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  • richardmitnick 8:33 PM on April 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Arone Dyer, , L’Rain, Lou Tides, Miho Hatori, New Music, Ziemba- Marilu Donovan- Elizabeth LoPiccolo & Mara Mayer   

    From (Le) Poisson Rouge: “The Hum (Night 2): Glasser & L’Rain at House of Yes 

    (Le) Poisson Rouge

    LPR Presents at House of Yes

    The Hum (Night 2):
    Glasser & L’Rain
    with Arone Dyer’s Dronechoir, Miho Hatori, Lou Tides & Ziemba, Marilu Donovan, Elizabeth LoPiccolo & Mara Mayer

    Wed May 9th, 2018

    7:30PM

    House of Yes
    2

    Minimum Age: 21+

    Doors Open: 7:00PM

    Show Time: 7:30PM

    Event Ticket: $15 / $30 / $75

    Day of Show: $20 / $35 / $75

    Tickets

    event description

    This event will take place at House of Yes: 2 Wyckoff Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11237

    General Admission: $15 advance, $20 day of show
    VIP Admission: $30 advance, $35 day of show
    Series Pass: $75 [Purchase The Hum – SERIES PASS here]

    the artists

    3
    L’Rain is a songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and singer whose sound borrows equally from 90’s R&B, music concrete, and ambient soundscapes. Both flippantly celebratory and lusciously introspective, her music is a meditation on the following: “The new black music is this: find the self and kill it.”

    “…one-woman studio band…that’s a sea of loops: guitar arpeggios, synthesizer burbles, endless layers of vocal harmony.”
    JON PARELES, NEW YORK TIMES

    “…filled with experiments in looping, field recording, layered vocals and guitar arpeggios that call to mind the best moments of Stereolab or Frank Ocean’s Endless.”
    TINY MIX TAPES

    “A swelling orchestra of lush soundscapes and hypnotizing, layered melodies…multi-instrumentalist L’Rain…is beyond lovely. Soft spoken , at times, but pulsating with warmth…a gripping roller coaster of unexpected sounds and emotions…”
    AFROPUNK

    3
    Arone Dyer’s Dronechoir

    Dronechoir combines unfamiliar collaborators with an unrehearsed performance that continuously reshapes itself through space-specific movement directions, physically foregrounding specific singers at different points in the carefully-composed piece, bringing depth to the listener’s experience by challenging comfort barriers and introducing a heightened sense of engagement with the performance.

    Arone Dyer has presented over 10 Dronechoir performances since 2015, from Hudson, NY, to Berlin, Germany, with anywhere from 4 to 24 vocalists, and most recently presented a successful collaboration with poet Mahogany L. Browne for Ecstatic Music Festival in NYC.

    4
    Miho Hatori

    MIHO HATORI is a singer/musician/visual artist, primarily known as the vocalist of the legendary NYC group, Cibo Matto.
    She has been collaborating with and being featured on many artists like Beastie Boys, Gorillaz, Handsome Boy Modeling School and etc…
    She is working on her solo projects, New Optimism and Miss Information (releasing in summer of 2017) now.
    Miho is originally from Tokyo, but has been working and living NYC for too many years.

    5
    Lou Tides

    6
    Ziemba, Marilu Donovan, Elizabeth LoPiccolo & Mara Mayer

    Ziemba’s multisensory performances offer an alchemy that is both alien and familiar.

    The Brooklyn-based composer, perfumer, geographer, and vocalist builds oozy architectures using fragrance, sound, costume, and the sincerest of theatrics. She recently founded Ardis Multiverse, a sonic fragrance imprint and artists alliance, and has spent the past year touring nationally and internationally in support of her debut album, Hope is Never. In the fall of 2017, Ziemba presented original sonic fragrance work at MoMA Ps1 and National Sawdust, and released music video El Paso which doubled as an underground history of the U.S./Mexico border, accompanied by an op-ed on Teen Vogue about women-led resistance on the border. She is currently immersed in ARDIS, her forthcoming album, a feminist sci-fi fragrant musical & wholly consuming parallel universe.

    As Ziemba, René Kladzyk has shown work widely within NYC at venues including:

    La Mama, MoMA Ps1, National Sawdust, Fourth Arts Block/ Creative Time, Superchief Gallery, CUE Art Foundation, Momenta Art, Queens Museum, Trans Pecos, and more. She has toured nationally and internationally at arts and music venues, and has held artist residencies with the French Institute in Fez, Morocco, and Guerilla Scienceʼs Fire Organ. She has written original scores for NYC dance companies, soundtracked Comedy Central’s Broad City, offered costume design and creative direction services to fellow artists in Brooklyn’s DIY scene, and currently leads an experimental vocal group named XHOIR with fellow artists Colin Self and Caitlin Baucom.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    (Le) Poisson Rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of (Le) Poisson Rouge.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 6:01 PM on April 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , New Music, Oracle Hysterical, Song Cycles   

    From National Sawdust: “Oracle Hysterical “Hecuba” Album Release Sunday, May 13th – 8pm 

    National Sawdust

    Oracle Hysterical Hecuba Album Release Sunday, May 13th – 8pm

    Oracle Hysterical

    Tickets

    About the Show

    Composer-collective Oracle Hysterical celebrates the group’s newest project, Hecuba, an experimental rock-leaning album based on Euripides’ tragedy of the same name. The album will be released on National Sawdust Tracks, the in-house record label formerly known as VIA Records that presents a carefully curated selection of new music from bold voices.

    Written around 424 BCE in Athens, Hecuba is a savage story of revenge in which the disgraced queen of Troy, Hecuba, with her city razed and her children murdered, descends from nobility to primal violence.

    Oracle Hysterical is made up of twin brothers Doug Balliett (double bass, viola da gamba) and Brad Balliett (bassoons), Majel Connery (vocals, keyboards), Elliot Cole (vocals, guitars, keyboards), and Dylan Greene (percussion). Part band, part book club, Oracle Hysterical combines eclectic musical influences with literary breadth, with all members of the group contributing as both performers and composers.

    Oracle’s works occupy the fluid space between classically-inclined song-cycle and art-rock concept album. The group’s songwriting illuminates fragments of great literary works like a child in a dark forest with a flashlight. Text sources have ranged from Grimms’ Fairy Tales to Greek tragedy, and falsely-attributed Shakespeare, all in collections of songs that distill centuries-old writing through a unique contemporary lens.

    Oracle Hysterical is twin brothers

    Doug Balliett


    Doug Balliett (double bass, viola da gamba)

    Brad Balliett


    Brad Balliett (bassoons)

    Majel Connery


    Majel Connery (vocals, keyboards),

    Elliot Cole


    Elliot Cole (vocals, guitars, keyboards)

    Dylan Greene


    Dylan Greene (percussion).

    Part band, part book club, Oracle Hysterical combines eclectic musical influences with literary breadth. All members of the group perform and compose, with each project developed collectively.

    Other touring projects include The Sea, a collaboration with the Grammy-nominated orchestra A Far Cry, which commissioned and premiered the work at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in 2016. In the song-cycle, Oracle Hysterical weaves music from texts by history’s greatest seafarers, explorers, and aquatic fabulists, from Shakespeare to Homer, and John Donne to the Book of Jonah. In 2017, Oracle Hysterical collaborated with period-instrument ensemble New Vintage Baroque on Passionate Pilgrim. The album, released on Naxos/Vision into Art, was called “music that is unstuck in time” by the Wall Street Journal, and what it would sound like if “Belle and Sebastian were to cut a record of Baroque-inspired folk songs,” by the New Yorker.

    Other ongoing projects include Cleopatra with the Metropolis Ensemble, and The Brothers Grimm with New Vintage Baroque. Oracle has appeared at the MATA Festival, the Berkshire Fringe Festival, The Stone (NYC), The Hideout (Chicago), (Le) Poisson Rouge (NYC), National Sawdust (NYC), the Toledo Museum of Art, and at the Lucerne Festival Academy, where they were Spotlight Artists in 2011.

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Space waiting

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:16 PM on April 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Emily Wells, , New Music   

    From National Sawdust: “Emily Wells Saturday, May 5th — 7pm” 

    National Sawdust

    Emily Wells

    About the Show

    “Quietly transfixing” composer / producer Emily Wells is known for her varied use of classical and modern instrumentation, deft approach to live sampling, and “dramatic, meticulous and gothic songs” (New York Times) that blend “traditionalism with electronic ambiance” (NPR). Fresh off a new album, Wells steps out of the studio this May for an intimate show at National Sawdust where she experiments with songs old and new.

    On stage Wells’ builds a “new instrument” out of acoustic and electronic drums, synth, violin, and her evocative solo performances leave audiences equal parts dancing and grieving. Her latest work, This World is Too _____ For You, arranged for chamber ensemble by composer Michi Wiancko, was commissioned by Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra’s Liquid Music Series premiered in November 2017. This work is being expanded and recorded as a studio LP, out January 2019.

    “The new songs are the rub between desire for, and desire to strip oneself of all wanting” Wells says of the new material, which clamors around all the edges, and sometimes into the center of our collective uncertainties. “I grew up with hymns and I often find myself drawn to a form that seeks redemption, even for transgressions unknown.” Wells’ video work will accompany the performances of which she says, “the video and the songs are mirrors of one another: human failing, desire, grace, the body, repetition, muted gutting, and the natural world, beating against our windows, drunk with the answer.”

    Tickets

    About the Artist

    Emily Wells is a performer, producer, singer, and composer known for her varied use of classical and modern instrumentation as well as her deft approach to live sampling. Classically trained as a violinist, she also performs using drums, synths and beat machines and has toured worldwide. Wells released her most recent full studio album Promise to critical acclaim on her label “Thesis & Instinct” January 2016 with a follow up EP In The Hot in March of 2017. Wells lives and works in New York City.

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Space waiting

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:50 AM on April 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: New Music, , The Homecoming, The National   

    From The National: Homecoming 

    The National

    The National

    Homecoming
    In association with MusicNOW
    April 28, 29
    Cincinnati, OH

    Homecoming, In Association with MusicNOW is LESS THAN TWO weeks away! ✨Grab your tickets now to ensure the lowest possible prices.

    The National return home to Cincinnati, OH this Spring hosting a week-end celebration of music, art, and cultural connections at Smale Park

    1
    MusicNOW Opening Night at The Cincinnati Masonic Center

    2
    Saturday, April 28

    3
    Sunday, April 29

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The National at BAM

    The National is an American rock band from Cincinnati, Ohio, formed in 1999. The band consists of Matt Berninger (vocals), Aaron Dessner (guitar, keyboards), Bryce Dessner (guitar), Scott Devendorf (bass) and Bryan Devendorf (drums).

    Founded by Berninger, Aaron Dessner, and Scott and Bryan Devendorf, The National released their self-titled debut album, The National (2001), on Brassland Records, an independent record label founded by Dessner and his twin brother, Bryce Dessner. Bryce, who had assisted in recording the album, soon joined the band, participating as a full member in the recording of its follow-up, Sad Songs for Dirty Lovers (2003).

    Leaving behind their day jobs, the National signed with Beggars Banquet Records and released their third studio album, Alligator (2005), to widespread critical acclaim. The band’s fourth and fifth studio albums, Boxer (2007) and High Violet (2010), increased their exposure significantly. In 2013, the band released its sixth studio album, Trouble Will Find Me, which was nominated for Best Alternative Music Album at the 56th Annual Grammy Awards. In 2017 the band released the album Sleep Well Beast, which won the Grammy award for Best Alternative Music Album at the 60th Annual Grammy Awards.

    Four of the band’s albums were included on NME’s 2013 list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

    Matt Berninger and Scott Devendorf met in 1991 while attending the University of Cincinnati’s DAAP college of graphic design program, where they also met Mike Brewer, Casey Reas and Jeff Salem. Together, the five of them formed the lo-fi garage band Nancy, named after Berninger’s mother, aspiring to sound like Pavement. The band was together for five years, and released one album, Ruther 3429, on Wife Records before breaking up after Berninger, Devendorf, Reas and Salem moved to Brooklyn.

    Bryan, Bryce and Aaron were childhood friends who played in several bands together over the years. When their last effort, Project Nim, broke up in 1998, they joined Matt and Scott in Brooklyn via the Devendorf relationship.

    When the band was formed in 1999, it was called “The National”, although the domain name of the band’s website is http://americanmary.com because, according to Matt Berninger, “[i]t’s a song off our first record. We never thought of changing the (website) name, although we should have.” Several of the members continued to work day jobs, including being involved in New York’s dot-com boom, while performing free Sunday night shows regularly at Lower East Side venue Luna Lounge.

    Members:

    Matt Berninger


    Matt Berninger – lead vocals (1999–present)

    Aaron Dessner


    Aaron Dessner – guitar, bass, piano, keyboards, harmonica, mandola, backing vocals (1999–present)

    Bryce Dessner


    Bryce Dessner – guitar, keyboards, piano, backing vocals (2001–present)

    Bryan Devendorf


    Bryan Devendorf – drums, percussion, backing vocals (1999–present)

    Scott Devendorf


    Scott Devendorf – bass, guitar, backing vocals (1999–present)

    Touring musicians

    Ben Lanz


    Ben Lanz – Trombone, synths (2007–present)

    Kyle Resnick


    Kyle Resnick – Trumpet, background vocals (2007–present)

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:59 PM on April 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Brooklyn Youth Chorus, Dianne Berkun Menaker, , , New Music   

    5 Questions to Dianne Berkun Menaker (Founder and Artistic Director, Brooklyn Youth Chorus) via National Sawdust 

    National Sawdust

    1

    April 17, 2018
    Jarrett Goodchild

    Dianne Berkun Menaker is the Founder and Artistic Director of the Brooklyn Youth Chorus. Under her direction, she has helped the chorus become one of the most highly regarded ensembles in the country and has prepared the choir to perform with conductors like Alan Gilbert, Marin Alsop, Gustavo Dudamel, Robert Spano and many others. On April 27-28, the chorus will perform the second installment of their Silent Voices concert series at National Sawdust. Silent Voices: If You Listen includes music by Julia Adolphe, Olga Bell, Anna Clyne, Paola Prestini, Toshi Reagon, Shelley Washington, Bora Yoon, guest artist Shaina Taub. Other artists like the International Contemporary Ensemble, R. B. Schlather, video and projection designer S. Katy Tucker, and sound designer Garth MacAleavey are also involved on the project. We were able to ask her some questions about the choir and the Silent Voices series.

    What was the driving force for you to form the Brooklyn Youth Chorus and what do you think makes the chorus as successful as it is?

    I was first compelled to create the Chorus because of my own deep love for the distinctive sound of the young treble voice. Apart from developing that sound ideal, I have always believed strongly in the value of music literacy and technical training for children, and felt that voice was the best vehicle in that it is unique to each person–an expression of one’s individuality–and accessible to all. Finally, I wanted to create a program that was truly representative of our larger community (geographically and demographically), without boundaries or barriers to participation based on economics or background.

    I believe the Chorus has been successful for three primary reasons. First, because it is built upon the highest standards of excellence, in training, professionalism and performance. Next, because our programming is a reflection of the singers themselves–their strengths, diversity of ideas and perspectives–and the time and place in which we are performing. And finally, because of the spirit of collaboration between the singers, composers and artists we work with, allowing the young people to take part in the creation of the work as well as its performance.

    As the loud cry for diversity in concert music seems to be at a fever pitch, how do you hope Silent Voices will affect other ensembles and artist in American concert halls?

    I don’t believe diversity should be regarded as a programmatic theme but rather as a reflection of an artist or organization’s core values. As in all areas of our society, it matters whose voices, and whose stories are being heard, and that representation is as broad and far-reaching as possible–including women, people of color, the young, the old, etc. We need to hear their stories, their points of view, their poetry, their melodies, in all their creative forms, and expand the narrative.

    There are a multitude of reasons why there has been a lack of representation in concert programming, which makes it an even greater responsibility now to seek out those underrepresented voices. I hope Brooklyn Youth Chorus can serve as a model in this regard, putting forth some lesser known or heard composers and venturing from the well-worn programmatic pathways. For us, diversity includes the composers whose music is being performed, who is doing the performing, and the range of themes and ideas being expressed. Contemporary music programming has helped to make this possible because we can learn from the composers and artists directly and fill in the gaps in our own knowledge or experience. We can be coached in different musical styles, explore new vocal techniques, help shape the subject matter, and be free of fixed ideas, standards or judgement.

    3
    Dianne Berkun Menaker–Photo by Jill Steinberg

    How did the International Contemporary Ensemble become involved and what do you think they add to the project?

    Our first collaboration with ICE was for the project Hagoromo, composed by Nathan Davis, and featuring dancer Wendy Whelan. I was taken by their extraordinary musicianship and the expanded playing techniques of these remarkable players. Their personal investment in both the music and the collaborative nature of the performance shines through. The other important factor in our ongoing collaboration with ICE is their respect for, and investment in, working with our young people. These musicians are so open and generous, and truly appreciate the role they are playing in accompanying these young lives on their artistic journey.

    What do you hope the members of the choir get out of this experience? Also, what do you hope the audience takes away from the performance?

    For the choristers, I hope they come away with a deeper understanding of themselves as musicians, artists and human beings. I want them to understand that they have been given a fairly unusual platform to have their voices heard–literally and figuratively–and with that, comes both opportunity and responsibility. I want them to feel safe, encouraged, proud, and hopeful in expressing their thoughts and feelings and in allowing themselves to be vulnerable. I want them to be more open to new ideas and people–but to learn to listen to themselves, as well–to trust their own instincts.

    I hope audiences come away moved, in their own way, by the power of the music, the beauty of the voices, and the importance of the ideas expressed. I hope they discover a composer they didn’t know before and an appreciation for the artistry of these young singers. I hope the audience recognizes the importance of the voices and perspectives of young people in tackling the issues of our time. Finally, I hope we all discover that, if we listen, and have the courage to speak our minds, we can all be agents of change and a needed voice for those who have fallen silent.

    Even though this program is the second installment of the Silent Voices project, what makes this performance different? What do you hope the third installment will bring?

    The musical program for If You Listen is completely new, with seven of the eight concert works as world premieres, and all by women composers. All of the spoken word elements in this production are drawn directly from the students own writing and conversations in response to the current repertoire and themes. This is also our first collaboration with director R.B. Schlather and video designer Katy Tucker, who have taken advantage of the unique space at National Sawdust in creating a truly immersive experience for the audience.

    Space waiting

    With the premiere of Silent Voices last season, we endeavored to give voice to those individuals and groups, perhaps our own selves, who had been silenced or marginalized. With Silent Voices: If You Listen, we are amplifying those voices, gathering even greater momentum in exploring the issues, while also pointing the spotlight on women composers, often underrepresented in contemporary classical music. Next season, we will premiere Silent Voices: Lovestate, which will draw on highlights from the first two seasons and also include new premieres (Bryce Dessner, David Lang, Angelica Negron–to name a few), while we seek to affirm our vision for a more inclusive and compassionate future–a world we can all look forward to.

    See the full article here .

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:40 PM on April 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: New Music, , , , , Ted Hearn   

    From Cantaloupe Music- Pulitzer Finalist: “Sound from the Bench, by Ted Hearne” 

    Cantaloupe Music is the recording arm of Bang On a Can, the original New Music DIY organization.

    Recording released on March 24, 2017 by The Crossing, a five-movement cantata for chamber choir, electric guitar and percussion that raises oblique questions about the crosscurrents of power through excerpts from sources as diverse as Supreme Court rulings and ventriloquism textbooks.

    3

    Sound from the Bench
    By Ted Hearne

    1

    “Sound From the Bench” is a 35-minute cantata for chamber choir, two electric guitars and drums, with a libretto by Jena Osman. It was co-commissioned by Volti and The Crossing.

    why these texts?

    Sound From the Bench is a reaction to Jena Osman’s incredible book Corporate Relations, a collection of poems that follows the historical trajectory of corporate personhood in the United States. The five movements combine language taken from landmark Supreme Court Cases with words from ventriloquism textbooks.

    I was instantly drawn to Osman’s work because of its rich intertextuality: she appropriates a variety of texts from diverse sources and assembles them into a powerful bricolage. I strive toward a similar polyphony of oppositional voices and perspectives in my music, and to bring the chaotic forces of life into the work itself. It was this impulse, and the unabashedly political tone of Osman’s poetry, that made me want to set some part of “Corporate Relations” to music.

    why electric guitars?

    Sound From the Bench
    is built around the tension between the human voice and electric guitar. The electric guitar can sound like literally anything. Through circuitry, programming, and analog and digital manipulation, the pitches and rhythms a guitarist plays can be utterly transformed, erasing all human touch. It speaks through an amplifier and could easily drown out any voice. These cyborg-esque qualities contrast the human voice, both in its inescapable limitations and the complex differences found in every individual vocal timbre.

    what does “no mouth” mean?

    No mouth is Osman’s paraphrase of the central reasoning behind the majority in Bellotti v. First National Bank, the 1978 case upon which Citizens United is based: because corporations don’t have a literal mouth, they cannot literally speak, therefore advertising is their only available method of communication and must be considered speech (and is entitled to First Amendment protections as such).

    The phrase the very heart, also found in the second movement, is excerpted from Justice White’s dissent in this case: “It has long been recognized, however, that the special status of corporations has placed them in a position to control vast amounts of economic power which may, if not regulated, dominate not only the economy but the very heart of our democracy, the electoral process.”

    about the third movement

    The central movement sets words from the oral argument to Citizens United. My brain started firing when I realized this poem of Jena’s was a literal erasure of the Supreme Court document – every phrase appeared in order, and in a position approximating the horizontal spot it appeared on the page. When I printed out the full 83-page oral argument and blacked out every phrase that Jena hadn’t included, the remaining words jumped out at me and started to take on new meanings and inferences. That strange, new energy helped propel the decontextualized text into music.

    The time at which the phrases appear approximate and in some way preserve the place at which they appear in the original document. The music between Osman’s text, that which fills the “blank pages,” sometimes includes a quote from Thomas Tallis’s motet Loquebantur Variis Linguis (the text is: “The Apostles spoke in different tongues – Alleluia.”) Aside from loving this music, I liked the image of our Justices as apostles.

    “personhood”

    What could this word even mean when it is applied to non-human things? The courts have systematically granted constitutional rights to corporations since the Civil War – we concede that a corporation can “speak” even though it has no mouth – and these rights have come at the expense of both the private citizen and the government.

    a corporation is to a person as a person is to a machine

    friends of the court we know them as good and bad, they too are sheep
    and goats ventriloquizing the ghostly fiction

    a corporation is to a body as a body is to a puppet

    putting it in caricature, if there are natural persons then there are those
    who are not that, buying candidates. there are those who are strong on
    the ground and then weak in the air. weight shifts to the left leg while
    the propaganda arm extends.
    (Jena Osman, from Corporate Relations)

    • program notes by Ted Hearne, with passages after Eric Howerton’s review of Corporate Relations for The Volta Blog

    — from the composer’s website

    Biography

    Composer, singer and bandleader Ted Hearne (b.1982, Chicago) draws on a wide breadth of influences ranging across music’s full terrain, to create intense, personal and multi-dimensional works.

    The New York Times has praised Mr. Hearne for his “tough edge and wildness of spirit,” and “topical, politically sharp-edged works.” Pitchfork called Hearne’s work “some of the most expressive socially engaged music in recent memory — from any genre.”

    Hearne’s newest theatrical work, The Source, sets text from the Iraq and Afghanistan War Logs, along with words by Chelsea Manning (the U.S. Army private who leaked those classified documents to WikiLeaks), and was premiered to rave reviews last October at the BAM Next Wave Festival in Brooklyn. The New York Times called The Source “a 21st Century masterpiece,” and included it on its list of the best classical vocal performances of 2014 and best albums of 2015, noting that the work “offers a fresh model of how opera and musical theater can tackle contemporary issues: not with documentary realism, but with ambiguity, obliquity, and even sheer confusion.” During the 2016-17 season, the original production of The Source (directed by Daniel Fish) was presented by both the LA Opera and San Francisco Opera.

    Hearne’s piece Katrina Ballads, another modern-day oratorio with a primary source libretto, was awarded the 2009 Gaudeamus Prize in composition and was named one of the best classical albums of 2010 by Time Out Chicago and The Washington Post. A recent collaboration paired him with legendary musician Erykah Badu, for whom he wrote an evening-length work combining new music with arrangements of songs from her 2008 album New Amerykah: Part One.

    Law of Mosaics, Hearne’s 30-minute piece for string orchestra, will see performances this year by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and San Francisco Symphony. His album of the same name, with Andrew Norman and A Far Cry, was named one of The New Yorker’s notable albums of 2014 by Alex Ross.

    A charismatic vocalist, Hearne performs with Philip White as the vocal-electronics duo R WE WHO R WE, whose debut album (New Focus Recordings, 2013) was called “eminently, if weirdly, danceable and utterly gripping.” (Time Out Chicago). Two albums of vocal music, The Source and Outlanders, were recently released on New Amsterdam Records.

    Ted Hearne was awarded the 2014 New Voices Residency from Boosey and Hawkes, and recently joined the composition faculty at the University of Southern California. Recent and upcoming commissions include orchestral works for the San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, New World Symphony, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and A Far Cry, chamber works for eighth blackbird, Ensemble dal Niente and Alarm Will Sound, and vocal works for Volti, The Crossing and Roomful of Teeth.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:21 PM on April 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , New Music, Robert Sirota, Robert Sirota’s third string quartet - Wave Upon Wave, , The Telegraph Quartet is a fervent champion of contemporary and 20th century repertoire   

    From Robert Sirota: Composer Robert Sirota’s “Wave Upon Wave” 

    Robert Sirota, composer

    Composer Robert Sirota’s Wave Upon Wave

    Performed by the Telegraph Quartet
    Winner of the 2016 Naumburg Chamber Music Award
    Presented by Noe Valley Chamber Music

    Sunday, May 20, 2018 at 4pm
    Noe Valley Ministry
    1021 Sanchez St. | San Francisco, CA

    Tickets ($25 advance; $30 at the door) and information available at http://www.nvcm.org or 415-648-5236

    Robert Sirota: http://www.robertsirota.com
    Telegraph Quartet: http://www.telegraphquartet.com

    On Sunday, May 20, 2018 at 4pm the Telegraph Quartet, winners of the 2016 Naumburg Competition, will perform composer Robert Sirota’s third string quartet, Wave Upon Wave on Noe Valley Chamber Music’s 25th anniversary season finale at Noe Valley Ministry (1021 Sanchez Street).

    Wave Upon Wave is the third string quartet in a trilogy spanning fifteen years, which Sirota began in 2002 with Triptych, an extended meditation on 9/11. Sirota’s second string quartet, American Pilgrimage, celebrates the rich diversity of the American landscape and the American spirit, and was completed in spring 2016.

    Sirota says, “Each of the string quartets in my trilogy is in essence a long journal entry reflecting a response to our times. Now, given the uncertainty of this moment in our history, rife with threats of tyranny, environmental catastrophe, and the human potential for evil, I find myself turning inward to examine the topography of the human heart: our vast potential for creative energy, idealism and altruism. Wave Upon Wave is about our fears, our hopes, and our prayers that we will triumph over the forces of darkness which threaten to overwhelm us.”

    Wave Upon Wave was commissioned by The Walter W. Naumburg Foundation for the competition winners and was premiered by the Telegraph Quartet on February 6, 2018 at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall.

    This program also includes Mozart’s String Quartet in D Major, K. 575 and Ravel’s String Quartet in F major. Complimentary wine and light bites are provided at intermission and there is a post-concert AfterParty reception and conversation with the artists moderated by musicologist Kai Christiansen immediately following the concert at La Boulangerie de Noe (3898 24th Street).

    About the Telegraph Quartet:
    The Telegraph Quartet (Joseph Maile, violin; Eric Chin, violin; Pei-Ling Lin, viola; Jeremiah Shaw, cello) was formed in 2013 with an equal passion for standard chamber music repertoire and contemporary and non-standard repertoire. Described by the San Francisco Chronicle in 2017 as, “an incredibly valuable addition to the cultural landscape,” and “powerfully adept… with a combination of brilliance and subtlety,” the Telegraph Quartet was most recently awarded the prestigious 2016 Walter W. Naumburg Chamber Music Award. Past prizes include the Grand Prize at the 2014 Fischoff Chamber Music Competition. The Quartet has since gone on to perform in concert halls, music festivals, and academic institutions from Los Angeles and New York to Italy and Taiwan, including Carnegie Hall, San Francisco’s Herbst Recital Hall and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music Chamber Masters Series and at festivals including the Chautauqua Institute, Kneisel Hall Chamber Music Festival, and the Emilia Romagna Festival. In 2016, the Quartet was invited as one of a handful of emerging professional string quartets from around the world to perform in Paris, France at the Biennale de quatuors à cordes, a showcase for major concert presenters of Europe and Asia taking place at the Philharmonie de Paris. The Telegraph Quartet gave its first Carnegie Hall appearance in Weill Recital Hall in 2015 along with violinist Ian Swensen and pianist Jeff LaDeur. A fervent champion of contemporary and 20th century repertoire, the Telegraph Quartet has co-commissioned John Harbison’s String Quartet No. 6, which received its West Coast premiere in the fall of 2017 at San Francisco State University’s Morrison Artist Series. In 2018, the Quartet plans to release its debut album featuring works by Anton Webern, Benjamin Britten, and Leon Kirchner.

    About Robert Sirota:
    Over four decades, composer Robert Sirota has developed a distinctive voice, clearly discernible in all of his work – whether symphonic, choral, stage, or chamber music. Writing in the Portland Press Herald, Allan Kozinn asserts: “Sirota’s musical language is personal and undogmatic, in the sense that instead of aligning himself with any of the competing contemporary styles, he follows his own internal musical compass.”

    Robert Sirota’s works have been performed by orchestras across the US and Europe; ensembles such as Alarm Will Sound, Sequitur, yMusic, Chameleon Arts, and Dinosaur Annex; the Chiara, American, Ethel, Elmyr, and Blair String Quartets; the Peabody, Concord, and Webster Trios; and at festivals including Tanglewood, Aspen, Yellow Barn, and Cooperstown music festivals; Bowdoin Gamper and Bowdoin International Music Festival; and Mizzou International Composers Festival. Recent and upcoming commissions include the American Guild of Organists, the American String Quartet, Alarm Will Sound, the Naumburg Foundation, Concert Artists of Baltimore, and yMusic.

    Recipient of grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, United States Information Agency, National Endowment for the Arts, Meet the Composer, and the American Music Center, Sirota’s works are recorded on the Capstone, Albany, New Voice, Gasparo and Crystal labels. His music is published by Muzzy Ridge Music, Schott, Music Associates of New York, MorningStar, Theodore Presser, and To the Fore.

    A native New Yorker, Sirota studied at Juilliard, Oberlin, and Harvard and divides his time between New York and Searsmont, Maine with his wife, Episcopal priest and organist Victoria Sirota. They frequently collaborate on new works, with Victoria as librettist and performer, at times also working with their children, Jonah and Nadia, both world-class violists.

    Received via email .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:08 PM on April 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: New Music, , Phil Kline, Unsilence   

    From New Sounds: ” Unsilence – I Love a Piano” 

    New Sounds
    Hand-picked music, genre free. 24/7 radio from New York City.

    4/16/2018

    1
    Phil Kline

    2

    Unsilence with host Phil Kline airs Mondays at 7 pm on New Sounds Radio. Repeats throughout the week, including Wednesdays at 11 am and Sundays at 9 pm.

    I knew I had to play something to mark Cecil Taylor’s passing, but what? No one track could do such a shape-shifter justice, so I picked one that doesn’t sound much like anything else he ever did. Aside from the great quartet, what really stands out in Amplitude from the live 1966 Great Paris Concert is that Taylor is playing a prepared piano! So it seemed natural to lead up to Cecil with some of John Cage’s little masterpieces from the 1940s, played by Steffen Schleiermacher on a gorgeously prepared and recorded Steinway B.

    Another ravishing sounding instrument is Penelope Crawford’s 1835 Conrad Graf Fortepiano, and her performances of late Beethoven sonatas (in this case No. 30 in E) make me long for desert islands to take them to. Then there’s the majestic Bosendorfer Imperial that the West German Radio found for Terry Riley to record The Harp of New Albion, and the “skillful and devoted” tuning of that instrument in five-limit just intonation by Alfred Shabda Owens. It’s stunning, as if tonality has acquired several extra dimensions.

    All that, along with pianos hammered, mangled, caressed and processed by Molly Joyce, Galina Ustvolskaja, and Annie Gosfield, on this week’s Unsilence.

    See the full article here .

    NewSounds.org infuses the eclectic spirit of the radio show into a full online and live event experience. Combining the New Sounds radio show, WNYC’s Soundcheck podcast and the adventurous spirit of WQXR’s Q2 Music, NewSounds.org will be a place for discovery, conversation, insights into the creative process, and of course 24/7 music.
    The centerpiece is New Sounds Radio, an online station hosted by New Sounds founder and long-running host John Schaefer, but infused with new, emerging voices including experimental musicians Kelly Moran, Eliza Bagg and Lora-Faye Åshuvud, and tastemakers Gamall Awad and Matt Werth, along with WQXR’s Helga Davis and Terrance McKnight, and composer-guitarist Phil Kline. The station will feature an array of styles and genres – from singer Courtney Barnett to contemporary classical music ensemble Kronos Quartet, from jazz icon Henry Threadgill to the Nordic folk music of Wardruna, from electronic composer and bandleader Anna Meredith to the stunning vocals of Puerto Rico’s Ileana Cabra.
    “With almost everything ever recorded anywhere now available online, where do you start? New Sounds might be the place,” said John Schaefer. “We try to be friendly and jargon free, and gleefully oblivious of genre. Our goal is to find the artists, the songs, and the sounds that you might love – if only you get a chance to hear them. And we believe that algorithms won’t give you the same experience as a set of recommendations from real people. A friendly guide is the best way to discover new music, or music that defies easy categorization; and some of that music just might change your life.”
    “For three decades, New Sounds was one of the last bastions of free form FM programming; completely genre-free and dictated solely by the impeccable and irresistible tastes of its host,” said Alex Ambrose, Senior Producer, New Sounds. “NewSounds.org will usher that sense of discovery and unpredictability into the digital age, drawing on the best of New York’s curatorial and taste-making power.”

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:49 PM on April 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , New Music, The [Switch~ Ensemble] Upstate New York Tour   

    From From NewMusicUSA: “The [Switch~ Ensemble] Upstate New York Tour: Concerts, Residencies, and Recordings” 

    From NewMusicUSA

    Posted on April 6, 2018 from the [Switch~ Ensemble]

    6
    It takes many hands to put on a tour…

    A 5-concert tour featuring a new work by Matt Sargent and celebrating upstate New York’s long-time pioneering spirit.

    Overview

    The [Switch~ Ensemble] seeks support for a tour of concerts and residencies throughout upstate New York. Founded in Rochester, NY, our ensemble is excited to embark on a homecoming tour that features new world premieres alongside works by pioneering composers with ties to the region.

    The crux of our project is a major new work for ensemble and live electronics by Matt Sargent, a former Buffalo resident and current professor of electronic music at Bard College. Our repertoire includes works by the laureates of our 2016-2017 International Commissioning Competition, works by Earle Brown and Morton Feldman, and works by composers with a connection to each tour stop: Annandale-on-Hudson, Woodstock, Ithaca, Rochester, and Buffalo.

    Sargent’s new work, Three Rooms, draws inspiration from a three-stanza poem by Robert Creeley entitled Kitchen. Creeley is naturally connected to our other programming, too, both through his longtime residence in Buffalo and his affiliation with Black Mountain College.

    Sargent writes: There’s a connection in these three stanzas with the three stages of life: birth, life, and death. The last section: “perpetually sweeping / this room, I want it to be / like it was,” is a phrase that I’ve ingrained over the years. It comes to mind daily, while working through the habits and practice that make up a musical life. I am always the most interested to work with simple materials – to explore a kind of delicate, cyclical writing for the ensemble, changing in shades as the music moves through its metaphorical day.

    Our tour begins with three days in the electronic music studios at Bard College. Bard has always had close ties to experimentalism, and we feel it a fitting place to kick off our tour and premiere Matt’s new work. The following day, we will perform at the Woodstock Artists Association and Museum, featuring chamber repertoire, pioneering electroacoustic works, and two works by Bard students. The WAAM holds a prominent collection of the works of Philip Guston, so we are especially excited to share works by Feldman and Brown at this venue.

    Subsequently, we will spend six days in Ithaca in a residency at Cornell University, performing works from our program alongside music by internationally renowned faculty and students, and two days in Rochester working with local composers and Eastman faculty. Our tour concludes with two days of events in residency and collaboration with composers at Buffalo State University.

    As our most ambitious curatorial venture to date, this tour comes at a pivotal time in our ensemble’s life. After thoughtfully considering our collaborators and programming for over a year, this homecoming tour will be a milestone achievement in our 6th season. We are passionate about this repertoire and excited to share it with audiences beyond our planned tour. Indeed, we have plans for a long life for these works, including projects in the 2018-2019 season in San Diego, NYC, and San Francisco, where our artistic director Jason Thorpe Buchanan is a curator at the Center for New Music.

    Project Media
    Voi(rex) by Philippe Leroux (Intro, Mvts. 1-2) – the [Switch~ Ensemble]

    Features: the [Switch~ Ensemble], Zach Sheets, Jason Thorpe Buchanan

    This 3-minute excerpt is from a performance of the [Switch~ Ensemble] in November of 2013, with Jason Thorpe Buchanan, conductor, and Sophia Burgos, soprano. It is the 2nd movement of Philippe Leroux’s 5-movement work, Voi(rex), a 23-minute piece for soprano, ensemble, and live electronics. This was our first major performance together as an ensemble—and the one that sparked our vision to life. More at http://www.switchensemble.com

    Jökulsárlón (2016) by Anna-Louise Walton – the [Switch~ Ensemble]

    Features: the [Switch~ Ensemble], Zach Sheets, Jason Thorpe Buchanan

    A U.S. premiere of Jökulsárlón will be included in our upstate NY tour. “Visiting Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon, I was left speechless by both the sight and sounds before me. As the glacier slowly melts, it creates a lagoon full of ice crystals of all shapes and sizes, which crackle and hiss gently. The vastness of the lagoon seemed to amplify these sounds; they were simultaneously delicate and striking. While writing, I attempted to create a world that was similarly sparse yet captivating, in reflection of the natural polyphony of the ice.”

    Ghost Light Trio by Matt Sargent

    Features: Matt Sargent

    This sample illustrates the beauty & subtlety of Sargent’s electroacoustic works.
    T.Saint, B.Solomon, & J.Torrence, Sep.30 2016, WAAM (Woodstock NY). Ghost Light Trio is a ten-minute work for percussion and field recordings, focusing on two fragile strata of activity. A narrow band of small metal percussion instruments, which are sounding as a single, ever-changing bell tone throughout, and a build-up of many layers of field recordings, played through two speakers placed in hallways or open spaces adjacent to the hall.

    Project Created By
    the [Switch~ Ensemble]
    Brooklyn, New York

    A new music ensemble for the 21st Century, the [Switch~ Ensemble] is dedicated to the creation and performance of new works for chamber ensemble and electronics, often featuring multimedia and other forms of technology. Our 2016-2017 season includes residencies at Kent State University, the San Francisco Center for New Music, and Vernon Salon Series in…
    In Collaboration With

    3
    Matt Sargent
    Composer
    Buffalo, New York

    4
    Zach Sheets
    Executive Director and Flutist
    New York, New York

    5
    Jason Thorpe Buchanan
    Artistic Director and Technician
    San Francisco, California

    the [Switch~ Ensemble]
    Brooklyn, NY

    A new music ensemble for the 21st Century, the [Switch~ Ensemble] is dedicated to the creation and performance of new works for chamber ensemble and electronics, often featuring multimedia and other forms of technology. Our 2016-2017 season includes residencies at Kent State University, the San Francisco Center for New Music, and Vernon Salon Series in Oakland, as well as a Spring residency at the University of Chicago to develop and premiere seven new works by doctoral student composers for ensemble and technology.

    In the summer of 2016, the [Switch~ Ensemble] served as ensemble-in-residence at the Valencia International Performance Academy in Spain. There, [Switch~] worked alongside both faculty and participant composers, led workshops and masterclasses, and performed the premieres of over a dozen works, including the world premiere of newly commissioned works by Timothy McCormack and James Bean. We believe in the pedagogical possibilities of such residencies, and are particularly passionate about helping to build a diverse canon of 21st century works that leaves space for all voices—especially those that, historically, have been excluded from our fields.

    Other recent highlights include an artist residency at Avaloch Farms Music Institute, the CD release of our recording of Christopher Chandler’s Smoke and Mirrors on the SEAMUS label, and featured concerts on the MATA Interval Series, the NYC Electroacoustic Music Festival, the Queens New Music Festival (QNMF), and the Vanguard New Music Series.

    We believe that working directly with composers throughout their creative process — in a medium where the score is a departure point rather than a finish line — allows for new and thrilling musical possibilities, optimizing our performance and collaborative practice for needs that differ radically from the creation and rehearsal of acoustic music while allowing for perpetual experimentation and refinement. [Switch~] contributes to the future of the genre by strongly advocating for and commissioning the music of a new generation of emerging young composers. We have additionally enjoyed fruitful collaborations with composers Rand Steiger, Philippe Leroux, Stefan Prins, Wojtek Blecharz, Anna-Louise Walton, Bryan Jacobs, Stefano Gervasoni, Panayiotis Kokoras, and many others, including American premieres of works by Alexander Schubert, Santiago Diez-Fischer, and Lisa Streich.

    Founded in 2012 at the Eastman School of Music’s Computer Music Center in Rochester, NY as a flexible-size professional ensemble looking toward the future of contemporary music, the [Switch~ Ensemble] specializes in high-level chamber music integrated with cutting-edge technology and multimedia, supporting emerging and early career composers to create bold new works featuring multimedia and electroacoustic elements. At the core of each performance is our commitment of total integration between technology and live performance — our goal is compelling artistry achieved through seamless production, creation, and execution.

    Zach Sheets, flute/Executive Director
    Madison Greenstone, clarinet
    Matt Evans, saxophone/Director of Development
    Lauren Cauley, violin/PR Manager
    T.J. Borden, cello
    Megan Arns, percussion
    Wei-Han Wu, piano
    Christopher Chandler, sound engineer/co-Founder
    Jason Thorpe Buchanan, Artistic Director/co-Founder
    Clay Mettens, sound engineer

    Voi(rex) by Philippe Leroux (Mvts. 1-2) – the [Switch~ Ensemble]

    Voi(rex) (2002)
    Philippe Leroux
    voice, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, piano, percussion, and processing

    the [Switch~ Ensemble]:
    Sophie Burgos, soprano
    Zach Sheets, flute
    Madison Greenstone, clarinet
    Lauren Cauley, violin
    T.J. Borden, cello
    Megan Arns, percussion
    Wei-Han Wu, piano

    Artistic Co-Directors:
    Jason Thorpe Buchanan, composer/conductor
    Christopher Chandler, composer/electronics

    Nov. 20, 2013 – Eastman School of Music
    For more information, visit http://www.switchensemble.com

    HUNGER: Part III, Scene 2, (8 Excerpts) by Jason Thorpe Buchanan

    A new multimedia opera in four parts by composer Jason Thorpe Buchanan & librettist Darcie Dennigan

    Premiered by the [Switch~ Ensemble] on the MATA Interval Series, DiMenna Center, NYC – May 15, 2015
    Sophia Burgos, soprano
    Lucy Dhegrae, soprano
    Jeff Gavett, baritone
    Daniel Bassin, conductor
    Jason Thorpe Buchanan, composer, artistic, and technical director

    Knut Hamsun’s novel Sult is a point of departure for a libretto by award-winning poet Darcie Dennigan, exploring themes of psychological decay, irrationality, and self-destruction…

    Jökulsárlón (2016) by Anna-Louise Walton

    Commissioned by the VIPA Festival for the [Switch~ Ensemble]
    Premiered 7/9/16 – Valencia, Spain

    “When I first visited Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon, I was left speechless by both the sight and sounds before me. As the glacier slowly melts, it creates a lagoon full of ice crystals of all shapes and sizes, which crackle and hiss gently. The vastness of the lagoon seemed to amplify these sounds; they were simultaneously delicate and striking. While writing Jökulsárlón, I attempted to create sound world that was similarly sparse yet captivating…

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:36 PM on April 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , New Music, , This week's #SōSelection is from Adam Sliwinski!   

    From Sō Percussion: “This week’s #SōSelection is from Adam Sliwinski!” 

    So Percussion in performance

    Sō Percussion

    4.16.18
    This week’s #SōSelection3 is from Adam Sliwinski!

    “On April 26th, I’m playing in a concert produced by Legacy Arts International and the Americas Society/Council of the Americas in New York City of the music of the Cuban composer Guido Lopéz-Gavilán. My wife Cristina Altamura, founder of Legacy Arts International, had the idea of bringing Gavilan to New York for a portrait concert. She met him in 2004 while performing a piano recital in Havana, and later met his son Ilmar in New York.

    His music reminds me of other Latin American composers who studied European classical music but habitually incorporated folk idioms: Piazzolla, Roldan, Villa-Lobos. Being from Cuba, Gavilan’s only real option for study as a young man was in the Soviet Union, and his music often seems to me to oscillate back and forth between those two poles. There is both magical shimmer and sturdy architecture in his music.

    Gavilan is an eminence in Cuba. He is a celebrated conductor, composer, and teacher. Although some of his work is known and performed beyond that country, my sense is that it would be better known if the political situation between our countries hadn’t been so icy all these years. I absolutely love this performance of his choral piece El Guayaboso by Cantores de Cienfuegos — and I think you will too!

    The “artist”

    Adam Sliwinski has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2002. Adam is particularly interested in keyboard instruments, especially marimba and piano.

    Eric Cha-Beach has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2007-A consummate percussionist he loves to learn new instruments like the musical saw integrating them into diverse setups

    Jason Treuting is a founding member of Sō Percussion- Jason has pioneered an innovative drum set practice within the new music sphere. He is also a composer.

    Josh Quillen has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2006- Josh is an expert Steel Drum artist having studied in Trinidad and immersed himself in Steel Band culture.

    Our Mission:

    Sō Percussion is a percussion-based music organization that creates and presents new collaborative works to adventurous and curious audiences and educational initiatives to engaged students, while providing meaningful service to its communities, in order to exemplify the power of music to unite people and forge deep social bonds.
    Our Vision:

    To create a new model of egalitarian artistic collaboration that respects history, champions innovation and curiosity, and creates an essential social bond through service to our audiences and our communities.
    Ensemble Bio:

    Sō is: Eric Cha-Beach, Josh Quillen, Adam Sliwinski, and Jason Treuting

    With innovative multi-genre original productions, sensational interpretations of modern classics, and an “exhilarating blend of precision and anarchy, rigor and bedlam,” (The New Yorker), Sō Percussion has redefined the scope and vital role of the modern percussion ensemble.

    Sō’s repertoire ranges from “classics” of the 20th century, by John Cage, Steve Reich, and Iannis Xenakis, et al, to commissioning and advocating works by contemporary composers such as Caroline Shaw, David Lang, Steve Mackey, and Paul Lansky, to distinctively modern collaborations with artists who work outside the classical concert hall, including vocalist Shara Nova, electronic duo Matmos, the groundbreaking Dan Deacon, legendary drummer Bobby Previte, jam band kings Medeski, Martin, and Wood, Wilco’s Glenn Kotche, choreographer Shen Wei, and composer and leader of The National, Bryce Dessner, among many others.

    Sō Percussion also composes and performs their own works, ranging from standard concert pieces to immersive multi-genre programs – including Imaginary City, Where (we) Live, and A Gun Show, which was presented in a multi-performance presentation as part of BAM’s 2016 Next Wave Festival. In these concert-length programs, Sō Percussion employs a distinctively 21st century synthesis of original music, artistic collaboration, theatrical production values and visual art, into a powerful exploration of their own unique and personal creative experiences.

    Rooted in the belief that music is an essential facet of human life, a social bond, and an effective tool in creating agency and citizenship, Sō Percussion enthusiastically pursues a growing range of social and community outreach. Examples include their Brooklyn Bound presentations of younger composers; commitments to purchasing offsets to compensate for carbon-heavy activities such as touring travel; and leading their SōSI students in an annual food-packing drive, yielding up to 25,000 meals, for the Crisis Center of Mercer County through the organization EndHungerNE.

    Sō Percussion is the Edward T. Cone Ensemble-in-Residence at Princeton University, where they offer educational work and present an annual series of concerts. They are also Co-Directors of the percussion department at the Bard College-Conservatory of Music, and run the annual Sō Percussion Summer Institute (SōSI, now in its ninth year), providing college-age composers and percussionists an immersive exposure to collaboration and project development.

    One of the first things any group needs is a name. When our group was founded in 1999, we cast far and wide among our friends and family for suggestions. The winner was this simple, short word offered by Jenise Treuting, Jason’s sister.

    Jenise has been living and working in Japan as an English-Japanese translator for 20 years. The word “Sō” was punchy, enigmatic, and memorable.

    “The Sō in Sō Percussion comes from 奏, the second character in the compound Japanese word 演奏 (ensou), to perform music. By itself, so means “to play an instrument.” But it can also mean “to be successful,” “to determine a direction and move forward,” and “to present to the gods or ruler.” Scholars have suggested that the latter comes from the character’s etymology, which included the element “to offer with both hands.” 奏 is a bold, straightforward character, but lends itself to calligraphy with a certain energy that gives so a springy, delicate look.”

    – Jenise Treuting

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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