Tagged: Opera Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 12:31 PM on October 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Opera   

    From The New York Times: “Nico Muhly on the Drama of Bringing His New Opera to the Met” 

    New York Times

    From The New York Times

    1
    Nico Muhly on rehearsing his new opera, “Marnie”: “I figure it’s only fair of me to be flexible.”CreditCreditDaniel Dorsa for The New York Times

    Nico Muhly by Samantha West

    Bedroom Community,Valgeir Sigurðsson, Nico Muhly, Ben Frost, Nadia Sirota, Sam Amidon, Daníel Bjarnason, Puzzle Muteson. by EuphemiaUCAS

    Oct. 17, 2018
    Nico Muhly

    “Marnie,” my new opera, which has its American premiere on Friday at the Metropolitan Opera, is about a woman who lies, steals, gets caught and is forced to marry a man who sexually assaults her. It’s delicate material — to say the least — and deeply plot-driven, and the dramatic structure has to be airtight to allow room for expressive musicality.

    The director, Michael Mayer, called me with the idea for a “Marnie” opera five years ago. The story is most famous from the Hitchcock film, but we found that the 1961 Winston Graham novel on which it’s based was a far richer source of psychological tension and freed us from any visual or musical entanglements with the movie. That first notion blossomed into a wonderful libretto by Nicholas Wright, which then turned into a giant stack of manuscript.

    Now, in the days before opening, among the orchestra, the chorus, the principal singers, the stage crew, spot ops, dressers, wig-makers, etc., there are hundreds of people reacting to this document; it’s a huge, thrilling, anxiety-producing setup.

    In the middle of rehearsal last week, Nick Wright, Michael and I had a sudden revelation: One of the arias, already endlessly fretted over, was seriously hindering the dramatic flow. The aria, in which Marnie tries to escape her husband but catches herself having second thoughts, was musically satisfying. I’d spent ages getting a kind of throbbing brass chorale to work; there was a clever interplay between the oboe and the voice; and Nick’s text gave us what we thought was a much-needed window into Marnie’s state of mind.


    Marnie: TrailerCreditCreditVideo by Metropolitan Opera

    But when Michael was staging the scenes that precede and follow this moment, it immediately became clear that the entire dramatic beat was unnecessary: We were “telling, not showing,” the classic drama-school no-no, and the aria took what should have felt like a satisfying gravitational pull toward the final scene and stalled it midair. (I was reminded of Boris Johnson’s humiliating zip-line ride, where he got stuck in the middle of it, bobbing helplessly over the park.)

    What if we just — cut it? I rushed over to the full score, figured out a way to make the snip work musically — scooch the oboe’s entrance over a bar; get rid of some vestigial gongs — and we tried it out: It was so much better. It felt like we’d obeyed Coco Chanel’s advice: “Before you leave the house, look in the mirror and take one thing off.” The conductor, Robert Spano, and I mourned the musical loss over a negroni but toasted to how much more successful the last 30 (now 26) minutes of the show would be without it.

    With a piece of concert music, I can tell, more or less, if the structure holds together just by looking through the manuscript in my studio. With a piece of theater, however, I find that on paper and even in rehearsals, the overall soundness of the structure is always just slightly out of view. It’s when you see an opera on stage for the first time with an audience that it feels like shining a black light on a crime scene: Even if you thought you’d carefully wiped clean all of the strange incisions and seams of the compositional process, you’ve still missed a spot.

    2
    Isabel Leonard, center, as the title character in “Marnie” at the Metropolitan Opera.Credit Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

    None of this sort of work is, for me, fully possible to execute if I’m sitting at my desk at home. It requires being in the room with Michael; with Nick; with Isabel Leonard, who plays Marnie; with Paul Cremo, the Met’s dramaturg; and seeing the scenes unfold in real time.

    I want to know what Isabel thinks about a given transition: She is the one who has to communicate what I wrote, and if there’s anything I can do to help her do that with grace and power, I feel that’s my job as a composer. If I can change an E flat to an F to make the text clearer, I will do it; if we need a better word, Nick will come over, and we’ll confer about how to make it all sync up. When I write a piece of orchestral music, I can be as controlling as I want, but with a piece this big, I try to be the opposite of precious.

    The practical process of mounting an opera is much more crabwise than one might suspect. For the first three weeks, the cast works in a subterranean rehearsal room with the actual floor of the set recreated; some of the real furniture and props are there, but, for example, the tall sliding panels in our full design are represented by shorter, temporary ones. There is a tag team of brilliant rehearsal pianists, the conductor, two assistant conductors, the director, two assistant directors, the stage manager, an assistant stage manager, the dramaturg — and me, in the corner with piles of scores and laptops and iPads and snacks.

    The chorus, which has been rehearsing and memorizing this work since the summer, comes half a dozen times, but not necessarily to work in any particular order; we might find ourselves staging the ending with the chorus before staging the beginning with the cast. We see the orchestra, which is equally busy, in its rehearsal room once or twice without the singers, then twice with the singers — but never with the chorus.

    Two weeks before we open, we start spending the mornings on the main stage with only the pianists. Visual elements creep in: lighting, projections, costumes, with all their attendant joys and problems. (The tracks in the floor seem to be of a thickness precisely designed to entrap the elegant high heels most of the women in this production wear.)

    The week before we open, we have a morning per act with everything (chorus, orchestra, heels), a complete run-through with piano, a complete final dress rehearsal with everything — then opening. The wildest thing about this schedule is that it means that before opening night, there is only one opportunity to see the whole show as a complete piece of theater, which is oftentimes when some of the more deeply-hidden knots reveal themselves. On opening night of “Dark Sisters,” in 2011, I felt a small amount of air leave the theater when I suddenly realized that I’d boxed the show in with a clumsy transition between an indoor space and an abstract outdoor space; I hadn’t perceived this until then.

    My inbox is, as I write this, filling up with requests to come to the dress rehearsal; in London, where “Marnie” had its premiere last year, it seems like a blood sport to go to the dress rather than to a show, and then make subdued but icy declarations of the opera’s wretchedness to anybody who will listen. I always liken the dress rehearsal to that moment in cooking for a group when the stew looks like grave slime (it needs that final 20 minutes to reduce), there are cardoons everywhere, and I’m in a sarong singing along to “Graceland.” It’s not ready yet! Go wait at a bar somewhere!

    I’ve learned, after three operas, what sorts of things require my intervention and what will get better on their own. My role, as I understand it now, is to be an editor and custodian of the document Nick and I created, and to guide — but not prescribe — the various options the singers and musicians have in expounding it. Obviously, it’s anxiety provoking, but as it’s not going to be me onstage in a negligee singing a high B flat, or in the pit playing an exposed oboe solo after hundreds of bars’ rest, I figure it’s only fair of me to be flexible, and to allow the thousands of hours of experience and diligent preparation to let the piece live on its own.

    Nico Muhly’s “Two Boys” was performed by the Metropolitan Opera in 2013.

    Marnie
    Friday through Nov. 10 at the Metropolitan Opera, Manhattan; http://www.metopera.org.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:52 AM on August 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Catalina Cuervo- soprano, , Opera   

    From LPR: “New York City Opera Presents: Maria de Buenos Aires” 

    From LPR

    1
    Catalina Cuervo, soprano Photo Credits: Anchorage Opera by Katie Behnke

    Mon October 22nd, 2018

    7:00PM

    Main Space

    Minimum Age: All Ages

    Doors Open: 6:00PM

    Show Time: 7:00PM

    Event Ticket: $55 / $10
    Tickets

    Fri October 26th, 2018

    7:00PM

    Main Space

    Minimum Age: All Ages

    Doors Open: 6:00PM

    Show Time: 7:00PM

    Event Ticket: $55 / $10
    Tickets

    Fri November 2nd, 2018

    7:00PM

    Main Space

    Minimum Age: All Ages

    Doors Open: 6:00PM

    Show Time: 7:00PM

    Event Ticket: $55 / $10
    Tickets

    Astor Piazzolla’s sultry and passionate nuevo tango fuels the surreal story of Maria, a prostitute born “one day when God was drunk.” An intimate production heightens the intensity of this allegorical drama of seduction, depravity, redemption and rebirth in Buenos Aires’ urban underbelly. The fourth installment in the company’s popular Ópera en Español series, this co-production with Atlanta Opera features soprano Catalina Cuervo, the world’s foremost interpreter of the title role. This production, conducted by Jorge Parodi and directed by Atlanta Opera General director Tomer Zvulun, has been praised by Opera News for its “undeniable authenticity.”

    A co-production with Atlanta Opera

    Music by Astor Piazzolla

    Libretto by Horacio Ferrar

    Conductor, Jorge Parodi

    Director, Tomer Zvulun

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings


    Stem Education Coalition

    (le) poisson rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    LPR

    LPR is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of LPR

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:08 AM on July 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Opera   

    From Bard’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts: Events 

    From Bard’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts

    Bard Fisher Center for the performing Arts

    You’re Invited!
    Bard Music Festival Opening Night Dinner

    1

    Spiegeltent
    Friday, August 10 at 5 pm

    Support the artistry and continuing presentation of the Bard Music Festival by joining us at the Festival’s Opening Night Dinner. The evening begins with an elegant cocktail reception in the garden, followed by dinner in the Spiegeltent. Then, head to the Fisher Center to enjoy Program One: Fashioning the Russian Sound, with commentary by Leon Botstein.

    Tickets include a preperformance dinner in the Spiegeltent and a premium seat for the evening’s concert.

    2

    Bard Music Festival
    Iva Bittová and Sergey Starostin: From Folk to Jazz
    Spiegeltent
    Thursday, August 16 at 8 pm

    Czech avant-garde violinist, singer, and composer Iva Bittová and Russian folk and jazz performer and composer Sergey Starostin join forces for an evening of improvisation and of “past perspectives filtered through the now.”

    3

    Bard Music Festival
    Program Ten: Russian Choral Traditions
    August 19

    Russia’s Orthodox Church has engendered one of the world’s most distinctive choral traditions, one rooted in a rich repository of ancient chant. Anchored by the Bard Festival Chorale, Program Ten explores the flowering of a cappella liturgical writing that took place among the late Romantics—Rimsky-Korsakov, despite his atheism, among them.

    For more information and ticketing, please see the full article.

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    About Us
    The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, designed by Frank Gehry, illustrates the College’s commitment to the performing arts as a cultural and educational necessity. The Center’s adventurous programs and world-class facilities provide an outstanding environment in which to create, perform, learn, and experience. The Center bears the name of Richard B. Fisher, the former chair of Bard’s Board of Trustees. This magnificent building and the extraordinary arts experiences that take place within it are a tribute to his vision, generosity, and leadership.

    The mission of the Fisher Center is to:

    bring leading artists to the Hudson Valley to engage with the public and the College;
    produce and present adventurous and in-depth programs, including new, rare, and undiscovered works;
    support the development of new work by artists at all stages of their careers; and
    provide a home for Bard student and faculty work in the performing arts.

    Bard College seeks to inspire curiosity, a love of learning, idealism, and a commitment to the link between higher education and civic participation. The undergraduate curriculum is designed to address central, enduring questions facing succeeding generations of students. Academic disciplines are interconnected through multidisciplinary programs; a balance in the curriculum is sought between general education and individual specialization. Students pursue a rigorous course of study reflecting diverse traditions of scholarship, research, speculation, and artistic expression. They engage philosophies of human existence, theories of human behavior and society, the making of art, and the study of the humanities, science, nature, and history.

    Bard’s approach to learning focuses on the individual, primarily through small group seminars. These are structured to encourage thoughtful, critical discourse in an inclusive environment. Faculty are active in their fields and stress the connection between the contemplative life of the mind and active engagement outside the classroom. They strive to foster rigorous and free inquiry, intellectual ambition, and creativity.

    Bard acts at the intersection of education and civil society, extending liberal arts and sciences education to communities in which it has been underdeveloped, inaccessible, or absent. Through its undergraduate college, distinctive graduate programs, commitment to the fine and performing arts, civic and public engagement programs, and network of international dual-degree partnerships, early colleges, and prison education initiatives, Bard offers unique opportunities for students and faculty to study, experience, and realize the principle that higher-education institutions can and should operate in the public interest.

    The Bard College of today reflects in many ways its varied past.
    Bard was founded as St. Stephen’s College in 1860, a time of national crisis. While there are no written records of the founders’ attitude toward the Civil War, a passage from the College’s catalogue of 1943 applies also to the time of the institution’s establishment:

    “While the immediate demands in education are for the training of men for the war effort, liberal education in America must be preserved as an important value in the civilization for which the War is being fought. . . . Since education, like life itself, is a continuous process of growth and effort, the student has to be trained to comprehend and foster his own growth and direct his own efforts.”

    This philosophy molded the College during its early years and continues to inform its academic aims.

    Bard College
    30 Campus Rd,
    Annandale-On-Hudson, NY 12504

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:51 AM on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Opera,   

    From Lincoln Center – Mostly Mozart Festival: “Americans in Paris” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    From Lincoln Center

    1

    July 24–25, 2018 David Geffen Hall

    Tuesday, July 24, 2018 at 7:30 pm
    Wednesday, July 25, 2018 at 7:30 pm

    Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra

    3

    Louis Langrée, conductor. Photo Credit Jennifer Taylor

    Emanuel Ax by Lisa-Marie Mazzucco


    Emanuel Ax, piano

    Friedrich Heinrich Kern, glass harmonica (Mostly Mozart Festival debut)
    Philipp Marguerre, glass harmonica
    Jasmine Choi, flute
    Max Blair, oboe
    Shmuel Katz, viola
    Ilya Finkelshteyn, cello

    Pre-concert recitals at 6:30 pm
    Friedrich Heinrich Kern and Philipp Marguerre, glass harmonicas
    Works by Mozart, Naumann, and more
    David Geffen Hall

    The Program
    Bernstein: Overture to Candide
    Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 17 in G major, K.453
    Mozart: Adagio and Rondo in C minor for glass harmonica, flute, oboe, viola, and cello, K.617
    Gershwin: An American in Paris (New critical edition, edited by Mark Clague)

    For this exhilarating evening inspired by fable and the French-American connection, maestro Louis Langrée leads the Festival Orchestra in Bernstein’s Voltaire-inspired overture and a new edition of Gershwin’s score to An American in Paris. The ultimate American Mozart pianist Emanuel Ax ignites the famous melodies of one of Mozart’s finest piano concertos (also Bernstein’s favorite “party” piece). And a rarely performed Mozart chamber work showcases the glass harmonica, invented by another famous American in Paris: Benjamin Franklin.

    “Always thoughtful, lyrical, lustrous.”

    Washington Post on Emanuel Ax

    “There are few surer guarantees of quality in classical music than the combination of Mr. Ax and Mozart.”

    New York Times

    2018 Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra by by Richard Termine

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:36 AM on July 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bard SummerScape Festival, , , , , Opera   

    From Bard’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts: “Bard SummerScape Festival” 

    From Bard’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts

    Bard Fisher Center for the performing Arts

    SummerScape
    June 28–August 19, 2018

    The fifteenth annual Bard SummerScape festival features seven weeks of world-class opera, theater, dance, cabaret, film, and music, including the 29th annual Bard Music Festival, Rimsky-Korsakov and His World.

    Explore the festival brochure and sign up for the Fisher Center e-newsletter to get program updates, special offers, and more.

    Tickets on sale now; create a festival subscription and save!

    Opera

    1
    Anton Rubinstein’s Demon
    American Symphony Orchestra
    Conducted by Leon Botstein
    Directed by Thaddeus Strassberger

    The rich choruses and fiery libretto of Rubinstein’s 1871 masterpiece will be performed by an all-Russian cast in this rare new American production.

    July 27–August 5

    Learn More

    Bard Music Festival
    Rimsky-Korsakov and His World

    3

    Bard Music Festival weekends include orchestral concerts, chamber and choral music performances, panel discussions, special events, and opera in concert.

    Weekend One: August 10–12
    Inventing Russian Music: The Mighty Five

    Weekend Two: August 17–19
    Rimsky-Korsakov and His Followers

    Explore The Festival

    Theater
    Leonard Bernstein’s Peter Pan

    After the play by J. M. Barrie
    Directed by Christopher Alden

    4

    Returning to New York for the first time since 1950, the Broadway smash hit is rediscovered for Leonard Bernstein’s centennial. This intimate new production grows by turns whimsical and sinister, joyful and dark, creating a gripping portrait of the boy who wouldn’t grow up.

    June 28–July 22
    Learn More

    The Spiegeltent
    Cabaret and More

    5

    Hosted by Mx. Justin Vivian Bond

    Mx. Bond’s fifth season at the Spiegeltent, an internationally renowned destination of magic and mayhem, has surprises in store all summer long. Enchanted evenings await with unforgettable performances of cabaret and jazz, food and drink, and dancing under the sparkling lights of the historic tent of mirrors.

    June 29–August 18
    Learn More

    Film Series
    Rimsky-Korsakov and the
    Poetry of Cinema

    6
    Fantasia, 1940, ©Walt Disney Productions/Photofest

    The 2018 SummerScape film series explores the influence of Russian nationalism, folk music, and exoticism in pieces by Rimsky-Korsakov and other members of The Mighty Five on Russian directors like Aleksandr Sokurov and in international films ranging from Walt Disney’s Fantasia to Louis Malle’s Atlantic City.

    July 26–August 19

    Explore SummerScape Film

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    About Us
    The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, designed by Frank Gehry, illustrates the College’s commitment to the performing arts as a cultural and educational necessity. The Center’s adventurous programs and world-class facilities provide an outstanding environment in which to create, perform, learn, and experience. The Center bears the name of Richard B. Fisher, the former chair of Bard’s Board of Trustees. This magnificent building and the extraordinary arts experiences that take place within it are a tribute to his vision, generosity, and leadership.

    The mission of the Fisher Center is to:

    bring leading artists to the Hudson Valley to engage with the public and the College;
    produce and present adventurous and in-depth programs, including new, rare, and undiscovered works;
    support the development of new work by artists at all stages of their careers; and
    provide a home for Bard student and faculty work in the performing arts.

    Bard College seeks to inspire curiosity, a love of learning, idealism, and a commitment to the link between higher education and civic participation. The undergraduate curriculum is designed to address central, enduring questions facing succeeding generations of students. Academic disciplines are interconnected through multidisciplinary programs; a balance in the curriculum is sought between general education and individual specialization. Students pursue a rigorous course of study reflecting diverse traditions of scholarship, research, speculation, and artistic expression. They engage philosophies of human existence, theories of human behavior and society, the making of art, and the study of the humanities, science, nature, and history.

    Bard’s approach to learning focuses on the individual, primarily through small group seminars. These are structured to encourage thoughtful, critical discourse in an inclusive environment. Faculty are active in their fields and stress the connection between the contemplative life of the mind and active engagement outside the classroom. They strive to foster rigorous and free inquiry, intellectual ambition, and creativity.

    Bard acts at the intersection of education and civil society, extending liberal arts and sciences education to communities in which it has been underdeveloped, inaccessible, or absent. Through its undergraduate college, distinctive graduate programs, commitment to the fine and performing arts, civic and public engagement programs, and network of international dual-degree partnerships, early colleges, and prison education initiatives, Bard offers unique opportunities for students and faculty to study, experience, and realize the principle that higher-education institutions can and should operate in the public interest.

    The Bard College of today reflects in many ways its varied past.
    Bard was founded as St. Stephen’s College in 1860, a time of national crisis. While there are no written records of the founders’ attitude toward the Civil War, a passage from the College’s catalogue of 1943 applies also to the time of the institution’s establishment:

    “While the immediate demands in education are for the training of men for the war effort, liberal education in America must be preserved as an important value in the civilization for which the War is being fought. . . . Since education, like life itself, is a continuous process of growth and effort, the student has to be trained to comprehend and foster his own growth and direct his own efforts.”

    This philosophy molded the College during its early years and continues to inform its academic aims.

    Bard College
    30 Campus Rd,
    Annandale-On-Hudson, NY 12504

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:07 PM on July 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , DEMON, Opera   

    From Bard’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts: “Demon” 

    From Bard’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts

    Bard Fisher Center for the performing Arts

    1
    Opera
    Demon

    By Anton Rubinstein

    American Symphony Orchestra

    Conducted by Leon Botstein

    Directed by Thaddeus Strassberger

    July 27 – August 5
    Tickets

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    About Us
    The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, designed by Frank Gehry, illustrates the College’s commitment to the performing arts as a cultural and educational necessity. The Center’s adventurous programs and world-class facilities provide an outstanding environment in which to create, perform, learn, and experience. The Center bears the name of Richard B. Fisher, the former chair of Bard’s Board of Trustees. This magnificent building and the extraordinary arts experiences that take place within it are a tribute to his vision, generosity, and leadership.

    The mission of the Fisher Center is to:

    bring leading artists to the Hudson Valley to engage with the public and the College;
    produce and present adventurous and in-depth programs, including new, rare, and undiscovered works;
    support the development of new work by artists at all stages of their careers; and
    provide a home for Bard student and faculty work in the performing arts.

    Bard College seeks to inspire curiosity, a love of learning, idealism, and a commitment to the link between higher education and civic participation. The undergraduate curriculum is designed to address central, enduring questions facing succeeding generations of students. Academic disciplines are interconnected through multidisciplinary programs; a balance in the curriculum is sought between general education and individual specialization. Students pursue a rigorous course of study reflecting diverse traditions of scholarship, research, speculation, and artistic expression. They engage philosophies of human existence, theories of human behavior and society, the making of art, and the study of the humanities, science, nature, and history.

    Bard’s approach to learning focuses on the individual, primarily through small group seminars. These are structured to encourage thoughtful, critical discourse in an inclusive environment. Faculty are active in their fields and stress the connection between the contemplative life of the mind and active engagement outside the classroom. They strive to foster rigorous and free inquiry, intellectual ambition, and creativity.

    Bard acts at the intersection of education and civil society, extending liberal arts and sciences education to communities in which it has been underdeveloped, inaccessible, or absent. Through its undergraduate college, distinctive graduate programs, commitment to the fine and performing arts, civic and public engagement programs, and network of international dual-degree partnerships, early colleges, and prison education initiatives, Bard offers unique opportunities for students and faculty to study, experience, and realize the principle that higher-education institutions can and should operate in the public interest.

    The Bard College of today reflects in many ways its varied past.
    Bard was founded as St. Stephen’s College in 1860, a time of national crisis. While there are no written records of the founders’ attitude toward the Civil War, a passage from the College’s catalogue of 1943 applies also to the time of the institution’s establishment:

    “While the immediate demands in education are for the training of men for the war effort, liberal education in America must be preserved as an important value in the civilization for which the War is being fought. . . . Since education, like life itself, is a continuous process of growth and effort, the student has to be trained to comprehend and foster his own growth and direct his own efforts.”

    This philosophy molded the College during its early years and continues to inform its academic aims.

    Bard College
    30 Campus Rd,
    Annandale-On-Hudson, NY 12504

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:50 PM on May 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: CLDP-Composer Librettist Development Program, InsightALT: Opera in Eden, , , Opera   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “InsightALT: Opera in Eden” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1

    Thursday, May 17, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    Merkin Concert Hall
    129 West 67th Street
    New York, NY 10036

    $25
    Tickets

    ALT concludes its 10th Anniversary celebration of the Composer Librettist Development Program with InsightALT: Opera in Eden, a one-night-only concert featuring three new one-act operas written by this year’s new class of Resident Artists. This event provides the opportunity to see the “next step” in the development of the three operas featured as part of The Living Libretto event in March. The evening will be hosted by composer/librettist Mark Adamo and Producing Artistic Director Lawrence Edelson.

    2

    American Lyric Theater (ALT)

    Great operas don’t just happen.

    American Lyric Theater (ALT) was founded in 2005 to build a new body of operatic repertoire for new audiences by nurturing composers and librettists, developing sustainable artistic collaborations, and contributing new works to the national canon. Many opera companies commission and perform new works; but ALT is the only company in the United States that offers extensive, full-time mentorship for emerging operatic writers. While the traditional company model focuses on producing a season, ALT’s programs focus on serving the needs of artists, developing new works, and collaborating with producing companies to help usher those works into the repertoire.

    In 2007, ALT launched its core initiative, the Composer Librettist Development Program (CLDP), led by Producing Artistic Director Lawrence Edelson and a faculty including some of the country’s foremost artists, including composer-librettist Mark Adamo, composers Robert Beaser and Paul Moravec, librettists Mark Campbell and Michael Korie, dramaturg Cori Ellison, soprano Catherine Malfitano, and stage director Rhoda Levine.

    Through the CLDP, ALT has provided intensive, personalized mentorship to 38 gifted emerging artists, and 15 short chamber operas have been developed under the auspices of the program. In addition, ALT has commissioned and developed 8 full-length operas through the CLDP. To present fully staged productions of these works, ALT has partnered with Atlanta Opera, Opera Theatre of Saint Louis, Tulsa Opera, Fargo-Moorhead Opera, Fort Worth Opera, Opera Saratoga, and others. Alumni artists are also at the forefront of creating new operas for companies around the country. CLDP alumni are currently writing new works for Opera Philadelphia, Houston Grand Opera and The Metropolitan Opera.

    Recently premiered and upcoming productions of operas commissioned by ALT include The Poe Project, a double-bill of one-act operas, Buried Alive by Jeff Myers and Quincy Long, and Embedded by Patrick Soluri and Deborah Brevoort (Fargo-Moorhead Opera 2014, Fort Worth Opera 2016); JFK by David T. Little and CLDP alumnus Royce Vavrek (FWOpera 2016); and The Long Walk by Jeremy Howard Beck and Stephanie Fleischmann, based on the memoir by Brian Castner (Opera Saratoga 2015, Utah Opera 2017).

    ALT’s public performance programs provide the opportunity for audiences in New York City to see operas-in-progress through two series: The Living Libretto and InsightALT. To celebrate CLDP alumni, who are creating new operas for companies around the country, we launched a new concert series, ALT Alumni: Composers and Librettists in Concert, in November 2015, which was recently lauded in Opera News for offering New Yorkers “the rare opportunity to hear excerpts of what audiences in Houston, St. Louis, Los Angeles and Saratoga Springs have already heard. And, it turns out, we’ve been missing out on fantastic opera written by living, young composers!”

    In the 2015-16 season, ALT provided personalized mentorship to 8 gifted composers and librettists through the CLDP working on four new operas: La Reina by Jorge Sosa and Laura Sosa Pedroza, The Life and Death(s) of Alan Turing by Justine F. Chen and David Simpatico, The Halloween Tree by Theo Popov and Tony Asaro, and Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Fallen Giant by Evan Meier and E.M. Lewis.

    The Long Walk – Final Scene from Act 1

    Commissioned and developed by American Lyric Theater. Music by Jeremy Howard Beck, Libretto by Stephanie Fleischmann, based on the memoir by Brian Castner. Developmental Workshop produced by ALT in NYC (June 2014). Featuring Daniel Belcher, baritone; David Blalock, tenor; Javier Abreu, tenor; Justin Hopkins, bass baritone; Caroline Worra, soprano; Donita Volkwijn, soprano. SCENE: Brian runs in Buffalo, New York, to keep “the Crazy” at bay, but scenes and memories from his time in Iraq keep overwhelming him.

    LA REINA – Act I Excerpt

    Commissioned and developed by American Lyric Theater. Music by Jorge Sosa, Libretto by Laura Sosa Pedroza & Jorge Sosa. Developmental Workshop Produced by ALT in NYC (Jan. 2016). Public concert co-presented as part of InsightALT and the PROTOTYPE Festival by French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) and ALT. Featuring Audrey Babcock, mezzo-soprano; Laura Claycomb, soprano; ALT Chamber Ensemble; Conducted by David Alan Miller. SCENE: Languishing in an American prison cell, Regina prays to La Santa Muerte, the patron saint of drug dealers.

    JFK – Opening Scene

    Commissioned by Fort Worth Opera and American Lyric Theater. Music by David T. Little, Libretto by Royce Vavrek. Developmental Workshop Produced by ALT in NYC (Nov. 2014). Public preview event presented as part of InsightALT, in partnership with Fort Worth Opera and MasterVoices. Featuring Sean Pannikar, tenor; Talise Trevigne, soprano; MasterVoices; Conducted by Steven Osgood. SCENE: The chorus and two Fates, set the stage for the final twelve hours of the 35th president’s life and time spent in Fort Worth, Texas.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    stem

    Stem Education Coalition

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:35 PM on May 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Opera, Samantha Long, Vanderbilt University   

    From Vanderbilt University: “Class of 2018: Samantha Long sings with body and soul” 

    Vanderbilt U Bloc

    From Vanderbilt University

    May. 7, 2018

    MyVU has profiled 14 members of the Class of 2018. We’re featuring their stories in the lead up to Commencement on May 11.

    1
    Samantha Long is an Eldon Stevenson Scholar. (Joe Howell/Vanderbilt)

    Samantha Long, a Johnston, Iowa, native majoring in musical arts (voice) at Blair School of Music, came to Nashville with many interests, not certain if music would be her path. But after doing a bit of searching, she found that singing was still her passion.

    “I explored a lot of things—political science, neuroscience, communications,” she said. “I was explaining this to a friend in an opera production my sophomore year, and she said, ‘Oh, so you don’t want to perform?’ And I realized right then—yes, I do want to perform.”

    The soprano has performed in Vanderbilt Opera Theatre productions each year, including a featured role in Leonard Bernstein’s Mass (2015), the lead role of Jo in Mark Adamo’s Little Women (2016), and the demanding role of Countess Almaviva in last fall’s production of Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro. Last summer Long attended Prague Summer Nights, touring the Czech Republic as the Second Lady in Mozart’s Magic Flute, and spent the rest of the summer in France at Festival Lyrique International de Belle-Île en Mer in the ensemble of Elixir of Love by Donizetti. She said she finds the feeling of singing addicting.

    “If I’m singing a B flat at the climax of a piece, I feel all the vibrations around me and through my voice and my body. Singing is interesting, because you can’t see what makes the sound the way you can look at piano keys as you play,” she explained. “Learning voice technique comes down to focusing on how you’re feeling tension or release or breath. Your body is your instrument, so you have to be really attuned to how you feel the music. A lot of our education is about how to access that feeling on cue.”

    This fall, Long will pursue a master of music in vocal performance at Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music. Her Vanderbilt education has included service work through a summer in Russia in 2016 as the recipient of a Nichols Humanitarian Fund grant. She valued that experience so much, she added a minor in Russian to her degree program. Closer to home, Long and fellow students in a Lyric Theater class worked with clients of the Mary Parrish Center for victims of domestic and sexual violence to create a show based on narratives about their lives.

    “I think one of the best ways art can serve others is by giving a voice to those who have had their voices quieted in some way,” she said.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt was in his 79th year when he decided to make the gift that founded Vanderbilt University in the spring of 1873.

    The $1 million that he gave to endow and build the university was the commodore’s only major philanthropy. Methodist Bishop Holland N. McTyeire of Nashville, husband of Amelia Townsend who was a cousin of the commodore’s young second wife Frank Crawford, went to New York for medical treatment early in 1873 and spent time recovering in the Vanderbilt mansion. He won the commodore’s admiration and support for the project of building a university in the South that would “contribute to strengthening the ties which should exist between all sections of our common country.”

    McTyeire chose the site for the campus, supervised the construction of buildings and personally planted many of the trees that today make Vanderbilt a national arboretum. At the outset, the university consisted of one Main Building (now Kirkland Hall), an astronomical observatory and houses for professors. Landon C. Garland was Vanderbilt’s first chancellor, serving from 1875 to 1893. He advised McTyeire in selecting the faculty, arranged the curriculum and set the policies of the university.

    For the first 40 years of its existence, Vanderbilt was under the auspices of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The Vanderbilt Board of Trust severed its ties with the church in June 1914 as a result of a dispute with the bishops over who would appoint university trustees.

    kirkland hallFrom the outset, Vanderbilt met two definitions of a university: It offered work in the liberal arts and sciences beyond the baccalaureate degree and it embraced several professional schools in addition to its college. James H. Kirkland, the longest serving chancellor in university history (1893-1937), followed Chancellor Garland. He guided Vanderbilt to rebuild after a fire in 1905 that consumed the main building, which was renamed in Kirkland’s honor, and all its contents. He also navigated the university through the separation from the Methodist Church. Notable advances in graduate studies were made under the third chancellor, Oliver Cromwell Carmichael (1937-46). He also created the Joint University Library, brought about by a coalition of Vanderbilt, Peabody College and Scarritt College.

    Remarkable continuity has characterized the government of Vanderbilt. The original charter, issued in 1872, was amended in 1873 to make the legal name of the corporation “The Vanderbilt University.” The charter has not been altered since.

    The university is self-governing under a Board of Trust that, since the beginning, has elected its own members and officers. The university’s general government is vested in the Board of Trust. The immediate government of the university is committed to the chancellor, who is elected by the Board of Trust.

    The original Vanderbilt campus consisted of 75 acres. By 1960, the campus had spread to about 260 acres of land. When George Peabody College for Teachers merged with Vanderbilt in 1979, about 53 acres were added.

    wyatt centerVanderbilt’s student enrollment tended to double itself each 25 years during the first century of the university’s history: 307 in the fall of 1875; 754 in 1900; 1,377 in 1925; 3,529 in 1950; 7,034 in 1975. In the fall of 1999 the enrollment was 10,127.

    In the planning of Vanderbilt, the assumption seemed to be that it would be an all-male institution. Yet the board never enacted rules prohibiting women. At least one woman attended Vanderbilt classes every year from 1875 on. Most came to classes by courtesy of professors or as special or irregular (non-degree) students. From 1892 to 1901 women at Vanderbilt gained full legal equality except in one respect — access to dorms. In 1894 the faculty and board allowed women to compete for academic prizes. By 1897, four or five women entered with each freshman class. By 1913 the student body contained 78 women, or just more than 20 percent of the academic enrollment.

    National recognition of the university’s status came in 1949 with election of Vanderbilt to membership in the select Association of American Universities. In the 1950s Vanderbilt began to outgrow its provincial roots and to measure its achievements by national standards under the leadership of Chancellor Harvie Branscomb. By its 90th anniversary in 1963, Vanderbilt for the first time ranked in the top 20 private universities in the United States.

    Vanderbilt continued to excel in research, and the number of university buildings more than doubled under the leadership of Chancellors Alexander Heard (1963-1982) and Joe B. Wyatt (1982-2000), only the fifth and sixth chancellors in Vanderbilt’s long and distinguished history. Heard added three schools (Blair, the Owen Graduate School of Management and Peabody College) to the seven already existing and constructed three dozen buildings. During Wyatt’s tenure, Vanderbilt acquired or built one-third of the campus buildings and made great strides in diversity, volunteerism and technology.

    The university grew and changed significantly under its seventh chancellor, Gordon Gee, who served from 2000 to 2007. Vanderbilt led the country in the rate of growth for academic research funding, which increased to more than $450 million and became one of the most selective undergraduate institutions in the country.

    On March 1, 2008, Nicholas S. Zeppos was named Vanderbilt’s eighth chancellor after serving as interim chancellor beginning Aug. 1, 2007. Prior to that, he spent 2002-2008 as Vanderbilt’s provost, overseeing undergraduate, graduate and professional education programs as well as development, alumni relations and research efforts in liberal arts and sciences, engineering, music, education, business, law and divinity. He first came to Vanderbilt in 1987 as an assistant professor in the law school. In his first five years, Zeppos led the university through the most challenging economic times since the Great Depression, while continuing to attract the best students and faculty from across the country and around the world. Vanderbilt got through the economic crisis notably less scathed than many of its peers and began and remained committed to its much-praised enhanced financial aid policy for all undergraduates during the same timespan. The Martha Rivers Ingram Commons for first-year students opened in 2008 and College Halls, the next phase in the residential education system at Vanderbilt, is on track to open in the fall of 2014. During Zeppos’ first five years, Vanderbilt has drawn robust support from federal funding agencies, and the Medical Center entered into agreements with regional hospitals and health care systems in middle and east Tennessee that will bring Vanderbilt care to patients across the state.

    studentsToday, Vanderbilt University is a private research university of about 6,500 undergraduates and 5,300 graduate and professional students. The university comprises 10 schools, a public policy center and The Freedom Forum First Amendment Center. Vanderbilt offers undergraduate programs in the liberal arts and sciences, engineering, music, education and human development as well as a full range of graduate and professional degrees. The university is consistently ranked as one of the nation’s top 20 universities by publications such as U.S. News & World Report, with several programs and disciplines ranking in the top 10.

    Cutting-edge research and liberal arts, combined with strong ties to a distinguished medical center, creates an invigorating atmosphere where students tailor their education to meet their goals and researchers collaborate to solve complex questions affecting our health, culture and society.

    Vanderbilt, an independent, privately supported university, and the separate, non-profit Vanderbilt University Medical Center share a respected name and enjoy close collaboration through education and research. Together, the number of people employed by these two organizations exceeds that of the largest private employer in the Middle Tennessee region.
    Related links

     
  • richardmitnick 3:51 PM on April 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Bard SummerScape 2018, , Opera   

    “Bard SummerScape 2018 Presents Rare New American Production of Anton Rubinstein’s Demon (July 27–Aug 5)” 

    Bard Music Festival

    Bard Music Festival

    Plus Rimsky-Korsakov’s Operas Mozart and Salieri (Aug 18) and The Tsar’s Bride (Aug 19) in Bard Music Festival

    “Some of the most important summer opera experiences in the U.S. are not at the better-known festivals but at Bard SummerScape.”
    Financial Times

    Committed since its inception to reviving important but neglected operas, Bard SummerScape has long proven itself “an indispensable part of the summer operatic landscape” (Musical America). Offering a rare new American production of Demon by Anton Rubinstein as its operatic centerpiece, this year’s immersion in Rimsky-Korsakov and His World is no exception. With Olga Tolkmit and Efim Zavalny heading an all-Russian cast in an original staging by renowned American director Thaddeus Strassberger, with the support of the American Symphony Orchestra under the leadership of music director and festival co-artistic director Leon Botstein, Demon runs for five performances between July 27 and August 5, with an Opera Talk, free and open to the public, before the matinee on July 29. SummerScape 2018 also provides the chance to see Rimsky-Korsakov’s seldom-staged operas Mozart and Salieri (August 18) and The Tsar’s Bride (August 19) during the 29th annual Bard Music Festival. Anchored by the Bard Festival Chorale under the direction of James Bagwell, all three presentations take place on Bard’s glorious Hudson Valley campus in the striking Frank Gehry-designed Fisher Center. As Time Out New York notes, “Botstein and Bard SummerScape show courage, foresight and great imagination, honoring operas that larger institutions are content to ignore.”

    Anton Rubinstein’s Demon (1871)
    It was Anton Rubinstein (1829–94), Rimsky-Korsakov’s senior by 15 years, who founded the St. Petersburg Conservatory, now named for the younger composer. Both men had an enormous influence on the next generation of Russian composition, and although in his lifetime Rubinstein was best known as a keyboard virtuoso and star pedagogue whose students included Tchaikovsky, he was also a prolific composer with no fewer than 20 operas to his name. The most popular of these was Demon (1871), one of the two operas mounted most often in 19th-century Russia, and the country’s first to be produced in Britain. Yet despite its rich choruses and fiery libretto, today Rubinstein’s masterpiece has fallen into neglect and is almost never staged in the English-speaking world.

    Composed in three acts to a libretto by Pavel Viskovatov, Demon was based on a narrative poem by Mikhail Lermontov that was initially banned as sacrilegious. Like the poem, Rubinstein’s opera depicts a demon, or fallen angel, who meets Tamara, a mortal princess, and falls desperately in love, trying everything in his power to seduce her. Tamara’s struggle to resist him becomes a battle not only for her soul but for the fate of the earth itself. When at last she weakens, the price of her redemption is death, and the demon is condemned to eternal solitude.

    On the few occasions it has been heard in the West, Demon has received a warm welcome. After a concert performance by the Kirov Opera at the 2003 Lincoln Center Festival, the New York Times admired the composer’s “sure lyrical gift and command of the orchestra,” while a 2009 London presentation prompted Gramophone to admire “Rubinstein’s colourful and lyrically expressive score.” As The Independent declared: “You can see why it did, and still does, carry the wow factor in Russia.”

    Bard’s full staging represents an all-too-rare opportunity to see Rubinstein’s opera mounted outside the composer’s homeland. Conceived expressly for SummerScape 2018, the new production is by renowned American director Thaddeus Strassberger, whose previous SummerScape productions are among Bard’s most resounding success stories. The Financial Times declared: “Les Huguenots in Bard’s staging is a thriller from beginning to end. … Five Stars.” New York magazine named his treatment of Der ferne Klang one of the “Top Ten Classical Music Events of 2010”; the Wall Street Journal called his take on Le roi malgré lui “hilarious”; and the New York Times found his handling of The Wreckers “extraordinarily successful.” As for his treatment of Oresteia by Rubinstein’s contemporary Sergei Taneyev, which marked the opera’s first fully staged production outside Russia, it was nominated for a 2014 International Opera Award.

    Making his U.S. debut in Demon’s title role is baritone Efim Zavalny, first prize-winner at the International Shtokolov Vocalists’ Competition. Singing opposite him as Tamara is soprano Olga Tolkmit, a nominee for Russia’s prestigious Golden Mask Award, in her third major role at Bard; having impressed the Financial Times with her “resonant, bright-voiced soprano” in Oresteia, she returned to grace Dvořák’s Dimitrij last summer. Belarusian bass Andrey Valentiy, who has appeared at Moscow’s Bolshoi Theatre and Milan’s La Scala, sings Tamara’s father, Prince Gudal. Her Nanny is portrayed by mezzo-soprano Ekaterina Egorova, a frequent leading lady at St. Petersburg’s Mikhailovsky Opera. Likewise tenor Alexander Nesterenko, who sings Tamara’s fiancé, Prince Sinodal, regularly headlines productions at Moscow’s Stanislavsky Opera. Bard’s all-Russian cast is completed by bass-baritone Yakov Strizhak as Sinodal’s Old Servant, mezzo-soprano Nadezhda Babintseva as the Angel, and tenor Pavel Sulyandziga as the Messenger. The opera’s thrilling dance sequences will be performed by the highly respected Georgian dance troupe, Pesvebi Georgian Dancers.

    Sets for Demon are designed by Paul Tate dePoo III, who was nominated for a 2017 Helen Hayes Award. The production will be enhanced by video projections from Greg Emetaz, known for his work for New York City Opera and San Francisco Opera, with lighting design by JAX Messenger, whose work on Oresteia helped ensure that “Strassberger’s cohesive vision … was searingly powerful” (Opera News). Demon’s costume design is by Obie Award-winner Kaye Voyce, whose extensive credits range from Broadway to the Royal Shakespeare Company, as well as numerous Bard theater and dance productions.

    High resolution images for Bard’s production of Demon are available here.

    Rimsky-Korsakov’s Mozart and Salieri (1897), Bard Music Festival Program 8
    No 19th-century composer contributed more substantially to Russia’s opera repertoire than Rimsky-Korsakov, who wrote 16 examples of the genre. Based on the same Pushkin verse drama that inspired Peter Shaffer’s Amadeus, his one-act opera Mozart and Salieri covers the same territory, animating the rumor that Salieri, official composer of Vienna’s Hapsburg court, so envied Mozart’s genius that he was driven to poison him. Although the opera is rarely mounted even in Russia, this is to be regretted, according to the New York Times, which – citing “the opera’s success and originality” – ranked it among the composer’s “most interesting work.”

    Forming the second half of a program exploring Domestic Music Making in Russia, Bard’s presentation of the opera stars tenor Gerard Schneider, whose “imposing tenor” (Wall Street Journal) “stole the show” (Allegri con Fuoco) in SummerScape 2016’s mainstage production of Iris. Schneider sings the role of Mozart, with Grammy nominee Mikhail Svetlov, who impressed the Washington Post with his “titanic, all-encompassing bass,” as the composer’s nemesis, Salieri.

    There will be a talk before the concert by festival co-artistic director Christopher Gibbs, who is the James H. Ottaway Jr. Professor of Music at Bard College.

    Rimsky-Korsakov’s The Tsar’s Bride (1898), Bard Music Festival Program 12
    For his tenth opera, Rimsky-Korsakov combined the fantastic with the historical, turning to the so-called Time of Troubles, the same period of Russian history that inspired Boris Godunov and SummerScape 2017’s Dimitrij. Based on a play by Lev Mey, The Tsar’s Bride depicts Marfa, the merchant’s daughter whom Ivan the Terrible (a silent role, in accordance with Tsarist censorship laws) chooses from among thousands of pretty girls as his third wife. Unfortunately she is already in love with another and subject to the unwanted attentions of a third, who attempts to give her a love potion. When poison is substituted, and the man she loves is blamed and executed, Marfa loses her mind, providing the opera with a bona fide mad scene. Although the familiar Slava anthem functions throughout as a leitmotif, Rimsky-Korsakov explained that he intended The Tsar’s Bride as a reaction against Wagner’s ideas, and aimed for “cantilena par excellence.” This proved successful in his homeland, where the opera was warmly welcomed at its premiere, and has remained in regular rotation ever since. In the West, by contrast, revivals are rare. Yet The Tsar’s Bride is “an upfront rumbustious melodrama, packed with big tunes and thrilling climaxes” (The Telegraph, UK). Moreover, it offers “a compelling study of power and powerlessness” (The Independent, UK), and has “one of the most lyrical of all Rimsky-Korsakov scores” (New York Times).

    Bard’s semi-staged production features The Orchestra Now (TŌN), Bard’s graduate training orchestra, under Botstein’s leadership. In the title role of Marfa, it stars Lyubov Petrova, “a soprano of ravishing, changeable beauty, blazing high notes and magnetic stage presence” (Opera News). Demon’s Andrey Valentiy sings Marfa’s father, Vasily Sobakin, and Mozart and Salieri’s Gerard Schneider takes the role of her falsely accused suitor, Ivan Likov. Efim Zavalny, the Demon himself, plays her third admirer, Grigory Gryaznoy, with mezzo-soprano Nadezhda Babintseva, who “brought the house down” (RTE) on tour with the Moscow State Opera, as Lyubasha, his murderous mistress. Joel Sorensen, “a beautifully expressive tenor, gifted at characterization” (The Independent, UK), appears as the Tsar’s physician, Yelisey Bomeliy, with bass-baritone Yakov Strizhak, first-prize-winner at the Rachmaninov International Music Competition, as an oprichnik, or member of the imperial police force. Rounding out Bard’s stellar cast as Petrovna, the Sobakins’ housekeeper, is mezzo-soprano Teresa Buchholz, winner of the female division at Carnegie Hall’s Nico Castel International Master Singer Competition; she returns to the festival after a series of “consistently excellent” (New York Arts) performances in previous SummerScape seasons.

    With lighting by Anshuman Bhatia, named a “Young Designer to Watch” by Live Design magazine, Bard’s semi-staged production is designed and directed by Doug Fitch, the co-founder of Giants Are Small. Consistently cited as benchmarks of innovation, his New York Philharmonic collaborations include Le Grand Macabre, named “Best Opera of the Year” by the New York Times, New York magazine, and Time Out New York; and The Cunning Little Vixen, chosen as the “Best Classical Event of the Year” by New York.

    Before the opera, there will be a talk by Bard’s 2018 Scholar-in-Residence, Marina Frolova-Walker, author of Russian Music and Nationalism: from Glinka to Stalin and editor of the forthcoming volume Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and His World.

    About opera at Bard SummerScape
    Since the opening of the Fisher Center at Bard, Botstein and the American Symphony Orchestra have been responsible for championing and restoring to the stage a growing number of important but long-neglected operas. All these presentations and their remarkable stagings have been warmly received by audiences and critics alike – not least, last season’s full staging of Dvořák’s Dimitrij. The New York Times admired Bard’s “simple and effective updated production,” called the “vivid choral scenes … a triumph for the impressive Bard Festival Chorale,” and concluded:

    “Mr. Botstein drew vibrant playing and a well-paced performance from the American Symphony Orchestra. … He, the festival and this hard-working cast deserve thanks.”

    As Musical America recognizes: “Bard’s annual opera has become an indispensable part of the summer operatic landscape.”

    Illustrating the scope and originality of the festival’s programming, a list of Bard’s previous operatic offerings follows below:

    2017: Dvořák – Dimitrij (first fully staged American production)
    Moniuszko – Halka
    2016: Mascagni – Iris
    Puccini – Il tabarro and Le Villi; Massenet – La Navarraise; Busoni – Turandot; Puccini/Berio – Turandot, Act III
    2015: Smyth – The Wreckers (first fully staged American production)
    2014: Weber – Euryanthe (first American revival in 100 years)
    Schubert – Fierrabras; Die Verschworenen
    von Suppé – Franz Schubert
    2013: Taneyev – Oresteia (first fully staged production outside Russia)
    Stravinsky – Oedipus Rex, Perséphone, and Mavra
    2012: Chabrier – Le roi malgré lui (first staged revival of original version)
    Saint-Saëns – Henry VIII
    2011: Strauss – Die Liebe der Danae (first fully staged New York production)
    2010: Schreker – Der ferne Klang
    Hindemith – Sancta Susanna
    Weill – Royal Palace
    2009: Meyerbeer – Les Huguenots
    2008: Szymanowski – King Roger; Harnasie (double-bill)
    2007: Zemlinsky – Der Zwerg; Eine florentinische Tragödie (first U.S. double-bill production)
    2006: Schumann – Genoveva (first U.S. professional production)
    2005: Blitzstein – Regina
    2004: Shostakovich – The Nose (first East-coast professional production)
    2003: Janáček – Osud (first U.S. staged production)

    Click here to see a celebration of opera at Bard SummerScape.

    Opera at Bard SummerScape 2018

    Anton Rubinstein (1829–94)
    Demon (1871)

    American Symphony Orchestra
    Conducted by Leon Botstein, music director
    Directed by Thaddeus Strassberger
    Bard Festival Chorale
    Conducted by James Bagwell
    Paul Tate dePoo III: set designer
    Kaye Voyce: costume designer
    Candida Nichols: associate costumer
    JAX Messenger: lighting designer
    Greg Emetaz: video designer
    Shorena Barbakadz: choreographer
    Anne Ford-Coates: hair and makeup designer
    Onofrio Colucci: acting coach/assistant director
    Roza Tulyaganova: diction coach/assistant director
    Jordan Fein: assistant director

    Demon: Efim Zavalny, baritone
    Tamara: Olga Tolkmit, soprano
    Angel: Nadezhda Babintseva, mezzo-soprano
    Prince Gudal: Andrey Valentiy, bass
    Prince Sinodal: Alexander Nesterenko, tenor
    Nanny: Ekaterina Egorova, mezzo-soprano
    Old Servant: Yakov Strizhak, bass-baritone
    Messenger: Pavel Sulyandziga, tenor
    Pesvebi Georgian Dancers

    Sosnoff Theater
    July 27* at 8 pm
    July 29*; August 1, 3* & 5* at 2 pm
    Tickets start at $25

    Opening Night Reception for Members
    July 27

    Opera Talk with Leon Botstein
    July 29 at 12 pm
    Free and open to the public

    Opera in the 2018 Bard Music Festival, Rimsky-Korsakov and His World

    Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (18441908)
    Mozart and Salieri (1897)

    Bard Festival Chorale
    Conducted by James Bagwell
    Mozart: Gerard Schneider, tenor
    Salieri: Mikhail Svetlov, bass

    August 18
    Program Eight, Domestic Music Making in Russia
    Olin Hall
    1 pm Preconcert Talk: Christopher Gibbs
    1:30 pm Performance

    Tickets: $40

    Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (18441908)
    The Tsar’s Bride (1898)

    The Orchestra Now (TŌN)
    Conducted by Leon Botstein
    Bard Festival Chorale
    Conducted by James Bagwell
    Designed and directed by Doug Fitch
    Lighting design: Anshuman Bhatia
    Marfa: Lyubov Petrova, soprano
    Lyubasha: Nadezhda Babintseva, mezzo-soprano
    Grigory Gryaznoy: Efim Zavalny, baritone
    Vasily Sobakin: Andrey Valentiy, bass
    Malyuta Skuratov: Yakov Strizhak, bass-baritone
    Yelisey Bomeliy: Joel Sorensen, tenor
    Ivan Likov: Gerard Schneider, tenor
    Petrovna: Teresa Buchholz, mezzo-soprano

    August 19
    Program Twelve, The Tsar’s Bride*
    Sosnoff Theater
    3:30 pm Preconcert Talk: Marina Frolova-Walker
    4:30 pm Performance

    Tickets: $25–$75

    • Round-trip transportation from Manhattan to Bard is available for this performance. The round-trip fare is $40 and reservations are required; see further details below.

    SummerScape 2018: other key performance dates by genre

    MUSIC
    Bard Music Festival, Weekend One: Inventing Russian Music: The Mighty Five (Aug 10–12)
    Bard Music Festival, Weekend Two: Rimsky-Korsakov and His Followers (Aug 17–19)

    DANCE
    Pam Tanowitz, Kaija Saariaho, Brice Marden: T.S. Eliot’s Four Quartets (world premiere of SummerScape commission, featuring Pam Tanowitz Dance, Kathleen Chalfant, and The Knights)
    Sosnoff Theater
    July 6* & 7 at 8 pm
    July 8* at 3 pm
    Tickets start at $25

    Opening Night Reception for Members Friday, July 6
    Post-Performance Conversation Saturday, July 7
    Pre-Performance Conversation Sunday, July 8 at 2pm

    THEATER
    Leonard Bernstein’s Peter Pan (new production)
    Music and lyrics by Leonard Bernstein
    After the play by J. M. Barrie
    Adapted and directed by Christopher Alden
    LUMA Theater
    June 28; July 5, 6*, 8, 12, 15, 19 & 22 at 7 pm
    June 29 & 30; July 7, 13, 14, 20 & 21 at 7:30 pm
    July 1, 4, 7, 8*, 11, 14, 15, 18, 21 & 22 at 2 pm
    Tickets start at $25
    Open to reviewing press beginning July 5
    Suitable for audiences aged 12 and up.

    Opening Night Reception for Members Friday, July 6
    Pre-Performance Conversation Sunday, July 1 at 1pm
    Post-Performance Conversation Wednesday, July 11

    FILM SERIES
    Rimsky-Korsakov and the Poetry of Cinema
    Ottaway Film Center
    July 26 – Russian Ark (Aleksandr Sokurov, 2002, Russia/Germany/Canada/Finland, 96 minutes)
    July 29 – A Night on Bald Mountain (Alexandre Alexeieff and Claire Parker, 1933, France, 8 minutes) and Fantasia (Walt Disney, 1940, USA, 126 minutes)
    August 2 – The Devil is a Woman (Josef von Sternberg, 1935, USA, 79 minutes)
    August 5 – Kismet (Vincente Minnelli, 1955, USA, 113 minutes)
    August 9 – Man of Music (Composer Glinka), (Grigori Aleksandrov, 1952, USSR, 100 minutes)
    August 12 – The Cranes are Flying (Mikhail Kalatozov, 1957, USSR, 97 minutes)
    August 16 – Atlantic City (Louis Malle, 1980, Canada/France, 104 minutes)
    August 19 – The House of Mirth (Terence Davies, 2000, UK/Germany/USA, 140 minutes)
    Tickets: $10

    SPIEGELTENT
    Live Music, Cabaret, Festival Dining, and After Hours salon
    Dates, times, and prices vary

    Bard SummerScape ticket information

    Tickets for all Bard SummerScape events are now on sale. For tickets and further information on all SummerScape events, call the Fisher Center box office at 845-758-7900 or visit http://fishercenter.bard.edu/summerscape.

    Venues:
    SummerScape opera, theater, and dance performances and most Bard Music Festival programs are held in the Sosnoff Theater or LUMA Theater in Bard’s Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, designed by Frank Gehry and celebrated since its opening as a major architectural landmark in the region. Some chamber programs and other BMF events are in Olin Hall, and the Spiegeltent has its own schedule of events, in addition to serving as a restaurant, café, and bar before and after performances. Film Series screenings are at the Jim Ottaway Jr. Film Center in the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Center.

    Full Schedule:
    For a complete schedule of SummerScape and Bard Music Festival events (subject to change), follow the links given below. Updates are posted at the festival web site fishercenter.bard.edu/summerscape.
    Fisher Center members receive priority access to the best seats in advance, and those who join the Center’s email list receive advance booking opportunities as well as regular news and updates.

    Bard SummerScape: http://fishercenter.bard.edu/summerscape

    Bard Music Festival: http://fishercenter.bard.edu/bmf

    Tickets and Subscriptions: http://fishercenter.bard.edu/boxoffice; or by phone at 845-758-7900. Tickets to all mainstage events start at $25.

    Special offers:
    Create Your Own Series: save 25% and enjoy maximum flexibility, by choosing four or more events.
    SummerScape Mainstage Package: save 30% and guarantee seats for dance, theater, and opera events.
    Out-of-Town Package: save up to 23% on mainstage ticket, roundtrip bus from New York City, and three-course meal.
    Night Out Package: save up to 15% on mainstage ticket (selected performances only) and three-course meal.

    Updates: Bard’s “e-subscribers” get all the news in regular updates. Click here to sign up, or send an e-mail to fishercenter@bard.edu.

    All programs are subject to change.

    The 2018 SummerScape season is made possible in part through the generous support of Jeanne Donovan Fisher, the Martin and Toni Sosnoff Foundation, the Board of The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, the Board of the Bard Music Festival, and Fisher Center members, as well as grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

    Received via email.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Bard Music Festival

    History of the Bard Music Festival

    Leon Botstein and Christopher H. Gibbs, Artistic Directors
    The Bard Music Festival was founded in 1990 to promote new ways of understanding and presenting the history of music to a contemporary audience. Each year, a single composer is chosen as the main subject. The biography of the composer, the influences and consequences of that composer’s achievement, and all aspects of the musical culture surrounding the time and place of the composer’s life are explored. Perhaps the most important dimensions of the festival are the ways in which it links music to the worlds of literature, painting, theater, philosophy, and politics and brings two kinds of audience together: those with a long history of interest in concert life and first-time listeners, who find the festival an ideal place to learn about and enjoy the riches of our musical past.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: