptown included Paris; downtown extended to California. But at bottom, New York’s new music subculture was fiercely, even ridiculously provincial. With little money or fame at stake, the spoils consisted of nuggets of prestige. Fortunately, even meaningless feuds eventually peter out. As the city has become more global, I have watched the music world get healthier, more complex, and less hermetic. In their decade of existence, (Le) Poisson Rouge and New Amsterdam have helped seed whole forests of music far beyond the five boroughs.

    To understand why this anniversary matters, it helps to scroll back to a time before they existed — to the late ’80s and early ’90s, for instance, when, as a graduate student at Columbia’s School of the Arts, I was an uptown foot soldier in a multi-decade war that had reached its exhausted, senescent stage. Eventually, my side lost, thank goodness. Downtown minimalism spawned Post-Minimalism in countless iterations, while the purest forms of old-fashioned academic avant-garde now seems like a form of decadent mannerism, a style of exquisite craftsmanship and technical extremes, going nowhere. I moved to Queens during my student years, which gave me an outer-borough vantage point on the silliness, and wrote music infected with a romanticism that neither faction had much use for. It was only later that I watched the walls come down and a new New York geography of music emerge, rooted in Brooklyn but assertively fragmented, eclectic, and fluid. Making the transition from composer to critic led me to put down my pencil and open my ears.

    Schools splinter, aesthetic principles get tossed or overhauled, the geography of music shifts. And yet the participants in all this fragmentation value continuity, too. Composers tend to slot into a long line of teachers and students, tracing their legacies back to 19th-century Europe and forward to the next generation. Missy Mazzoli, one of the pillars of New York’s new music scene, for instance, is heir to a century’s worth of cultivated originality stretching back from Brooklyn and Yale to Hapsburg Budapest. She studied with Pulitzer Prize–winner David Lang, now a colleague of his Yale professor (and New York native) Martin Bresnick, who once sat at the feet of the Hungarian master György Ligeti, whose teachers, Ferenc Farkas and Sándor Veress, also taught Béla Bartok — who spent the last years of his life laboring in the music library at Columbia.

    I was drawn to Columbia by the music of Mario Davidovsky, then the senior composer on the faculty. (He later moved to Harvard.) In the 1960s and 70s, Davidovsky had composed a series of Synchronisms, pairing live instruments with pre-recorded electronics and combining rigor and inventiveness in a way that I thought would do my own music good. On recording, which was how I first got to know them, these brief works had a Kandinsky-like delicacy: bright pinpricks, precise slashes, and fiery colors, all assembled into mysterious, wizardly abstractions. Davidovsky himself turned out to be nothing like the slender, rapturous being that the Synchronisms suggested to my fantasy.

    I had hoped to join a fellowship of composers; instead I found a self-important Order of Modernists. The Yodas of uptown were Milton Babbitt, whose musical lineage extended back through New England musical aristocracy to the most august academies of Central Europe and whose students included Davidovsky; Elliott Carter (whose teacher, Nadia Boulanger, also taught Philip Glass), and, though he lived in Europe, Pierre Boulez. If the new-music schism lasted for so many years, it was partly because all three of those wise men had such long, productive lives. Babbitt died in 2011 at 94; Carter in 2012 at 101; Boulez in 2016 at 90. Babbitt was a mathematically inclined Princeton professor, with heavy glasses and white wisps that clung to the side of a great bald pate, giving him an owlish air. He played jazz clarinet and was rumored to compose while watching baseball on television. But his down-to-earth demeanor coexisted with a fondness for erudite sentences and music of prickly sophistication. In 1958 he had written an article for the magazine High Fidelity, in which he claimed for contemporary music a status analogous to that of pure mathematics: a sublime intellectual activity, rightfully mysterious to all but a few. “Why should the layman be other than bored and puzzled by what he is unable to understand, music or anything else?” he asked.

    Babbitt was one of the founders of the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center, a futuristic facility in the 1960s and a largely obsolete one by the time I was spending many of my evenings fiddling with its antique knobs. Night after night, I trudged past the windswept, vaguely menacing McDonald’s parking lot on the corner of Broadway and 125th Street, and east to Prentis Hall, which housed that time capsule of antique technology. There, we composition students banged, played, and hummed into a microphone, ran tape backwards, sped it up to chipmunk speeds or slowed it down to thunderous rumbles, chopped it up with a razor blade, mixed the results with irritatingly pure sine wave tones or horrific square-wave buzzes from a bank of oscillators, and came up with sounds whose origins we deliberately obscured. Later, I moved to the computer music studio down the hall, where composers sat at workstations laboriously coding bleeps. I accomplished very little there, apart from one sort-of-Synchronism of my own, for electric bass guitar and tape. I handed the piece off to a jazz virtuoso, who promised to learn it but never did.

    For a few years, I attended three or four contemporary music concerts a week, almost never paying more than $8 a ticket. (I even produced a few.) They were always the same: a scattering of audience members listened to pieces that varied widely in instrumentation but stuck to the same squeak-fart earnestness. The best performances were given by Speculum Musicae (which sounds like a medical instrument but means “mirror of music” in Latin), a collection of players who prided themselves on being able to handle even the most intricate rhythms and acrobatic lines. I listened to live music the way people once used to watch TV, sitting through whatever happened to be on. Much of it ranged from terrible to okay, but I clung to the possibility of excitement and revelation. Afterwards, when I stepped outside, most of the sounds I had just heard would whip out of my mind.

    From my uptown perch, I eavesdropped on the goings-on below 14th Street with a mixture of disdain and wistfulness. Columbia had taught me to cram my music with obsessive minutiae, to differentiate every millisecond from every other. Uptowners saw literal repetition as evidence of laziness. Downtowners believed in repetition as an essential metabolic function, and they indulged in it for hours on end. Their scores abounded in the symbol that looks like a filled-in percent sign: repeat previous measure. Just do it again, and again, and again. Oh, how I wished I could get away with that simple sign.

    I also craved the laid-back ease and raucous excitement that minimalism offered in its early days, the way musicians had hammered together their own society rather than politely apply to the big institutions. That party had long since shut down and moved on by the early 1990s. Downtown Manhattan had gone bourgie and its rebel leaders had joined the musical equivalents of the Knickerbocker Club. The Metropolitan Opera commissioned Philip Glass’s Christopher Columbus opera, The Voyage, which had its premiere in 1992.

    Philip Glass performing in Florence 1993. Pasquale Salerno

    Steve Reich, who in his youth composed for clapping hands, drums, and loops of tape, now began writing for symphony orchestras.

    Steve Reich Photograph by Steven Sebring.

    Their influence can be felt in several generations of performers, acolytes, and collaborators. Nico Muhly spent years copying and editing Glass’s operas and film scores, and translated that experience into his own brand of delicately deceptive simplicity.

    Nico Muhly by Samantha West

    After all the years of resisting the uptowners’ thou-shalt-nots, the downtowners assessed their place in history with the quiet triumphalism of liberators. “John Cage gave me permission to do whatever I wanted to do,” Glass once told Muhly in a published conversation. “And then I gave you permission to do whatever you wanted to do. That’s what one generation can do for the next.”

    That was not quite true—both sides had its shibboleths and regulations—but New York’s contemporary music scene had far more going on than the endless squabble between Big Enders and Little Enders. Ned Rorem continued turning out songs in the same elegantly lyrical style he had been employing for decades. At Columbia, a contingent of composers who had grown up in Mao’s China, including Bright Sheng, Tan Dun, Zhou Long, and Chen Yi, were struggling to fuse two radically different traditions. Orchestras, including the Philharmonic, were lapping up scores by neo-Romantics such as David Del Tredici and Richard Danielpour.

    And then there was Bang on a Can.

    Evan Ziporyn by Jon Hurd, Boulder, Colorado, USA

    Julia Wolfe © Peter Serling, 2009

    David Lang, © Peter Serling

    Bang on a Can All-Stars Group, David Lang, Julia Wolfe, Evan Ziporyn, Michael Gordon, Mark Stewart, Robert Black, Lisa Moore, Steven Schick. © Stephanie Berger

    At around the time that I moved to New York, so did a trio of Yale School of Music graduates, Julia Wolfe, Michael Gordon, and David Lang, all students of Martin Bresnick (and therefore heirs to the maverick Hungarian tradition that ran through Ligeti). They started a seat-of-the-pants organization that grew into an establishment force: Bang on a Can. The movement had its own distinctive pre-hipster style. Did the three composers really wear Converse All-Stars, or do I just think so because they also founded a hotshot chamber ensemble called Bang-on-a-Can All-Stars? In 1987, they pioneered the 12-hour all-you-can-hear marathon concert, in which audience members were invited to wander in and out as they pleased.

    Bang On A Can Marathon 2018

    Those who made it through the whole thing were almost guaranteed to hear something they loved, even if dozens of 10-minute pieces merged into a barrage of earnest weirdness.

    Wolfe, Gordon, and Lang have been around long enough now to become proper eminences, complete with followers, tenure, awards, and, of course, prejudices of their own. As impresarios, they created a new ecosystem. As composers, they have filled it with some very fine music. I remember sitting cross-legged on the floor of the Angel Orensanz Foundation on the Lower East Side, while Bill Morrison’s film Decasia, an assemblage of melting images on ancient, crumbling film stock, played across multiple screens and Gordon’s dark, pitiless score shuddered through my limbs.

    3
    Decasia. NYT Credit Icarus Films

    Saxophones and electric keyboards rent the air; trombones uttered glissando roars. Gordon is married to Wolfe, and she too is partial to loud, intense music that is elbow deep in history. In her 2015 multimedia choral work Anthracite Fields, she paid tribute to the sufferings of Pennsylvania coal miners with music of lyrical violence.

    5
    Julia Wolfe Anthracite Fields. Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia

    Lang, on the other hand, has pursued extremes of quiet—literally in the whisper opera, in which performers hiss their lines; spiritually in Little Match Girl Passion, a fairy tale set to luminous blocks of choral sound.

    David Lang-Little Match Girl passion by Cory Weaver

    Nearly 20 years after the Yale trio set up shop in Manhattan, a fresh crop of composers with pop-infused sensibilities and elaborate educations showed up, this time in Brooklyn. Judd Greenstein (Williams, Yale, Princeton), William Brittelle (Vanderbilt), and Sarah Kirkland Snider (Wesleyan, Yale) aspired to bust new music out of its specialist niche. They saw themselves as advocates, not just for themselves but for the kind of community I had hoped to find in the late 1980s. Composer/performers gathered around New Amsterdam Records and (Le) Poisson Rouge, founded by a pair of young classical musicians, cellist Justin Kantor and violinist David Handler. The forest planted in the early 2000s spread quickly beyond the confines of those two institutions and has yielded, if not broad renown, then at least widely scattered pinpoints of recognition. Starting next fall, the violist, proselytizer, and podcast host Nadia Sirota will be curate and emcee nine new music chamber concerts for the New York Philharmonic.

    Nadia Sirota in Performance 2014 by Steven Pisano

    The composer, singer, and violinist Caroline Shaw won a Pulitzer Prize in music for gorgeously textured Partita,

    collaborated with Kanye West, appeared as a key plot element in the Netflix series Mozart in the Jungle, and now has a piano concerto for Jonathan Biss in the works. Proud collaborator rather than loner auteur, Shaw appears as a violinist on New Amsterdam’s latest release, The Hands Free, which sounds as though a bluegrass band, a jazz collective, and a modernist chamber ensemble had holed up for the winter in a remote cabin in the woods.

    6
    The Hands Free. Artwork is by Holly Mulder-Wollan, and album design is by Alexandra Washkin.

    I sometimes wonder why New York still has a new music scene at all, now that composers can go hunting for influences by meandering through YouTube and form a social circle on Twitter. And yet they continue to rely on the happenstance and physical proximity that only a major city can provide. Many do what they must to live here, others pay the electric bill in other states or countries but keep converging here. In music, New York is finally living up to its reputation for globalism, transience, and cosmopolitanism. Dutch composer Louis Andriessen; Esa-Pekka Salonen, a Finn by way of London and L.A.; Irishman Donnacha Dennehey; Icelandic composer Anna Thorvaldsdóttir; Chinese-American Du Yun; jazz guru Wynton Marsalis; Egyptian-American composer Mohammed Fairouz; Russian-born Lera Auerbach; jazz pianist Vijay Iyer; electronica guru DJ Spooky; indie rocker Bryce Dessner; Californian Andrew Norman—all of them and many more are fixtures of New York’s “contemporary classical” programs, even if some make their homes in other countries or inhabit disparate musical worlds. Even John Luther Adams, who spent decades sending musical dispatches from a remote ridge in Alaska, moved to Harlem a few years ago, adapting a sensibility bred in the wilds to a new urban context.

    A decade into the so-called indie classical era, I would have expected this elastic community to harden, to codify laws and stigmas, to develop irrational loathings and arbitrary stylistic borders. Instead, New York’s new music world just becomes ever more varied and excitingly disorienting. Venues have multiplied, and I relish not being able to predict what I’m going to hear. Old aesthetic geographies have lost their meaning, and so has the distinction between establishment and guerilla. Carnegie Hall, the Philharmonic, and even the Mostly Mozart Festival monitor young composers and new ensembles the way college baseball coaches scout high school games. Nico Muhly was only a few years out of college when he had a lavish one-man concert at Zankel Hall. (Now he’s working on his second opera for the Met.)


    Nico Muhly Two Boys trailer

    Whenever I emulate my graduate student days and whip from premiere to premiere, I find myself dropping into a variety of overlapping yet distinct worlds. Young Brooklynites pack into National Sawdust in Williamsburg to listen with beer in hand.


    National Sawdust


    Space waiting

    Suspicious habitués of Carnegie Hall sample the underground offerings at Zankel. Devotees of Alarm Will Sound or Yarn/Wire or yMusic follow their favorite ensembles around. The whole messy scene looks more like the pop world than the preserves of classical music. Audiences for symphony orchestras have traditionally expected perfect performances of precertified masterworks; greatness is the baseline. But audiences for new music have a more forgiving attitude: if tonight’s program disappoints, tomorrow’s may inspire. And so we avid listeners bounce around the city with ears cocked, eager to see what the next cohort will produce, constantly hoping for another dose of gorgeously disquieting sounds.

    In all of our presenting and recording activities, NewAm holds firmly to its mission to support artists whose work lies outside of traditional music industry infrastructure – whether that be classical, pop/rock/indie, jazz, world, or experimental. In pursuit of this calling, NewAm often collaborates with like-minded organizations. Our past and ongoing partnerships with the River to River Festival, Ecstatic Music Festival, Art of Elan, the Indianapolis Symphony (multi-year residency), MoMA PS 1, Liquid Music, Galapagos Artspace and National Sawdust have yielded high-profile opportunities for our artists to present their work. On the records side, we often partner with other labels in order to offer our artists the best possible representation for their projects. Partner labels have included Bedroom Community (Iceland), Nonclassical (UK), One Little Indian (UK), Sono Luminus (USA), Cantaloupe (USA) and NNA Tapes (USA).

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:08 PM on June 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Antenna Cloud Farm, New Amsterdam Records, The Greenfield Recorder   

    From New Amsterdam via The Greenfield Recorder: “Antenna Cloud Farm’s concert series returns this summer with 10 diverse shows” 

    From New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam

    via

    1

    The Greenfield Recorder

    May 30, 2018
    RICHIE DAVIS

    2
    Michi Wiancko (left) and Judd Greenstein (right) at Antenna Cloud Farm in Gill, MA. Wiancko, the Juilliard-trained violinist who bought the former dairy farm and estate at 25 Green Hill Road in Gill with her husband, composer Greenstein, envisioned a retreat where musicians could relax, be inspired and offer a concert as well as a community service performance. Recorder Staff/Paul Franz

    When sell-out crowds showed up for all five concerts in Antenna Cloud Farm’s opening season last year, they were wowed by the view looking down on Turners Falls and the Connecticut River from its 100-acre hideaway hilltop site.

    This summer, as Antenna Cloud’s founders roll out twice as many concerts — including a special picnic celebration of Gill’s 225th anniversary –- the diversity of the musical offerings should produce some wows of their own.

    This year, they’ve had to turn away performers as word of Antenna Cloud has spread.

    “It was a little too easy,” said Wiancko, when asked about how they managed to extend the list of performers beyond the talented musicians who filled last summer’s schedule. “I turned down quite a few people I would have loved to have had here. It’s tough. I’ve never had to write rejection letters before.”

    The concerts are performed in the music room of the couple’s home — with capacity for up to 80. Wiancko says she’s amazed at the intimate feel of the performances, which reverberates back and forth with the musicians. This year, there are also outdoor events on the lawn, and someday she imagines the old dairy barn could become a concert hall.

    Light refreshments will be served again this year, from local artisans like Gill’s Upinngil Farm. This year’s concerts will also include some reduced-price admissions for concertgoers who can’t afford the $15 tickets.

    “We love experimentation, bringing together different types of musicians and different genres,” said Wianko, who’s played with the New York Philharmonic and Los Angeles Symphony, and has toured China, Korea and Taiwan with Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble.

    Greenstein, meanwhile, has composed works for the Minnesota Orchestra, and Alabama and North Carolina symphonies. He promotes new music as co-director of New Amsterdam Presents, New Amsterdam Records and the Ecstatic Music Festival, as well as Zurich’s Apples & Olives festival.

    Ecstatic Music Festival 2018

    Diverse performances

    This year’s concert lineup promises to showcase a wide array of dazzling musical talent, beginning June 8 at 7 p.m. with an opening outdoor concert/dance party with Ladama, a Latin roots/folk/pop collective with members from Colombia, Brazil, Venezuela and the U.S.

    Their Confesión was chosen by Billboard as a top pick for best new Latin alternative song. The group, which works to engage young people through its vigorous take on traditional Latin music forms, will be part of a special outreach program at the Turners Falls Brick House on June 7 at 5 p.m. to reach the wider, Spanish-speaking community as part of Antenna Cloud’s community service work.

    The second concert, June 24 at 5 p.m., features The Hands Free, with Pulitzer prize-winning composer-violinist Caroline Shaw, guitarist James Moore, accordionist Nathan Koci and bassist Eleonore Oppenheimin in an innovative, eclectic mash-up of “lush sonic textures and explosive improvisations.” The New York-based collective is also scheduled to do an interactive outreach performance at the Franklin County Jail.

    An outdoor 225th anniversary celebration of Gill on July 7 at 7 p.m. will feature bluegrass by Chris Brashear of Amherst — who’s also scheduled to play the Green River Festival — and North Carolina-based Jim Watson. There’s also a 5:30 p.m. “bring-your-own” picnic.

    The award-winning Aizuri Quartet, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s string quartet in residence, will be featured in the series’ fourth concert July 21 at 7 p.m.

    Founders, an ensemble combining folk, jazz, classical and contemporary music, will perform Aug. 4 at 7 p.m., combining trumpet, violin, cello, clarinet and string bass performed by musicians who have appeared with James Taylor, Sufjan Stevens, Sting and Björk.

    Irwin Reese, a 25-year Metropolitan Opera veteran tenor, will present an evening of art songs, spirituals and works by African-American composers in the sixth concert, Aug. 19 at 5 p.m., together with Greenfield pianist Julia Bady.

    Flutist Alex Sopp, who’s completing Paul Simon’s current goodbye tour, will team up with virtuoso pianist Michael Mizrahi for an Aug. 31 concert at 7 p.m. that includes works by Copland and Antenna Cloud’s Greenstein.

    Banjoist-singer Anna Roberts-Gevalt and guitarist-singer Grey Mcmurray will perform Sept. 14 at 7 p.m. in a concert featuring a mix of old ballads and contemporary sounds.

    NPR [Tiny] Desk Concerts 2016 winner Gaelynn Lea will perform Sept. 16 at 4 p.m. Lea plays fiddle and sings from her wheelchair, using a looping pedal to create layers of sound. Speaking publicly about her “brittle bones disease,” she is an advocate for people with disabilities and for social change.

    The final concert, Sept. 31 at 4 p.m., showcases Cindertalk, featuring wine-glass virtuoso and songwriter Jonny Rodgers, who also sings, plays guitar and uses looping pedals, for a special outdoor festival-closing party. Cindertalk will also present a concert at Turners Falls High School.

    “When you hear him, you can’t believe it’s one person,” said Wiancko, who adds that all of the second season’s performers are “extremely carefully chosen” for their ability to present a great concert, their need for a retreat and “their passion for community engagement” in settings that also include Musica Franklin and Sheffield Elementary School.

    “One of my goals is to have artists be inspirational about music, art and creativity for kids and adults, to listen to their own voices and express themselves in ways that feel artistically fulfilling,” she adds.

    Wiancko said she’s spending less time traveling around the globe to perform and more time composing and performing closer to home.

    “For me, that’s the challenge: I love to throw parties, to create events and bring people together,” she said. “But that’s not a substitute for composing. I’ve lived a life of constant travel. Now it’s time to dig in my heels in the community, to be present. That’s really fulfilling.”

    To purchase tickets to one of Antenna Cloud Farm’s 10 concerts, visit: http://www.antennacloudfarm.com.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:39 AM on May 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Abstract elements of World Music, , It’s not quite Contemporary Classical, , Latin American rhythms, Middle Eastern-style melodies, New Amsterdam Records, Rochester CITY Newspaper, The music isn’t exactly Jazz   

    From New Amsterdam Records via CITY Newspaper Rochester: “Album review: ‘All Can Work’ “ 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    2

    CITY Newspaper

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam Records

    5.3.18
    Daniel J. Kushner

    1

    John Hollenbeck Large Ensemble’s All Can Work was released back in January, but it’s still hard to pin down. Conducted by JC Sanford, the music isn’t exactly jazz, and it’s not quite contemporary classical; abstract elements of world music are nearly impossible to trace back to a single source. Genre labels do no good here.

    The title track finds Eastman School of Music alumnus, percussionist, and composer Hollenbeck building a monolithic sound sculpture from the ground up, layer by layer. Horns intone solemnly, before vocalist Theo Bleckmann and the woodwinds chime in with an airier, if still ambiguous mood. The lyrics — penned by the band’s late trumpeter Laurie Frink — take on an optimistic, carefree tone, as the music escalates toward an ingeniously bleary climax and the brass instruments seem to close in on one another.

    Middle Eastern-style melodies and Latin American rhythms coexist on the effervescent Elf, while Heyoke features Bleckmann singing a kind of organized scat through the orchestral din of Hollenbeck’s free-flowing, 21-member band. The nonverbal vocalizations continue with this kiss, in which Bleckmann frequently disappears into unison with the instrumental melodies.

    Hollenbeck’s compositions are inherently restless and endlessly busy, bordering on frantic surrealism at times. It’s as if the bandleader is painting a vertigo-inducing network of bustling city streets that somehow lead both everywhere and nowhere. And that’s a good thing. The sound space is often congested, but the effect is thrilling rather than claustrophobic. All Can Work is an album bubbling with creative energy and deserving of repeat listens.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:17 PM on May 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Aizuri Quartet, , New Amsterdam Records   

    From New Amsterdam Records: “Aizuri Quartet, winners of the 2018 M-Prize from the University of Michigan!” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam Records

    New Amsterdam Records
    congratulates the Aizuri Quartet

    The prize comes with a $100,000 grant,
    plus performance opportunities and more.

    The quartet will release their debut album on NewAm this September, featuring music by Lembit Beecher, Yevgeniy Sharlat, Caroline Shaw, Gabriella Smith,
    and Paul Wiancko.

    1
    Aizuri Quartet Photo: Erica Lyn

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:06 PM on May 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Nathaniel Bellows, New Amsterdam Records, Sarah Kirkland Snider, Unremembered   

    From New Amsterdam: “Unremembered” – Nathaniel Bellows and Sarah Kirkland Snider 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    New Amsterdam

    1

    New production of Sarah Kirkland Snider / Nathaniel Bellows’s “Unremembered” comes to Europe this summer, starting tonight at PODIUM Esslingen!

    Information and ticketing at the event links below.

    Sarah Kirkland Snider – New Amsterdam Records – no image credit

    1
    Nathaniel Bellows. No image credit

    May 5 – Esslingen, DE: http://podiumfestival.de/programm/epilog-exzess-mein-liebling-5/?date=0

    June 10 – Oranjewoud Festival, NL: https://oranjewoudfestival.nl/en/programmaonderdeel/unremembered — with Sarah Kirkland Snider, Sarah Kirkland Snider and Nathaniel Bellows.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:55 PM on May 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Deerhoof, , Molly Joyce, New Amsterdam Records, , No Lands, , , ,   

    New Amsterdam Records: ”New Amsterdam Records and (Le) Poisson Rouge Turn 10″ 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    New Amsterdam Records

    (Le) Poisson Rouge

    New Amsterdam Records and (Le) Poisson Rouge Turn 10

    Celebrated at NYC’s (Le) Poisson Rouge on June 10 and 11 with
    Roomful of Teeth, Deerhoof, and more

    New Amsterdam Records and (Le) Poisson Rouge were both born in 2008 with the mission of promoting the New Music community. Since inception, NewAm and LPR have partnered regularly to present boundary-breaking artists, collaborations, and music. As such, we will celebrate our 10th anniversaries together through a series of adventurous, high-quality programming, featuring artists and friends in the New Amsterdam Records community.

    Sunday, June 10:

    2:30PM: Roomful of Teeth with Arooj Aftab
    TICKETS

    6:00PM: Olivia Chaney with Roomful of Teeth
    2
    Olivia Chaney

    4
    Roomful of Teeth
    (Olivia Chaney’s Shelter Album Release Show – Nonesuch Records)
    14
    TICKETS

    Monday, June 11:

    7:00PM: Deerhoof with Tigue and Subtle Degrees
    6
    Deerhoof
    8
    Tigue

    9
    Subtle Degrees

    with performances between sets in the Gallery by
    Molly Joyce, No Lands, and itsnotyouitsme
    9
    Molly Joyce,

    13
    No Lands

    14
    itsnotyouitsme

    TICKETS

    In all of our presenting and recording activities, NewAm holds firmly to its mission to support artists whose work lies outside of traditional music industry infrastructure – whether that be classical, pop/rock/indie, jazz, world, or experimental. In pursuit of this calling, NewAm often collaborates with like-minded organizations. Our past and ongoing partnerships with the River to River Festival, Ecstatic Music Festival, Art of Elan, the Indianapolis Symphony (multi-year residency), MoMA PS 1, Liquid Music, Galapagos Artspace and National Sawdust have yielded high-profile opportunities for our artists to present their work. On the records side, we often partner with other labels in order to offer our artists the best possible representation for their projects. Partner labels have included Bedroom Community (Iceland), Nonclassical (UK), One Little Indian (UK), Sono Luminus (USA), Cantaloupe (USA) and NNA Tapes (USA).

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    (Le) Poisson Rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of (Le) Poisson Rouge.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:41 AM on April 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Strange Paradise", , New Amsterdam Records, , ,   

    From New Amsterdam Records: “Tigue’s Strange Paradise” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    New Amsterdam Records

    1
    Strange Paradise
    album art by Devra Freelander and Gregory Wikstrom

    2
    https://phermans.wordpress.com/2012/11/07/tigue-residency/

    Strange Paradise is the sophomore album from Brooklyn-based composer-performer percussion trio Tigue, co-released by New Amsterdam Records (CD + digital) and NNA Tapes (vinyl) and following the group’s widely-celebrated debut album, Peaks (2015).

    The band will also celebrate the album’s release on April 27 with a performance at Brooklyn’s Elsewhere, a new multi-room venue from the owners of the now-defunct venue Glasslands. The performance is presented by LPR Presents and Operator Music Band will open.

    Tickets are on sale now here.

    Tigue is a group of three percussionists with a fluid musical identity. Praised for their energetic and focused performances, the members of Tigue (Matt Evans, Amy Garapic and Carson Moody) have continued to to develop their own language of instrumental minimalism while simultaneously performing in collaborative endeavors over the past five years. Strange Paradise sees them creating as a unit, pushing each other to transcend the limits and expectations of their percussion instrumentation through the construction of long-form, radiant hypnotic soundscapes described by the group as “rendered in ecstatic complexity.”

    The music on Strange Paradise flows directly from the hands and minds of the members, the result of a deep human connection that can only come from playing music together for nearly a decade. The group wrote the music with a sense of immediacy — everyone together in a room, with vibraphones, drums, synthesizers, gongs and garbage — with every sound maintaining an intimate connection to its creator. The members’ distinct musical voices interlock seamlessly, and the pieces radiate with warmth.

    As a result, Strange Paradise is a luminous, abstract, non-narrative world that funnels inspiration from patterns, objects, and relationships. Built on an intricate patchwork of tones where instrumental lines and textures shift in and out of alignment to produce a vibrating landscape, Strange Paradise is designed for a mode of “extended listening” — asking listeners to explore slow gradations of change between rhythm and texture. The album creates a sound environment that envelopes the listener but continually defies expectation — shapeshifting at each point it seems understood. Though the music floats from the serene to the uncanny, Strange Paradise is perhaps most notable for providing a distinct sensation of interconnectedness.

    Strange Paradise was produced by Tigue & Seth Manchester, and recorded at Machines with Magnets in Pawtucket RI and Brooklyn NY. The album was engineered and mixed by Seth Manchester, and mastered by Heba Kadry at Timeless Mastering. Special guests on “Triangle” include: Benedict Kupstas (guitar); Seth Manchester (guitar); Tristan Kasten-Krause (bass); Trevor Wilson (Wurlitzer); and Eliot Krimsky (OP1).

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:30 PM on April 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Until my Last", , Jordan Munson, New Amsterdam Records,   

    From New Amsterdam Records: Jordan Munson – “Until My Last” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    New Amsterdam Records

    1
    Jordan Munson – Until My Last

    Until My Last is the new album from Indianapolis-based composer, performer, and multimedia artist Jordan Munson. The album will be released on May 11 and will be available exclusively through New Amsterdam’s Bandcamp subscription. Subscribe today to be sure you receive the album.

    Until My Last collects three works written over the course of the past three years. In creating the music on the album, Munson drew on his backgrounds in sound design, improvisation, and pop music. With the focused hand of an engineer, Munson fuses together textural electronics with jarring moments of melodic clarity, creating an immersive and starkly emotional listening experience.

    Opening work Anew—co-written with composer/vocalist Hanna Benn (Son Lux, BOOTS)—pairs triumphant vocal fanfare with darkly visceral industrial rhythms, while title track Until My Last presents a furiously urgent piano performance (played by Munson himself) in counterpoint with a bed of processed music box tones. Where Light Escapes You, the shortest of the three works, acts as something of a palette cleanser in the middle of the album, filtering the delicate percussion work of Alex Wier through Munson’s kaleidoscopic electronics.

    About the album, Munson writes, “This collection of works selects from material over a three year span, so there is an inherent evolution of style and technique. I hear strong similarities in both form and intent although each maintains a very different character. Commonalities in form have mainly to do with process. My background in free improvisation often sets the framework for a piece. At least initially. The intention with these works was to further graft my history playing popular and experimental music to formal musical training in a way that is more honest and personal.”

    Munson continues, “A visual analogy for this album that makes sense to me is rather topographical. It’s as if you are starting at the bottom entrance of a heavily wooded mountain trail. Here, the landscape is intricate but formless as you focus on what is right in front of you. This perception only strengthens as the environment becomes denser, until you reach a clearing at the end. At that point there is a feeling of arrival. You can sense the clarity and connection of everything that surrounds you.”

    All works on Until My Last were written by Jordan Munson with the exception of Anew which was co-written with Hanna Benn. The album was recorded, mixed, and mastered by engineer Doug Bielmeier in Indianapolis, IN. Featured performers include vocalists Hanna Benn and Abby Gardner (Anew), violinist Robin Cox (Anew), and percussionist Alex Wier (Where Light Escapes You). Text in Anew derives from the poem Heaven-Haven: A Nun Takes the Veil (1918) by Gerard Manley Hopkins.

    Until My Last Tracklisting:

    1. Anew, Part 1
    2. Anew, Part 2
    3. Anew, Part 3
    4. Where Light Escapes You
    5. Until My Last, Part 1
    6. Until My Last, Part 2
    7. Until My Last, Part 3
    8. Until My Last, Part 4
    9. Until My Last, Part 5

    3
    Jordan Munson (Photo Credit: Jenn Kriscunas )

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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