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  • richardmitnick 1:00 PM on December 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , panSonus, , Voice   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “panSonus NYC Premiere Concert” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    Saturday, December 15, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    St. John’s in the Village
    224 Waverly Place
    New York, NY 10014

    $10—20

    Tickets

    Comprised of New York-based musicians Jon Clancy (Westfield, NJ) and Amber Evans (Brisbane, AUS), panSonus is an interdisciplinary duo that seeks to promote and collaborate in the creation of new and experimental works for combinations of voice, percussion, theatre, and electronics, that transcend their respective traditional practices. Through their work, the duo curates uniquely engaging and visceral performance experiences through works that heighten awareness of corporeal, spacial, and material resonance, and advocates for thoughtful, inclusive, and conceptual programming practices.

    Program:

    Sarah HENNIES || Psalm 3 (2009) for woodblock
    Bethany YOUNGE & Kayleigh BUTCHER || Her Disappearance (2015) for two voices extended by 5′ PVC pipe
    Allessandro PERINI || Three Studies for Two Voices (2017) for two performers and embedded electronics*
    Andrea L. SCARTAZZINI || Aura (2000) for obscured vocalist and percussionist*

    – intermission –

    Daniel TACKE || Abend (2009) for voice and percussion**
    Kate SOPER || III. The Crito [from IPSA DIXIT] (2013) for vocalist playing percussion and speaking percussionist
    Sarah HENNIES || Flourish (2013) for vibraphone (two players)

    • US Premiere

    ** NYC Premiere

    Doors open at 7pm
    Tickets: $20 Adult / $15 Student / $10 Early Bird

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 6:03 PM on November 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Sara Serpa, Voice   

    From National Sawdust: “John Zorn’s Stone Commissioning Series presents: Sara Serpa” 

    From National Sawdust

    National Sawdust

    John Zorn

    John Zorn by Scott Irvine – Courtesy of the artist


    John Zorn at the Newport Jazz Festival, 2014 digboston (https://www.flickr.com/photos/weeklydig/)%5B/caption

    [caption id="attachment_13855" align="alignnone" width="300"] Sara Serpa Photo by Carlos Ramos

    Wed, Nov 28, 2018, 7:00 PM

    Sara Serpa is a singer, composer, and improviser who implements a unique instrumental approach to her vocal style. Recognized for her distinctive wordless singing, Serpa has been immersed in the field of jazz, improvised, and experimental music since first arriving in New York in 2008. Described by JazzTimes as “a master of wordless landscapes” and by The New York Times as “a singer of silvery poise and cosmopolitan outlook”, Serpa started her recording and performing career with jazz luminaries such as Grammy–nominated pianist Danilo Pérez, Guggenheim and MacArthur Fellow pianist Ran Blake, and Greg Osby.

    Her ethereal music draws from a broad variety of inspirations, including literature, film, visual arts, history, and nature. As a leader, she has produced and released nine albums (with labels Sunnyside Records, Clean Feed Records, Tzadik, and Inner Circle Music), the latest being All The Dreams in collaboration with guitarist André Matos. Serpa has collaborated with an extensive array of musicians, including John Zorn, Guillermo Klein, Zeena Parkins, Mark Turner, Tyshawn Sorey, and Nicole Mitchell, among many others.

    She has performed her own music in Europe, Australia, and North and South America, singing at international festivals such as Festa do Jazz, the Panama Jazz Festival, the Festival de Jazz de Montevideo, the Wangaratta Festival of Jazz and Blues, the Adelaide Festival, and the Sopot Jazz Festival, as well as in venues like Bimhuis, Casa da Música, the Village Vanguard, Jazz Standard, The Stone, the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, among others.

    Currently, Serpa leads a trio with Erik Friedlander (cello) and Ingrid Laubrock (tenor sax) — with a debut album released in March 2018 (Close Up on Clean Feed) — and a trio featuring Zeena Parkins (harp) and Mark Turner (tenor sax) in an interdisciplinary performance combining film with live music entitled Recognition.

    For tickets please see the full article as there is no tickets link.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    National Sawdust is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Space waiting

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:55 PM on September 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Monica Germino, , , , Voice   

    From National Sawdust and The New York Philharmonic: “MUTED: Monica Germino, violin & voice” 

    From National Sawdust

    National Sawdust


    New York Philharmonic

    New York Philharmonic & National Sawdust Present:
    MUTED: Monica Germino, violin & voice

    8:30pm doors • 9pm show

    Monica Germino. Photo Sharon Mor Yosef

    Monica Germino by Anne Reinke

    Dubbed “the quietest violin piece ever written,” MUTED was composed by Louis Andriessen, Michael Gordon, David Lang, and Julia Wolfe for Monica Germino after she was diagnosed with high sensitivity to sound. Experience this work for violin, “whisperviolin,” voice, and light design as it was meant to be heard — by small groups of listeners in an intimate space.

    Composer Louis Andriessen (photo by Frances Capatella)

    Bang On A Can David Lang- Michael Gordon- Julia Wolfe © Peter Serling

    MUTED will be performed at National Sawdust (co-presented with the New York Philharmonic) on October 8-9. Availability is limited, so get your tickets today!

    For tickets see the full article.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    National Sawdust is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Space waiting

    New York Philharmonic by Chris Lee


    Founded in 1842, the New York Philharmonic is the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States. Read a complete historical overview, visit the New York Philharmonic Leon Levy Digital Archives, or explore our history below.

    The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc.,globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra (NYPO) or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra based in New York City in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the “Big Five”. The Philharmonic’s home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York’s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

    Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the “Big Five” orchestras. Its record-setting 14,000th concert was given in December 2004.

    The New York Philharmonic was founded in 1842 by the American conductor Ureli Corelli Hill, with the aid of the Irish composer William Vincent Wallace. The orchestra was then called the Philharmonic Society of New York. It was the third Philharmonic on American soil since 1799, and had as its intended purpose, “the advancement of instrumental music.” The first concert of the Philharmonic Society took place on December 7, 1842 in the Apollo Rooms on lower Broadway before an audience of 600. The concert opened with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, led by Hill himself. Two other conductors, German-born Henry Christian Timm and French-born Denis Etienne, led parts of the eclectic, three-hour program, which included chamber music and several operatic selections with a leading singer of the day, as was the custom. The musicians operated as a cooperative society, deciding by a majority vote such issues as who would become a member, which music would be performed and who among them would conduct. At the end of the season, the players would divide any proceeds among themselves.

    After only a dozen public performances and barely four years old, the Philharmonic organized a concert to raise funds to build a new music hall. The centerpiece was the American premiere of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, to take place at Castle Garden on the southern tip of Manhattan. About 400 instrumental and vocal performers gathered for this premiere, which was conducted by George Loder. The chorals were translated into what would be the first English performance anywhere in the world. However, with the expensive US$2.00 ticket price and a war rally uptown, the hoped-for audience was kept away and the new hall would have to wait. Although judged by some as an odd work with all those singers kept at bay until the end, the Ninth soon became the work performed most often when a grand gesture was required.

    During the Philharmonic’s first seven seasons, seven musicians alternated the conducting duties. In addition to Hill, Timm and Étienne, these were William Alpers, George Loder, Louis Wiegers and Alfred Boucher. This changed in 1849 when Theodore Eisfeld was installed as sole conductor for the season. Eisfeld, later along with Carl Bergmann, would be the conductor until 1865. That year, Eisfeld conducted the Orchestra’s memorial concert for the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln, but in a peculiar turn of events which were criticized in the New York press, the Philharmonic omitted the last movement, Ode to Joy, as being inappropriate for the occasion. That year Eisfeld returned to Europe, and Bergmann continued to conduct the Society until his death in 1876.

    Leopold Damrosch, Franz Liszt’s former concertmaster at Weimar, served as conductor of the Philharmonic for the 1876/77 season. But failing to win support from the Philharmonic’s public, he left to create the rival Symphony Society of New York in 1878. Upon his death in 1885, his 23-year-old son Walter took over and continued the competition with the old Philharmonic. It was Walter who would convince Andrew Carnegie that New York needed a first-class concert hall and on May 5, 1891, both Walter and Russian composer Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky conducted at the inaugural concert of the city’s new Music Hall, which in a few years would be renamed for its primary benefactor, Andrew Carnegie. Carnegie Hall would remain the orchestra’s home until 1962.

    The Philharmonic in 1877 was in desperate financial condition, caused by the paltry income from five concerts in the 1876/77 season that brought in an average of only $168 per concert. Representatives of the Philharmonic wished to attract the German-born, American-trained conductor Theodore Thomas, whose own Theodore Thomas Orchestra had competed directly with the Philharmonic for over a decade and which had brought him fame and great success. At first the Philharmonic’s suggestion offended Thomas because he was unwilling to disband his own orchestra. Because of the desperate financial circumstances, the Philharmonic offered Theodore Thomas the conductorship without conditions, and he began conducting the orchestra in the autumn of 1877. With the exception of the 1878/79 season – when he was in Cincinnati and Adolph Neuendorff led the group – Thomas conducted every season for fourteen years, vastly improving the orchestra’s financial health while creating a polished and virtuosic ensemble. He left in 1891 to found the Chicago Symphony, taking thirteen Philharmonic musicians with him.

    Another celebrated conductor, Anton Seidl, followed Thomas on the Philharmonic podium, serving until 1898. Seidl, who had served as Wagner’s assistant, was a renowned conductor of the composer’s works; Seidl’s romantic interpretations inspired both adulation and controversy. During his tenure, the Philharmonic enjoyed a period of unprecedented success and prosperity and performed its first world premiere written by a world-renowned composer in the United States – Antonín Dvořák’s Ninth Symphony From the New World. Seidl’s sudden death in 1898 from food poisoning at the age of 47 was widely mourned. Twelve thousand people applied for tickets to his funeral at the Metropolitan Opera House at 39th Street and Broadway and the streets were jammed for blocks with a “surging mass” of his admirers.

    According to Joseph Horowitz, Seidl’s death was followed by “five unsuccessful seasons” under Emil Paur [music director from 1898 to 1902] and Walter Damrosch [who served for only one season, 1902/03].” After this, he says, for several seasons [1903–1906] the orchestra employed guest conductors, including Victor Herbert, Édouard Colonne, Willem Mengelberg, Fritz Steinbach, Richard Strauss, Felix Weingartner, and Henry Wood.

    In 1909, to ensure the financial stability of the Philharmonic, a group of wealthy New Yorkers led by two women, Mary Seney Sheldon and Minnie Untermyer, formed the Guarantors Committee and changed the Orchestra’s organization from a musician-operated cooperative to a corporate management structure. The Guarantors were responsible for bringing Gustav Mahler to the Philharmonic as principal conductor and expanding the season from 18 concerts to 54, which included a tour of New England. The Philharmonic was the only symphonic orchestra where Mahler worked as music director without any opera responsibilities, freeing him to explore the symphonic literature more deeply. In New York, he conducted several works for the first time in his career and introduced audiences to his own compositions. Under Mahler, a controversial figure both as a composer and conductor, the season expanded, musicians’ salaries were guaranteed, the scope of operations broadened, and the 20th-century orchestra was created.

    In 1911 Mahler died unexpectedly, and the Philharmonic appointed Josef Stránský as his replacement. Many commentators were surprised by the choice of Stránský, whom they did not see as a worthy successor to Mahler. Stránský led all of the orchestra’s concerts until 1920, and also made the first recordings with the orchestra in 1917.

    In 1921 the Philharmonic merged with New York’s National Symphony Orchestra (no relation to the present Washington, D.C. ensemble). With this merger it also acquired the imposing Dutch conductor Willem Mengelberg. For the 1922/23 season Stránský and Mengelberg shared the conducting duties, but Stránský left after the one shared season. For nine years Mengelberg dominated the scene, although other conductors, among them Bruno Walter, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Igor Stravinsky, and Arturo Toscanini, led about half of each season’s concerts. During this period, the Philharmonic became one of the first American orchestras to boast an outdoor symphony series when it began playing low-priced summer concerts at Lewisohn Stadium in upper Manhattan. In 1920 the orchestra hired Henry Hadley as “associate conductor” given specific responsibility for the “Americanization” of the orchestra: each of Hadley’s concerts featured at least one work by an American-born composer.

    In 1924, the Young People’s Concerts were expanded into a substantial series of children’s concerts under the direction of American pianist-composer-conductor Ernest Schelling. This series became the prototype for concerts of its kind around the country and grew by popular demand to 15 concerts per season by the end of the decade.

    Mengelberg and Toscanini both led the Philharmonic in recording sessions for the Victor Talking Machine Company and Brunswick Records, initially in a recording studio (for the acoustically-recorded Victors, all under Mengelberg) and eventually in Carnegie Hall as electrical recording was developed. All of the early electrical recordings for Victor were made with a single microphone, usually placed near or above the conductor, a process Victor called “Orthophonic”; the Brunswick electricals used the company’s proprietary non-microphone “Light-Ray” selenium-cell system, which was much more prone to sonic distortion than Victor’s. Mengelberg’s first records for Victor were acousticals made in 1922; Toscanini’s recordings with the Philharmonic actually began with a single disc for Brunswick in 1926, recorded in a rehearsal hall at Carnegie Hall. Mengelberg’s most successful recording with the Philharmonic was a 1927 performance in Carnegie Hall of Richard Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben. Additional Toscanini recordings with the Philharmonic, all for Victor, took place on Carnegie Hall’s stage in 1929 and 1936. By the 1936 sessions Victor, now owned by RCA, began to experiment with multiple microphones to achieve more comprehensive reproductions of the orchestra.

    The year 1928 marked the New York Philharmonic’s last and most important merger: with the New York Symphony Society. The Symphony had been quite innovative in its 50 years prior to the merger. It made its first domestic tour in 1882, introduced educational concerts for young people in 1891, and gave the premieres of works such as Gershwin’s Concerto in F and Holst’s Egdon Heath. The merger of these two venerable institutions consolidated extraordinary financial and musical resources. Of the new Philharmonic Symphony Society of New York, Clarence Hungerford Mackay, chairman of the Philharmonic Society, will be chairman. President Harry H. Flagler, of the Symphony Society, will be president of the merger. At the first joint board meeting in 1928, the chairman, Clarence Mackay, expressed the opinion that “with the forces of the two Societies now united… the Philharmonic-Symphony Society could build up the greatest orchestra in this country if not in the world.”

    Of course, the merger had ramifications for the musicians of both orchestras. Winthrop Sargeant, a violinist with the Symphony Society and later a writer for The New Yorker, recalled the merger as “a sort of surgical operation in which twenty musicians were removed from the Philharmonic and their places taken by a small surviving band of twenty legionnaires from the New York Symphony”. This operation was performed by Arturo Toscanini himself. Fifty-seventh Street wallowed in panic and recrimination.” Toscanini, who had guest-conducted for several seasons, became the sole conductor and in 1930 led the group on a European tour that brought immediate international fame to the orchestra. Toscanini remained music director until the spring of 1936, then returned several times as a guest conductor until 1945.

    That same year nationwide radio broadcasts began. The orchestra was first heard on CBS directly from Carnegie Hall. To broadcast the Sunday afternoon concerts, CBS paid $15,000 for the entire season. The radio broadcasts continued without interruption for 38 years. A legend in his own time, Toscanini would prove to be a tough act to follow as the country headed into war.

    After an unsuccessful attempt to hire the German conductor, Wilhelm Furtwängler, the English conductor John Barbirolli and the Polish conductor Artur Rodziński were joint replacements for Toscanini in 1936. The following year Barbirolli was given the full conductorship, a post he held until the spring of 1941. In December, 1942, Bruno Walter was offered the music directorship, but declined, citing his age (he was 67 years old).[20] In 1943, Rodziński, who had conducted the orchestra’s centennial concert at Carnegie Hall in the preceding year, was appointed Musical Director. He had also conducted the Sunday afternoon radio broadcast when CBS listeners around the country heard the announcer break in on Arthur Rubinstein’s performance of Brahms’s Second Piano Concerto to update them about the attack on Pearl Harbor. (The initial word of the attack was forwarded by CBS News Correspondent John Charles Daly on his own show before the Philharmonic broadcast.) Soon after the United States entered World War II, Aaron Copland wrote A Lincoln Portrait for the Philharmonic at the request of conductor Andre Kostelanetz as a tribute to and expression of the “magnificent spirit of our country.”

    Artur Rodziński, Bruno Walter, and Sir Thomas Beecham made a series of recordings with the Philharmonic for Columbia Records during the 1940s. Many of the sessions were held in Liederkranz Hall, on East 58th Street in New York City, a building formerly belonging to a German cultural and musical society, and used as a recording studio by Columbia Records. Sony Records later digitally remastered the Beecham recordings for reissue on CD.

    In February, 1947, Artur Rodziński resigned; Bruno Walter was once again approached, and this time he accepted the position but only if the title was reduced to “Music Adviser”; he resigned in 1949. Leopold Stokowski and Dimitri Mitropoulos were appointed co-principal conductors in 1949, with Mitropoulos becoming Musical Director in 1951. Mitropoulos, known for championing new composers and obscure operas-in-concert, pioneered in other ways; adding live Philharmonic performances between movies at the Roxy Theatre and taking Edward R. Murrow and the See It Now television audience on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Orchestra. Mitropoulos made a series of recordings for Columbia Records, mostly in mono; near the end of his tenure, he recorded excerpts from Prokofiev’s ballet Romeo and Juliet in stereo. In 1957, Mitropoulos and Leonard Bernstein served together as Principal Conductors until, in the course of the season, Bernstein was appointed Music Director, becoming the first American-born-and-trained conductor to head the Philharmonic.

    Leonard Bernstein, who had made his historic, unrehearsed and spectacularly successful debut with the Philharmonic in 1943, was Music Director for 11 seasons, a time of significant change and growth. Two television series were initiated on CBS: the Young People’s Concerts and Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic. The former program, launched in 1958, made television history, winning every award in the field of educational television. Bernstein continued the orchestra’s recordings with Columbia Records until he retired as Music Director in 1969. Although Bernstein made a few recordings for Columbia after 1969, most of his later recordings were for Deutsche Grammophon. Sony has digitally remastered Bernstein’s numerous Columbia recordings and released them on CD as a part of its extensive Bernstein Century series. Although the Philharmonic performed primarily in Carnegie Hall until 1962, Bernstein preferred to record in the Manhattan Center. His later recordings were made in Philharmonic Hall. In 1960, the centennial of the birth of Gustav Mahler, Bernstein and the Philharmonic began a historic cycle of recordings of eight of Mahler’s nine symphonies for Columbia Records. (Symphony No. 8 was recorded by Bernstein with the London Symphony.) In 1962 Bernstein caused controversy with his comments before a performance by Glenn Gould of the First Piano Concerto of Johannes Brahms.

    Bernstein, a lifelong advocate of living composers, oversaw the beginning of the Orchestra’s largest commissioning project, resulting in the creation of 109 new works for orchestra. In September 1962, the Philharmonic commissioned Aaron Copland to write a new work, Connotations for Orchestra, for the opening concert of the new Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. The move to Philharmonic Hall in Lincoln Center brought about an expansion of concerts into the spring and summer. Among the many series that have taken place during the off-season have been the French-American and Stravinsky Festivals (1960s), Pierre Boulez’s “Rug Concerts” in the 1970s, and composer, Jacob Druckman’s Horizon’s Festivals in the 1980s.

    In 1971, Pierre Boulez became the first Frenchman to hold the post of Philharmonic Music Director. Boulez’s years with the Orchestra were notable for expanded repertoire and innovative concert approaches, such as the Prospective Encounters which explored new works along with the composer in alternative venues. During his tenure, the Philharmonic inaugurated the Live From Lincoln Center television series in 1976, and the Orchestra continues to appear on the Emmy Award-winning program to the present day. Boulez made a series of quadraphonic recordings for Columbia, including an extensive series of the orchestral music of Maurice Ravel.

    Members of the New York Philharmonic string section are heard on the 1971 John Lennon album Imagine, credited as The Flux Fiddlers.

    Zubin Mehta, then one of the youngest of a new generation of internationally known conductors, became Music Director in 1978. His tenure was the longest in Philharmonic history, lasting until 1991. Throughout his time on the podium, Mehta showed a strong commitment to contemporary music, presenting 52 works for the first time. In 1980 the Philharmonic, always known as a touring orchestra, embarked on a European tour marking the 50th anniversary of Toscanini’s trip to Europe.

    Kurt Masur, who had been conducting the Philharmonic frequently since his debut in 1981, became Music Director in 1991. Notable aspects of his tenure included a series of free Memorial Day Concerts at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and annual concert tours abroad, including the orchestra’s first trip to mainland China. He presided over the 150th Anniversary celebrations during the 1992–1993 season. His tenure concluded in 2002, and he was named Music Director Emeritus of the Philharmonic.

    In 2000, Lorin Maazel made a guest-conducting appearance with the New York Philharmonic in two weeks of subscription concerts after an absence of over twenty years, which was met with a positive reaction from the orchestra musicians. This engagement led to his appointment in January 2001 as the orchestra’s next Music Director. He assumed the post in September 2002, 60 years after making his debut with the Orchestra at the age of twelve at Lewisohn Stadium. In his first subscription week he led the world premiere of John Adams’ On the Transmigration of Souls commissioned in memory of those who died on September 11, 2001. Maazel concluded his tenure as the Philharmonic’s Music Director at the end of the 2008/09 season.

    In 2003, due to ongoing concerns with the acoustics of Avery Fisher Hall, there was a proposal to move the New York Philharmonic back to Carnegie Hall and merge the two organizations, but this proposal did not come to fruition. On May 5, 2010, the New York Philharmonic performed its 15,000th concert, a milestone unmatched by any other symphony orchestra in the world.

    On July 18, 2007, the Philharmonic named Alan Gilbert as its next music director, effective with the 2009/10 season, with an initial contract of five years. In October 2012, the orchestra extended Gilbert’s contract through the 2016/17 season. In February 2015, the orchestra announced the scheduled conclusion of Gilbert’s tenure its music director after the close of the 2016/17 season.

    In January 2016, the orchestra announced the appointment of Jaap van Zweden as its next Music Director, effective with the 2018/19 season, with an initial contract of five years. van Zweden is scheduled to serve as Music Director Designate for the 2017/18 season.

    The current president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the orchestra is Deborah Borda. Borda had previously held the same posts, as well as the post of managing director, with the orchestra.
    (So, Wikipedia)

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:50 AM on September 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "These Wicked Things", Americana indie, Beat Circus, , , Voice   

    From Innova: “These Wicked Things” 

    From Innova the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1

    Beat Circus
    These Wicked Things
    Description:
    Weird American Gothic
    Composers: Brian Carpenter, Andrew Stern, Paul Dilley, Gavin McCarthy

    Performers: Beat Circus

    Brian Carpenter – vocals
    Andrew Stern – guitar
    Abigale Reisman – violin
    Emily Bookwalter – viola
    Dana Colley – bass saxophone
    Paul Dilley – double bass
    Gavin McCarthy – drums

    Catalog Number: #1 015
    Genre: new music
    Collection: Americana, indie
    singer-songwriter

    Release Date:
    Mar 22, 2019

    Liner Notes:
    View

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:34 PM on August 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Voice   

    From LPR : “LPR X: Meredith Monk & Vocal Ensemble “Cellular Songs” Concert Three Nights 

    From LPR

    1
    Photo © Christine Alicino

    (Night 1)
    Sun October 14th, 2018

    8:00PM

    Main Space

    Minimum Age: 18+

    Doors Open: 7:00PM

    Show Time: 8:00PM

    Event Ticket: $35 / $25

    Tickets

    (Night 2)

    Mon October 15th, 2018

    8:00PM

    Main Space

    Minimum Age: 18+

    Doors Open: 7:00PM

    Show Time: 8:00PM

    Event Ticket: $35 / $25
    Tickets

    (Night 3)

    Tue October 16th, 2018

    8:00PM

    Main Space

    Minimum Age: 18+

    Doors Open: 7:00PM

    Show Time: 8:00PM

    Event Ticket: $35 / $25

    Tickets

    Recognized as one of the most unique and influential artists of our time, composer/performer Meredith Monk presents a concert of music from her newest work, Cellular Songs, with the women of her acclaimed Vocal Ensemble. A “deeply affecting meditation on the nature of the biological cell as a metaphor for human society” (Financial Times), Cellular Songs features some of Monk’s most adventurous and daring music for the voice to date, paired with violin, piano and keyboard. Over the course of the evening, shimmering, multi-dimensional musical forms evoke such biological processes as layering, replication, division, and mutation. Cellular Songs premiered to sold-out audiences at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in March 2018.

    Meredith Monk, voice and keyboard
    Ellen Fisher, voice
    Katie Geissinger, voice
    Allison Sniffin, voice and keyboard
    Jo Stewart, voice

    “As [Monk] sang, there was a palpable sense of love and joy between her and the audience that spoke volumes. An antidote to the troubled times we live in.”
    -Virginia Webb, Financial Times

    “[Monk] may loom even larger as the new century unfolds, and later generations will envy those who got to see her live.” –Alex Ross, The New Yorker

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings


    Stem Education Coalition

    (le) poisson rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    LPR

    LPR is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of LPR

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:16 AM on August 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Gilbert Kalish piano, , , Ravinia Festival, soprano, Voice   

    From Ravinia Festival: Sō Percussion, Dawn Upshaw, Gilbert Kalish 

    2

    Ravinia Festival

    So Percussion in performance by Vartoogian/FrontRowPhotos

    Dawn Upshaw Photo by Brooke Irish.

    2
    Pianist Gilbert Kalish (Lilian Finckel photo)

    Sō Percussion via the artist

    200 Ravinia Park Road, Ravinia Park, Gurnee, IL

    Dawn Upshaw, soprano
    Gilbert Kalish, piano
    Sō Percussion
    Martin Theatre
    Monday, August 27, 2018 4:30 PM
    Donor Gates Open 5:00 PM Public Gates Open
    Concert Starts 7:30 PM

    Tickets: $60 / $40
    Lawn: $10

    Reserved seats
    Lawn tickets

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    On Sō Percussion
    The “artist”

    Adam Sliwinski has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2002. Adam is particularly interested in keyboard instruments, especially marimba and piano.

    Eric Cha-Beach has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2007-A consummate percussionist he loves to learn new instruments like the musical saw integrating them into diverse setups

    Jason Treuting is a founding member of Sō Percussion- Jason has pioneered an innovative drum set practice within the new music sphere. He is also a composer.

    Josh Quillen has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2006- Josh is an expert Steel Drum artist having studied in Trinidad and immersed himself in Steel Band culture.

    Our Mission:

    Sō Percussion is a percussion-based music organization that creates and presents new collaborative works to adventurous and curious audiences and educational initiatives to engaged students, while providing meaningful service to its communities, in order to exemplify the power of music to unite people and forge deep social bonds.
    Our Vision:

    To create a new model of egalitarian artistic collaboration that respects history, champions innovation and curiosity, and creates an essential social bond through service to our audiences and our communities.
    Ensemble Bio:

    Sō is: Eric Cha-Beach, Josh Quillen, Adam Sliwinski, and Jason Treuting

    With innovative multi-genre original productions, sensational interpretations of modern classics, and an “exhilarating blend of precision and anarchy, rigor and bedlam,” (The New Yorker), Sō Percussion has redefined the scope and vital role of the modern percussion ensemble.

    Sō’s repertoire ranges from “classics” of the 20th century, by John Cage, Steve Reich, and Iannis Xenakis, et al, to commissioning and advocating works by contemporary composers such as Caroline Shaw, David Lang, Steve Mackey, and Paul Lansky, to distinctively modern collaborations with artists who work outside the classical concert hall, including vocalist Shara Nova, electronic duo Matmos, the groundbreaking Dan Deacon, legendary drummer Bobby Previte, jam band kings Medeski, Martin, and Wood, Wilco’s Glenn Kotche, choreographer Shen Wei, and composer and leader of The National, Bryce Dessner, among many others.

    Sō Percussion also composes and performs their own works, ranging from standard concert pieces to immersive multi-genre programs – including Imaginary City, Where (we) Live, and A Gun Show, which was presented in a multi-performance presentation as part of BAM’s 2016 Next Wave Festival. In these concert-length programs, Sō Percussion employs a distinctively 21st century synthesis of original music, artistic collaboration, theatrical production values and visual art, into a powerful exploration of their own unique and personal creative experiences.

    Rooted in the belief that music is an essential facet of human life, a social bond, and an effective tool in creating agency and citizenship, Sō Percussion enthusiastically pursues a growing range of social and community outreach. Examples include their Brooklyn Bound presentations of younger composers; commitments to purchasing offsets to compensate for carbon-heavy activities such as touring travel; and leading their SōSI students in an annual food-packing drive, yielding up to 25,000 meals, for the Crisis Center of Mercer County through the organization EndHungerNE.

    Sō Percussion is the Edward T. Cone Ensemble-in-Residence at Princeton University, where they offer educational work and present an annual series of concerts. They are also Co-Directors of the percussion department at the Bard College-Conservatory of Music, and run the annual Sō Percussion Summer Institute (SōSI, now in its ninth year), providing college-age composers and percussionists an immersive exposure to collaboration and project development.

    One of the first things any group needs is a name. When our group was founded in 1999, we cast far and wide among our friends and family for suggestions. The winner was this simple, short word offered by Jenise Treuting, Jason’s sister.

    Jenise has been living and working in Japan as an English-Japanese translator for 20 years. The word “Sō” was punchy, enigmatic, and memorable.

    “The Sō in Sō Percussion comes from 奏, the second character in the compound Japanese word 演奏 (ensou), to perform music. By itself, so means “to play an instrument.” But it can also mean “to be successful,” “to determine a direction and move forward,” and “to present to the gods or ruler.” Scholars have suggested that the latter comes from the character’s etymology, which included the element “to offer with both hands.” 奏 is a bold, straightforward character, but lends itself to calligraphy with a certain energy that gives so a springy, delicate look.”

    – Jenise Treuting

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

     
  • richardmitnick 10:15 AM on August 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 2018–2019 Season, Big Bands and beyond, , Chamber Music Masters, , Daring Explorations, , Tops of the Pops, Voice   

    From Carnegie Hall: Inspiring Journeys. Inviting Discoveries. 2018–2019 Season 


    From Carnegie Hall

    1

    Now on Sale!

    Tickets for Carnegie Hall’s 2018–2019 season are now on sale. Enjoy a quintessential New York City experience when you spend an evening at Carnegie Hall hearing great artists like Yuja Wang, Chris Thile, Audra McDonald, or many others. We have your favorite music from orchestral showpieces to sizzling jazz. Treat yourself to something special: a concert at Carnegie Hall.

    Breathtaking Pianists
    Yuja Wang, Daniil Trifonov, Evgeny Kissin, Mitsuko Uchida

    Mighty Orchestras
    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Mariinsky Orchestra, The Philadelphia Orchestra

    Chamber Music Masters
    Kronos Quartet, St. Lawrence String Quartet with Inon Barnatan, Hagen Quartet with Jörg Widmann, The Knights

    Golden Voices
    Juan Diego Flórez, Anna Netrebko, Elīna Garanča, Iestyn Davies

    Violin Virtuosos
    Joshua Bell, Anne-Sophie Mutter, Maxim Vengerov, Leonidas Kavakos

    Tops of the Pops
    The New York Pops, Michael Feinstein, Frankie Moreno, Ashley Brown

    Big Band and Beyond
    Dafnis Prieto Big Band, Anat Cohen Tentet, Nicholas Payton, Jason Moran and Alicia Hall Moran

    Daring Explorations
    Chris Thile, Youssou NDOUR, Nickel Creek and Punch Brothers, Les Violons du Roy, Gautier Capuçon

    Please see the full article for links to the above concerts and events.
    Three Easy Ways to Purchase

    carnegiehall.org

    CarnegieCharge 212-247-7800
    (Daily, 8 AM–8 PM)

    Box Office at 57th and Seventh
    (Monday through Saturday, 11 AM–6 PM; Sunday, 12 PM–6 PM)

    Browse the 2018–2019 Season

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:57 AM on June 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Judith Berkson, , Voice   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “Bang on a Can: Judith Berkson at The Jewish Museum” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    Judith Berkson

    Thursday, July 19, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    The Jewish Museum
    1109 5th Ave
    New York, NY 10128

    $12—20

    Tickets

    Bang on a Can and the Jewish Museum’s 2018-2019 concert season, pairing innovative music with the Museum’s exhibitions and showcasing leading female performers and composers, begins with a performance by Judith Berkson. An innovative Brooklyn-based composer, pianist, and vocalist, Berkson will perform a dynamic set featuring her unique blend of cantorial music, Hebrew liturgy, and her indie-contemporary composed songs, in conjunction with the Jewish Museum’s exhibition Chaim Soutine: Flesh.

    Mezzo soprano, pianist and composer Judith Berkson uses voice along with analog and digital keyboards to create pieces that cross the boundaries of classical, electronic and experimental music. She has collaborated with Kronos Quartet, City Opera, and has performed works by Chaya Czernowin, Joe Maneri, Rick Burkhardt, Gerard Pape, Julia Werntz, Aleksandra Vrebalov, and Milton Babbitt. She has presented solo works at the Picasso Museum Malaga, Le Poisson Rouge, Roulette and the Concertgebouw. Called “an intriguing young singer-pianist,” her solo album Oylam (ECM Records, 2010), was described as “standards and Schubert and liturgical music, swing and chilly silences. I can’t get enough of it,” by the New York Times. In 2012 she completed The Vienna Rite, a chamber opera based on the friendship between Franz Schubert and Viennese cantor Salomon Sulzer. She is currently working on a recording of pieces for voice and electronics.

    Bang on a Can
    Brooklyn, NY

    Bang on a Can is dedicated to making music new. Since its first Marathon concert in 1987, Bang on a Can has been creating an international community dedicated to innovative music, wherever it is found. With adventurous programs, it commissions, performs, presents, and records new works, develops new audiences, and educates the musicians of the future. Bang on a Can is building a world in which powerful new musical ideas flow freely across all genres and borders.

    It all started with the first Marathon back in 1987. Three young composers – Michael Gordon, Julia Wolfe and David Lang – noticed that great “art” music was coming from all sorts of interesting new places.

    Bang On A Can David Lang- Michael Gordon- Julia Wolfe © Peter Serling

    So they created the concert of their dreams…the come-as-you-are informal sampling of everything innovative, exciting and/or unusual – The Bang on a Can Marathon.

    The ethos and energy of the Marathon proved unstoppable. In the coming years, we addressed the need to commission new work (People’s Commissioning Fund), create and nurture top-notch ensembles (Bang on a Can All-Stars, Asphalt Orchestra), record outstanding performances of pieces both new and under-heard (Cantaloupe Music), inspire the next generation (Summer Festival at MASS MoCA) and produce and present visionary new multi-media works on major stages.

    Bang on a Can All-Stars Group, David Lang, Julia Wolfe, Evan Ziporyn, Michael Gordon, Mark Stewart, Robert Black, Lisa Moore, Steven Schick. © Stephanie Berger

    Asphalt Orchestra, Stephanie Berger/Courtesy photo

    Recently, we honed a mobile-studio approach to bringing digital music-making to the streets, to the schools, and around the world through an educational recording approach we call Found Sound Nation (FSN). From this venture, we partnered with the State Department to create OneBeat, an international cultural exchange designed to bring creative, socially engaged musicians together from all corners of the globe.

    Today, the very phrase “Bang on a Can” connotes a thorough and fearless vision of music without prejudice, and of contemporary composition as a vital and powerful part of the cultural landscape. Our performances, recordings, broadcasts and videos are heard and seen by millions annually.

    1. The Bang on a Can Marathon, our original and signature program, bringing dozens of composers and hundreds of musicians to the stage for a day-long informal FREE concert in NYC each year.

    2. The annual People’s Commissioning Fund (PCF) Week featuring performances of new works by mid-career composers commissioned for the BoaC All-Stars by hundreds of our supporters.

    3. Our frequent NYC concerts, from BAM to Lincoln Center to smaller, funky venues all over town.

    4. Our Touring schedule, which includes more than 30 from L.A. to Latvia, from Kansas to Kyrgystan.

    5. Regular Commissions, new Record Releases and featured Broadcasts.

    6. Our annual Summer Festival of Music at MASS MoCA, the first national residency program for gifted young composers and performers interested in experimental music.

    7. Our audacious marching project – Asphalt Orchestra – a 12-person, virtuosic mobile ensemble.

    8. A new initiative blending music and technology in public schools and beyond, called Found Sound Nation. Its OneBeat intiative, in partnership with the Dept of State, is an experiment in cultural diplomacy, bringing 60+ musicians from far-flung corners of the globe for a monthlong residency and tour.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:21 PM on June 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Norwegian Vocalist Susanna and Friends, Voice   

    From New Sounds: “#4123: Norwegian Vocalist Susanna and Friends, from Big Ears 2018” 

    From New Sounds
    Hand-picked music, genre free. 24/7 radio from New York City.

    6/6/2018
    John Schaefer

    1
    Susanna by Gitte Johannessen/NTB

    From the 2018 Big Ears Festival, listen to a bewitching set of covers and originals from Norwegian singer Susanna, recorded at the historic Bijou Theatre. The magical Susanna, (whose full name is Susanna Wallumrød) was joined by Swiss harpist Giovanna Pessi, accordion player Frode Haltli, and Kentucky based multi-instrumentalist Cheyenne Mize, as the set covered American blues guitarist Elizabeth Cotton, English Baroque composer Henry Purcell, and songwriters Leonard Cohen and Nick Drake. The arrangements used Baroque harp, some strikingly cinematic accordion playing, and haunting 3-part harmonies that included her special guest Bonnie “Prince” Billy and Cheyenne Mize.

    Hear most of her set from that night, March 23, 2018, which also included arrangements of Joy Division, Nick Drake, and Lou Reed, traditional folk songs, and an original by Susanna. Our thanks to AC Entertainment for the recording of this performance and to the Big Ears Festival team.

    PROGRAM #4123: Susanna & Friends w/ Bonnie Prince Billy, Live from Big Ears 2018 (First aired 6/6/2018)

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, Frode Haltli and Cheyenne Mize w/ Bonnie Prince Billy
    WORK: Rye Whiskey [1:00]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO: http://www.bigearsfestival.org | http://www.susannamagical.com

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, Frode Haltli and Cheyenne Mize w/ Bonnie Prince Billy
    WORK: Leonard Cohen: Who By Fire [3:39]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO: http:///www.bigearsfestival.org | http://www.susannamagical.com

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, Frode Haltli and Cheyenne Mize w/ Bonnie Prince Billy
    WORK: Leonard Cohen: Who By Fire [3:39]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO: http:///www.bigearsfestival.org | http://www.susannamagical.com

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, Frode Haltli and Cheyenne Mize
    WORK: Joy Division: Wilderness [2:39]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO: http:///www.bigearsfestival.org | http://www.susannamagical.com

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, Frode Haltli and Cheyenne Mize
    WORK: Three Ravens [4:32]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO:http:///www.bigearsfestival.org | http://www.susannamagical.com

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, Frode Haltli and Cheyenne Mize
    WORK: Elizabeth Cotton: Freight Train [3:28]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO: http:///www.bigearsfestival.org | http://www.susannamagical.com

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, Frode Haltli and Cheyenne Mize
    WORK: Invitation to the Voyage [6:17]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO: bigearsfestival.org | http://www.susannamagical.com

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, Frode Haltli and Cheyenne Mize w/ Bonnie Prince Billy
    WORK: AC/DC: It’s A Long Way To The Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘N’ Roll) [4:04]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO: http:///www.bigearsfestival.org | http://www.susannamagical.com

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, Frode Haltli and Cheyenne Mize w/ Bonnie Prince Billy
    WORK: Leonard Cohen: You Know Who I Am [4:38]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO: http:///www.bigearsfestival.org | http://www.susannamagical.com

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, Frode Haltli and Cheyenne Mize w/ Bonnie Prince Billy
    WORK: Go Dig My Grave [5:23]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO: http:///www.bigearsfestival.org | http://www.susannamagical.com

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, Frode Haltli and Cheyenne Mize w/ Bonnie Prince Billy
    WORK: Lou Reed: Perfect Day [4:47]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO:http://bigearsfestival.org | http://www.susannamagical.com

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, w/ Bonnie Prince Billy
    WORK: Nick Drake: Which Will [3:41]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO: http:///www.bigearsfestival.org | http://www.susannamagical.com

    ARTIST: Susanna & Giovanna Pessi, Frode Haltli and Cheyenne Mize w/ Bonnie Prince Billy
    WORK: Rye Whiskey [:30]
    RECORDING: Live, from Big Ears 2018, 3/23/18 at the Bijou Theatre
    SOURCE: This performance not commercially available.
    INFO: http:///www.bigearsfestival.org |http://www.susannamagical.com

    Click on the pink triangle on the full article page to start the stream.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    NewSounds.org infuses the eclectic spirit of the radio show into a full online and live event experience. Combining the New Sounds radio show, WNYC’s Soundcheck podcast and the adventurous spirit of WQXR’s Q2 Music, NewSounds.org will be a place for discovery, conversation, insights into the creative process, and of course 24/7 music.
    The centerpiece is New Sounds Radio, an online station hosted by New Sounds founder and long-running host John Schaefer, but infused with new, emerging voices including experimental musicians Kelly Moran, Eliza Bagg and Lora-Faye Åshuvud, and tastemakers Gamall Awad and Matt Werth, along with WQXR’s Helga Davis and Terrance McKnight, and composer-guitarist Phil Kline. The station will feature an array of styles and genres – from singer Courtney Barnett to contemporary classical music ensemble Kronos Quartet, from jazz icon Henry Threadgill to the Nordic folk music of Wardruna, from electronic composer and bandleader Anna Meredith to the stunning vocals of Puerto Rico’s Ileana Cabra.
    “With almost everything ever recorded anywhere now available online, where do you start? New Sounds might be the place,” said John Schaefer. “We try to be friendly and jargon free, and gleefully oblivious of genre. Our goal is to find the artists, the songs, and the sounds that you might love – if only you get a chance to hear them. And we believe that algorithms won’t give you the same experience as a set of recommendations from real people. A friendly guide is the best way to discover new music, or music that defies easy categorization; and some of that music just might change your life.”
    “For three decades, New Sounds was one of the last bastions of free form FM programming; completely genre-free and dictated solely by the impeccable and irresistible tastes of its host,” said Alex Ambrose, Senior Producer, New Sounds. “NewSounds.org will usher that sense of discovery and unpredictability into the digital age, drawing on the best of New York’s curatorial and taste-making power.”

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:33 PM on June 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Voice   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “Resonant Bodies Festival 2018: Jen Shyu, Kiera Duffy, Caroline Shaw” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1

    Wednesday, September 12, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    Roulette Intermedium
    509 Atlantic Ave
    Brooklyn, NY 11217

    $20—25
    Tickets

    Jen Shyu — Voice
    Kiera Duffy — Voice
    Caroline Shaw — Voice

    $50 Festival Pass! See all three nights for $50

    The second night of the Resonant Bodies Festival opens with composer/performer Jen Shyu presenting her solo work Nine Doors; operatic superstar Kiera Duffy will make her RBF debut, presenting a variety of pieces curated for the Festival; and Pulitzer Prize-winner Caroline Shaw (of Roomful of Teeth) will perform works of her own composition.

    Resonant Bodies Festival was founded to catalyze the creation of new vocal music, to expand the audience for new vocal music, and to challenge and transform the role of the vocal recitalist. Since its inception in 2013, RBF has been greeted with sustained critical acclaim and the delight of audiences and vocalists alike. For three nights every September in New York City, nine vocalists are given curatorial carte blanche over a forty-five minute set. This freedom—rarely granted to vocalists in the contemporary music world—gives each show a “happy zealousness, where the singers’ enthusiasm for their repertoire [is] contagious” (Sequenza 21). Thanks to a generous grant from the Ellis L. Phillips Foundation, RBF had its Australian debut at the Melbourne Recital Centre on May 17, 2017, which was greeted with much enthusiasm from the international vocal music community. Since then, RBF has expanded to include festivals in Chicago and Sydney, with an LA festival slated for 2019. In addition to the festivals, RBF reaches 25,000+ listeners around the globe through MRMR, the Festival’s extensive collection of online resources. MRMR includes: professional audio, video, and photo documentation of each Festival; Resonant Bodies Podcast, which features in-depth interviews with vocalists year-round; and the Contemporary Vocal Music Database, an open, crowdsourced, searchable index of 20th and 21st century vocal works with links to musical scores, as well as audio and video recordings. The Database aids composers in promoting their works to a larger audience, and assists vocalists in their search for new and meaningful repertoire.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    At New Music USA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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