Tagged: New classical Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 12:18 PM on December 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: New classical, ,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “New England Premiere of “A Certain Slant of Light” – by DOUGLAS HEDWIG” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    Sunday, January 20, 2019
    at 4:00 PM

    Trinity Episcopal Church
    36 Main Street
    Newtown, CT 06470

    $25
    Tickets

    Members of the Waterbury Symphony Orchestra, organ soloist Matthew Daley, under the direction of conductor Leif Bjaland, will perform the New England premiere of composer Douglas Hedwig’s “A Certain Slant of Light,” for brass, organ and percussion. This majestic five-movement work is inspired by the poetry of Emily Dickinson. “A Certain Slant of Light” was recently awarded 3rd Prize, nationally, in the 2018 American Prize in Chamber Music Composition.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:41 PM on November 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Canterbury music, , Far Corner, New classical, , Progressive rock   

    From Cuneiform Records: “November 2018 Newsletter” 

    From Cuneiform Records

    NOVEMBER 2018 NEW RELEASES

    Cuneiform Records Releases Two New Discs On November 9th:

    RISK
    FAR CORNER

    1

    Celebrating its 15th anniversary with a bang, Wisconsin post-classical / chamber rock / avant progressive ensemble Far Corner release Risk, their third studio album, on their longtime label Cuneiform Records. It’s an astounding disc. Bassist William Kopecky relays that “Far Corner plays insanely complex instrumental chamber rock (modern classical meets prog rock) and I can easily say that Risk was the most challenging record I’ve ever played on.” We encourage classical music lovers as well as rock fans to plunge into Risk’s stunningly original, accessible, and captivating works. The future of 21st Century classical music is rooted in works like this.
    _____________________________________________________________

    L’oreille électrique
    FORGAS BAND PHENOMENA

    2

    For more than 40 years, Parisian composer and drummer Patrick Forgas has been forging a distinctive take on progressive jazz/rock, leading Forgas Band Phenomena for over 20 years. Cuneiform is thrilled to release their sixth album, their fourth on our label. Called L’oreille électrique, the album displays the band’s signature sound, a singular electric fusion / progressive rock / Canterbury music blend.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:26 PM on October 31, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , New classical, University of St. Thomas (UST) Symphonic Wind Ensemble   

    From innova: “University of St. Thomas (UST) Symphonic Wind Ensemble ‘The Other Side’ “ 


    From Innova
    innova is the home for New Music in America

    innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1

    University of St. Thomas (UST) Symphonic Wind Ensemble
    The Other Side

    Composers: Luis Serrano Alarcon, Nigel Clarke, Kit Turnbull
    Performers: University of St Thomas Symphonic Wind Ensemble, Matthew George

    Catalog Number: #1 007
    Genre: new classical
    Collection: wind band

    Release Date:
    Feb 22, 2019

    Liner notes
    See the liner notes for the list of tracks.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The story of innova® Recordings begins in 1982, when it was founded by the Minnesota Composers Forum (now the American Composers Forum) as a way to document the McKnight Composer Fellowship winners. In its early years, innova produced several sampler LPs featuring the works of a range of Minnesota composers, many of whom have since achieved national prominence, including Eric Stokes, Libby Larsen, Paul Schoenfield, Steve Tibbetts, and Steven Paulus. With the advent of the compact disc, innova began releasing selected highlights from the top ensembles (the Dale Warland Singers, the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, the Alexander String Quartet, and others) that had been on the Composers Forum concert seasons.

    Over its first ten years, innova built up a broad distribution network, far beyond the Forum’s own membership circles, and in 1994, the label — always looking for ways to be of service to the new music community — opened its doors to artists who had their own finished masters and were looking for a helping hand in reaching a wider audience. Thus was born the Recording Assistance Program, an exceptionally artist-friendly business model that has allowed the label to grow to one of the most substantial in the nation. In recognition of the career benefits innova can bestow on its artists, the McKnight Foundation endowed it with a $1 million fund in 2002. Interest from that allows the label to keep costs relatively low to artists (who also keep 100% of sales income) and subsidize administrative costs so each title can receive greater bang for the buck.

    In the last decade, the label’s catalog has grown from 70 to over 550 titles, with innova producing 24-30 releases a year encompassing diverse genres, concepts, and approaches — all somehow non-conformist, individualistic, and groundbreaking. Original works receiving their recording debuts (Joseph Bertolozzi’s Tower Music, Robert Moran’s Trinity Requiem, The Crossings’ Seven Responses, Kenji Bunch’s The Snow Queen) sit next to reissues of long out-of-print classics (Talking Drums’ Some Day Catch Some Day Down, William Bolcom’s Open House) and definitive career retrospectives (archives of recordings by Harry Partch and Henry Brant). Bold reimaginings of classics (Darryl Brenzel’s The Re(w)-Rite of Spring, Grand Valley State University New Music Ensemble’s In C Remixed and Music for 18 Musicians) collide with expansive cultural time capsules (The NYFA Collection: 30 Years of New York New Music, Sonic Circuits Electronic Music Festival). Exploratory new music (Mari Kimura’s Voyage Apollonian, Maya Beiser’s Provenance and TranceClassical, and ETHEL’s Documerica) mingles with modern twists on traditional music (Arcomusical’s MeiaMeia, ETHEL’s The River, and Emanuele Arciuli’s Walk in Beauty) and hangs out with lo-fi garage pop (R. Stevie Moore’s Nevertheless Optimistic). Field recordings from Vietnam (Stilling Time), Cuba (Habanera), and Belize (Lebeha Boys) cohabit with career collections of music by PRISM Quartet, Zeitgeist, Society for New Music, Fred Ho, Mark Applebaum, Barry Schrader, Andrew Violette, Eleanor Hovda, Robert Moran, Steven Miller, and many more. Not only does innova march to the beat of a different drum (the non-profit, artist centered philosophy, in this case), but the different drummer herself (and not just Susie Ibarra) is likely on the roster of artists.

    innova albums and artists have been nominated for – and won – Pulitzers, Grammies, and Emmies. They have received plaudits from publications from the New York Times to Czech Republic’s His Voice magazine, from the Wire in London to the Los Angeles Times, Italy’s Kathodik and everywhere in between.

    Major grants over the years from the National Endowment for the Arts (2001, 2003, 2004, 2008, 2010) and the New York State Music Fund (2007) have boosted the label’s growth, reputation, and visibility. In 2009 innova partnered with Naxos USA distribution to expand its reach even further and is constantly adapting to changing needs and embracing new technologies. Philip Blackburn took over the directorship of the label from Homer Lambrecht in 1996 and has been joined by Chris Campbell (2003) as Operations Director, and Publicist, Tim Igel (2017-, taking the baton from Steve McPherson (2010-16)).

    In 2012 innova was awarded the prestigious Laurel Leaf Award from the American Composers Alliance “for its excellent support of the full range of contemporary American music.”

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:07 AM on September 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , New classical, , Of Radiance & Refraction   

    From Innova: “Of Radiance & Refraction” 


    From Innova
    Innova is the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1

    NOTUS
    Of Radiance & Refraction

    A shining debut
    Composers: Claude Baker, Sven-David Sandström, Dominick DiOrio, Igor Stravinsky, John Gibson, Aaron Travers
    Performers:
    NOTUS, Dominick DiOrio, Zorá String Quartet

    Catalog Number:
    #1 002
    Genre: new classical
    Collection: choral

    Release Date:
    Sep 28, 2018

    For tracks see the full article.

    NOTUS is one of the country’s most unique collegiate vocal ensembles, with a singular commitment to championing living composers through the commissioning, programming, and recording of new works. Directed by conductor-composer Dominick DiOrio, NOTUS has performed across the nation, from regional and national ACDA conferences to Carnegie Hall. In September of 2018, NOTUS released their first commercial album on the Innova label, NOTUS: Of Radiance and Refraction, which includes five world premiere recordings by IU faculty composers.

    Over the course of its history, NOTUS has delivered premiere or second performances of more than 150 new works in the choral repertoire. This includes recent commissions and premieres by Claude Baker, Don Freund, John Gibson, P.Q. Phan, Sven-David Sandström, Aaron Travers, and Zachary Wadsworth. NOTUS also regularly programs a rich and eclectic array of leading contemporary composers, such as Chen Yi, Eriks Esenvalds, Sofia Gubaidulina, Sydney Guillaume, Ted Hearne, James MacMillan, Nico Muhly, Tawnie Olson, Steve Reich, and Christopher Theofanidis, as well as music by their director. In 2013, the ensemble was honored to collaborate with Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Caroline Shaw and guest conductor and former King’s Singer Simon Carrington

    NOTUS is proud to also shine a spotlight on the talent of Jacobs School of Music student composers through an annual contest for new choral works. Winning compositions receive premiere performances by NOTUS and help to launch national careers for their young composers, such as IU alumni Texu Kim, Christopher LaRosa, Matthew Recio, and Corey Rubin. In 2016, NOTUS member and IU student Alex Berko went on to be named the winner of the ACDA Raymond W. Brock Memorial Student Composition Prize.

    NOTUS was originally founded in 1980 as the Indiana University Contemporary Vocal Ensemble, and it was renamed in 2013 after the selection of its fourth director, Dominick DiOrio. The choir’s new name was inspired by Notos, the Greek god of the south wind. Previous directors include Alan Harler (1980-1981), Jan Harrington (1981-1992), and Carmen Helena Téllez (1992-2012).

    Liner notes

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:29 PM on August 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , New classical, , Soaring through song, Stanley Grill   

    From Innova: “Stanley Grill – Rustling Flights of Wings” 

    From Innova the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1
    Description: Soaring through song
    Composers: Stanley Grill
    Performers: Nancy Allen Lundy, Stephen Gosling, Ralph Farris

    Genre: new classical
    Collection: solo voice, violin

    Catalog Number: #1 019
    Release Date:
    Nov 16, 2018

    Liner Notes:
    View

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:54 PM on August 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , New classical,   

    From Eighth Blackbird: “Performance of the Year” 

    From Eighth Blackbird

    Australian Music Centre

    Eighth Blackbird by Interlochen Public Radio

    1

    Time for the final Award for 2018: Performance of the Year. It goes all the way to Chicago, to Eighth Blackbird, for their performance of Holly Harrison’s ‘Lobster Tales and Turtle Soup’. The group toured Australia for Musica Viva Australia last year with Harrison’s work in the program. #artmusicawards

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition


    Nathalie Joachim, flutes • Michael J. Maccaferri, clarinets • Yvonne Lam, violin & viola •
    Nick Photinos, cello • Matthew Duvall, percussion • Lisa Kaplan, piano

    Eighth Blackbird is “one of the smartest, most dynamic contemporary classical ensembles on the planet” (Chicago Tribune). Launched by six entrepreneurial Oberlin Conservatory undergraduates in 1996, this Chicago-based super-group has earned its status as “a brand-name…defined by adventure, vibrancy and quality….known for performing from memory, employing choreography and collaborations with theater artists, lighting designers and even puppetry artists” (Detroit Free Press).

    Eighth Blackbird’s mission—moving music forward through innovative performance, advocating for new music by living composers, and creating a legacy of guiding an emerging generation of musicians —extends beyond recording and touring to curation and education. The ensemble served as Music Director of the 2009 Ojai Music Festival, has held residencies at the Curtis Institute of Music and at the University of Chicago, and holds an ongoing Ensemble-in-Residence position at the University of Richmond. The 2015-16 season featured a pioneering residency at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art: a living installation with open rehearsals, performances, guest artists, and public talks. In 2017, Eighth Blackbird launched its boldest initiative yet with the creation of Blackbird Creative Laboratory, a tuition-free, two-week summer workshop and performance festival for performers and composers in Ojai, CA.

    Eighth Blackbird’s members hail from the Great Lakes, Keystone, Golden, Empire and Bay states. The name “Eighth Blackbird” derives from the eighth stanza of Wallace Stevens’s evocative, imagistic poem, Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird: “I know noble accents / And lucid, inescapable rhythms; / But I know, too, / That the blackbird is involved / In what I know.”

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:31 AM on August 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Polyphony and Storytelling: A Conversation with Nate Wooley on Solo Improvisation, , , , New classical, ,   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Polyphony and Storytelling: A Conversation with Nate Wooley on Solo Improvisation” 

    New Music USA


    From NEWMUSICBOX

    August 20, 2018
    Josh Modney

    1

    As a listener, I’ve long found myself seeking musical experiences that generate a kind of sustained ecstatic energy from a foundation of rigorous thought and technique. Gaining access to that plane as a solo improviser is a particularly challenging task. It takes a special type of artist who engages deeply with the details of sound, upending instrumental conventions while setting boundaries and reference points (as if to say, “Here is a trumpet, unadorned—let’s see what I can do with it.”) and who is able to transfer an emotional experience through the instrument to the listener. Part of what makes trumpeter/composer/writer Nate Wooley such an extraordinary musician is his ability to achieve all of those things in performance. He is a true sonic explorer who has redefined the capabilities of his instrument while making profound spiritual connections with his listeners.

    Nate’s music and relationship to his instrument has been a huge inspiration to me as a violinist. Nate wrote an eloquent introduction to the liner notes of my debut solo violin album, Engage (New Focus Recordings – August 3, 2018), and graciously agreed to have a conversation with me about solo improvisation for NewMusicBox. I’m very grateful to Nate for taking the time to offer his take on some thoughts I’ve had since recording the solo improvised material on Engage, and to share a veritable masterclass on improvisation as part of my series of posts.

    2
    Nate Wooley (photo by Ziga Koritnik)

    Josh Modney: Polyphony is something I think about a lot in solo playing. The violin is not really built to realize densely polyphonic textures, so there’s a natural curiosity to want to do more with it. I’ve also in a very broad sense always been more interested in harmony than melody. So those are two factors pulling me away from the traditional role of violin as a singing, melodic instrument. The traditional role of trumpet is quite similar, so I’m wondering if you could share some thoughts about your relationship to polyphony in your solo work.

    Nate Wooley: That’s consistently been an area of my playing that has provided the particular kind of frustration that can generate new directions—kind of a positive within a negative. I have also always loved harmony, but my sense of how (and when) dissonance should resolve has never fallen within a certain tradition of counterpoint or polyphony. Even when I was concentrating on the linear playing that is expected of a jazz player, I liked to stretch the tension as far as I could, or find a place to resolve that was awkward or uncomfortable. That always felt so much more human to me than pounding a chord tone on the strong beats; nothing in life is that foursquare, so why would music—which is inherently supposed to be an expression of life—be so rigid in the way it ebbed and flowed?

    When I started playing solo, of course, the whole conception of harmony and polyphony had to change, as I didn’t have a rhythm section or other line to play against. It took me a long time to come to grips with that. It takes an incredible mind to captivate an audience with the brilliance of their harmonic mind through monophonic playing…and my mind ain’t one of those. I grappled with it in a lot of different ways: through electronics/feedback, extreme extended technique, use of the voice or other parts of my body. But, a certain breakthrough came during a tour with percussionist Paul Lytton. Someone told me after the show that they appreciated the way I could unfold a single sound and present the micro-events within that single note. I hadn’t thought about the way a note on the trumpet wavers in its timbral quality or overtone production, but after that comment (and certainly playing music by Eliane Radigue and Annea Lockwood in recent years) I started paying attention to a certain harmonic motion contained in those micro-movements. The motion, density, and velocity of those small details produce their own tension and release, and that became the center of how I think—not only in solo playing, but in every situation. Of course, the playing becomes broader than just that, and solo playing encompasses all the techniques I listed above (feedback, et al.) but everything now is really filtered through an attempt to give the inner workings of every sound, no matter how short or long it may be, the attention it deserves.

    Nate Wooley solo at Something Else! Festival of Creative Music 2017

    JM: The idea of harmonic motion contained in micro-movements totally resonates with me, and I love the way that you work with those kinds of textures. I remember in particular being inspired by the way you are able to make an extraordinarily long and continuous drone by circular breathing and using a harmon mute with a metal plate. The sound is modified unpredictably by the circular breathing while you make specific modifications with the metal plate. It sets up a feedback loop between things that you are controlling and things that can’t be controlled, generating a wealth of musical possibilities.

    Hearing you do that was one of the musical experiences that sent me down a path looking for ways to translate or “map” brass and wind sounds onto the violin. The violin is such an old and thoroughly researched instrument, it can be a challenge to find means of expression that aren’t tied to the lineage of Western classical music from Bach to Lachenmann and beyond. That lineage is really important to me and forms the backbone of my practice, but I also want to fold in new possibilities for musical expression. By mapping things like the micro-variation of a trumpeter’s circular breathing and the intensity of a saxophonist’s multiphonics onto the violin, what started as an attempt to make a copy of something develops into something different and, hopefully, fresh on the instrument.

    I keep on coming back to this thought about the ways that attempts at polyphony dating back to Bach may have informed my own improvisation practice, like a “spiral” of influences being mapped onto one another. This idea was spurred by a conversation with an improviser from a jazz background who told me that Bach’s solo cello suites were his inspiration for cultivating the technique to make chorale textures on the saxophone using multiphonics. Bach’s solo string music is itself a mapping of contrapuntal keyboard textures onto violin and cello. The evolution of polyphonic writing for the violin can be traced directly through the lineage of classical repertoire from Bach through Paganini, Bartók, etc. But as an improviser on the violin, I find it interesting to look at this alternate trajectory or “spiral”—Bach maps keyboard polyphony onto strings, which is in turn mapped onto winds by adventurous players, and finally mapped back onto violin after many layers of translation.

    I’m not sure if there is an analog to this “spiral” idea in your experience as a trumpeter, but would love to hear your thoughts. I’m also curious to what extent, if at all, you might consider the genesis of your own highly detailed sounds to represent a “mapping” of polyphony onto your monophonic instrument?

    NW: Part of that answer probably lies in my above comments about the polyphony inherent in micro-events but, in my history, there has been a different approach to mapping. I had a period when I worked at mapping piano (which I played for years before playing trumpet) or other polyphonic instruments onto the trumpet, but the real moments of change happened for me when I stopped trying to think of music at all and, instead, started mapping the soundworld that had the most physical impact on me onto the horn instead. It’s very rare for me to be moved by musical means alone. I have a deeper relationship to the sound of the human voice. And, by that, I mean the complete human voice inclusive of all that is not the stylized singing voice within any genre (as beautiful as that can be). I am most touched by the way people express ideas through speech, and the ideas they express through vocal sounds when the words escape them, and the sounds they make when they are experiencing those magnificent emotions that humans can only articulate through their individual taxonomy of hums, screams, small sighs, snorts, clicks, pops…anything like that. It has amazed me since I was small, that my grandmother could make me feel more loved by tunelessly humming just under her breath than when she would use the words “I love you.” It’s that phenomenon that I’m interested in mapping onto the instrument. I want to make it express in that way.

    So, in a way, there is a “spiraling” in the way you describe it above, but it takes place a little differently in the way I articulate it to myself. In a very bastardized version of a Marcuse idea, I try to look outside the dialectic to see what may be of interest. I try to look at the process from outside and see if there’s a way to sidestep the whole cycle. And, in hindsight, that’s what I did with taking the vocal sounds as a model as opposed to the tradition of music on the trumpet. Granted, it just sets up its own dialectic, but I work within that until I become bored and then—hopefully I’ll get there before I die—I start to look outside of that cycle or “spiral.”

    JM: The way you describe using vocal sounds as a model is beautiful. It makes total sense knowing your music, but I hadn’t thought of it in that way. I’d like to ask you a bit more about elements of trumpet tradition, since you hail primarily from a jazz background. For example, some traditions and practices on the violin related to classical lineage include straight-ahead “romantic” playing, noise-based music, post-Lachenmann timbral studies, and Just Intonation/drone music. What are the elements of creative improvisation that are within a shared space, regardless of background and training?

    NW: I have a lot of the same influences you do, I guess. I got as much from listening to Lachenmann or Bernhard Lang as I did from Clifford Brown or Booker Little. It’s just where that information presents itself that may be different from you to me. The jazz stuff is way deeper in my psyche at this point and has a lot of relationships to nostalgia and family, which means it has a different context for me and is generative in a base way, which I may manipulate or filter through more recent interests like hard noise, contemporary classical, David Tudor, or Ba-Benzele pygmy recordings. It’s like a rough artistic version of base and superstructure. I will always have a desire to build phrases and performances from the eighth-note grid of swing music, but everything I have in my mind that comes from outside that (the superstructure) distorts that base information in a way that makes me an individual. Just like what makes you Josh Modney (musically) is the base of the classical training and the superstructure of noise, Just Intonation, and timbral study.

    JM: I’m curious about the ways that you engage with material in your solo playing, or the ways that you think about/categorize the material that forms, as you put it, the superstructure of your musical aesthetic. Do you see the various techniques that you employ coming from families of sound, or different reservoirs of musical practice?

    NW: I did think that way for a certain time, but then I started feeling like I was trapped inside the technique. One of my greatest fears about the way I play is that it will be perceived as a set of parlor tricks. I always cringe when someone tells me they were impressed by all the “crazy sounds” after a solo show. To me, that means I did a poor job of putting the technique in the service of some sort of human expression. At a certain point, I felt like my approach to solo playing was too rooted in the architecture of the sound at the risk of losing the human component, so I abandoned that kind of taxonomic approach.

    Now, I think of each solo concert as storytelling. I come from a place where people still hold forth over beers and tell long and, mostly false, stories of their past or the history of where they are from. It’s a grand tradition that takes many forms and is something I have always loved. My process of solo playing, at its best, takes its cue from that tradition, from sitting in the chair and wanting to have the audience close, to the recent use of the singing and speaking voice unfiltered by the trumpet, to flat out telling a story as I change to the amplifier. Every choice I make now has to do with a kind of storytelling now that’s not strictly narrative or meant to paint a picture, but tries to get at the core of what a great storyteller does, which is slowly pry open their chest and show you everything that’s inside them, if only for a brief second. The hope being that, at the end, I’ve given a small, actually living, piece of myself and the audience feels like they know me a little better. I can’t do that if I think of any taxonomy or groups of sounds, if that makes sense. And, I don’t mean this as a diatribe for what solo playing should be. It’s just what communicates for me.

    JM: Love the storytelling analogy! And I totally agree that the perception of “crazy sounds” is sometimes counterproductive to musical ideals. Could you talk a bit about your expressive goals in your solo music? Are there particular elements of your music that you feel act as a gateway to personal expression?

    NW: It’s perhaps a little contemporary and I don’t intend to deal in politics (for my own reasons) but this has been on my mind lately and this seems like an apt place to put it in print. I think that we are in a moment of immense, prolonged trauma. There was a time when I believe people could feel intertwined with their fellow human beings in a way that—not discounting humanity’s ability to treat others with coldness and extreme evil—felt safe. That has been chipped away, and I see people everywhere I go that are just trying to figure out how to handle it—some in better and healthier ways than others. My way is to attempt to live. That sounds stupid, but how many people are trying to do that in any conscious way. Not survive, but LIVE. Breathe air, notice the world, bathe in a piece of music, freak out on an amazing turn of phrase in a piece of literature, recognize beauty, recognize ugliness, be glad that they’re both there. Say hello to people, appreciate when they say hello back, be empathetic when they tell you to fuck off. Just sit in your family, your culture, your world, and be a part of it. To that end, when I play solo, I want to be a part of an experience with the people in the room. They actually made an attempt to come out and do something, so I want to live in that room with them for 30 minutes or an hour or whatever. I want us all to feel like something happened, so that we have a renewed faith in the ability to intertwine on any level with our humanity again and fight the trauma. It’s small and, I admit, it’s not a grand political gesture, but I’m not a grandly political person. I just want to give that one period of time to the people in the room as a moment when someone shows themselves and is, maybe uncomfortably, human.

    JM: Yeah, I feel from both sides of the stage, as performer and audience member, that the most affecting and memorable experiences are when people are close, usually in a small room, and you can feel the energy of everybody together. Those have always been my favorite musical experiences, but I share your sense that it all has more urgency and immediacy now.

    What you describe is also a beautifully non-hierarchical way of thinking about what makes a successful musical performance, which brings me to my final question. I’ve been noticing that, at least within the relatively small community of new music in NYC, we’re moving toward a hybridized scene that operates on a continuum between composition, improvisation, and interpretation. I’m not sure if this represents an overall shift in American contemporary music culture, but there does seem to be good momentum in this direction. I can at least say that the work that comes out of this hybridized model is the music that I’m most interested in listening to and making! I’d love to hear your perspective on this. Do you think we’re experiencing a significant shift away from the “top down” hierarchy of musicmaking from the last century?

    NW: On the street level, definitely! I am not sure it’s leaked to the organizational or funding branches necessary for our world yet, but that’s completely understandable given their inherently decisive task. And, even within those institutional bodies, I think we’re seeing a shift toward the holistic mixture of composition, improvisation, collaboration, and interpretation. I’m a bit of a cynic, so I hope that it isn’t just the pendulum’s apex before it swings back but, as you say, there’s so much in that way of making music that one can invest themselves in, that I do have a little hope that it’s just the beginning of a new model of how to make music.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:32 PM on August 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , New classical, , Zack Browning - Soul Doctrine   

    From Innova: ” Zack Browning — Soul Doctrine” 

    From Innova the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    Zack Browning
    Soul Doctrine

    1

    Composers: Zack Browning
    Performers: Sonata Island Quartet, Emilio Galante, Walter Zanetti, Andrea Dindo, Pepito Ros

    Catalog Number: #1 009
    Genre: new classical, new music

    Release Date:
    Nov 16, 2018

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:45 PM on April 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: David Kechley -The Walbrzych Project, , New classical,   

    From Innova: “David Kechley -The Walbrzych Project” 

    Innova is the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1

    David Kechley
    The Walbrzych Project
    A global vision from a small Polish town

    Composers:
    David Kechley

    Performers:
    Philharmonia Sudeka

    Catalog Number: #932
    Genre: new classical
    Collection: orchestra

    Release Date: Apr 27, 2018

    Music by David Kechley
    The Walbrzych Project

    The Walbrzych Project
    My first compact disc, Winter Branches (1997) took more than 10 years to complete. It began with an idea to record two pieces requiring three performers, but it grew with the addition of more works, more performers, and more recording venues. The Walbrzych Project is my fifth collection, and it also has taken longer than planned. Unlike Branches it was complicated from the outset. It includes a seven-minute introductory work for large orchestra and a four-movement symphony involving performances by hundreds of individuals not to mention travel to audition an orchestra in the Czech Republic before final arrangements were made with Sudeten Filharmonie. Its Chief Conductor Jerzy Kosek worked with New York-based Joel Suben to rehearse and prepare the orchestra for five recording sessions that took place during one week in the small, faraway city of Walbrzych, Poland. And then the project remained stymied after I encountered unexpected health problems in 2013. I am grateful to have recovered enough to finish the editing and production of this collection, and I have hopes it won’t be my last either.

    David Kechley began composing as a teen after years spent listening to his composer and music professor father Gerald at the piano. At 19, The Seattle Symphony premiered Second Composition for Large Orchestra and since then more than 1,000 performances of his work in a variety of genres have been performed by orchestras, chamber groups and college musical ensembles throughout the United States and abroad.

    His music draws from 20th Century classics and from vernacular, popular, and ethnic music. Time spent in Kyoto, Japan, profoundly affected his compositions. His pieces are marked by a distinctive style, but his musical narratives are known for sharp contrasts between lyricism, virtuosity, and dramatic gesture.

    Kechley’s work has been recognized and applauded for nearly 40 years by such organizations as the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council, and the Massachusetts Cultural Council. Born in Seattle, Kechley was educated at the University of Washington, Cleveland Institute of Music, and Case Western Reserve University. He also followed his father into music education, teaching at the University of North Carolina in Wilmington, and teaching and chairing the Music Department at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts until his recent retirement as professor emeritus.

    Disc One
    Karasuma
    A Fast Funk for Orchestra

    Karasuma has been called a crossover piece as it combines popular fusion music rhythms and themes with classical style development and orchestral techniques. The work originates from music written for a presentation given at for the Music Department at Doshisha Women’s College in Kyoto, Japan. To show various ways in which the computer could be used in music composition and performance, I composed a demonstration piece in which music students were to perform written parts on their acoustic instruments while I conducted and improvised at the computer. The instrumentation was completely dependent upon which students volunteered. It turned out to be violin, clarinet, strings bass, piano and two percussionists. The original Fast Funk was a rather loosely constructed improvisation designed for a specific situation and has not been performed since. However, many of the musical ideas continued to play themselves in my head me so I eventually felt compelled to give them a permanent home in this orchestral form.

    Karasuma was premiered by the Boston Pops in the summer of 1993 under the title Blackbird. The present, Japanese, title is more meaningful since it specifically refers to a well known street and subway line in Kyoto. Although the word karasu written with its corresponding Chinese kanji characters does mean black bird, raven or crow, the actual name of the street is taken from several kanji characters chosen for their sounds. There are also interesting historical origins to the name Karasuma and its kanji characters that date so far back most modern residents of the area may even not be aware of them. While karasu and its kanji do mean raven or blackbird, thus explaining the original title, the relationship between a bird and this familiar location is pretty much coincidental.

    I created the original themes for Fast Funk to be entertaining, fun to play, American in character and immediate in effect. It was a wonderful experience working with those music students at Doshisha Women’s College and was a highlight of my trip to Japan in 1991. Karasuma is dedicated to Tomomi Ogino, Makiko Oda, Akemi Ueno, Mika Matsumoto, Miwa Oda and Yukiko Iwaasa the first Fast Funk players.

    Disc 2
    Wakeful Visions / Moonless Dreams
    A Symphony in Four Movements

    I. Whirlwind
    II. Notari Notari
    III. Something Wicked
    IV. Moments

    Dreams can sometimes seem quite real while visions experienced in the light of day may seem completely unreal. Dreams or visions can be frightening, comforting, spiritual, playful, and so many other things. Each movement of Wakeful Visions / Moonless Dreams explores some of these qualities and finds its point of departure in a suggestive literary source.

    I. Whirlwind

    As the title suggests, is a fast and furious musical reaction to the well-known biblical quote: “For they have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind…” (Hosea 8:7). Regardless of its original Old Testament context this phrase clearly applies anytime human actions produce dire consequences, which are ultimately beyond the limits of human control or understanding, i.e., irreversible.

    The movement opens quietly, bubbling below the surface, but quickly becomes explosive with rhythmic interjections, which constantly threaten the stability of the driving triplet rhythms. The transition to a more lyrical, but still foreboding mood is sudden and the harp and marimba continue to provide the underlying rhythm for more sustained and complete thematic statements by solo and tutti strings. The explosions return, but the final texture ultimately implodes as the movement crashes to an abrupt finish.

    II. Notari Notari is inspired by the following haiku:

    Haru no umi
    Hinemosu notari
    Notari kana

    Behold! The spring sea undulates
    And undulates the whole day long.

    A delightful picture of the halcyon spring sea rises to the mind’s eye at once. As far as the eye can travel, the ocean swells and sinks gently and regularly all day long. This is how translator Asataro Miyamori describes this beautiful poem by Buson (An Anthology of Haiku Ancient and Modern,1932). . . . The chief merit of this verse [is] the pleasing rhythm of notari-notari which cannot adequately be reproduced in a translation. The music moves beyond the imagery and rhythm of the words, as the flute begins an expansive and lyrical solo. The musical ideas continue to expand beyond the first movement into broad and climatic statements. A cello and piccolo dialog returns to the opening mood and imagery.

    III. Something Wicked

    The musical imagery for Something Wicked is suggested by MacBeth, Act IV, Scene I, in which the three witches are chanting as they circle the bubbling caldron. Just before Macbeth enters, the second witch says,

    By the pricking of my thumbs,
    Something wicked this way comes.
    Open, locks,
    Whoever knocks!

    Because of its playful although not really dance like rhythms, perhaps this serves the role of a traditional symphonic third movement. It might even be called a scherzo in a somewhat grotesque and twisted sort of way. Percussion and various orchestral effects are employed to create a sense of malevolence and occasional chaos from which the ultimate outcome is not entirely clear.

    IV. Moments

    Moments is, among other things, about looking back and wondering if what we remember really happened or if it may have been a dream. Musical fragments from previous movements return in original form while others continue their transformative journey and create new connections with one another in a different musical reality, the reality of the present moment.

    “The moments of the past do not remain still; they retain in our memory the motion which drew them towards the future, towards a future which has itself become the past, and draw us on in their train.”
    Marcel Proust

    Produced by David Kechley
    Graphic Design by Rose Michelle Taverniti
    Liner notes by David Kechley; Liner notes edited by Rosemary Armao
    Innova is the label of the American Composers Forum.
    David Kechley 2017. All Rights Reserved.

    Innova Recordings, 75 W 5th St #522, St. Paul, MN 55102, USA
    Innova Director: Philip Blackburn; Operations Director: Chris Campbell; Publicist: Tim Igel
    Innova is supported by an endowment from the McKnight Foundation http://www.innova.mu http://www.pinevalleypress.com

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: