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  • richardmitnick 3:14 PM on November 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Nico Muhly,   

    From The Rest is Noise via the New Yorker: “Nico Muhly Escapes Hitchcock with a “Marnie” Opera” 

    From The Rest is Noise

    Alex Ross, by E.H Jan 17th 2013

    November 5, 2018
    Alex Ross

    1
    Illustration by Cynthia Kittler

    “Didone,” “Norma,” “Tosca,” “Salome,” “Elektra,” “Lulu”: the operatic repertory overflows with works that take their title from a doomed female character, one who is made to undergo a kind of ritual sacrifice. It is a pattern that goes far back: the genre began with Daphne turning into a laurel tree and with Eurydice being dragged back to Hades. Even so, opera’s dependence on the female voice had the effect of empowering singers, who attained unusual cultural authority during eras when women were generally consigned to the social periphery.

    Nico Muhly by Samantha West

    Nico Muhly’s new opera, “Marnie,” which was first seen at the English National Opera last year and is now at the Met, extends and revises that troubling history. The work is drawn from two eponymous sources: Winston Graham’s novel, from 1961, and Alfred Hitchcock’s film, from 1964. Marnie is a sociopathic young woman who routinely invents new identities, steals from her employers, and then vanishes. The story is, on its face, a stereotypical male fantasy of female neurosis: the Hitchcock version borders on misogynist hysteria. From this twisted material, Muhly fashions an absorbing, ambiguous, and haunting entertainment.

    The opera, which has a libretto by the British playwright Nicholas Wright, is based more on the novel than on the film, although the icy allure of the Hitchcock style is undoubtedly the reason “Marnie” has arrived at the Met. Graham was a prolific novelist who is best remembered for his “Poldark” series—historical romances that have been adapted by the BBC. His “Marnie” is told in the first person, and delivers its bizarre narrative with unexpected wit and flair. The protagonist at first finds a hardboiled thrill in pulling off her heists, but is eventually forced to confront the familial trauma that is said to drive her: it turns out that her mother fell into prostitution, became pregnant, and killed the baby to avoid shame.

    The most shocking moment in “Marnie”—book, film, and opera alike—is when Mark Rutland, the head of the printing company where Marnie is employed, attempts to rape her. Mark has seen through her latest scam but is in love with her all the same. He blackmails her into marrying him, then forces himself on her when she refuses his advances. In the novel, Marnie is allowed to speak of her “repulsion and horror”; Graham takes no sadistic pleasure in the situation. The same cannot be said of Hitchcock. It was apparently the rape scene that drew the director to the story, and he filmed it in a grotesquely detached, pseudo-artistic manner. The sequence is even more intolerable in light of the testimony of the actress Tippi Hedren, who played Marnie: in a 2016 memoir, she described how Hitchcock had sexually harassed her.

    In the opera, nothing mitigates the horror of Mark’s act. As Marnie fights him off, she asks, “Do you know what I mean when I say ‘No’?” The last word is drawn out in an anguished melisma. She escapes to the bathroom and attempts suicide by slitting her wrists. The orchestra flails and screams along with her. As a composer, Muhly is attracted to glittering sounds, elegantly intertwining lyrical lines, and austere polyphonic textures modelled on Renaissance and Anglican choral music. His uncharacteristic choice here of a harsh, brittle texture indicates that the violation is again being told from Marnie’s point of view.

    Throughout, Muhly’s chief concern is to show the individuation of the protagonist. At the beginning of the opera, Marnie inhabits a male-dominated world in which women are treated as interchangeable objects. An opening scene in a secretarial pool has female employees chanting in unison—“I enclose an invoice for our services,” “I like your nails”—as the orchestra chatters and pulses around them, with high winds predominating. Sustained tones in the lower brass suggest the weight of the male gaze. Marnie has a knack for manipulating the predictable behavior of male colleagues. She is shadowed by a quartet of look-alikes in candy-colored coats, who form a kind of madrigal ensemble, singing in cool tones without vibrato. Ingeniously, they represent both Marnie’s seductiveness and her internal confusion.

    Marnie’s game falls apart when two men become too curious about her: Mark, who is propelled by a murky mixture of aggression and sympathy; and Mark’s brother Terry, who is purely malevolent, seeking to destroy Marnie after she spurns him. Marnie’s own shell begins to crack after memories of her childhood resurface, partly through the mediation of a male psychoanalyst. In the end, though, she experiences an epiphany on her own. She gives herself up to the police, and it is not at all clear that she will go back to Mark when she is released.

    Muhly, who is thirty-seven, burst onto the musical scene a little over a decade ago. There has never been doubt about his prodigious talent, even if he has sometimes been too distracted by his myriad musical loves. “Two Boys” and “Dark Sisters,” his first two operas, offered magical set pieces but suffered from dramatic deficiencies. Parts of Act I of “Marnie” follow the same pattern, lacking momentum. Act II is another matter: Muhly assumes command, filtering the action through his restless lyric voice. The four central characters—Marnie, Mark, Terry, and Marnie’s mother—are beautifully differentiated, with melodic contours and instrumental timbres tailored for each. Marnie’s instrument is the oboe, and the opera’s trajectory is telegraphed in the first bars, where a sustained oboe note is drowned out by a shrill trumpet and by grunts of brass. By the end, as Marnie sings “I’m free!” in upward-vaulting intervals, she is accompanied by an intricate, vital new sonority of piccolos, celesta, harp, and bowed crotales.

    The Met marshalled an élite cast on opening night. Isabel Leonard, as Marnie, used her rich-hued mezzo to trace the character’s complicated layers. The baritone Christopher Maltman was similarly agile as Mark: he brought a vacant, self-involved air to his rapt Act II aria, in which he compares Marnie to a startled deer. The countertenor Iestyn Davies made for a chillingly incisive Terry; Denyce Graves lent a bracing tinge of Tennessee Williams melodrama to the role of Marnie’s mother. Robert Spano presided over a virtuosic orchestral and choral performance. The production, directed by Michael Mayer, is both chic and affecting. Fluid sets and projections, by Julian Crouch and 59 Productions, deftly cover more than twenty changes of scene. The costumes, by Arianne Phillips, play Marnie’s bright colors against a dull-gray background. The intrusion of the four doppelgängers and of a squad of fedora-wearing male dancers suggests that at least half of what we see is taking place in Marnie’s mind.

    What if a woman had taken on the task of composing “Marnie”? The Met has presented only two operas by women in its history: Ethel Smyth’s “Der Wald,” in 1903; and Kaija Saariaho’s “L’Amour de Loin,” in 2016. The company recently signalled that it will begin to correct this dismal record by commissioning operas from Missy Mazzoli and Jeanine Tesori. I was particularly excited to hear of the Mazzoli project—an adaptation of George Saunders’s novel “Lincoln in the Bardo.” Mazzoli is of Muhly’s generation, and has made her name with stories of gnashing Expressionist power. “Breaking the Waves,” her first evening-length opera, buffeted audiences at Opera Philadelphia two seasons ago. “Proving Up,” a smaller-scale but no less disconcerting piece, had its première earlier this year, and was staged in September at Columbia University’s Miller Theatre.

    Mazzoli’s favorite collaborator is the prolific librettist Royce Vavrek, who has shaken up the timid, backward-looking business of American opera. “Proving Up,” based on a story by Karen Russell, is set on the Nebraska plains in the late nineteenth century, but it is blunt, stark, and devoid of nostalgia. As in “Breaking the Waves,” Mazzoli wrings ferocious intensity from familiar-seeming materials: folkish ballads and wheezing harmonicas are blended into a gorgeously eerie orchestral fabric, one that includes dangling guitars brushed with whisks. Andrew Harris, a young Berlin-based singer with a striking black-toned bass, provided the stuff of nightmares with his turn as a supernatural apparition known as the Sodbuster. The unleashing of Mazzoli’s apocalyptic imagination on the huge Met stage is an occasion eagerly awaited. ♦

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century is a voyage into the labyrinth of modern music, which remains an obscure world for most people. While paintings of Picasso and Jackson Pollock sell for a hundred million dollars or more, and lines from T. S. Eliot are quoted on the yearbook pages of alienated teenagers across the land, twentieth-century classical music still sends ripples of unease through audiences. At the same time, its influence can be felt everywhere. Atonal chords crop up in jazz. Avant-garde sounds populate the soundtracks of Hollywood thrillers. Minimalism has had a huge effect on rock, pop, and dance music from the Velvet Underground onward.

    The Rest Is Noise shows why twentieth-century composers felt compelled to create a famously bewildering variety of sounds, from the purest beauty to the purest noise. It tells of a remarkable array of maverick personalities who resisted the cult of the classical past, struggled against the indifference of a wide public, and defied the will of dictators. Whether they have charmed audiences with sweet sounds or battered them with dissonance, composers have always been exuberantly of the present, defying the stereotype of classical music as a dying art. The narrative goes from Vienna before the First World War to Paris in the twenties, from Hitler’s Germany and Stalin’s Russia to downtown New York in the sixties and seventies. We follow the rise of mass culture and mass politics, of dramatic new technologies, of hot and cold wars, of experiments, revolutions, riots, and friendships forged and broken. The end result is not so much a history of twentieth-century music as a history of the twentieth century through its music.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 12:31 PM on October 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Nico Muhly,   

    From The New York Times: “Nico Muhly on the Drama of Bringing His New Opera to the Met” 

    New York Times

    From The New York Times

    1
    Nico Muhly on rehearsing his new opera, “Marnie”: “I figure it’s only fair of me to be flexible.”CreditCreditDaniel Dorsa for The New York Times

    Nico Muhly by Samantha West

    Bedroom Community,Valgeir Sigurðsson, Nico Muhly, Ben Frost, Nadia Sirota, Sam Amidon, Daníel Bjarnason, Puzzle Muteson. by EuphemiaUCAS

    Oct. 17, 2018
    Nico Muhly

    “Marnie,” my new opera, which has its American premiere on Friday at the Metropolitan Opera, is about a woman who lies, steals, gets caught and is forced to marry a man who sexually assaults her. It’s delicate material — to say the least — and deeply plot-driven, and the dramatic structure has to be airtight to allow room for expressive musicality.

    The director, Michael Mayer, called me with the idea for a “Marnie” opera five years ago. The story is most famous from the Hitchcock film, but we found that the 1961 Winston Graham novel on which it’s based was a far richer source of psychological tension and freed us from any visual or musical entanglements with the movie. That first notion blossomed into a wonderful libretto by Nicholas Wright, which then turned into a giant stack of manuscript.

    Now, in the days before opening, among the orchestra, the chorus, the principal singers, the stage crew, spot ops, dressers, wig-makers, etc., there are hundreds of people reacting to this document; it’s a huge, thrilling, anxiety-producing setup.

    In the middle of rehearsal last week, Nick Wright, Michael and I had a sudden revelation: One of the arias, already endlessly fretted over, was seriously hindering the dramatic flow. The aria, in which Marnie tries to escape her husband but catches herself having second thoughts, was musically satisfying. I’d spent ages getting a kind of throbbing brass chorale to work; there was a clever interplay between the oboe and the voice; and Nick’s text gave us what we thought was a much-needed window into Marnie’s state of mind.


    Marnie: TrailerCreditCreditVideo by Metropolitan Opera

    But when Michael was staging the scenes that precede and follow this moment, it immediately became clear that the entire dramatic beat was unnecessary: We were “telling, not showing,” the classic drama-school no-no, and the aria took what should have felt like a satisfying gravitational pull toward the final scene and stalled it midair. (I was reminded of Boris Johnson’s humiliating zip-line ride, where he got stuck in the middle of it, bobbing helplessly over the park.)

    What if we just — cut it? I rushed over to the full score, figured out a way to make the snip work musically — scooch the oboe’s entrance over a bar; get rid of some vestigial gongs — and we tried it out: It was so much better. It felt like we’d obeyed Coco Chanel’s advice: “Before you leave the house, look in the mirror and take one thing off.” The conductor, Robert Spano, and I mourned the musical loss over a negroni but toasted to how much more successful the last 30 (now 26) minutes of the show would be without it.

    With a piece of concert music, I can tell, more or less, if the structure holds together just by looking through the manuscript in my studio. With a piece of theater, however, I find that on paper and even in rehearsals, the overall soundness of the structure is always just slightly out of view. It’s when you see an opera on stage for the first time with an audience that it feels like shining a black light on a crime scene: Even if you thought you’d carefully wiped clean all of the strange incisions and seams of the compositional process, you’ve still missed a spot.

    2
    Isabel Leonard, center, as the title character in “Marnie” at the Metropolitan Opera.Credit Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

    None of this sort of work is, for me, fully possible to execute if I’m sitting at my desk at home. It requires being in the room with Michael; with Nick; with Isabel Leonard, who plays Marnie; with Paul Cremo, the Met’s dramaturg; and seeing the scenes unfold in real time.

    I want to know what Isabel thinks about a given transition: She is the one who has to communicate what I wrote, and if there’s anything I can do to help her do that with grace and power, I feel that’s my job as a composer. If I can change an E flat to an F to make the text clearer, I will do it; if we need a better word, Nick will come over, and we’ll confer about how to make it all sync up. When I write a piece of orchestral music, I can be as controlling as I want, but with a piece this big, I try to be the opposite of precious.

    The practical process of mounting an opera is much more crabwise than one might suspect. For the first three weeks, the cast works in a subterranean rehearsal room with the actual floor of the set recreated; some of the real furniture and props are there, but, for example, the tall sliding panels in our full design are represented by shorter, temporary ones. There is a tag team of brilliant rehearsal pianists, the conductor, two assistant conductors, the director, two assistant directors, the stage manager, an assistant stage manager, the dramaturg — and me, in the corner with piles of scores and laptops and iPads and snacks.

    The chorus, which has been rehearsing and memorizing this work since the summer, comes half a dozen times, but not necessarily to work in any particular order; we might find ourselves staging the ending with the chorus before staging the beginning with the cast. We see the orchestra, which is equally busy, in its rehearsal room once or twice without the singers, then twice with the singers — but never with the chorus.

    Two weeks before we open, we start spending the mornings on the main stage with only the pianists. Visual elements creep in: lighting, projections, costumes, with all their attendant joys and problems. (The tracks in the floor seem to be of a thickness precisely designed to entrap the elegant high heels most of the women in this production wear.)

    The week before we open, we have a morning per act with everything (chorus, orchestra, heels), a complete run-through with piano, a complete final dress rehearsal with everything — then opening. The wildest thing about this schedule is that it means that before opening night, there is only one opportunity to see the whole show as a complete piece of theater, which is oftentimes when some of the more deeply-hidden knots reveal themselves. On opening night of “Dark Sisters,” in 2011, I felt a small amount of air leave the theater when I suddenly realized that I’d boxed the show in with a clumsy transition between an indoor space and an abstract outdoor space; I hadn’t perceived this until then.

    My inbox is, as I write this, filling up with requests to come to the dress rehearsal; in London, where “Marnie” had its premiere last year, it seems like a blood sport to go to the dress rather than to a show, and then make subdued but icy declarations of the opera’s wretchedness to anybody who will listen. I always liken the dress rehearsal to that moment in cooking for a group when the stew looks like grave slime (it needs that final 20 minutes to reduce), there are cardoons everywhere, and I’m in a sarong singing along to “Graceland.” It’s not ready yet! Go wait at a bar somewhere!

    I’ve learned, after three operas, what sorts of things require my intervention and what will get better on their own. My role, as I understand it now, is to be an editor and custodian of the document Nick and I created, and to guide — but not prescribe — the various options the singers and musicians have in expounding it. Obviously, it’s anxiety provoking, but as it’s not going to be me onstage in a negligee singing a high B flat, or in the pit playing an exposed oboe solo after hundreds of bars’ rest, I figure it’s only fair of me to be flexible, and to allow the thousands of hours of experience and diligent preparation to let the piece live on its own.

    Nico Muhly’s “Two Boys” was performed by the Metropolitan Opera in 2013.

    Marnie
    Friday through Nov. 10 at the Metropolitan Opera, Manhattan; http://www.metopera.org.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:10 PM on October 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Jeffrey Milarsky, John Corigliano, , , , Nico Muhly   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “AXIOM | Muhly and Corigliano” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    Friday, October 26, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    Alice Tully Hall
    1941 Broadway
    New York, NY 10023

    Free Event
    Tickets

    Jeffrey Milarsky, conductor

    Jeffrey Milarsky music.columbia.edu

    Nadia Sirota, viola

    Nadia Sirota in Performance 2014 by Steven Pisano


    Matthew Pearce, tenor

    MUHLY No Uncertain Times (2017)
    CORIGLIANO Chiaroscuro (1997)
    MUHLY Keep in Touch
    CORIGLIANO Poem in October

    Nico Muhly by Samantha West

    John Corigliano by J. Henry Fair

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:46 PM on October 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bryce Dessner, , , , Nico Muhly,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA and yMusic: “Bryce Dessner Premiere” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    and

    yMusic

    yMusic Photograph by Allan Amato

    yMusic presents a recital of commissioned work including new pieces by Bryce Dessner, Nico Muhly and Gabriel Kahane.

    “One of the groups that has really helped to shape the future of classical music.” – NPR on yMusic

    “Bryce Dessner is a man who slips in and out of musical guises with disarming ease…this is gorgeous and full-hearted music.” – NPR

    yMusic applies its virtuosic execution and unique ensemble configuration (string trio, flute, clarinet, and trumpet) to its largest commissioned work to date: the N.Y. Premiere of a composition by Bryce Dessner, one of today’s foremost composers. Also receiving its N.Y. Premiere is Nico Muhly’s highly kinetic and agitated Clip. The two premiering works are presented alongside compositions by Gabriel Kahane, Andrew Norman, and Gabriella Smith.

    The new album-length work by Bryce Dessner was commissioned in 2016 through BAC’s inaugural Cage Cunningham Fellowship, established to support artists who embody John Cage and Merce Cunningham’s commitment to artistic innovation. The 2016-17 Fellow, celebrated Russian pianist Alexei Lubimov, generously applied his entire $50,000 award to commission five composers he identified at the forefront of music innovation—including Dessner.

    Program
    Bryce Dessner, N.Y. Premiere, 2018
    Nico Muhly: Clip, N.Y. Premiere, 2017
    Gabriel Kahane: Bluets, 2017
    Gabriella Smith: Tessellations, 2018
    Andrew Norman: Caught, 2017

    Bryce Dessner by Charlotte de Mezamat

    Nico Muhly by Samantha West

    Gabriel Kahane credit Josh Goleman

    Monday, October 15, 2018
    at 8:00 PM

    450 west 37th street
    New York, NY 10018

    $25

    Tickets

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:14 PM on August 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Nico Muhly, , ,   

    From Nonesuch Records: “Thomas Bartlett (aka Doveman) and Nico Muhly” 

    From Nonesuch Records

    1
    Thomas Bartlett and Nico Muhly Photo: Heidi Solander

    2
    Peter Pears: Ceremonial Music (Remixes)
    August 17, 2018

    Peter Pears: Ceremonial Music Remixes includes reimagined versions of two tracks from Thomas Bartlett (aka Doveman) and Nico Muhly’s 2018 album, Peter Pears: Balinese Ceremonial Music, from E*vax (of Ratatat) and Kid Koala. Drowned in Sound called the album “exceptional … simultaneously tense and light, dramatic and calming, an originality which few albums can fully lay claim to.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Nonesuch Records is an American record company and label owned by Warner Music Group, distributed by Warner Bros. Records, and based in New York City. Founded by Jac Holzman in 1964 as a budget classical label, Nonesuch has developed into a label that records critically acclaimed music from a wide range of genres. Robert Hurwitz was president of the company from 1984 to 2017.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:23 PM on May 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Corigliano @ 80", , Nico Muhly   

    From National Sawdust: “Corigliano @ 80” 

    From National Sawdust

    Jeffrey Zeigler (cello), Ursula Oppens (piano), Lara St. John (violin), and Martin Kennedy (piano).

    Wednesday, May 23rd – 7pm

    About the Show

    John Corigliano by J. Henry Fair

    National Sawdust continues its year-long celebration of famed composer John Corigliano’s 80th birthday with a concert highlighting his chamber works. One of his most famous students, Nico Muhly, will host and moderate the evening.

    Nico Muhly by Samantha West

    Muhly, whose collaborations span from Glen Hansard to Björk and Philip Glass, has emerged as one of the most vital composers since the turn of the millennium.

    This final performance, exclusively at National Sawdust, features some of Corigliano’s most notable collaborators over his career: Jeffrey Zeigler (cello), Ursula Oppens (piano), Lara St. John (violin), and Martin Kennedy (piano). [See the full article for images and biographical material on these artists.]

    Program:
    Fancy on a Bach Air
    Violin Sonata
    Phatasmagoria
    Fantasia on an Ostinato
    Chiaroscuro

    Ticketing available only at the full article.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem
    Stem Education Coalition

    National Sawdust, is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Space waiting

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:35 AM on April 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Nico Muhly, ,   

    From (Le) Poisson Rouge: LPR X: Thomas Bartlett + Nico Muhly – Peter Pears: Balinese Ceremonial Music with Ensemble LPR 

    (Le) Poisson Rouge

    Thu May 24th, 2018

    8:30PM

    Main Space

    Minimum Age: 18+

    Doors Open: 7:30PM

    Show Time: 8:30PM

    Event Ticket: $25

    Day of Show: $35

    Purchase tickets

    Classical

    Contemporary Classical

    Thomas Bartlett + Nico Muhly perform Peter Pears: Balinese Ceremonial Music with Ensemble LPR

    Using Colin McPhee’s transcriptions of Balinese music as a springboard for their own texturally hypnotic dual piano compositions, Thomas Bartlett and Nico Muhly perform a collection of nine new songs. Colin McPhee, whose music inspired tonight’s performance, was the first composer to seriously study the music of Java and Bali, producing a number of transcriptions for two pianos that reimagined the gamelan for Western ears. In turn, Bartlett and Muhly reimagine McPhee’s transcriptions for the 21st Century, borrowing their mesmerising interlocking patterns for a new collaborative album to be released on Nonesuch Records, Peter Pears: Balinese Ceremonial Music – which they will perform in its entirety tonight. They will be joined by members of Ensemble LPR on strings & percussion.

    The record, ten years in the making, was born from Bartlett and Muhly’s shared love of Colin McPhee’s music. McPhee himself was a close friend of Benjamin Britten and his partner Peter Pears – an accomplished musician in his own right, for whom this collaborative project is named.

    The live iteration of a highly anticipated collaboration between Thomas Bartlett, also known as Doveman, and contemporary classical composer Nico Muhly kicks off Le Poisson Rogue’s special 10th anniversary music programme. Bartlett and Muhly will perform their forthcoming record Peter Pears: Balinese Ceremonial Music (Nonesuch Records) in its entirety.

    Ten years in the making, this recording was born from a love of Colin McPhee’s (1900-1964) transcriptions of Balinese ceremonial music for two pianos. The dual pianos translate the complicated overlapping patterns of gamelan music into a stylised, Western approximation. McPhee lived, in 1940, with the composer Benjamin Britten, his partner Peter Pears, W.H. Auden and other artists.

    McPhee and Britten recorded the suite in 1941, and while the recording’s audio quality is dated, it is evocative and points towards the music Britten wrote before his death in 1976. Bartlett and Muhly decided to write a set of nine songs loosely based on the textures and interlocking rhythms from McPhee’s transcriptions, as well as the various resonant sounds from Balinese music, but consolidated into their own stylised processes.

    The project is named after Peter Pears, who, in addition to being Britten’s partner, was an observer and collaborator not just of Britten, but of a larger community of musicians, writers, and thinkers.

    Thomas and Nico have both been frequent contributors to Le Poisson Rouge and we are delighted to welcome them back for this very special 10th Anniversary show where they will be joined by members of Ensemble LPR on strings and percussion.

    1
    Thomas Bartlett. Kevin Yatarola Photography

    Nico Muhly. The New York Times

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    (Le) Poisson Rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of (Le) Poisson Rouge.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:23 PM on March 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , James McVinnie, , , Nico Muhly, Paul Corley, Puzzle Muteson, ,   

    From Bedroom Community: Latest Releases 

    Bedroom Community

    Latest Releases

    12
    Ben Frost The Center Cannot Hold

    13
    Nadia Sirota Tessellatum

    14
    Ben Frost Threshold Of Faith EP

    15
    The Crash Ensemble Ghosts

    16
    Valgeir Sigurðsson DISSONANCE

    17
    James McVinnie Cycles_1

    See the full article here .

    Bedroom Community is an Icelandic record label/collective formed in 2006 by Valgeir Sigurðsson, with Nico Muhly and Ben Frost, later adding Sam Amidon, Daníel Bjarnason, Puzzle Muteson, Paul Corley, Nadia Sirota and James McVinnie to the intimate roster. 2015 saw two new additions to the family being: Emily Hall & Jodie Landau and wild Up.

    11

    4
    Valgeir Sigurðsson

    4
    Nico Muhly

    63
    Ben Frost

    5
    Sam Adidon

    7
    Daniel Bjarnason

    8

    9
    Nadia Sirota

    Like-minded, yet diverse individuals from different corners of the globe all creatively orbit around an inconspicuous building and its inhabitants on the outskirts of Reykjavík Iceland – Greenhouse Studios – where the music is mostly created.

    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 8:59 AM on November 5, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Nico Muhly   

    From The New York Times: Nico Muhly On Opera and Life 

    Nico Muhly is one of today’s most important composers.

    This article is copyright protected, so just a few notes.

    By VIVIEN SCHWEITZER
    Published: November 4, 2011

    nm
    Nico Muhly

    “Mr. Muhly, 30, whose high-profile commissions include a work for the Metropolitan Opera, said that as a gay man he is particularly interested in the government’s role in personal relationships. He explores a longstanding fascination with polygamy in his chamber opera “Dark Sisters,” a story of a polygamist family in a Mormon offshoot whose children are removed by state officials concerned about child abuse.”

    See the full article here.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:41 AM on October 10, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Nico Muhly, ,   

    From Q2 Music: Nico Muhly Discusses His Catalogue 

    i1

    Q2 is the 24/7 New Music Stream from New York Public Radio

    Monday, October 10, 2011

    Nico Muhly has already managed to build not one, but around three or four careers for himself as a composer. With his work on movie scores and indie-rock albums, he has one toe inching towards pop-culture recognition, while keeping one foot firmly in the classical mainstream with a substantial body of pieces composed for the likes of the New York Philharmonic and the English National Opera. And then there are his pet projects, the pieces he and a circle of close friends—folksinger Sam Amidon, singer/keyboardist Thomas Bartlett, electronic artists Ben Frost and Valgeir Sigurðsson, and violist Nadia Sirota—create together in Valgeir’s studio and on tour. But closest to Muhly’s heart is the repertoire of sacred choral music he’s created, drawing on his experiences as a boy chorister to write for music for performance in both churches and concert halls.”

    Listen to Nico Muhly introduce his works.”


    Nico Muhly

    See the full post and listen to some of the pieces here.

     
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