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  • richardmitnick 12:06 PM on October 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Hilary Hahn, Montserrat Caballé, WQXR   

    From WQXR Listen On Demand: Carnegie Hall plus Montserrat Caballé and Hilary Hahn 

    From WQXR

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    Listen On-Demand: Carnegie Hall’s Opening Night with Michael Tilson Thomas, Renée Fleming & Audra McDonald in a program that goes from George Gershwin to Laura Nyro.


    Carnegie Hall COURTESY OF BROOK WARDFLICKR

    2

    WQXR Didn’t Always Play ‘Classical’ Music. Here’s the Story of a Name

    3
    Soprano Montserrat Caballé, 1933-2018: An Appreciation from Fred Plotkin

    Hilary Hahn by Brandes Autographs

    Hilary Hahn Goes Back to Bach: “The most important thing is the music and getting the music across.”

    4
    Vivaldi At The Gate: Stranded Orchestra Makes The Best Out of (Yet Another) Flight Delay

    See the full article here .

    WQXR-FM (105.9 FM) is an American classical radio station licensed to Newark, New Jersey and serving the New York City metropolitan area. It is the most-listened-to classical-music station in the United States, with an average quarter-hour audience of 63,000.[citation needed]

    It is owned by the nonprofit New York Public Radio, which also operates WNYC (820 AM and 93.9 FM) and the four-station New Jersey Public Radio group. New York Public Radio acquired WQXR on July 14, 2009, as part of a three-way trade which also involved The New York Times Company – the previous owners of WQXR – and Univision Radio.[1] WQXR-FM broadcasts from studios and offices located in the Hudson Square neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, and the transmitter is located atop the Empire State Building.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 3:52 PM on May 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , The Trombone's Wild Path to the Orchestra, WQXR   

    From WQXR : “The Trombone’s Wild Path to the Orchestra” 

    From WQXR

    May 1, 2018
    James Bennett, II

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    No image credit found

    In his analysis of Schumann’s Second Symphony, Leonard Bernstein highlights a moment in the first movement that garnered some harsh criticism from not only Schumann’s contemporaries, but from composers and conductors in the years following his death. Can you figure out what that “issue” is?


    43 minutes

    It’s all that wonderful, solemn brass. With it, Bernstein explains, Schumann made “a significant contribution to the history of orchestration for using the brass instruments for his main singing line.” And while the sound of that opening, unified brass is reminiscent of a trumpet call, the delicacy with which the brass players produce it — especially against the controlled restlessness of the strings beneath — becomes all the more lyrical, “as if it were no simple trumpet call, but one that came from the furthest reaches of the universe.” It turns out that usage was on the novel side of orchestral history, and it was a bit of an orchestral faux pas: For years, the brass was sparingly employed for dramatic flair and punctuation — never melody. That was the strings’ job.

    But to Bernstein there is something even more unusual within the brass line: the trombone, which Bernstein calls “really exceptional” among the pairs of trumpets and horns.

    The trombone had one of the more interesting journeys into the modern orchestra. It made its way around different European circles independently, reaching places like England and Spain decades apart. Forerunners to the trombone were variously known in English as the “sackbut,” “shagbut” and “shakbush.” Funny names to be sure, but it makes sense when you learn the term probably comes from the Spanish sacar or Middle French saquer (to pull), and the French bouter (to shove). After all, what’s trombone playing but a pull and a push? It’s also important to remember that “sackbut” wasn’t used to identify one particular instrument, and instead referred to a variety of instruments with single telescopic slides. The Harvard Concise Dictionary of Music and Musicians suggests the trombones origins lay in long medieval trumpets, known in Italian as the tromba and Old French as the buisine. Larger trombas came to be called trombones in Italy, while buisine made its way to German as Posaune.

    According to Grove, from the 16th to 17th century, “the trombone was one of the most prominent professional instruments,” and it eventually found a natural home in church music. The sound produced by a group of them was perceived as incredibly solemn and reverential, perhaps laying the groundwork for future associations with the “underworld and supernatural.” But by the end of the 17th century, it fell out of wide usage, possibly due to a desire for French-style string orchestras. (One Canterbury Cathedral registry mentions two trombones described as “two brass Sackbuts not us’d for a grete number of years past.”)

    The trombone refused to die. Handel employed them in his oratorios Israel in Egypt and Saul, and they came back for the Handel Commemoration in 1784, which marked 25 years since the composer’s death. (They must have been an English rarity judging by one observant concertgoer, who described them as “bassoons with an end like a large speaking trumpet.”) Other composers included them to conjure those hellish associations: Gluck used them to signal the underworld in Orfeo ed Euridice, and Mozart for Don Giovanni’s dinner from hell (the latter only used trombones in operas and some sacred music, never in his other orchestral works).

    Things changed, though slightly, with Beethoven.

    According to University of Texas musicology doctoral candidate Michael Lee Harland, trombones were “first introduced into the symphony by Beethoven in his Fifth, representing a heroic victory over fate and death.” That’s particularly interesting with respect to the trombone’s earlier religious associations. Using the instrument here, Harland posits, is “harnessing the power of its sacred association toward more humanistic (Romantic) ends.” But he didn’t make it a trend: as Bernstein noted in his analysis of Schumann’s second, Beethoven only used the trombone in two of his symphonies. (Although, in addition to the Fifth and Ninth, the Beethoven’s Sixth Symphony also employs trombones).

    When Beethoven died in 1827, he left a musical legacy that inspired the next generation of composers. Though his trombone usage was light, it was significant, and helped the instrument acquire (along with others in the brass section) a new association with the heroic, which led composers like Schumann to embrace a little more brass. Not everyone was on board though. “There were more traditional critics of this tendency,” says Harland, “who saw the expansion of the orchestra as something that betrayed an Enlightenment-influenced understanding of beauty as something restrained and understated.” Hence the kind of criticisms Schumann’s symphony received.

    But thanks to imaginative orchestrating — and technological advances in the instruments themselves (for a long time brasses had a limited range and was notoriously difficult to tune) — the trombone joined the expanding, diversifying orchestra. Hector Berlioz, who Bernstein identifies as a skilled orchestrator, wrote that the trombone “is the real leader among the class of wind instruments I have described as epic,” and praised its broad capabilities, which ranged from “imposing and calm religious tones to the frenzied clamour of an orgy.” And even though it seemed to be earning a regular place, some composers still expressed timidity when it came to writing for it, which may have impacted audience perception of it (though Harland notes that more “progressive” composers like Wagner and Liszt were more comfortable including them, as opposed to traditionalists like Brahms and Schumann). Anthony C. Baines writes in Grove, “Nineteenth-century composers often limited themselves to a stereotyped usage of the trombone for reinforcements of tutti passages and for background harmonies in soft passages.” The effects of those decisions were far-reaching, and as 19th-century music has dominated concert programs in the 20th and 21st centuries, audiences are familiar with the “least interesting sides of the trombone’s character.”

    If anything, that should serve as a parable on the importance of programming contemporary music. Luckily, time has made the trombone ever more popular — it plays an integral role in jazz and swing bands, and its classical possibilities are still being explored by contemporary composers like Melinda Wagner, whose Trombone Concerto was premiered in 2007.

    See the full article here .

    WQXR-FM (105.9 FM) is an American classical radio station licensed to Newark, New Jersey and serving the New York City metropolitan area. It is the most-listened-to classical-music station in the United States, with an average quarter-hour audience of 63,000.[citation needed]

    It is owned by the nonprofit New York Public Radio, which also operates WNYC (820 AM and 93.9 FM) and the four-station New Jersey Public Radio group. New York Public Radio acquired WQXR on July 14, 2009, as part of a three-way trade which also involved The New York Times Company – the previous owners of WQXR – and Univision Radio.[1] WQXR-FM broadcasts from studios and offices located in the Hudson Square neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, and the transmitter is located atop the Empire State Building.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:39 PM on May 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classic FM, , The Agony of Mahler's 7th Symphony, WQXR   

    From Carnegie Hall via Classic FM: “Here’s why Mahler’s Symphony No. 7 is an agonising work of infinite genius” 19 September 2017 


    Carnegie Hall

    Classic FM

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    Gustav Mahler – public domain image

    Of all Mahler’s symphonies, the Seventh is often thought of as the ‘ugly ducking’. But actually we reckon it’s the work in which the composer’s genius is most clearly on show. Hear us out…

    Gustav Mahler has composed so many cracking symphonies. He burst onto the symphonic stage with his ‘Titan’ symphony in 1889 (just about as big as its name implies).

    Then his Symphony No. 2 was the ‘Resurrection’, a work for an enormous symphony orchestra, alto and soprano soloists, a double SATB chorus, and two offstage brass bands. Here’s what it does to Leonard Bernstein:

    3
    GIPHY

    Not stopping there, Mahler then created one of the longest symphonies in the modern repertoire, his Symphony No. 3, and later the ‘Symphony of a Thousand’ (yes, it needs that many people).

    So it’s perhaps easy to see why the Seventh may have gone unappreciated in the past – it’s not the largest, nor the longest, nor the most exciting of Mahler’s symphonies (some have even said it’s musically ‘incoherent’ – ouch). As a result, it has spent much of the 20th century as Mahler’s ‘forgotten’ symphony.

    However, if there’s one massive element in which Mahler’s Seventh comes top of the symphonic pile, it’s the way in which he uses the orchestra…

    The orchestration is crazy-innovative

    Mahler uses his most extravagant orchestral effects in the Seventh. He begins the first movement with a Tenor Horn solo, an instrument very rarely included in an orchestral setup. Though this may seem like an unnecessary addition, it’s difficult to hear the dark, brooding melody which begins the piece played on anything else.

    In complete contrast to this, Mahler welcomes a guitar and mandolin into the orchestra for the fourth movement. These two instruments which are not normally associated with symphonic music are used to depict an intimate walk through the Viennese night…

    He takes things to the extreme

    Not only does Mahler add unusual instruments to the orchestra in this symphony, but he also uses standard orchestral instruments in very different ways. In the first movement, he has violins and a solo trumpet playing to the extremes of their upper register, which is of course to represent the ‘agony of his own existence’.

    Woe is Mahler.

    In the third movement, the composer actually gives the cellos and double basses a dynamic marking of fffff, instructing them to ‘pluck the string so hard that it hits the wood’. Ear plugs in during the third movement, folks.

    He uses sounds we’d never heard before

    As unorthodox instruments combine with unusual instrumental techniques, Mahler creates a soundscape where the orchestra is heard like never before.

    So although the Seventh can’t boast the gigantism of his Third or Eighth symphonies, or the uplifting euphoria of his First and Second symphonies, it’s still a gigantic, agonising work of pure genius.

    LISTEN TO IT!

    It’s time to listen to the Symphony No. 7 in full. Take an hour and a bit to yourself, tidy your room, rearrange your sock drawer and have a listen to this epic piece of music which quite literally reinvented the orchestra.

    See the full article here .

    Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park.
    Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season
    Carnegie Hall has 3,671 seats, divided among its three auditoriums.
    Main Hall (Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage)
    Zankel Hall
    Weill Recital Hall
    The building also contains the Carnegie Hall Archives, established in 1986, and the Rose Museum, which opened in 1991. Until 2009 studios above the Hall contained working spaces for artists in the performing and graphic arts including music, drama, dance, as well as architects, playwrights, literary agents, photographers and painters. The spaces were unusual in being purpose-designed for artistic work, with very high ceilings, skylights and large windows for natural light.

    Carnegie Hall is named after Andrew Carnegie, who funded its construction. It was intended as a venue for the Oratorio Society of New York and the New York Symphony Society, on whose boards Carnegie served. Construction began in 1890, and was carried out by Isaac A. Hopper and Company. Although the building was in use from April 1891, the official opening night was May 5, with a concert conducted by maestro Walter Damrosch and great Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[15][16] Originally known simply as “Music Hall” (the words “Music Hall founded by Andrew Carnegie” still appear on the façade above the marquee), the hall was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1893 after board members of the Music Hall Company of New York (the hall’s original governing body) persuaded Carnegie to allow the use of his name. Several alterations were made to the building between 1893 and 1896, including the addition of two towers of artists’ studios, and alterations to the smaller auditorium on the building’s lower level.

    The hall was owned by the Carnegie family until 1925, when Carnegie’s widow sold it to a real estate developer, Robert E. Simon. When Simon died in 1935, his son, Robert E. Simon, Jr., became owner. By the mid-1950s, changes in the music business prompted Simon to offer Carnegie Hall for sale to the New York Philharmonic, which booked a majority of the hall’s concert dates each year.
    Most of the greatest performers of classical music since the time Carnegie Hall was built have performed in the Main Hall, and its lobbies are adorned with signed portraits and memorabilia. The NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Arturo Toscanini, frequently recorded in the Main Hall for RCA Victor. On November 14, 1943, the 25-year old Leonard Bernstein had his major conducting debut when he had to substitute for a suddenly ill Bruno Walter in a concert that was broadcast by CBS,[19] making him instantly famous. In the fall of 1950, the orchestra’s weekly broadcast concerts were moved there until the orchestra disbanded in 1954. Several of the concerts were televised by NBC, preserved on kinescopes, and have been released on home video.

    Many legendary jazz and popular music performers have also given memorable performances at Carnegie Hall including Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Miller, Billie Holiday, the Dave Brubeck Quartet, Violetta Villas, Judy Garland, Harry Belafonte, Charles Aznavour, Ike & Tina Turner, Paul Robeson, Nina Simone, Shirley Bassey, James Gang and Stevie Ray Vaughan, all of whom made celebrated live recordings of their concerts there.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:56 AM on May 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Leonard Bernstein’s Bookshelf: An Intimate Look, , WQXR   

    From WQXR: “Leonard Bernstein’s Bookshelf: An Intimate Look” 

    WQXR

    Get to know the great composer-conductor through his library.

    Leonard Bernstein -no photo credit found

    May 3, 2018
    James Bennett, II

    I like to think that the best way to get to know someone is by taking a long, hard look at their bookshelf. What’s on it? How is it organized? What’s in the dusty corner that hasn’t been touched for years? Gazing at a friend’s collection can give you an idea of what to read next, but there’s something even more fascinating about browsing those of interesting and influential people. And that’s why we’re bringing you a curated list of selections from Leonard Bernstein’s library.

    1
    (Clarissa Sosin / WQXR)
    Looking at Bernstein’s books is like taking a walk through his life. Left, a photo with Stravinsky.

    The Bernstein family apartment, situated in the northern part of Manhattan’s Hell’s Kitchen, houses many of the conductor’s books (as well as those of his wife Felicia Montealegre) on two massive shelving units. Alexander Bernstein, the second of the Bernstein children, believes his father read pretty much every volume on the shelf, an eclectic mix ranging from religion and political science to psychology and social theory. (And even though Bernstein was a music man, books about music are few and far between.) It’s inspiring to see how varied his collection is: A small section holds several works by his favorite author, Vladimir Nabokov, and also present are his most treasured stories, Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. Numerous collections by poets like E.E. Cummings and William Carlos Williams dot the shelves, and there are classics like Homer and Austen next to works by Bernstein’s contemporaries, like Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin and Truman Capote.

    So check out the selections below, and see how your reading habits stack up to Leonard’s..

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    Favorite author? Nabokov.

    Fiction and Novels

    How German Is It by Walter Abish
    Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
    Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
    Difficult Loves by Italo Calvino
    Complete Works of Lewis Carroll
    The Grass Harp by Truman Capote
    In Cold Blood by Truman Capote
    Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
    The Man with the Golden Gun by Ian Fleming
    You Only Live Twice by Ian Fleming
    Roots by Alex Haley
    A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway
    The Secret of Avalon by Marjorie Yourd Hill
    From Here to Eternity by James Jones
    One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez
    Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
    Ada by Vladimir Nabokov
    Vladimir Nabokov, collected works by Collins Collectors’ Choice (Includes Lolita, The Gift, Invitation to a Beheading and Glory)
    The Godfather by Mario Puzo
    City of Night by John Rechy
    Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
    The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
    Restless House by Emile Zola
    Aphrodisiac: Fiction From Christopher Street

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    A section of Bernstein’s sizable personal library. (Clarissa Sosin / WQXR)

    Theatre

    Seven Plays by Bertolt Brecht
    Six Plays by Rodgers and Hammerstein (includes Oklahoma!, Carousel, Allegro, South Pacific, The King and I, and Me and Juliet)

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    Two of Bernstein’s favorite books were Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.
    (Clarissa Sosin / WQXR)

    Poetry

    Poems, 1923–1954 by E.E. Cummings
    The Poetry of Robert Frost
    The Homeric Hymns and Homerica by Hesiod
    Complete Poems by Marianne Moore
    Poems by Boris Pasternak
    The Green Wall by James Wright
    The Collected Later Poems by William Carlos Williams
    Stolen Apples by Yevgeny Yevtushenko
    An Anthology of Modern Yiddish Poetry
    The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova, Volumes I & II
    Miracles: Poems by Children of the English Speaking World
    The Oxford Book of American Verse
    The Random House Book of Twentieth Century French Poetry
    Women of the Fertile Crescent: An Anthology of Modern Poetry by Arab Women

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    American poetry, postmodern literature, medical and philosophical works … Bernstein had many varied interests. (Clarissa Sosin / WQXR)

    History

    The True Story of the Greensboro Massacre by Paul C. Bermanzohn and Sally A. Bermanzohn
    The Quicksand War: Prelude to Vietnam by Lucien Bodard
    The Death of A President by William Manchester
    The Pocket History of the United States by Allan Nevins and Henry Steele Commager
    The Crisis of the Old Order by Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.

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    Though he didn’t practice any single religion, Bernstein was a spiritual man. (Clarissa Sosin / WQXR)

    Religion

    Collected Works of Dietrich Bonhoeffer
    In God We Trust by Norman Cousins
    God Knows by Joseph Heller
    Science of Survival by L. Ron Hubbard
    The Book of Mormon
    The Holy Bible
    Divine Office

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    The books aren’t ordered in any particular way, which makes one realize how far-reaching his interests were. (Clarissa Sosin / WQXR)

    Philosophy, Essays and Social Criticism

    Nothing Personal
    by Richard Avedon and James Baldwin
    No Name in the Street by James Baldwin
    Nobody Knows My Name by James Baldwin
    Sexuality and Feminism in Shelly by Nathaniel Brown
    The Anatomy of Melancholy: What It Is, With All the Kinds, Causes, Symptomes, Prognostickes & Several Cures of It by Robert Burton
    Bodies in Revolt: A Primer in Somatic Thinking by Thomas Hanna
    Justice: Crisis of Law, Order and Freedom in America by Richard Harris
    The Doors of Perception by Aldous Huxley
    Sexual Politics by Kate Millet
    The City in History by Lewis Mumford
    A History of Orgies by Burgo Partridge
    The Toynbee-Ikeda Dialogue by Arnold Toynbee and Daisaku Ikeda
    A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf

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    ‘Nothing Personal’ is photographer Richard Avedon and writer James Baldwin’s exploration of American life. (Clarissa Sosin / WQXR)

    Biography, Memoir & Letters

    Rickover by Norman Polmar and Thomas B. Allen
    No Bed of Roses by Joan Fontaine
    Death Be Not Proud by John Gunther
    Upton Sinclair: An American Rebel by Leon Harris
    Kissinger by Marvin Kalb and Bernard Kalb
    Scarlett O’Hara’s Younger Sister by Evelyn Keyes
    Hope Against Hope by Nadezhda Mandelstam
    Borrowed Time: An AIDS Memoir by Paul Monette
    Nietzsche: Life as Literature by Alexander Nehamas
    The Angel Inside Went Sour by Esther P. Rothman
    Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years and the War Years by Carl Sandburg
    Robert Kennedy and His Times by Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.
    Roosevelt and Hopkins: An Intimate History by Robert E. Sherwood
    Alice James: A Biography by Jean Strouse
    Oedipus and Akhnaton by Immanuel Velikovsky
    A Precocious Autobiography by Yevgeny Yevtushenko

    See the full article here .

    WQXR-FM (105.9 FM) is an American classical radio station licensed to Newark, New Jersey and serving the New York City metropolitan area. It is the most-listened-to classical-music station in the United States, with an average quarter-hour audience of 63,000.[citation needed]

    It is owned by the nonprofit New York Public Radio, which also operates WNYC (820 AM and 93.9 FM) and the four-station New Jersey Public Radio group. New York Public Radio acquired WQXR on July 14, 2009, as part of a three-way trade which also involved The New York Times Company – the previous owners of WQXR – and Univision Radio.[1] WQXR-FM broadcasts from studios and offices located in the Hudson Square neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City, and the transmitter is located atop the Empire State Building.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:30 PM on March 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , WQXR   

    From ECM: “Alexander Knaifel – Lukomoriye” 

    New from ECM

    ECM might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    Alexander Knaifel – Lukomoriye

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    1
    The fourth New Series album from Russian composer Alexander Knaifel may be his most wide-ranging to date. Luminously quiet, and quietly magical.
    Pre-order your copy of “Lukomoriye” here: https://ecm.lnk.to/MmTtL

    See the full article here .


    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz

    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00AM-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 4:23 PM on March 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Collection: improvisation, Genre: Jazz, Graham Haynes, , , , Jennifer Choi, , , , , Night Wave, , , , , WQXR, Yuko Fujiyama   

    From Innova: “OUT NOW! Night Wave: Pianist/composer/improviser Yuko Fujiyama with Susie Ibarra , Jennifer Choi, and Graham Haynes” 

    Innova is the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1

    Yuko Fujiyama
    Night Wave
    Yuko Fujiyama: Woven Colors
    Description:
    That moment on a sidewalk
    Composers:
    Yuko Fujiyama
    Performers:
    Jennifer Choi
    Susie Ibarra
    Graham Haynes
    Yuko Fujiyama

    Catalog Number: #995
    Genre: Jazz
    Collection: improvisation

    Release Date:
    Mar 23, 2018

    1.Woven Colors 03:18
    2.Up Tempo 09:37
    3.Romance 01:49
    4.Clash 00:59
    5.Premonition 03:09
    6.Indignation 03:01
    7.Fireworks 01:17
    8.Beyond the Sound 06:41
    9.Waltz of the Shadows 01:11
    10.Autumn Whispers 02:53
    11.Floating on a Breeze 02:19
    12.Leap 01:59
    13.Starlight 01:14
    14.Night Wave 07:57
    15.Tale of the Old Tree 02:55

    See the full article here .

    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz


    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00AM-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 4:01 PM on March 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Irish Arts Center presents Martin Hayes: In Residence April 25-29, , , , , , , , , , , WQXR   

    From JAZZCORNER: “Irish Arts Center presents Martin Hayes: In Residence, April 25-29” 

    JAZZCORNER

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    MARTIN HAYES RETURNS TO IRISH ARTS CENTER FOR A WEEKLONG RESIDENCY WITH A RANGE OF SPECIAL GUESTS, APRIL 25-29

    Martin Hayes: In Residence Includes

    Performance alongside frequent collaborator Dennis Cahill as part of IAC’s triple-bill Gala Concert Event (April 25)

    Conversation with Randy Cohen and Howard Wolfson as part of a live taping of Cohen’s Person Place Thing podcast (April 26)

    Three nights of collaborative concerts with Tríona Marshall and Nic Gareiss (April 27), Marla Fibish (April 28), and Kevin Crawford (April 29)
    Irish Arts Center (IAC), the arts and cultural center dedicated to projecting a dynamic image of Ireland and Irish America for the 21st century, is proud to welcome back fiddle player Martin Hayes, “one of Ireland’s great musical exports” (WNYC), for a week-long residency, April 25-29, to take place in and out of their current home on 51st Street. Each of these five evenings, many of which are curated by Hayes himself, will feature special guests from within and beyond the world of Irish traditional music, breaking barriers and taking audiences on an unforgettable artistic journey.

    When Martin was last in residence at IAC in the fall of 2016, alongside his longtime collaborator, guitarist Dennis Cahill, it prompted the Village Voice to write, “It’s a big deal when the violinist and guitarist make their semi-annual New York stops.” Wednesday, April 25 should prove to be no exception, when Martin is joined Cahill as part of IAC’s extraordinary triple-bill Gala Concert Event at Symphony Space. Jon Pareles of The New York Times has said of the legendary pair, “In their long collaboration, [Martin and Dennis] have found intriguing possibilities within the traditional Irish repertory – glimmers of jazz, Minimalism and chamber music – without diluting the traditional spirit.” The evening also features Camille O’Sullivan and Declan O’Rourke, with special guests including Gabriel Byrne and Paul Muldoon.

    On Thursday, April 26 at Irish Arts Center, audiences can hear Martin and former Bloomberg Deputy Mayor and renowned national political strategist Howard Wolfson speak about their passions in a live taping of humorist and four-time Emmy Award-winner Randy Cohen’s podcast Person Place Thing. The beloved podcast is based on the idea that people are particularly engaging when they speak not directly about themselves, but about something they care about. For each episode, guests talk about one person, one place, and one thing that are important to them. Past guests have included Paul Shaffer, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Maya Lin, Laurie Anderson, Andy Borowitz, A.O. Scott, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Julianne Moore.

    The residency continues with three evening concerts featuring Martin performing alongside special guests, each brilliantly curated by the artist in residence himself. Friday, April 27 sees Martin joined by Tríona Marshall, former principal harpist with the RTÉ Concert Orchestra; as well as Nic Gareiss, percussive dancer and current member of This is How we Fly. On Saturday, April 28 Martin is joined by Marla Fibish, mandolin player and member of the duo Noctambule. And to close out the residency on Sunday, April 29, Martin is joined by Kevin Crawford, flute player and former front man of Lúnasa, who has toured with Martin and John Doyle as The Teetotalers.

    Martin Hayes: In Residence is made possible in part through the generosity of Bloomberg Philanthropies and Howard Wolfson and Terri McCullough.

    Martin Hayes: In Residence

    Gala Concert: Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill, Camille O’Sullivan, and Declan O’Rourke
    Wednesday, April 25 at 7:45pm
    Symphony Space
    Tickets: $75+

    Martin Hayes is joined by his longtime collaborator Dennis Cahill as part of an extraordinary triple-bill Gala Concert Event also featuring Camille O’Sullivan and Declan O’Rourke, with special guests including Gabriel Byrne and Paul Muldoon.

    Person Place Thing
    Thursday, April 26 at 7:30pm
    Irish Arts Center
    Tickets: Free

    Martin Hayes joins four-time Emmy award-winner Randy Cohen and former Bloomberg Deputy Mayor and renowned national political strategist Howard Wolfson for a live taping of Cohen’s podcast Person Place Thing.

    Martin Hayes with Tríona Marshall and Nic Gareiss
    Friday, April 27 at 8pm
    Irish Arts Center
    Tickets: $52

    Martin Hayes in concert with Tríona Marshall, former principal harpist with the RTÉ Concert Orchestra and previous member of the Chieftains; as well as Nic Gareiss, percussive dancer and current member of This is How We Fly.

    Martin Hayes with Marla Fibish
    Saturday, April 28 at 8pm
    Irish Arts Center
    Tickets: $52

    Martin Hayes in concert with Marla Fibish, mandolin player and member of the duo Noctambule.

    Martin Hayes with Kevin Crawford
    Sunday, April 29 at 8pm
    Irish Arts Center
    Tickets: $52

    Martin Hayes in concert with flute player Kevin Crawford, former frontman of Lúnasa, and former touring partner of Hayes and John Doyle as The Teetotalers.

    About Irish Arts Center

    Irish Arts Center, founded in 1972 and based in Hell’s Kitchen, New York City, is a national and international home for artists and audiences of all backgrounds who share a passion for the evolving arts and culture of contemporary Ireland and Irish America. We present, develop, promote, tour, and distribute work from established and emerging artists and cultural practitioners, providing audiences with emotionally and intellectually transporting experiences-the results of innovation, collaboration, and the authentic celebration of our common humanity.

    Steeped in grassroots traditions, with a commitment to inclusion that dates back to our founding, we provide education programs and access to the arts for people of all ages and ethnic, racial and socioeconomic backgrounds, and an international home for the Irish community to come together and engage with a dynamic global diaspora.

    This year, we will break ground on a landmark new permanent home, including a state of the art contemporary, flexible performance and arts space for the presentation and development of work across a range of disciplines; a second, intimate performance space-the renovated historic Irish Arts Center theatre-optimized for the most intimate live music and conversation, recordings, master classes and special events; classrooms and studio spaces for community education programs in Irish music, dance, language, history, and the humanities; technology to stream and distribute the Irish Arts Center experience on the digital platform; a spacious and vibrant avenue-facing café lobby that will be a hospitable hub for conversation and interaction between artists and audiences; and a beautiful new courtyard entrance on 51st Street where the historic Irish Arts Center building and the new facility meet.

    More Information: http://irishartscenter.org/event/martin-hayes-in-residence

    See the full article here .

    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer


    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz

    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00Am-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    JazzCorner.com is the largest portal for the official websites of hundreds of jazz musicians and organizations. New features on JazzCorner include the jazz video share where you can upload and share jazz and blues videos, JazzCorner Jukebox, surf the net with Jazz always on, submit your latest jazz news, and check out what’s hot at JazzCorner’s Speakeasy, the busiest bulletin board for jazz. Be the first to know where Jazz artists are performing in our gigs section, and be sure to listen to our podcasts with established and up and coming jazz musicians in our Innerviews section.

     
  • richardmitnick 3:42 PM on March 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A Dance That Empties, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , WQXR   

    From New Amsterdam Records: “A Dance That Empties” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    http://WWW.NEWAMRECORDS.COM

    A Dance That Empties
    Subtle Degrees

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    Buy Digital Album $8 USD or more

    Buy CD $12 USD or more

    A Dance That Empties is Travis Laplante’s latest album-length composition, written for Subtle Degrees, a new two-musician ensemble consisting of Laplante (tenor saxophone) and Gerald Cleaver (drums).

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    Travis Laplante

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    Gerald Cleaver

    The duo’s uncategorizable sound evokes everything from contemporary classical music, avant garde jazz, minimalism, technical metal, and sacred world music. Laplante is also the founder/composer of saxophone quartet Battle Trance and the ensemble Little Women.

    A Dance That Empties is an extremely demanding composition that pushes the players to the limit both technically and physically, while the raw, vulnerable instrumentation makes for an intimately emotional experience for both performers and listeners.

    A Dance That Empties is the culmination of a very long musical relationship. In 2001, when he was only 18 years old, Laplante played a concert at New York’s Knitting Factory, then a pre-eminent mecca for adventurous music of all kinds. Cleaver was in the audience, and came up to Laplante afterwards, handed him his phone number and said they should play together sometime. They soon did, “and I felt a very intimate and spiritual connection with Gerald that feels more alive than ever today,” Laplante says. “I’ve learned a tremendous amount from Gerald and have long considered him one of my favorite living… more

    credits
    released February 23, 2018

    Composed by Travis Laplante
    Drum arrangements by Gerald Cleaver

    Travis Laplante – tenor saxophone
    Gerald Cleaver – drums

    Recorded on April 20th, 2017 at Guilford Sound Recording Studio
    Guilford, VT

    Recording Engineer, Dave Snyder
    Assistant Engineer: Matt Hall

    Mixed by Eli Crews
    Mastered by Joe Branciforte

    Cover Image by Priscilla Cross
    Back cover image by Sarah H. Paulson

    A Dance That Empties was made possible, in part, by the Jerome Foundation and Roulette.

    Vinyl record version available from NNA Tapes (NNA109)

    See the full article here .

    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz

    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00AM-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 3:08 PM on March 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Birmingham Ensemble for Electroacoustic Research, CERN CMS, , Dark Matter: Music Meets Physics, , , , , , Originally published on March 22nd 2018 on Esprit Orchestra website, , The Cylindrical Onion, , , WQXR   

    From CERN CMS The Cylindrical Onion: “Dark Matter: Music Meets Physics” 

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    CERN CMS

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It has a broad physics programme ranging from studying the Standard Model (including the Higgs boson) to searching for extra dimensions and particles that could make up dark matter. Although it has the same scientific goals as the ATLAS experiment, it uses different technical solutions and a different magnet-system design.

    The CMS detector is built around a huge solenoid magnet. This takes the form of a cylindrical coil of superconducting cable that generates a field of 4 tesla, about 100,000 times the magnetic field of the Earth. The field is confined by a steel “yoke” that forms the bulk of the detector’s 14,000-tonne weight.

    An unusual feature of the CMS detector is that instead of being built in-situ like the other giant detectors of the LHC experiments, it was constructed in 15 sections at ground level before being lowered into an underground cavern near Cessy in France and reassembled. The complete detector is 21 metres long, 15 metres wide and 15 metres high.

    The CMS experiment is one of the largest international scientific collaborations in history, involving 4300 particle physicists, engineers, technicians, students and support staff from 182 institutes in 42 countries (February 2014).

    Music Meets Physics

    March 22nd, 2018
    Scott Wilson

    Several years ago, my friend and collaborator Konstantinos Vasilakos approached me with an idea to develop a collaboration between CERN and our laptop group, the Birmingham Ensemble for Electroacoustic Research. The idea was to develop ways of transforming data from experiments at the Large Hadron Collider – the world’s largest particle accelerator – into electronic music and visuals, allowing us to hear and see the results of this cutting-edge research into the nature of the universe. This was under the auspices of art@CMS, an established international project for collaboration between art and science. They connected us with physicist Maurizio Pierini, who along with Kostas Nikolopoulos and Tom McCauley has served as physicist advisor and collaborator.

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    In the original stages of the project, we worked with what is called live coding; essentially making music by writing computer programmes in real time. This is done in such a way that they can be re-written ‘on the fly’, while they are running. The physics data formed source material for our improvisations, and our goal was to explore the unique character of these particle collisions by rendering their salient aspects in sound, creating surprising results and challenging us as performers to respond musically. This evolved into a fruitful and ongoing project, leading most recently to this new work for orchestra, electronic sound, and video for Esprit. While not an improvisation, it uses similar approaches to produce orchestral material as well as electronic music. Working in SuperCollider (the environment we use with the ensemble, of which I’m an active developer), I developed initial sonifications which I then converted to musical notation. These formed the core material of the work, both in terms of orchestral writing and electronic sound. The orchestra parts consist both of music derived from these (in whole or in fragments), and a variety of responses to them, inspired by the fascinating musical characters they exhibited. In some sense this work must be intuitive: Particle collisions do not sound like anything, except as made audible through an algorithm which maps aspects of the event to sounds or musical materials.

    3
    The visualizations posed a similar problem: We cannot see sub-atomic particles, as they are beyond that level of reality in which sight can be said to function; outside of the mechanisms which make ‘sight’ possible. All we can do is capture their traces, render their geometry. Many of the techniques historically utilized for this (the predecessors of today’s advanced particle accelerators) result in images which are beautiful and strange in their own right, and the mysterious tracks that can be seen in cloud chambers have been a powerful inspiration to me in this work.

    4
    The completed piece is in three movements. The first, Clouds, is based around a melody derived from a single particle collision – a sort of slow-motion version of both that event and the accompanying electronic sound. The second, Particles, is based around different sonifications with unique musical characters, which inspire orchestral responses. The final movement, Tapestries, weaves together lines of music derived from different physics events into a rhythmic interplay, inspired by Nobel laureate Sheldon Glashow’s words: “Tapestries are made by many artisans working together. The contributions of separate workers cannot be discerned in the completed work, and the loose and false threads have been covered over. So it is in our picture of particle physics.”

    5

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    LHC

    CERN/LHC Map

    CERN LHC Tunnel

    CERN LHC particles

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz

    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:33 PM on March 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , The Jewish Museum, Tomeka Reid Quartet, , , WQXR   

    From Bang On A Can: The Jewish Museum and Bang on a Can Present Tomeka Reid Quartet 

    Bang On a Can is the original DIY New Music Organization

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    Tomeka Reid Quartet
    Tomeka Reid, cello
    2
    Jason Roebke, bass
    3
    Mary Halvorson, guitar
    4
    Tomas Fujiwara, drums
    5

    Thursday, April 26, 2018 at 7:30pm
    Scheuer Auditorium at the Jewish Museum
    1109 5th Ave at 92nd St | New York, NY

    Tickets: $18 General; $15 Students and Seniors; $12 Jewish Museum and Bang on a Can Members.
    Available at http://www.thejewishmuseum.org. Includes museum admission.

    Bang on a Can and the Jewish Museum’s 2017-18 concert season, which focuses on pioneering female artists, concludes on Thursday, April 26, 2018 at 7:30pm with a performance by cellist, composer, and improviser Tomeka Reid. Reid will perform with the Tomeka Reid Quartet, her own collection of leading Chicago and New York-based musicians, including Jason Roebke, bass; Mary Halvorson, guitar; and Tomas Fujiwara, drums. The ensemble will perform new compositions, combining her love of groove along with freer concepts, inspired by the themes in Scenes from the Collection, a new, major exhibition of the Jewish Museum’s unparalleled collection featuring nearly 600 works from antiquities to contemporary art.

    On being a pioneer, Reid says, “I like to think that I am a musician who is helping, along with so many other musicians, to keep moving the tradition forward. There have been many other string players and female musicians before me who have helped pave the way and have showed me possibility. I am honored to be a part of this legacy, while carving out my own path. I am an advocate for other string players to explore the imaginative world of improvisation because I feel like it develops us not only musically but personally too. I also feel like it’s a great medium for musical and cultural exchange. I am currently embarking on a month long tour in places like Beirut, Istanbul, Cairo and Addis Ababa and I am so grateful to partake in so many improvisational musical exchanges.”

    In the ongoing exhibition, Scenes from the Collection, art and Jewish objects are shown together, affirming universal values that are shared among people of all faiths and backgrounds. The installation is a powerful expression of artistic and cultural creativity as well as a reflection of the continual evolution that is the essence of Jewish identity. This unique mix of art and ceremonial objects speaks of the many strands of Jewish tradition, culture, spirituality, and history. The stories the works of art tell illuminate multiple perspectives on being Jewish in the past and present, how Jewish culture intersects with art, and how it is part of the larger world of global interconnections.

    About Tomeka Reid
    Recently described as a “New Jazz Power Source” by the New York Times, Chicago cellist and composer Tomeka Reid has emerged as one of the most original, versatile, and curious musicians in the Chicago’s bustling jazz and improvised music community over the last decade. Her distinctive melodic sensibility, usually braided to a strong sense of groove, has been featured in many distinguished ensembles over the years. Reid has been a key member of ensembles led by legendary reedists like Anthony Braxton and Roscoe Mitchell, as well as a younger generation of visionaries including flutist Nicole Mitchell, singer Dee Alexander, and drummer Mike Reed. She is also a co-leader of the adventurous string trio Hear in Now, with violinist Mazz Swift and bassist Silvia Bolognesi. Reid released her debut recording as a bandleader in 2015, with the eponymous recording, Tomeka Reid Quartet, a lively yet charged debut album that is a vibrant showcase not only for the cellist’s improvisational acumen, but also her knack for dynamic arrangements and her compositional ability. Reid, grew up outside of Washington D.C., and her musical career kicked into gear after moving to Chicago in 2000 to attend DePaul University for graduate school. Her work with Nicole Mitchell and various Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians-related groups have proved influential to the young musician. By focusing on developing her craft primarily as a side person and working in countless improvisational contexts, Reid has achieved a stunning musical maturity. Reid is a 2016 recipient of a 3Arts award in music and received her doctorate in music from the University of Illinois, Urbana- Champaign in 2017.

    The 2017-2018 season marks the fourth year of the Jewish Museum and Bang on a Can’s partnership, producing dynamic musical performances inspired by the Museum’s diverse slate of exhibitions. This is the final concert of this season focused on pioneering female artists. Details about the 2018-2019 season to be announced.

    Received via email.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Bang On A Can David Lang- Michael Gordon- Julia Wolfe © Peter Serling

    Bang On A Can All-Stars Members Ashley Bathgate, cello
    Robert Black, bass
    Vicky Chow, piano
    David Cossin, percussion
    Mark Stewart, guitars
    Ken Thomson, clarinet

    Formed in 1992, the Bang on a Can All-Stars are recognized worldwide for their ultra-dynamic live performances and recordings of today’s most innovative music. Freely crossing the boundaries between classical, jazz, rock, world and experimental music, this six-member amplified ensemble has consistently forged a distinct category-defying identity, taking music into uncharted territories. Performing each year throughout the U.S. and internationally, the All-Stars have shattered the definition of what concert music is today.

    Together, the All-Stars have worked in unprecedented close collaboration with some of the most important and inspiring musicians of our time, including Steve Reich, Ornette Coleman, Burmese circle drum master Kyaw Kyaw Naing, Tan Dun, DJ Spooky, and many more. The group’s celebrated projects include their landmark recordings of Brian Eno’s ambient classic Music for Airports and Terry Riley’s In C, as well as live performances with Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Don Byron, Iva Bittova, Thurston Moore, Owen Pallett and others. The All-Stars were awarded Musical America’s Ensemble of the Year and have been heralded as “the country’s most important vehicle for contemporary music” by the San Francisco Chronicle.

    Current and recent project highlights include the touring performances and recording of Julia Wolfe’s Pulitzer Prize winning Anthracite Fields for the All-Stars and guest choir, the record release of Wolfe’s acclaimed Steel Hammer, featuring Trio Mediaeval, plus a moving theatrically staged collaboration with SITI Company and director Anne Bogart; Field Recordings, a major multi-media project and CD/DVD now featuring 30 commissioned works by Tyondai Braxton, Mira Calix, Anna Clyne, Bryce Dessner, Florent Ghys, Michael Gordon, Jóhann Jóhannsson, David Lang, Christian Marclay, Steve Reich, Todd Reynolds, Julia Wolfe, and more; the Lincoln Center Festival 2017 world premiere of Cloud River Mountain, a new collaboration featuring Chinese superstar singer Gong Linna; the world premiere performance and recording of Steve Reich’s 2×5 including a sold-out performance at Carnegie Hall, and much more. With a massive repertoire of works written specifically for the group’s distinctive instrumentation and style of performance, the All-Stars have become a genre in their own right. The All-Stars record on Cantaloupe Music and have released past recordings on Sony, Universal and Nonesuch.


    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz

    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00AM-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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