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  • richardmitnick 10:51 PM on August 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , New Music   

    From ECM via Dazzle: “SPOTLIGHT ON ECM” 

    New from From ECM

    via

    1

    Dazzle
    1512 Curtis St.
    Denver, CO 80202

    Dazzle has teamed up with ECM records to present a whole month packed full of some of the iconic label’s most prominent contemporary musicians.

    2

    3

    4

    5

    Featuring Two Colorado-Based Projects:

    6

    7

    Ticket packages

    From ECM which might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 7:36 AM on August 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , New Music   

    From Hearts of Space: “PGM 1121 : ‘DESERT REFLECTIONS'” 

    Music From the Hearts of Space

    3

    From Hearts of Space

    i1
    Stephen Hill

    About this program from Hearts of Space Stephen Hill tells us:
    After two centuries of novels and a century of films, the endless desert spaces of the American Southwest have taken on a mythic identity. The desert has become a metaphor for expansion, infinite opportunity, and the wild frontier — the scene of rough justice and adventure, and a place for self-discovery and reinvention.

    For Ambient musicians, the desert has long been a prime source of inspiration, a visual and spatial touchstone, a realm of vast vistas and profound silences. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, another journey in the sun-dried spaces of the American Southwest, on a program called DESERT REFLECTIONS.

    STEVE ROACH
    The Breathing Stone 05:23 >
    : WESTERN SPACES ; Fortuna 17051-2; 1990
    : Info: http://www.harmonies.com

    STEVE ROACH
    The Desert Eternal 19:22 >
    : LIVE IN TUCSON — PINNACLE MOMENTS ; Timeroom Editions TM37; 2016
    : Info: http://www.steveroach.com

    DAN POUND
    Moon Cast 28:04 >
    : SHADOWS OF THE HEART ; Pound Sounds PS18; 2016
    : Info: http://www.danpound.com

    D LOOP
    Planet to Planet 36:04 >
    : MYSTERY’S RIVER ; Third Ear 100-101; 2004
    : Info: http://www.dwightloop.com

    BRIAN PARNHAM
    Solace in Solitude 43:47 >
    : THE BROKEN SILENCE ; Floating Point FPR1001; 2010
    : Info: http://www.brianparnham.com

    STEVE ROACH
    Shadow of Time 54:33 >
    : SHADOW OF TIME ; Projekt PRO334; 2016
    : Info: http://www.projekt.com

    RUDY ADRIAN
    Of Clouds and Mountains 58:59 >
    : DESERT REALMS ; Lotuspike LSM 11; 2008
    : Info: http://www.spottedpeccary.com

    PRODUCED BY : Steve Davis and Stephen Hill

    From the program:
    1
    Mountain Mikey
    Mono Lake 57

    2
    Jorge Enrique Moran
    Mono Lake & Milky Way

    3
    Jon Feider
    Mono Lake View #2
    The view of Mono Lake, CA from US 395 just north of the lake.

    3
    Florent Ferrasse
    Mono Lake, july 2014

    The weekly program is FREE on Sundays

    Enjoy Hearts of Space in a variety of ways on your iPhone and many phones in the ANDROID system

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 6:02 PM on August 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , E4TT, New Music,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “Ensemble for These Times” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    Saturday, January 26, 2019
    at 7:30 PM

    Center for New Music
    55 Taylor Street
    San Francisco, CA 94102

    $5—15
    Tickets

    1

    Celebrating our Tenth Anniversary in 2017/18, Ensemble for These Times (E4TT) is a new music chamber group consisting of Van Cliburn competitor pianist Dale Tsang, 2015 winner of The American Prize in Composition, David Garner, award-winning soprano Nanette McGuinness, and cellist Anne Lerner-Wright.

    E4TT performs 20th and 21st century music—particularly by women composers or with texts by women poets—that is relevant, engaging, original, and compelling, music that resonates today and will speak to tomorrow. E4TT strongly believes in the power of artistic beauty, intelligence, wit, lyricism, and irony to create a deep understanding of our times and the human condition.

    Over the past decade years, E4TT has commissioned over 20 works for premiere in the U.S. and Europe in mix-and-match combination of songs for soprano and piano, solo works for piano, works for cello plus piano, and the occasional work for soprano, cello, and piano, a wonderfully resonant combination. We rebranded in 2015; our new name was inspired by one of E4TT’s first songs, “In dieser Zeit” (“In These Times”), to a poem by Mascha Kaléko, on the ensemble’s critically acclaimed 2016 debut CD, “Surviving: Women’s Words” (Centaur Recordings CRC3490), which won a Silver Medal in the Global Music Awards. The CD sets music to texts by Jewish women poets, reflecting on their wartime experiences and was made possible by grants from the SF Conservatory of Music and SFFCM’s Musical Grant Program.

    what we’ve done

    Formed in 2007/2008 when McGuinness encountered music by Garner during recording sessions at Skywalker Ranch, the Ensemble quickly grew to include pianist Dale Tsang. Co-produced by the Jewish Music Festival in Berkeley in 2011, the group made its international debut in 2012 at a concert produced by the Jüdische Gemeinde Berlin. In 2016 the ensemble toured to the Krakow Culture Festival in Poland and in 2014, the U.S. Embassy in Budapest sponsored the JMPP in a 4-city tour in Hungary as part of the Daniel Pearl World Music Days. Most recently, E4TT toured their “Guernica Project” to Madrid, Spain, in October, 2017. The group has received 15 national and local grants, with Bay Area performances at the German Consulate General, SF Conservatory of Music, Old First Concerts, Noontime Concerts, Berkeley Public Library, and Trinity Concerts, among other venues. The ensemble has received grants from the Clorox Foundation, the Puffin Foundation, the Zellerbach Family Foundation Community Arts Program, the Ross McKee Foundation, the East Bay Fund for Artists, the Jewish Music Commission of Los Angeles, The SFKrakow Sister Cities Association, and CCI’s Quick Capacity Fund. Since 2011, E4TT has been fiscally sponsored by InterMusic SF (formerly SF Friends of Chamber Music).

    where we’re going

    In our 2017/18 tenth anniversary season, we will continue our series, 56×54, presenting 56 works by 54 composers, chosen from our first Call for Scores in 2016, plus we premiere our next commisioning program, “Once/Memory/Night: Paul Celan.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:58 PM on August 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Brooks Frederickson, , New Music   

    From New Amsterdam Records: Brooks Frederickson’s “Small Works” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam Records

    NOW AVAILABLE:

    Brooks Frederickson’s
    Small Works
    available exclusively through
    New Amsterdam’s Bandcamp Subscription
    as part of new Windmill Series

    1
    Artwork by Katrina Neumann

    Small Works is the new album from Durham-based composer Brooks Frederickson. The record is available exclusively through New Amsterdam’s Bandcamp subscription as part of the Windmill Series, a new digitally-focused set of releases for subscribers in addition to our existing release schedule. Subscribe today to receive the album, which will be released on all other platforms on November 16.

    Composer Brooks Frederickson’s debut album Small Works is a snapshot of the community of collaborators Brooks lived and worked with in Brooklyn. The community includes some of the leading contemporary music interpreters of today: Ashley Bathgate (Bang on a Can All Stars), Eliza Bagg (Pavo Pavo), all three members of Bearthoven (Matt Evans, Karl Larson, Pat Swoboda), Exceptet, Longleash, and Brendon Randall-Myers (Invisible Anatomy / Marateck). Small Works comes from not only the small forces needed for each piece, but also from the small amount of material that acts as the germ for each piece.

    The album includes premiere recordings of four of Brooks’ chamber works written between 2014-2017. This group of pieces, some of which have been presented by MATA, premiered at Le Poisson Rouge and presented as a part of Sō Percussion’s Brooklyn Bound series, show Brooks’ interest in building musical worlds out of limited materials.

    The works were recorded at Oktaven Audio by Ryan Streber and Guilford Sound by Dave Snyder. The recordings have been edited, mixed and mastered by Ryan Streber at Oktaven Audio.

    In all of our presenting and recording activities, NewAm holds firmly to its mission to support artists whose work lies outside of traditional music industry infrastructure – whether that be classical, pop/rock/indie, jazz, world, or experimental. In pursuit of this calling, NewAm often collaborates with like-minded organizations. Our past and ongoing partnerships with the River to River Festival, Ecstatic Music Festival, Art of Elan, the Indianapolis Symphony (multi-year residency), MoMA PS 1, Liquid Music, Galapagos Artspace and National Sawdust have yielded high-profile opportunities for our artists to present their work. On the records side, we often partner with other labels in order to offer our artists the best possible representation for their projects. Partner labels have included Bedroom Community (Iceland), Nonclassical (UK), One Little Indian (UK), Sono Luminus (USA), Cantaloupe (USA) and NNA Tapes (USA).

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:33 PM on August 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , New Music,   

    From New Sounds: “Remixing Matt Marks” 

    From New Sounds
    Hand-picked music, genre free. 24/7 radio from New York City.

    John Schaefer by Marco Antonio

    New Sounds is proud to partner with Alarm Will Sound to announce Remixing Matt Marks: an ongoing, crowdsourced tribute celebrating the irrepressible imagination of the late composer-performer.

    Matt Marks by Taylor Dixson/Alarm Will Sound

    Alarm Will Sound via http://www.alarmwillsound.com

    Remixing Matt Marks invites composers and producers to indulge in the free-spirited pop sound and irreverent reconstruction of familiar songs for which Marks was known, and remix or cover his song, “A Song for Wade (This is not that song).”

    Stems for excerpts from “A Song for Wade (This is not that song)” can be downloaded here. We will post remixes (and any and all musical tributes for that matter) on this page as they come in, alongside a sentence or two description from the contributor. Please send your .mp3 file (under 25 MB) to newsoundsmusic@gmail.com.

    A founder of and French horn player in the adventurous ensemble Alarm Will Sound, Marks was a prodigious, at turns subversive and mischievous, composer who often took inspiration from pop music with its over-the-top production value and vocal lines. He penned the raucous orchestral arrangement of the Beatles’ “Revolution 9” for Alarm Will Sound, remixes of George Gershwin and pieces from Disney films, alongside covers of Shania Twain and “Somewhere That’s Green” from Little Shop of Horrors.

    His own inimitable brand of twisted, whimsical songwriting can be heard throughout his opera The Little Death Vol.1, a work he called a “post-Christian nihilist pop opera.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    NewSounds.org infuses the eclectic spirit of the radio show into a full online and live event experience. Combining the New Sounds radio show, WNYC’s Soundcheck podcast and the adventurous spirit of WQXR’s Q2 Music, NewSounds.org will be a place for discovery, conversation, insights into the creative process, and of course 24/7 music.
    The centerpiece is New Sounds Radio, an online station hosted by New Sounds founder and long-running host John Schaefer, but infused with new, emerging voices including experimental musicians Kelly Moran, Eliza Bagg and Lora-Faye Åshuvud, and tastemakers Gamall Awad and Matt Werth, along with WQXR’s Helga Davis and Terrance McKnight, and composer-guitarist Phil Kline. The station will feature an array of styles and genres – from singer Courtney Barnett to contemporary classical music ensemble Kronos Quartet, from jazz icon Henry Threadgill to the Nordic folk music of Wardruna, from electronic composer and bandleader Anna Meredith to the stunning vocals of Puerto Rico’s Ileana Cabra.
    “With almost everything ever recorded anywhere now available online, where do you start? New Sounds might be the place,” said John Schaefer. “We try to be friendly and jargon free, and gleefully oblivious of genre. Our goal is to find the artists, the songs, and the sounds that you might love – if only you get a chance to hear them. And we believe that algorithms won’t give you the same experience as a set of recommendations from real people. A friendly guide is the best way to discover new music, or music that defies easy categorization; and some of that music just might change your life.”
    “For three decades, New Sounds was one of the last bastions of free form FM programming; completely genre-free and dictated solely by the impeccable and irresistible tastes of its host,” said Alex Ambrose, Senior Producer, New Sounds. “NewSounds.org will usher that sense of discovery and unpredictability into the digital age, drawing on the best of New York’s curatorial and taste-making power.”

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:35 AM on August 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , New Music, Roomful of Teeth announces new 2018-2019 tour dates   

    From New Amsterdam Records: “Roomful of Teeth announces new 2018-2019 tour dates” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam Records

    Performances include the group’s
    annual residency and concert
    at MASS MoCA on August 24

    MASS MoCA by Jessica Rinaldi-Globe

    New album feat. the group’s performance of
    Luciano Berio’s Sinfonia with Seattle Symphony out now

    Room Full of Teeth by Bonica Ayala

    “Roomful of Teeth is making some of the most rigorously venturesome and thrillingly inventive music being made by any ensemble, vocal or instrumental.” – David Hajdu, The Nation

    “The agility of the voices and multicolored blend
    they achieve are extraordinary.”

    • Tom Huizenga, NPR

    “In addition to transforming the way
    contemporary composers write for the voice,
    Roomful of Teeth also possesses the ability to
    fundamentally change the way we listen.”

    • Amanda Cook, I Care If You Listen

    Grammy Award-winning vocal ensemble Roomful of Teeth announces new performances for 2018 and 2019 that include a production with groundbreaking director Peter Sellars, and a collaboration with acclaimed composer Bryce Dessner that honors the work of Robert Mapplethorpe.

    Upcoming tour dates include Roomful of Teeth’s 9th annual residency at MASS MoCA, where the group will work with guest artists Richard Beaudoin, Claire Chase, and American Composers Forum participants Mingjia Chen, Mary Kouyoumdjian and Peter S. Shin. The group’s residency will culminate in a performance on Friday, August 24 of Richard Beaudoin’s Another Woman of Another Kind (also featuring Claire Chase), and an arrangement of David Lang’s Little Match Girl Passion. More information here.

    Roomful of Teeth also recently performed live on PRI’s Studio 360. Click here to hear the group perform and discuss its inspirations, creative approach, and more.

    Roomful of Teeth’s live performances:
    Please see the full article for the listing of concerts with links.

    More about Roomful of Teeth

    Roomful of Teeth is a GRAMMY-winning vocal project dedicated to reimagining the expressive potential of the human voice. Through study with masters from vocal traditions the world over, the eight-voice ensemble continually expands its vocabulary of singing techniques and, through an ongoing commissioning process, forges a new repertoire without borders.

    Founded in 2009 by Brad Wells, Roomful of Teeth gathers annually at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA) in North Adams, Massachusetts, where they’ve studied with some of the world’s top performers and teachers in Tuvan throat singing, yodeling, Broadway belting, Inuit throat singing, Korean P’ansori, Georgian singing, Sardinian cantu a tenore, Hindustani music, Persian classical singing and Death Metal singing. Commissioned Composers include Rinde Eckert, Fred Hersch, Merrill Garbus (of tUnE-yArDs), William Brittelle, Toby Twining, Missy Mazzoli, Julia Wolfe, Ted Hearne and Ambrose Akinmusire, among many others.

    Roomful of Teeth is a registered 501(c)(3) not for profit organization. Learn more at http://www.roomfulofteeth.org

    In all of our presenting and recording activities, NewAm holds firmly to its mission to support artists whose work lies outside of traditional music industry infrastructure – whether that be classical, pop/rock/indie, jazz, world, or experimental. In pursuit of this calling, NewAm often collaborates with like-minded organizations. Our past and ongoing partnerships with the River to River Festival, Ecstatic Music Festival, Art of Elan, the Indianapolis Symphony (multi-year residency), MoMA PS 1, Liquid Music, Galapagos Artspace and National Sawdust have yielded high-profile opportunities for our artists to present their work. On the records side, we often partner with other labels in order to offer our artists the best possible representation for their projects. Partner labels have included Bedroom Community (Iceland), Nonclassical (UK), One Little Indian (UK), Sono Luminus (USA), Cantaloupe (USA) and NNA Tapes (USA).

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:08 PM on August 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 2018-19 Season Announcement, , New Music   

    From Eighth Blackbird: “Eighth Blackbird 2018-19 Season Announcement” 

    From Eighth Blackbird

    1

    Eighth Blackbird
    2018-19 Season Announcement

    Summer is winding down, but we’re gearing up for an adventurous new season of concerts, residencies and more. Rehearsals are now underway for our 2018-19 tour, which includes stops from our home state of Illinois to bella Italia. This year’s programs bring back old favorites like Jennifer Higdon’s dynamic concerto On a Wire with the Eugene Symphony, and last season’s centerpiece Olagón with Iarla Ó Lionáird for Kansas City’s Open Spaces Festival; new programs featuring work by Blackbird Creative Lab alums Nina Shekhar and Viet Cuong; the world premiere of a new piece by electroacoustic icon Pamela Z on the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Noon to Midnight Festival; and vibrant educational work through continued residencies at the University of Richmond, UNCSA and more.

    We’re still adding dates to this schedule, so keep an eye open for events that you can catch in a town near you. And don’t hesitate to get your tickets now!

    Buy tickets

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition


    Nathalie Joachim, flutes • Michael J. Maccaferri, clarinets • Yvonne Lam, violin & viola •
    Nick Photinos, cello • Matthew Duvall, percussion • Lisa Kaplan, piano

    Eighth Blackbird is “one of the smartest, most dynamic contemporary classical ensembles on the planet” (Chicago Tribune). Launched by six entrepreneurial Oberlin Conservatory undergraduates in 1996, this Chicago-based super-group has earned its status as “a brand-name…defined by adventure, vibrancy and quality….known for performing from memory, employing choreography and collaborations with theater artists, lighting designers and even puppetry artists” (Detroit Free Press).

    Eighth Blackbird’s mission—moving music forward through innovative performance, advocating for new music by living composers, and creating a legacy of guiding an emerging generation of musicians —extends beyond recording and touring to curation and education. The ensemble served as Music Director of the 2009 Ojai Music Festival, has held residencies at the Curtis Institute of Music and at the University of Chicago, and holds an ongoing Ensemble-in-Residence position at the University of Richmond. The 2015-16 season featured a pioneering residency at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art: a living installation with open rehearsals, performances, guest artists, and public talks. In 2017, Eighth Blackbird launched its boldest initiative yet with the creation of Blackbird Creative Laboratory, a tuition-free, two-week summer workshop and performance festival for performers and composers in Ojai, CA.

    Eighth Blackbird’s members hail from the Great Lakes, Keystone, Golden, Empire and Bay states. The name “Eighth Blackbird” derives from the eighth stanza of Wallace Stevens’s evocative, imagistic poem, Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird: “I know noble accents / And lucid, inescapable rhythms; / But I know, too, / That the blackbird is involved / In what I know.”

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:00 PM on August 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Cultural exchange, New Music,   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Morocco, Iceland, Finland, and Cyprus: To Change and Be Changed” 

    New Music USA


    From NEWMUSICBOX

    August 16, 2018
    Passepartout Duo

    1

    Before getting into the details of how we discover and apply to artist residency opportunities, we wanted to share our thoughts on some of the benefits to performers and composers of continual travel for music. The main takeaway is that every artist residency is different in its financial burden, its scope, and its circumstance; we’d like to encourage people to take on engagements of every kind, not just those which offer stipends and plentiful resources.

    Marrakech, Morocco // Flexibility

    2

    In April 2017, we were in residence at Dar Slimane, in a remote location outside of Marrakech, Morocco. Part of the institution’s mission is to revitalize desertified land altered by years of unsustainable agriculture, while also supporting artists in an interesting cultural environment. There are residencies of all sizes out there, and Dar Slimane represents those of the smallest size, where just a local couple is essentially hosting artists in their home. It has a completely different dynamic from those like Avaloch Farm or Banff that musicians often turn to, but one we’ve come to cherish in its own right. Small residencies are normally run by artists themselves, and they can connect you with the local community and environment in ways that huge institutions cannot. The key lesson we learned through our experience, and the one that made participating in this residency possible, was to be flexible artistically.

    For the first time, we had a circumstance that necessitated leaving our instrument comfort-zone. We knew there wouldn’t be a piano on the premises, and that we would only be in residence for two weeks. Our solution was to learn and record a piece by Christopher Adler that is scored only for instruments that could all easily fit in a carry-on suitcase. The piece was great for this situation but, better yet, it was a choice that set us on a path to seek out increasingly more portable solutions. Here’s our current traveling instrumentation, as it existed in Åland a couple months ago:

    3

    Our stay in Morocco represented the first time we wondered, “Should pianists only apply to residencies that provide a grand piano? Do we need to find a five-octave marimba?” Prefaced by saying that we believe there are an incredible set of residencies all offering beautiful pianos, of course our answer to these questions is no. A recurring theme in the classical music world is to “bring classical music outside of the concert hall,” but that’s not a proposition we can pursue without changing our perception of what is needed for a performance.

    Our desire to continue working within situations as culturally vibrant and influential as ours in Morocco has played an important role in how we’re approaching music now. We had a bug—not having a proper instrumentation—that has now been transformed into a feature of our ensemble: being able to travel and perform anywhere. We’d encourage anyone to extend the perimeter of their comfort zone when it comes to artist residencies. Whether it’s about being away from home, having limited resources, or stretching what is financially possible, usually the good will outweigh the bad in the end and you’ll come out with inspiring experiences that would’ve otherwise never happened.

    4
    5

    We were in northern Iceland for a residency at Listhús art space that coincided with their Skammdegi Festival. During our nine-week stay we: recorded an EP, filmed three music videos, played on the Dark Music Days Festival, were on the Radio and TV in Icelandic, had a small house concert tour, and met a dozen other inspiring artists (from the town and abroad). We were even extras on a Netflix show. By our standards, that’s a lot for nine weeks in a completely new location. It wasn’t like we were stretched to our limits either; in the dark and cold North, we had the time to be introspective, to catch up on typical admin work, and still had plenty of energy for fun and discovery within this unique place in the world.

    It did come at a price, though. Not all residencies are free, and this was the most expensive one we’ve participated in. The fee and expenses of living in Iceland can sound a bit difficult to swing for most people, but an eagerness to take on this opportunity helped us to find a way to make it work.

    One of the hidden benefits of distant travel as an artist is the ability to accrue funding from grants not only from your home city/country, but also abroad. Our residency proposition in Iceland opened us up to many different funding bodies in the Nordic countries that helped us to build a project across many locations and disciplines. We were able to couple the opportunity with an advantageous festival appearance that also helped offset the cost.

    Grants and funding aside, we think that giving a fee per month to an arts organization that needs it, is so much more satisfying than giving that money to a landlord. Our project in the Nordic countries quickly expanded to include festival appearances, composer commissions, and residencies in Finland, Norway, Sweden, the Faroe Islands, and Denmark. Although it took a leap of faith and a small initial investment, this larger project that accumulated support on the way would have never happened without the Listhús residency as a catalyst.

    Fiskars, Finland // City Living and Quality of Life

    6

    Fiskars, a small town outside Helsinki that is owned by the Fiskars company, is a true “artists’ village.” Funds from the company helped facilitate an influx of Helsinki-based artists to live and work in the vacant factory buildings. Though a town of just 600 or so permanent inhabitants, it is somehow an epicenter of arts and culture. Couple that with Finland’s incredible public education and social programs, and it’s hard to imagine a place with a higher quality of life for musicians.

    It’s easy to think that media center cities like Los Angeles and Paris are the only places it’s possible to be a contemporary musician in touch with the vanguard, but traveling has shown us something different. Going to an artist residency somewhere halfway across the world will give you an outsider’s perspective on your own life and the current circumstances in which you live. It will also give you a window into another kind of lifestyle you may not have yet encountered.

    The lesson we’ve learned this time is that the best place for you to choose to settle down may not be the city you grew up near and it doesn’t have to be automatically the city you went to school in; it’s possibly even somewhere you haven’t heard of yet.

    Treis Elies, Cyprus // Local and global communities

    7
    8
    9

    We stayed in the small town of Treis Elies, Cyprus this past July as part of the Kammari Residency. Kammari was very recently started by a small group of Finnish/Cypriot artists and philosophers. With just 20 permanent residents, the town of Treis Elies represents a shift in Europe where small rural villages are losing residents and becoming uninhabited. With several young couples moving to Treis Elies from abroad, the village’s make-up is now a mix of an older Cypriot generation and a new very international one, not without clashes of lifestyles. The introduction of the artist residency has created a foundation for these two different cultures to interact on and this has drastically changed the sense of community within the village. In Treis Elies, meals and drinks are shared on a daily basis regardless of age, language, or background. In a place with a history such as Cyprus’s we felt this message was very powerful: that artist residencies propose the ability to change a cultural landscape.

    La Casa del Herrero in Torralba de Ribota, Spain (population 188) is doing the very same thing: it represents one of three artist residencies in the same small village, and it contributes to building a vibrant and inclusive community there. Our experiences at these residencies were not only defined by the art we encountered, but also defined by memories of conversations shared over lunchtime backgammon and late-night barbecues in many languages. We learn about different cultures and communities in this way and often can draw parallels between them.

    The people we know, and have met on the way, are what have made our experiences meaningful, more than the places we’ve been. It’s both for us and for these communities we encounter that we hope to start new discussions about art and create shared memories during our travels.

    Morocco, Iceland, Finland, and Cyprus: it was a general openness toward going anywhere and an eagerness to share our music with anyone who will listen that brought us to these places. We’ve learned a lot along the way, and hope that by seeing these four examples you’re encouraged to travel somewhere not only because you want to go there, but also because you think it might expand your world, practice, or ideology in some way. Traveling somewhere new provides us with a thought-provoking invitation, applicable in both life and in new music: to change and be changed.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:54 PM on August 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: New Music, , Speak Now: #45miniatures   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Speak Now: #45miniatures” 

    New Music USA


    From NEWMUSICBOX

    August 15, 2018
    Nicholas Phillips

    1

    Several composers have written eloquently on this site about how the 2016 presidential election and its aftermath have affected their work. They’ve advised that ultimately, no matter how paralyzed they feel, it is time to create, even if their job as composers has now changed. Margaret Atwood wrote a great article about what art can, should, or will be made under the current administration. And she makes a good point when she says that the president won’t even notice, rating his interest in the arts somewhere between zero and negative 10 (on a scale from 1 to 100).
    I found myself wondering what I could do, as a performer.

    To me, the result of the election was an “unpresidented” [sic] embarrassment on a global level, and continues to be as we all witness the daily barrage of tantrums and tweets. But I found myself wondering what I could do, as a performer. I felt compelled to do something, and regrettably I had not yet read this great article about what many other performers were up to, or discovered projects such as the Activist Songbook or this hilarious piece.

    So, late at night on August 9, 2017 (I’m pretty sure it was after reading about North Korea and how “Trump’s ‘Fire and Fury’ Threat Raises Alarms in Asia”), I turned to the one thing I know I can always count on: sarcasm. I posted on Facebook that I was thinking of commissioning a piece called Suite #45, or potentially writing it myself. I listed a humorous set of possible characteristics (which I’ve also listed here):

    movements limited to 140 notes, 140 measures, 140 phrases, or other permutations of the Twitter character limit
    erratic shifts of: character, dynamic, articulation, tempo
    improvisatory sections that do not relate in any way to the thematic material of the piece, or commonly accepted musical practices. In ANY way.
    playful/childish outbursts, in the form of “heckler chords” or “bad hombre-like non-chord tones” with shocking key area explorations highly encouraged!
    “tonality-change” denier (i.e. Anti-Modulation) sympathies
    structural musical elements in no way qualified to be a part of supporting the administration of the composition
    short, repeated motifs that are expressed vehemently (but not developed), then forgotten by the average listener at crucial later moments when they could change the appreciation/understanding of the piece
    a blatantly critical and unwavering sense of self-importance, in the face of wide-spread critical disdain, and limited audience base.

    It was a moment of comic relief, shared with my friends. It made me feel better, at least temporarily, and then I went to bed.

    But something quite unexpected happened. The next morning, there were a lot of notifications on my phone. People loved the idea and encouraged me to actually do it. Having devoted a significant amount of my own professional career over the past decade to contemporary piano music, both in recital programming and through commissioning projects like American Vernacular: New Music for Solo Piano, it seemed like a natural fit. After some thought, I set up an open “Call for Scores” and changed the name to #45miniatures, combining the hashtag styling of Trump’s favorite social media pastime and a word with obvious double entendre implications.

    This call was done entirely on Facebook, and 24 composers (including a violist and a pianist!) responded expressing interest. No one cared about a commissioning fee, though I set up a GoFundMe campaign anyway to try and generate some funds to be distributed equally among the composers. As scores started coming in I was – as I always am – amazed by the creativity and craft of the participating composers.

    One piece for speaking pianist takes text from the campaign, punctuating each section with “SAD!” Another combines clusters with an increasingly louder, faster chant of “LOCK HER UP!” and incorporates a Dies Irae recitative. There is a toccata that systematically removes all pitches until only Ds are left.

    A palindromic chaconne leads to a “wall” in the middle before reversing itself all the way back to the first note. Text from tweets and speeches feature prominently in many, and musical quotations abound (from “If I Only Had a Brain” to our National Anthem). Some are very serious; some are definitely not. These are just a few; you can read about of the pieces I have received to date here.

    However, a few things didn’t sit right. First, I began feeling uncomfortable thinking of the project as “mine” in any sort of singular way. Performers often hold tight to the right for a premiere or first recording, and in many cases this makes sense. But #45miniatures isn’t about me. It is about the music and the message it sends. The mere presence of a body of work in response to this presidency is, in itself, powerful.
    #45miniatures isn’t about me. It is about the music and the message it sends.

    Second, why should I limit this to composers who happened to have seen the call on my Facebook wall? Many of these people are my friends, but we all know how much is missed on that platform, as Facebook’s algorithms decide what you should see on any given day based on your interactions (or non-interactions) with your friends. Surely there are others who are looking for an outlet like this?

    The conclusion I came to was that this really needs to be a collective, open-source project, so I created this #45miniatures website to connect us all. You can read about the project there, and view perusal scores. (Funny story, the sub-heading on the homepage was suggested by the Wix auto template design robots in nanoseconds after seeing my title. I’ve ordered hats, but they are currently held up at customs, due to the trade war.)

    Here’s the important part:

    Pianists: Want to get involved? Great! You are welcome here. You can peruse any score that I’ve received. See something you like and want to program? Contact the composer and get a score. I don’t have to premiere anything. This music should be programmed and played all over the country and globe. The News/Media section of the website will be a great place to share info about performances and audio/video links.

    Composers: Do you have an idea and want to write something after reading this article? Great! Please get in touch. I took everyone who responded to the initial call for scores, and I genuinely welcome as diverse an array of composers as I can possibly have. This is a work in progress, but I would love to eventually see a published book of all the miniatures that come in.

    I believe history will be the ultimate judge of this president, but art must be a part of the contemporary response.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:19 AM on August 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Fall Season, New Music,   

    From Roulette: “ROULETTE’S 40TH YEAR BEGINS!” 

    Roulette Intermedium

    From Roulette

    This September we kick off our 40th anniversary year with an exciting season of Roulette veterans, including Sally Silvers, Darius Jones, Bill Frisell, and Elliott Sharp, as well as emerging artists Kelly Moran, Tomas Fujiwara, Brandon Lopez, and so many others. Our gala, honoring Hal Willner and featuring a performance by Laurie Anderson, takes place at the end of October.

    Fall 2018 Season Lineup

    SEPTEMBER
    Tues, Sept 4 • Brandon Lopez Trio

    Fri, Sept 7 • Kelly Moran: Music for Piano and Electronics

    Tues, Sept 11 • Resonant Bodies Festival 2018: Paul Pinto, Helga Davis, Lucy Dhegrae

    Wed, Sept 12 • Resonant Bodies Festival 2018: Jen Shyu, Caroline Shaw

    Thurs, Sept 13 • Resonant Bodies Festival 2018: Sarah Maria Sun, Pamela Z, Gelsey Bell

    Sun, Sept 16 • The Jamie Baum Septet+

    Sept 19–20 • High Zero Festival of Experimental Improvised Music

    Mon, Sept 24 • Konk Pack Trio

    OCTOBER
    Mon, Oct 1 • Brandon Seabrook Trio

    Sun, Oct 7 • Ken Thomson Sextet

    Wed, Oct 10 • Tomas Fujiwara: 7 Poets Trio

    Tues, Oct 16 • Joseph C Phillips Jr & Numinous: The Grey Land

    Wed, Oct 17 • Tania Chen, M.C. Schmidt, Jon Leidecker: Monitored Feldman

    Thurs, Oct 25 • Roulette’s 40th Anniversary Benefit honoring Hal Willner

    NOVEMBER
    Thurs, Nov 1 • Elliott Sharp: IrRational Music

    Mon, Nov 5 • Darius Jones: For The People

    Sun, Nov 11 • ICE: 100 for 100: Musical Decades of Freedom

    Sun, Nov 18 • Ross Feller & Kora Radella: Reckoning: Music and Motion

    Tues, Nov 27 • Webber/ Morris Big Band: Reverses

    Nov 29 –Dec 1 • Sally Silvers & Dancers: Along

    DECEMBER
    Mon, Dec 3 • Sylvie Courvoisier Trio // Nate Wooley: Battle Pieces IV

    Tues, Dec 4 • loadbang: The Music That Defines

    Wed, Dec 5 • Wayne Horvitz: The Snowghost Sessions

    Thurs, Dec 20 • Bill Frisell

    Friday, Dec 21 • Phill Niblock: 6 Hours of Music and Film


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Mission

    Roulette’s mission is to support artists creating new and adventurous art in all disciplines by providing them with a venue and resources to realize their creative visions and to build an audience interested in the evolution of experimental art.

    History

    Roulette Intermedium was founded in 1978 at the height of the Downtown Experimental Arts revolution by three young composers: trombonist/composer Jim Staley, composer/producer David Weinstein, and Intermedia artist Dan Senn. The informal concerts they presented in a small loft space in TriBeCa in Manhattan soon attracted an audience and critical attention. The first donation – an unsolicited and unexpected check for $1,000 – arrived in the mail from the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, suggested by noted composer, John Cage. By the mid-1980s, Roulette had emerged as “a landmark for New York’s downtown new music composers.”

    Over the next three decades, Roulette attracted a steadily growing audience and worldwide reputation as a center for musical innovation. Seminal pioneering figures who have presented their work at Roulette, oftentimes early in their careers, include Maryanne Amacher, Robert Ashley, Anthony Braxton, Simone Forti, Bill Frisell, Philip Glass, Yusef Lateef, Christian Marclay, Meredith Monk, Ikue Mori, Pauline Oliveros, Zeena Parkins, Arthur Russell, Kaija Saariaho, Wadada Leo Smith, Henry Threadgill, and John Zorn. Roulette continues to make a mark as a venue where scores of promising avant-garde artists make their first professional statements. Representatives of the latest generation of composing artists who have recently developed and presented works at Roulette include Aaron Burnette, Maria Chavez, Phyllis Chen, Jennifer Choi, Mario Diaz de Leon, Mary Halvorson, Darius Jones, Mary Kouyoumdjian, Alfredo Marin, Tristan Perich, Matana Roberts, Tyshawn Sorey, Ben Stapp, C. Spencer Yeh and many more.

    As audiences grew and rents in lower Manhattan began to rise, the staff and Board members began the search for a larger, more flexible and affordable home. On September 15th, 2011, Roulette opened a new chapter in its history when it moved into the 1928 Memorial Hall in the Downtown Brooklyn Cultural District. The new 400-seat theater allows us to expand our presentations along with our services to artists and our community; each season, we now present more than 100 music, dance, and intermedia performances. Our annual attendance now tops 60,000.

    In recent years, Roulette has effected a major transition, expanding programs, audiences and community, but it is still an artist-driven space, valued for its payment of professional guaranteed fees, its insistence on the best presentation conditions, and the provision of other critical artists’ services. Our GENERATE Program, supported for more than 30 years by the Jerome Foundation and other private and public support, awards emerging and established composers commissions and/or monetary stipends along with extensive rehearsal time in Roulette’s theater, access to audio and lighting equipment and technical staff to help them with their experiments, and full production support for performances of the work created during the residency.

    Our programming has expanded globally through Roulette’s online and television broadcast programs where audiences all over the world can explore the treasures of our archives. Roulette TV features senior figures of the avant-garde movement and their young successors.

    Roulette is one of the few surviving organizations to maintain its identity as an Artists’ Space and its commitment to bring the experimental performing arts to a wider public; its history of performances (preserved in an archive that contains nearly 3,000 hours of recordings and videos), leaves a detailed and distinguished record of almost four decades of artistic development, experimentation, and achievement.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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