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  • richardmitnick 3:35 PM on October 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, Diane Moser - piano, Hafez Modirzadeh – saxophone, , , Tyshawn Sorey – piano   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “HAFEZ MODIRZADEH: THE PULSIVITY/RESONANCE PROJECT: TONAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATIONS FOR RE-TUNED PIANO AND SAXOPHONE” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    Hafez Modirzadeh (Photo Credit Walter Wagner)

    Saturday, November 10, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    The Jazz Gallery
    1160 Broadway, 5th Floor
    New York, NY 10001

    $10—35
    Tickets

    1st set – 7:30pm

    Hafez Modirzadeh – saxophone & compositions
    Diane Moser – piano

    Diane Moser by Dennis Connors

    2nd set – 9:30 pm

    Hafez Modirzadeh – saxophone & compositions
    Tyshawn Sorey – piano

    Tyshawn Sorey – piano from MacArthur Foundation

    // sets 7.30pm + 9.30pm //
    // each set: $25/$10 members; reserved table seating: $35/$20
    members

    The Pulsivity/Resonance Project explores a dual concept of time and temperament through a set of pieces for re-tuned piano and saxophone. In this regard, a second goal is realized: to inspire balance between fixed (periodic) and fluid (pulsivic) temporalities. In practice, this gets related to the elasticity of Persian poetic meter – formulas for improvisation are composed for each musical artist’s own pulse to accelerate/decelerate in synchronistic harmony, resulting in transient resolutions of unpredictable beauty.

    Each duo works from the same set of pieces that share a sonic palette of 8 re-tuned pitches. Exploring such resonances, from a variety of interlocking temperaments and temporalities, should expand harmonic empathy beyond the music itself.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 5:51 PM on October 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , Garlands for Steven Stucky, ,   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Garlands for Steven Stucky” 

    New Music USA


    From NEWMUSICBOX

    1

    Steven Stucky by Hoebermann Studio-Courtesy of the artist

    After the passing of Steven Stucky on Valentine’s Day of 2016, Christopher Rouse, Steve’s friend of 40 years, wrote on this website:

    “I don’t think I’m alone in seeing Steve as the sort of person we all wish we were. Even had he lacked the musical genius he did in fact possess, his way of living his life and treating all with kindness and respect would have been a model worth emulating for anyone. Loved by so many, we have lost not only a great composer, but the dearest of friends. I wonder how we will be able to go on without him.”

    Steve died much too soon—and for so many of us, unacceptably—at the age of 66. His unusually aggressive brain cancer had been diagnosed only three months earlier.

    I met Steve in 1988 upon his arrival at the Los Angeles Philharmonic, where I had been working steadily as an “extra” alongside the redoubtable principal keyboard player, Zita Carno. Steve’s tenure there as resident composer and new music advisor lasted for 21 years, the longest such affiliation between a composer and an American orchestra. I was a frequent participant during most of those years in much of the new music programming for the LA Phil’s orchestral series and Green Umbrella concerts. Steve, having largely determined much of that programming, was present at every rehearsal, always exuding his special combination of bemused, gracious, self-deprecating erudition. Over time we became friends, and his interests became my interests. As the foremost authority on the music of Witold Lutosławski, he was my guiding light as I prepared my CD Piano Music of Salonen, Stucky, and Lutosławski. The 2009 Grammy Award bestowed on me for that recording is an honor that I owe in no small part to Steve.

    The day after Steve died, Deborah Borda, then-President of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, phoned to tell me about an April tribute concert already being organized by the Philharmonic. Several of Steve’s friends and former students were being invited to write short piano pieces (one or two minutes each) in Steve’s memory, and she asked me to organize the pianists. There would ultimately be six works, by Fang Man, Anders Hillborg, Magnus Lindberg, James Matheson, Joseph Phibbs, and Esa-Pekka Salonen, interspersed with music by Steve and Lutosławski. The pianists, all associated with Piano Spheres, Los Angeles’ piano series devoted to new music, would be, respectively, Mark Robson, Susan Svrček, Steven Vanhauwaert, Nic Gerpe, Vicki Ray, and myself.

    Following the announcement of the upcoming program, I heard from a few of Steve’s countless composer friends who were expressing a wish to dedicate a piano homage of their own. Though I was not empowered to add them to the Philharmonic’s program, I knew that I couldn’t ignore their heartfelt offers, that I would be in touch afterwards, and that this had the makings of a very good idea that would embody all the goodness that Steve had brought to so many of our lives. Later that spring I began inviting them and others to contribute additional pieces to the initial set of six for a collection that would be called Garlands for Steven Stucky. With the original six pieces having been such powerful declarations of love and friendship, and knowing how many more of Steve’s eminent, emotionally devastated friends and students would want to honor him similarly, I felt that a CD would be the necessary endgame. Unsurprisingly, my wish list of essential invitees, compiled with the help of Christopher Rouse, Donald Crockett, and Steve’s widow, Kristen Stucky, grew very, very long. I had to limit the number to just 24 more composers who then wrote their hearts out to honor Steve in the way they do best.

    The Garlands

    Julia Adolphe: Snowprints
    Julian Anderson: Capriccio
    Charles Bodman Rae: Steven Stucky in memoriam
    Chen Yi: In Memory of Steve
    Louis Chiappetta: This is no less curious
    Donald Crockett: Nella Luce
    Brett Dean: Hommage à Lutosławski
    Fang Man: That raindrops have hastened the falling flowers: in memory of Steven Stucky
    Gabriela Frank: Harawi-cito de charanguista ciego
    Daniel S. Godfrey: Glas
    John Harbison: Waltz
    Anders Hillborg: Just a Minute
    Pierre Jalbert: Inscription
    Jesse Jones: Reverie
    William Kraft: Music for Gloria (In Memoriam Steven Stucky)
    Hannah Lash: November
    David Lefkowitz: In Memoriam: Steven Stucky
    Magnus Lindberg: Fratello
    David Liptak: Epitaph
    Steven Mackey: A Few Things, in memory of Steve
    James Matheson: CHAPTER I: In which our hero dies and encounters Palestrina, Brahms, Debussy, Ligeti, Lutosławski and other dead loves; looks out to see the entire universe before him, and prepares to visit all of the amazing shit therein
    Colin Matthews: some moths for Steve
    Harold Meltzer: Children’s Crusade
    Eric Nathan: In memoriam
    Joseph Phibbs: in memory of Steven Stucky
    Kay Rhie: Interlude
    Christopher Rouse: Muistomerkki
    Esa-Pekka Salonen: Iscrizione
    Michael Small: Debussy Window
    Stephen Andrew Taylor: Green Trees Are Bending
    Andrew Waggoner: …and Maura Brought Me Cookies (Remembering Steve)
    Judith Weir: Chorale, For Steve

    As the recording was shaping up to be a collective portrait of friendship, I invited two more of Steve’s trusted collaborators, Peabody Southwell (mezzo-soprano) and Carolyn Hove (oboe), to join me on the CD. Together, we close the recording with Steve’s Two Holy Sonnets of Donne (1982), based on John Donne’s defiant, mocking proclamations on the powerlessness of death.

    For the 32 composers, I imagine that it must have felt hardly possible to write a one- to two-minute piece that expressed all that they wanted to say about Steve. “How could I even begin to capture the depth and quiet intensity of this man?” asks Esa-Pekka Salonen in his liner note. For me, holding 32 such individual, deeply-felt relationships in my hands has been fulfilling beyond words. As reflections on Steve as a friend and teacher, the Garlands are by no means a compilation of mournful dirges. I note many cheery portrayals of him, such as in Julia Adolphe’s reimagining of his “giddy excitement” during composition lessons, Pierre Jalbert’s inclusion of a “fast rhythmic section (Steve’s wit and humor),” and Steven Mackey’s evocation of “the playful banter” that they shared. We also see Steve invoked several times in quotations of his music and of music that he loved, and in opening motives that seem to summon him with the pitches B-flat (si), E-flat (es), and G (sol), representing his initials.

    3
    Steven Stucky with Esa-Pekka Salonen and Gloria Cheng (photo by Carlos Rodriguez)

    Proceeds from our CD sales and royalties will be donated to the Steven Stucky Composer Fellowship Fund. The fund was established by the Los Angeles Philharmonic to honor Steve’s vision of engaging young composers in multi-year educational programs with the orchestra. The Composer Fellowship Program continues to flourish under Program Director Andrew Norman and Teaching Artist Sarah Gibson.

    4
    Garlands for Steven Stucky (Bridge 9509). Photo by Jeffrey Herman.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:22 PM on October 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , Peter Garland: The Landscape Scrolls, Starkland   

    From Starkland: “Peter Garland: The Landscape Scrolls” 

    From Starkland

    1
    Available October 19, 2018

    Peter Garland from NewMusicUSA


    Peter Garland:
    The Landscape Scrolls
    Available now
    Finally, the CD can be pre-ordered at Bandcamp and Amazon.

    John Luther Adams wrote the highly enthusiastic Introduction. The next issue of Gramophone will review the CD, and Vital Weekly has praised it as “a great release” and possibly Garland’s “best work.”

    Commissioned by and dedicated to percussionist John Lane, the composition depicts the 24-hour day cycle in five movements. Each movement is a monochromatic study, more about resonance and space than melody or harmony: mid-day (Chinese drums); afternoon (rice bowls); after dark (triangles); late (glockenspiel); early morning (tubular bells).

    “Employing just one musician and a limited array of instruments, Garland reminds us of the magic all around us, and the imperative to rediscover our proper place
    in the miraculous and mysterious
    dance of life on this earth.”
    – John Luther Adams.

    “Garland is an artist who knows what he’s doing, and then does it — repeatedly, each time out.
    He’s a marvelous artist;
    I admire his work a lot.”
    – Harold Budd

    “He has sometimes been classed as
    a minimalist, but Garland’s economy
    and radical consonance are manifestations
    of his own spatial sensitivity
    and clarity of attention.”
    Wire Magazine

    “An avatar of an experimental American tradition [and] a composer
    of mesmerizing music”
    – Kyle Gann

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Heard on Starkland

    Charles Amirkhanian
    Ashley Bathgate
    Phillip Bimstein
    Martin Bresnick
    Phyllis Chen
    Jay Cloidt
    Nathan Davis
    Tod Dockstader
    Paul Dolden
    Paul Dresher
    William Duckworth
    Robert Een
    Either/Or
    Ethel
    Fred Frith
    Ellen Fullman
    David Garland
    Peter Garland
    International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE)
    JACK Quartet
    Janáček Philharmonic Orchestra
    Aaron Jay Kernis
    John King
    Roger Kleier
    Phil Kline
    Guy Klucevsek
    Kronos Quartet
    Lukas Ligeti
    Jenny Lin
    Keeril Makan
    Ingram Marshall
    Merzbow
    Meredith Monk
    David Lee Myers
    Lisa Moore
    Pauline Oliveros
    Todd Reynolds
    Frederic Rzewski
    Elliott Sharp
    Carl Stone
    Lois V Vierk
    Randall Woolf
    Pamela Z
    John Zorn
    and more

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:35 AM on September 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , , , ,   

    From Lincoln Center: “White Lights Festival” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    From Lincoln Center

    Sutra October 16–18, 2018

    Film: Silent Light Wednesday, October 17, 2018

    Poetry for Strings Thursday, October 18, 2018

    Film: Dreyer’s Ordet Thursday, October 18, 2018

    Borderline October 19–20, 2018

    Solo Flight Tuesday, October 23, 2018

    White Light Conversation: Community Saturday, October 27, 2018

    XENOS October 31–November 1, 2018

    Framing Time November 1–2, 2018

    Waiting for Godot November 2–13, 2018

    The Distant LightTuesday, November 13, 2018

    The Creation Thursday, November 15, 2018

    Blak Whyte Gray November 16–17, 2018

    Only the Sound Remains November 17–18, 2018

    See the full article here For more information and ticketing.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Artsis a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:58 AM on September 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, , , , Strange Beautiful Music 2018   

    From New Amsterdam Records: ‘Detroit Symphony Orchestra” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam Records

    1

    Strange Beautiful Music 2018
    2

    3

    Friday September 14 and Saturday, September 15 | 3 p.m. – 11 p.m.
    New Music Detroit brings their 11th annual marathon music festival to The Cube, the DIA and The Wright Museum! The avant-garde production features experimental and far-reaching sounds ranging from contemporary chamber music and European folk to experimental electronics and noise improvisation.

    Pricing
    General Admission – Single Day (Advance) – $10
    General Admission – Single Day (Door) – $20
    General Admission 2-day Weekend Pass (Advance) – $20*
    General Admission 2-day Weekend Pass (Door) – $30
    VIP 2-day Weekend Pass $125*

    VIP Weekend Pass holders will receive:
    • One reserved seat throughout the entire festival (The Cube, DIA, The Wright Museum)
    • One complimentary drink, with access to cash bar thereafter
    • One New Music Detroit T-shirt
    • One New Music Detroit CD
    General admission and VIP weekend passes can be purchased by calling the DSO Box Office at 313.576.5111.

    Lineup:

    Friday, September 14 | 3 p.m. – 11 p.m.
    Charles Wright Museum (315 E. Warren Ave, Detroit, MI 48201)

    3:00 PM – Dave Sharp Worlds Quartet
    4:00 PM – Akropolis Reed Quintet
    5:00 PM – Tia Imani Hanna Ensemble
    5:50 PM – Maria Chavez

    Friday, September 14 | 7 p.m. -10 p.m.
    Detroit Institute of Arts** (5200 Woodward Ave, Detroit, MI 48202)

    7:00 PM – James Cornish Ensemble Opera
    8:00 PM – Marcus Elliot’s Beyond Rebellious Ensemble
    **General admission is free for residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties – seats are based on first-come, first-served basis. VIP 2-day Weekend Pass holders will have a reserved seat.

    Saturday, September 15 | 2 p.m. – 11 p.m.
    The Cube (3711 Woodward Ave, Detroit, MI 48201)
    2:00 PM – Betsy Soukup
    3:00 PM – Detroit Composers Project
    4:00 PM – Whoopknox
    5:00 PM – Contemporary Directions Ensemble
    6:00 PM – ONO
    7:00 PM – Subtle Degrees
    8:00 PM – Synergistic Mythologies
    9:00 PM – New Music Detroit
    10:00 PM – Saajtak

    Detroit Symphony Orchestra
    Max M. & Marjorie S. Fisher Music Center
    3711 Woodward Avenue
    Detroit, MI 48201

    Box Office
    313.576.5111
    Summer Hours: Monday-Friday, 11am-5pm
    Plus 2 hours prior to concerts *

    Dates, times, prices, programs, and artists are subject to change.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    In all of our presenting and recording activities, NewAm holds firmly to its mission to support artists whose work lies outside of traditional music industry infrastructure – whether that be classical, pop/rock/indie, jazz, world, or experimental. In pursuit of this calling, NewAm often collaborates with like-minded organizations. Our past and ongoing partnerships with the River to River Festival, Ecstatic Music Festival, Art of Elan, the Indianapolis Symphony (multi-year residency), MoMA PS 1, Liquid Music, Galapagos Artspace and National Sawdust have yielded high-profile opportunities for our artists to present their work. On the records side, we often partner with other labels in order to offer our artists the best possible representation for their projects. Partner labels have included Bedroom Community (Iceland), Nonclassical (UK), One Little Indian (UK), Sono Luminus (USA), Cantaloupe (USA) and NNA Tapes (USA).

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:52 PM on September 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , Kneebody with Becca Stevens & Michael Mayo, ,   

    From LPR: “Kneebody with Becca Stevens & Michael Mayo” 

    From LPR

    1

    Sun September 16th, 2018

    8:00PM

    Main Space

    Minimum Age: 18+

    Doors Open: 7:00PM

    Show Time: 8:00PM

    Event Ticket: $18

    Day of Show: $25

    Tickets

    Kneebody
    2
    Photo Credit: Tarona

    Kneebody’s sound is… explosive rock energy paralleled with high-level nuanced chamber ensemble playing, with highly wrought compositions that are balanced with adventurous no-holds-barred improvising. All “sounds-like” references can be set aside; this band has created a genre and style all its own.

    Kneebody bassist Kaveh Rastegar thinks of their sound this way, “Personally, I think calling Kneebody ‘jazz’ or ‘electric jazz’ is fantastic because then we can move on from that hang up and play our music – and alter expectations of what ‘jazz’ is.”

    Kneebody is keyboardist Adam Benjamin, trumpeter Shane Endsley, electric bassist Kaveh Rastegar, saxophonist Ben Wendel and drummer Nate Wood. The band has no leader or rather, each member is the leader; they’ve developed their own musical language, inventing a unique cueing system that allows them each to change the tempo, key, style, and more in an instant.

    Kneebody draws upon influences spanning D’Angelo’s Voodoo to music by Elliot Smith, Bill Frisell, and Miles Davis. Their live shows are known for intense sonic landscapes of the Radiohead ilk, for the rhythmic bombast of a Squarepusher or Queens of the Stone Age show, and the harmonic depth and improvisational freedom experienced at a Brad Mehldau concert.

    In 2005, Kneebody released their debut self-titled album Kneebody on Dave Douglas’ Greenleaf Music Label. Low Electrical Worker followed in 2007 on the Colortone Label. A collection of 13 original songs, Low Electrical Worker was hailed by saxophonist Joshua Redman as one of his “favorite albums of 2007.” In the spring of 2009, Kneebody and vocalist Theo Bleckmann released 12 Songs of Charles Ives on the Winter & Winter label and received a Grammy Award nomination in the “classical crossover” category. 2013 saw the release of The Line for ConcordRecords. In 2015, Kneebody’s groundbreaking collaboration with electronic musician Daedelus on Kneedelus was released on Flying Lotus’ imprint Brainfeeder records to praise from critics and audiences alike. Kneebody made their Motéma Music debut album Anti-Hero in March of 2017.

    Becca Stevens
    3
    © Harald Krichel / CC BY-SA 3.0 (via Wikimedia Commons)

    Becca Stevens is an American singer, songwriter, and guitarist who draws upon elements of jazz, chamber-pop, indie-rock, and folk. She has collaborated with artists including Jacob Collier, Laura Mvula, Billy Childs, David Crosby, and many others.

    Michael Mayo
    4

    Michael Mayo began forging his musical identity long before he hit the stage. The son of two successful musicians, the Los Angeles native grew up just a little more than 20 feet from the likes of Diana Ross, Luther Vandross, Earth Wind and Fire and Stevie Wonder. This proximity helped Mayo create a musical path centered around the innovative elements of jazz.

    After receiving his Bachelors from the New England Conservatory of Music, Mayo attended the acclaimed Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance, only the third vocalist to be accepted into the 20-year-old program, where he learned from Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, and Luciana Souza, among many others. Mayo, who recently moved to New York City, is a veteran international performer. His highlights include singing at the White House for First Lady Michelle Obama on International Jazz Day 2016, the Kennedy Center for both the Betty Carter Jazz Ahead program and Renée Fleming’s American Voices Festival in 2013, as well as the Panama Jazz Festival. Whether he is performing with a full big band, a rhythm section or alone with a looper pedal, Mayo’s classic vocal style commands the attention of listeners worldwide.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings


    Stem Education Coalition

    (le) poisson rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    LPR

    LPR is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
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  • richardmitnick 12:21 PM on September 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , , , Nightcap, Sound On   

    From Nadia Sirota and New York Philharmonic: “I am EXTREMELY EXCITED for this” 

    From Nadia Sirota

    and

    New York Philharmonic

    From Nadia Sirota

    My friends! I am working with the New York Phil!

    I am EXTREMELY EXCITED for this

    Over the past eight-ish months I have had the pleasure of collaborating with a completely inspiring and kickass group of people over at New York Philharmonic on two brand-new series that feature new music in new venues:

    Nightcap and Sound ON

    The whole thing kicks off with our first Nightcap show curated by Conrad Tao and featuring Caleb Teicher (a phenomenal tap dancer) and Charmaine Lee (a phenomenal vocalist)

    Friday September 28th at 10:30pm. That’s in a little over two weeks, and attendance is totally mandatory. SEE YOU THERE!!

    Then, on Sunday October 7th, we debut Sound ON: Going Dutch starring Musicians of the New York Philharmonic and Louis Andriessen!! That’s 3pm Sunday! There shall be mimosas. And Jaap van Zweden.

    And there is SO MUCH MORE TO COME.

    Vanessa Lann, Martijn Padding, Gabriel Kahane, Caroline Shaw, Timo Andres, Miró Quartet, Chen Yi, Georg Friedrich Haas, Marcos Balter, Kinan Azmeh, Thomas Adès, Ariel Quartet, Donnacha Dennehy, Matthias Pintscher, JS Bach, György Kurtág, John Adams (Composer), Attacca Quartet, John Corigliano, David Lang, Gabriella Smith, Steve Reich

    Thanks a zillion to Isaac Thompson Adam Crane Vince Ford Deborah Borda Stephanie McGurren and so many others

    Please spread the word!!!!!

    xx

    From The New York Philharmonic

    September 11, 2018
    Katherine E. Johnson
    Vice President, Communications
    (212) 875-5700
    johnsonk@nyphil.org

    1

    3
    Nadia With Anjuli Fatima Raza Kolb.

    NEW MUSIC: NEW VENUES
    Hosted by Creative Partner NADIA SIROTA

    SOUND ON
    GRoW @ Annenberg Sound ON Series
    Curated by Nadia Sirota
    Three Chamber Concerts Performed by Musicians from the New York Philharmonic
    The Appel Room, Jazz at Lincoln Center, 3:00 p.m.

    NIGHTCAP
    Kravis Nightcap Series
    Curated by Composers of Today
    Six Late-Night Concerts Performed by Guest Musicians
    Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse, 10:30 p.m.

    The New York Philharmonic announces details for the two new-music series it is inaugurating in the 2018–19 season: GRoW @ Annenberg Sound ON and Kravis Nightcap. Both series present the music of today in casual settings, hosted by The Marie-Josée Kravis Creative Partner Nadia Sirota, who will engage in conversation with the composers and performers.

    As the Peabody Award–winning host and producer of the podcast Meet the Composer — which profiled contemporary composers — a soloist, and a member of the ensemble yMusic, violist Nadia Sirota is a leader in the new-music community. “Nightcap and Sound ON are designed for curious music lovers and newcomers alike,” said Nadia Sirota. “Our goal is to put together concerts that are smart and fun, and to explore music in conversation with the incredible people who bring it to life. I see my role as a cheerleader and proselytizer: I love this music, and I’m dying to get more people to listen to it.”

    “To be onstage with a living composer is one of the most inspiring experiences for me,” said Music Director Jaap van Zweden.

    Jaap van Zweden Director of the New York Philharmonic by Marco Borggreve

    “I can turn and say, ‘Tell me, what do you mean by this passage? What do you want to tell us with your music?’ For the audience, being in the same room as the composers and hearing their thoughts is also inspiring. I know that our public will love getting to know today’s composers during Nightcap and Sound ON.”

    The series are complemented by the Insights at the Atrium event “New York’s New-Music Landscape,” Monday, November 5, 2018, at 7:30 p.m.

    Sound ON
    The GRoW @ Annenberg Sound ON series — three Sunday afternoon chamber concerts at The Appel Room, Jazz at Lincoln Center — presents contemporary chamber repertoire performed by Philharmonic musicians. The concerts will dive deeper into the season’s key initiatives and explore the music of our time through the performer’s lens. Host and curator Nadia Sirota will lead conversations with the musicians, discussing what they love about the works they are performing — what is difficult, new, and unexpected.

    The series will begin on October 7, 2018, with “Going Dutch,” part of The Art of Andriessen, which spotlights the music of Dutch composer Louis Andriessen — recipient of The Marie-Josée Kravis Prize for New Music at the New York Philharmonic. “Going Dutch” will highlight the Netherlands new-music scene with music by Andriessen and his former students: Andriessen’s Image de Moreau, Hout, and Symphony for Open Strings, the last conducted by Music Director Jaap van Zweden; Dutch composer Martijn Padding’s Mordants; and the New York Premiere of The Key to the Fourteenth Vision by Vanessa Lann, an American composer living in the Netherlands.

    The series continues on January 27, 2019, with “Threads,” part of New York Stories: Threads of Our City, which looks at musical expressions of the immigrant experience in New York. “Threads” will examine how diverse communities lend their voices to the creative conversation in the US through performances of music by composers who have been influenced by their time in America. The program will feature the World Premiere of a New York Philharmonic commission by Syrian composer / clarinetist Kinan Azmeh, as well as Chinese-American composer / violinist Chen Yi’s At the Kansas City Chinese New Year Concert, Austrian composer Georg Friedrich Haas’s tria ex uno, Brazilian-American composer Marcos Balter’s Chambers, British composer / pianist / conductor Thomas Adès’s Darknesse Visible, and Irish composer Donnacha Dennehy’s Bulb.

    The inaugural season of Sound ON will conclude on June 2, 2019, with “Response,” part of Music of Conscience, which delves into composers’ responses to the social issues of their time. “Response” will examine works composers have written as a means of processing the world around them, from personal losses to sociopolitical events — both present-day and of the last century. The concert will feature the World Premiere of a New York Philharmonic commission by Gabriella Smith, as well as Caroline Shaw’s First Essay, selections from David Lang’s memory pieces, the US Premiere of Judd Greenstein’s The Seeming Disorder of the Old City, and Steve Reich’s Different Trains.

    GRoW @ Annenberg, which supports Sound ON, is a philanthropic initiative led by Gregory Annenberg Weingarten, a vice president and director of the Annenberg Foundation. GRoW @ Annenberg is dedicated to supporting humanitarian efforts across the globe as well as innovative projects in health, education, the arts, and civic and cultural life.

    Nightcap
    The Kravis Nightcap series presents six late-night, cabaret-style concerts curated by composers of today, who will engage in conversation about the music with host Nadia Sirota. Taking place at the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse after select subscription programs, the concerts will delve into themes related to those Philharmonic concerts in a casual setting.

    Composer / pianist Conrad Tao will curate the inaugural Nightcap concert, Friday, September 28, 2018, a semi-improvised set featuring Mr. Tao on piano, avant-garde vocalist Charmaine Lee, and tap dancer Caleb Teicher. This follows a Philharmonic concert featuring Mr. Tao’s Everything Must Go, which the Philharmonic commissioned and is premiering that week.

    Louis Andriessen will curate Nightcap on Saturday, October 13, 2018, part of The Art of Andriessen. The Dutch composer will spotlight his diverse musical interests, from Ravel to Miles Davis and John Cage, with performances by the Ariel Quartet. This follows a Philharmonic concert featuring Mr. Andriessen’s TAO.

    Composer / pianist / vocalist / raconteur Gabriel Kahane will curate Nightcap on Saturday, November 10, 2018, exploring the evolution of art song, from Schubert to the composers of today, with performances by composer / vocalist Caroline Shaw, the Miró Quartet, and composer / pianist Timo Andres. This follows a Philharmonic concert of works by Schubert and Beethoven.

    Composer / conductor Matthias Pintscher will curate Nightcap on Saturday, February 23, 2019, presenting music from his deepest influences, J.S. Bach and Kurtág. This follows a Philharmonic concert he will conduct featuring his mar’eh, receiving its New York Premiere that week.

    Composer John Adams will curate Nightcap on Saturday, March 23, 2019, featuring music by emerging composers he has championed, performed by the Attacca Quartet and composer / pianist Timo Andres. This follows a Philharmonic concert featuring Mr. Adams’s The Wound-Dresser.

    Composer John Corigliano will curate the season’s final Nightcap concert on Saturday, June 1, 2019, part of Music of Conscience. The program will feature music by composers whose voices were cut short by the AIDS epidemic. This follows a Philharmonic concert featuring Mr. Corigliano’s Symphony No. 1, his personal response to the AIDS crisis.

    Henry and Marie-Josée Kravis, whose generosity makes possible the Nightcap series and the Creative Partner position, have long supported new music at the New York Philharmonic. In 2009 they made a gift of $10 million to the Orchestra endowing, among other initiatives, The Marie-Josée Kravis Prize for New Music at the New York Philharmonic.

    See Nadia Sirota’s article here .
    See the full article New York Phil article here .

    Violist Nadia Sirota’s varied career spans solo performances, chamber music, curation, and broadcasting. In all branches of her artistic life she aims to open classical music up to a broader audience. Nadia’s singular sound and expressive execution have served as muse to dozens of composers, including Nico Muhly, David Lang, Bryce Dessner, Missy Mazzoli, and Marcos Balter. Nadia won a 2015 Peabody Award, broadcasting’s highest honor, for her podcast Meet the Composer, “the world’s best contemporary classical music podcast” (Pitchfork), which deftly profiles some of the most interesting musical thinkers living today.

    Next season, Nadia teams up with the New York Philharmonic as their first-ever Creative Partner, a position created for her. In this role, she will host nine contemporary music concerts over two new series: Nightcap and Sound ON, the latter of which she will also curate.

    As a soloist, Nadia has appeared with acclaimed orchestras around the world, including the Detroit Symphony, National Arts Centre Orchestra, Spanish National Orchestra, and the Orchestre National d’Île-de-France. To date, she has released four albums of commissioned music, most recently, Tessellatum, Donnacha Dennehy’s groundbreaking work for viola and microtonal viola da gamba consort, featuring Liam Byrne.

    Nadia is a member of the chamber sextet yMusic and has lent her sound to recording and concert projects by such artists and songwriters as Anohni, The National, Arcade Fire, and Paul Simon. In 2013 she won Southern Methodist University’s Meadows Prize, awarded to pioneering artists and scholars with an emerging international profile. She received her undergraduate and Master’s degrees from the Juilliard School, studying with Heidi Castleman, Misha Amory, and Hsin-Yun Huang.

    Nadia with ACME


    Nadia with yMusic

    Nadia with Bedroom Community Only photo I could find

    New York Philharmonic by Chris Lee


    Founded in 1842, the New York Philharmonic is the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States. Read a complete historical overview, visit the New York Philharmonic Leon Levy Digital Archives, or explore our history below.

    The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc.,globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra (NYPO) or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, is a symphony orchestra based in New York City in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the “Big Five”. The Philharmonic’s home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York’s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

    Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the “Big Five” orchestras. Its record-setting 14,000th concert was given in December 2004.

    The New York Philharmonic was founded in 1842 by the American conductor Ureli Corelli Hill, with the aid of the Irish composer William Vincent Wallace. The orchestra was then called the Philharmonic Society of New York. It was the third Philharmonic on American soil since 1799, and had as its intended purpose, “the advancement of instrumental music.” The first concert of the Philharmonic Society took place on December 7, 1842 in the Apollo Rooms on lower Broadway before an audience of 600. The concert opened with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, led by Hill himself. Two other conductors, German-born Henry Christian Timm and French-born Denis Etienne, led parts of the eclectic, three-hour program, which included chamber music and several operatic selections with a leading singer of the day, as was the custom. The musicians operated as a cooperative society, deciding by a majority vote such issues as who would become a member, which music would be performed and who among them would conduct. At the end of the season, the players would divide any proceeds among themselves.

    After only a dozen public performances and barely four years old, the Philharmonic organized a concert to raise funds to build a new music hall. The centerpiece was the American premiere of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, to take place at Castle Garden on the southern tip of Manhattan. About 400 instrumental and vocal performers gathered for this premiere, which was conducted by George Loder. The chorals were translated into what would be the first English performance anywhere in the world. However, with the expensive US$2.00 ticket price and a war rally uptown, the hoped-for audience was kept away and the new hall would have to wait. Although judged by some as an odd work with all those singers kept at bay until the end, the Ninth soon became the work performed most often when a grand gesture was required.

    During the Philharmonic’s first seven seasons, seven musicians alternated the conducting duties. In addition to Hill, Timm and Étienne, these were William Alpers, George Loder, Louis Wiegers and Alfred Boucher. This changed in 1849 when Theodore Eisfeld was installed as sole conductor for the season. Eisfeld, later along with Carl Bergmann, would be the conductor until 1865. That year, Eisfeld conducted the Orchestra’s memorial concert for the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln, but in a peculiar turn of events which were criticized in the New York press, the Philharmonic omitted the last movement, Ode to Joy, as being inappropriate for the occasion. That year Eisfeld returned to Europe, and Bergmann continued to conduct the Society until his death in 1876.

    Leopold Damrosch, Franz Liszt’s former concertmaster at Weimar, served as conductor of the Philharmonic for the 1876/77 season. But failing to win support from the Philharmonic’s public, he left to create the rival Symphony Society of New York in 1878. Upon his death in 1885, his 23-year-old son Walter took over and continued the competition with the old Philharmonic. It was Walter who would convince Andrew Carnegie that New York needed a first-class concert hall and on May 5, 1891, both Walter and Russian composer Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky conducted at the inaugural concert of the city’s new Music Hall, which in a few years would be renamed for its primary benefactor, Andrew Carnegie. Carnegie Hall would remain the orchestra’s home until 1962.

    The Philharmonic in 1877 was in desperate financial condition, caused by the paltry income from five concerts in the 1876/77 season that brought in an average of only $168 per concert. Representatives of the Philharmonic wished to attract the German-born, American-trained conductor Theodore Thomas, whose own Theodore Thomas Orchestra had competed directly with the Philharmonic for over a decade and which had brought him fame and great success. At first the Philharmonic’s suggestion offended Thomas because he was unwilling to disband his own orchestra. Because of the desperate financial circumstances, the Philharmonic offered Theodore Thomas the conductorship without conditions, and he began conducting the orchestra in the autumn of 1877. With the exception of the 1878/79 season – when he was in Cincinnati and Adolph Neuendorff led the group – Thomas conducted every season for fourteen years, vastly improving the orchestra’s financial health while creating a polished and virtuosic ensemble. He left in 1891 to found the Chicago Symphony, taking thirteen Philharmonic musicians with him.

    Another celebrated conductor, Anton Seidl, followed Thomas on the Philharmonic podium, serving until 1898. Seidl, who had served as Wagner’s assistant, was a renowned conductor of the composer’s works; Seidl’s romantic interpretations inspired both adulation and controversy. During his tenure, the Philharmonic enjoyed a period of unprecedented success and prosperity and performed its first world premiere written by a world-renowned composer in the United States – Antonín Dvořák’s Ninth Symphony From the New World. Seidl’s sudden death in 1898 from food poisoning at the age of 47 was widely mourned. Twelve thousand people applied for tickets to his funeral at the Metropolitan Opera House at 39th Street and Broadway and the streets were jammed for blocks with a “surging mass” of his admirers.

    According to Joseph Horowitz, Seidl’s death was followed by “five unsuccessful seasons” under Emil Paur [music director from 1898 to 1902] and Walter Damrosch [who served for only one season, 1902/03].” After this, he says, for several seasons [1903–1906] the orchestra employed guest conductors, including Victor Herbert, Édouard Colonne, Willem Mengelberg, Fritz Steinbach, Richard Strauss, Felix Weingartner, and Henry Wood.

    In 1909, to ensure the financial stability of the Philharmonic, a group of wealthy New Yorkers led by two women, Mary Seney Sheldon and Minnie Untermyer, formed the Guarantors Committee and changed the Orchestra’s organization from a musician-operated cooperative to a corporate management structure. The Guarantors were responsible for bringing Gustav Mahler to the Philharmonic as principal conductor and expanding the season from 18 concerts to 54, which included a tour of New England. The Philharmonic was the only symphonic orchestra where Mahler worked as music director without any opera responsibilities, freeing him to explore the symphonic literature more deeply. In New York, he conducted several works for the first time in his career and introduced audiences to his own compositions. Under Mahler, a controversial figure both as a composer and conductor, the season expanded, musicians’ salaries were guaranteed, the scope of operations broadened, and the 20th-century orchestra was created.

    In 1911 Mahler died unexpectedly, and the Philharmonic appointed Josef Stránský as his replacement. Many commentators were surprised by the choice of Stránský, whom they did not see as a worthy successor to Mahler. Stránský led all of the orchestra’s concerts until 1920, and also made the first recordings with the orchestra in 1917.

    In 1921 the Philharmonic merged with New York’s National Symphony Orchestra (no relation to the present Washington, D.C. ensemble). With this merger it also acquired the imposing Dutch conductor Willem Mengelberg. For the 1922/23 season Stránský and Mengelberg shared the conducting duties, but Stránský left after the one shared season. For nine years Mengelberg dominated the scene, although other conductors, among them Bruno Walter, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Igor Stravinsky, and Arturo Toscanini, led about half of each season’s concerts. During this period, the Philharmonic became one of the first American orchestras to boast an outdoor symphony series when it began playing low-priced summer concerts at Lewisohn Stadium in upper Manhattan. In 1920 the orchestra hired Henry Hadley as “associate conductor” given specific responsibility for the “Americanization” of the orchestra: each of Hadley’s concerts featured at least one work by an American-born composer.

    In 1924, the Young People’s Concerts were expanded into a substantial series of children’s concerts under the direction of American pianist-composer-conductor Ernest Schelling. This series became the prototype for concerts of its kind around the country and grew by popular demand to 15 concerts per season by the end of the decade.

    Mengelberg and Toscanini both led the Philharmonic in recording sessions for the Victor Talking Machine Company and Brunswick Records, initially in a recording studio (for the acoustically-recorded Victors, all under Mengelberg) and eventually in Carnegie Hall as electrical recording was developed. All of the early electrical recordings for Victor were made with a single microphone, usually placed near or above the conductor, a process Victor called “Orthophonic”; the Brunswick electricals used the company’s proprietary non-microphone “Light-Ray” selenium-cell system, which was much more prone to sonic distortion than Victor’s. Mengelberg’s first records for Victor were acousticals made in 1922; Toscanini’s recordings with the Philharmonic actually began with a single disc for Brunswick in 1926, recorded in a rehearsal hall at Carnegie Hall. Mengelberg’s most successful recording with the Philharmonic was a 1927 performance in Carnegie Hall of Richard Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben. Additional Toscanini recordings with the Philharmonic, all for Victor, took place on Carnegie Hall’s stage in 1929 and 1936. By the 1936 sessions Victor, now owned by RCA, began to experiment with multiple microphones to achieve more comprehensive reproductions of the orchestra.

    The year 1928 marked the New York Philharmonic’s last and most important merger: with the New York Symphony Society. The Symphony had been quite innovative in its 50 years prior to the merger. It made its first domestic tour in 1882, introduced educational concerts for young people in 1891, and gave the premieres of works such as Gershwin’s Concerto in F and Holst’s Egdon Heath. The merger of these two venerable institutions consolidated extraordinary financial and musical resources. Of the new Philharmonic Symphony Society of New York, Clarence Hungerford Mackay, chairman of the Philharmonic Society, will be chairman. President Harry H. Flagler, of the Symphony Society, will be president of the merger. At the first joint board meeting in 1928, the chairman, Clarence Mackay, expressed the opinion that “with the forces of the two Societies now united… the Philharmonic-Symphony Society could build up the greatest orchestra in this country if not in the world.”

    Of course, the merger had ramifications for the musicians of both orchestras. Winthrop Sargeant, a violinist with the Symphony Society and later a writer for The New Yorker, recalled the merger as “a sort of surgical operation in which twenty musicians were removed from the Philharmonic and their places taken by a small surviving band of twenty legionnaires from the New York Symphony”. This operation was performed by Arturo Toscanini himself. Fifty-seventh Street wallowed in panic and recrimination.” Toscanini, who had guest-conducted for several seasons, became the sole conductor and in 1930 led the group on a European tour that brought immediate international fame to the orchestra. Toscanini remained music director until the spring of 1936, then returned several times as a guest conductor until 1945.

    That same year nationwide radio broadcasts began. The orchestra was first heard on CBS directly from Carnegie Hall. To broadcast the Sunday afternoon concerts, CBS paid $15,000 for the entire season. The radio broadcasts continued without interruption for 38 years. A legend in his own time, Toscanini would prove to be a tough act to follow as the country headed into war.

    After an unsuccessful attempt to hire the German conductor, Wilhelm Furtwängler, the English conductor John Barbirolli and the Polish conductor Artur Rodziński were joint replacements for Toscanini in 1936. The following year Barbirolli was given the full conductorship, a post he held until the spring of 1941. In December, 1942, Bruno Walter was offered the music directorship, but declined, citing his age (he was 67 years old).[20] In 1943, Rodziński, who had conducted the orchestra’s centennial concert at Carnegie Hall in the preceding year, was appointed Musical Director. He had also conducted the Sunday afternoon radio broadcast when CBS listeners around the country heard the announcer break in on Arthur Rubinstein’s performance of Brahms’s Second Piano Concerto to update them about the attack on Pearl Harbor. (The initial word of the attack was forwarded by CBS News Correspondent John Charles Daly on his own show before the Philharmonic broadcast.) Soon after the United States entered World War II, Aaron Copland wrote A Lincoln Portrait for the Philharmonic at the request of conductor Andre Kostelanetz as a tribute to and expression of the “magnificent spirit of our country.”

    Artur Rodziński, Bruno Walter, and Sir Thomas Beecham made a series of recordings with the Philharmonic for Columbia Records during the 1940s. Many of the sessions were held in Liederkranz Hall, on East 58th Street in New York City, a building formerly belonging to a German cultural and musical society, and used as a recording studio by Columbia Records. Sony Records later digitally remastered the Beecham recordings for reissue on CD.

    In February, 1947, Artur Rodziński resigned; Bruno Walter was once again approached, and this time he accepted the position but only if the title was reduced to “Music Adviser”; he resigned in 1949. Leopold Stokowski and Dimitri Mitropoulos were appointed co-principal conductors in 1949, with Mitropoulos becoming Musical Director in 1951. Mitropoulos, known for championing new composers and obscure operas-in-concert, pioneered in other ways; adding live Philharmonic performances between movies at the Roxy Theatre and taking Edward R. Murrow and the See It Now television audience on a behind-the-scenes tour of the Orchestra. Mitropoulos made a series of recordings for Columbia Records, mostly in mono; near the end of his tenure, he recorded excerpts from Prokofiev’s ballet Romeo and Juliet in stereo. In 1957, Mitropoulos and Leonard Bernstein served together as Principal Conductors until, in the course of the season, Bernstein was appointed Music Director, becoming the first American-born-and-trained conductor to head the Philharmonic.

    Leonard Bernstein, who had made his historic, unrehearsed and spectacularly successful debut with the Philharmonic in 1943, was Music Director for 11 seasons, a time of significant change and growth. Two television series were initiated on CBS: the Young People’s Concerts and Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic. The former program, launched in 1958, made television history, winning every award in the field of educational television. Bernstein continued the orchestra’s recordings with Columbia Records until he retired as Music Director in 1969. Although Bernstein made a few recordings for Columbia after 1969, most of his later recordings were for Deutsche Grammophon. Sony has digitally remastered Bernstein’s numerous Columbia recordings and released them on CD as a part of its extensive Bernstein Century series. Although the Philharmonic performed primarily in Carnegie Hall until 1962, Bernstein preferred to record in the Manhattan Center. His later recordings were made in Philharmonic Hall. In 1960, the centennial of the birth of Gustav Mahler, Bernstein and the Philharmonic began a historic cycle of recordings of eight of Mahler’s nine symphonies for Columbia Records. (Symphony No. 8 was recorded by Bernstein with the London Symphony.) In 1962 Bernstein caused controversy with his comments before a performance by Glenn Gould of the First Piano Concerto of Johannes Brahms.

    Bernstein, a lifelong advocate of living composers, oversaw the beginning of the Orchestra’s largest commissioning project, resulting in the creation of 109 new works for orchestra. In September 1962, the Philharmonic commissioned Aaron Copland to write a new work, Connotations for Orchestra, for the opening concert of the new Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. The move to Philharmonic Hall in Lincoln Center brought about an expansion of concerts into the spring and summer. Among the many series that have taken place during the off-season have been the French-American and Stravinsky Festivals (1960s), Pierre Boulez’s “Rug Concerts” in the 1970s, and composer, Jacob Druckman’s Horizon’s Festivals in the 1980s.

    In 1971, Pierre Boulez became the first Frenchman to hold the post of Philharmonic Music Director. Boulez’s years with the Orchestra were notable for expanded repertoire and innovative concert approaches, such as the Prospective Encounters which explored new works along with the composer in alternative venues. During his tenure, the Philharmonic inaugurated the Live From Lincoln Center television series in 1976, and the Orchestra continues to appear on the Emmy Award-winning program to the present day. Boulez made a series of quadraphonic recordings for Columbia, including an extensive series of the orchestral music of Maurice Ravel.

    Members of the New York Philharmonic string section are heard on the 1971 John Lennon album Imagine, credited as The Flux Fiddlers.

    Zubin Mehta, then one of the youngest of a new generation of internationally known conductors, became Music Director in 1978. His tenure was the longest in Philharmonic history, lasting until 1991. Throughout his time on the podium, Mehta showed a strong commitment to contemporary music, presenting 52 works for the first time. In 1980 the Philharmonic, always known as a touring orchestra, embarked on a European tour marking the 50th anniversary of Toscanini’s trip to Europe.

    Kurt Masur, who had been conducting the Philharmonic frequently since his debut in 1981, became Music Director in 1991. Notable aspects of his tenure included a series of free Memorial Day Concerts at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and annual concert tours abroad, including the orchestra’s first trip to mainland China. He presided over the 150th Anniversary celebrations during the 1992–1993 season. His tenure concluded in 2002, and he was named Music Director Emeritus of the Philharmonic.

    In 2000, Lorin Maazel made a guest-conducting appearance with the New York Philharmonic in two weeks of subscription concerts after an absence of over twenty years, which was met with a positive reaction from the orchestra musicians. This engagement led to his appointment in January 2001 as the orchestra’s next Music Director. He assumed the post in September 2002, 60 years after making his debut with the Orchestra at the age of twelve at Lewisohn Stadium. In his first subscription week he led the world premiere of John Adams’ On the Transmigration of Souls commissioned in memory of those who died on September 11, 2001. Maazel concluded his tenure as the Philharmonic’s Music Director at the end of the 2008/09 season.

    In 2003, due to ongoing concerns with the acoustics of Avery Fisher Hall, there was a proposal to move the New York Philharmonic back to Carnegie Hall and merge the two organizations, but this proposal did not come to fruition. On May 5, 2010, the New York Philharmonic performed its 15,000th concert, a milestone unmatched by any other symphony orchestra in the world.

    On July 18, 2007, the Philharmonic named Alan Gilbert as its next music director, effective with the 2009/10 season, with an initial contract of five years. In October 2012, the orchestra extended Gilbert’s contract through the 2016/17 season. In February 2015, the orchestra announced the scheduled conclusion of Gilbert’s tenure its music director after the close of the 2016/17 season.

    In January 2016, the orchestra announced the appointment of Jaap van Zweden as its next Music Director, effective with the 2018/19 season, with an initial contract of five years. van Zweden is scheduled to serve as Music Director Designate for the 2017/18 season.

    The current president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the orchestra is Deborah Borda. Borda had previously held the same posts, as well as the post of managing director, with the orchestra.
    (So, Wikipedia)

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:32 AM on September 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , , Pledge Music,   

    From Pledge Music: John Zorn – ‘The Book Beri’ah'” 

    From Pledge Music

    05 September, 2018

    The Book Beri’ah, Hot Takes by Andy Hollander

    John Zorn -Scott Irvine-Courtesy of the artist

    The release of The Book Beri’ah is exciting for fans of John Zorn’s Masada series, with 92 new compositions. An amalgam of various elements ranging from klezmer to free jazz, I’ve always found Masada’s music difficult to describe except to say that you know it when you hear it. A common theme in Masada is a sense of urgency and intent; even when there is exploratory improvisation, it feels like it’s purposeful and driven. Getting an entire box set of Masada released all at once has been sensory overload for me in the best way possible. Below are my takes from my first listen through the Book Beri’ah.

    • by Andy Hollander

    Book Beri’ah 1 – Keter – Sofia Rei & JC Maillard

    I can see why Zorn chose this to start Book 3; for Masada it’s a somewhat unique group- vocals and something that sounds like an acoustic guitar called a “bass saz”. Some very Middle Eastern feels throughout, and Sofia Rei’s voice is perfect. I’m curious what the lyrics mean (I think she’s singing in French) and if Zorn wrote the lyrics, and if so if he had her voice in mind. Hearing only one instrument play Masada evokes memories of albums like Masada Guitars, and even Masada String Trio. Great album, will not scare the elderly.

    Book Beri’ah 2 – Chokhma – Cleric

    This album will scare the elderly. And most people. It is simultaneously beautiful and terrifying. You know when real metal fans laugh at people who are into a band like Motley Crue or Metallica and say that’s not really metal? I think they’d listen to this and say that it’s legit metal. Some incredibly aggressive vocals, and in between the vocals is incredibly technical and great playing. This band has Matt Hollenberg on guitar, who I’ve seen shred Bagatelles and other Masada songs before. The keys and vocals are Nick Shellenberger. Interesting to me that the first two albums in Book 3 have vocals, which is unique in the Masada catalog.

    Book Beri’ah 3 – Binah – Spike Orchestra

    BEAUTIFUL. An orchestra that has 11 horns, guitar, keys, accordion (which adds this kind of French bistro feel), double bass, and drums/percussion. There is a lot going on here- a lot of layers to music that on its surface is already complex. There are other big bands in this Masada set (e.g. Zion80, Secret Chiefs 3), but this really feels like orchestral, swinging big band Masada, with a dose of klezmer every now and then. The track Kalim (which was released ahead of the album) is a pretty perfect embodiment of Masada.

    2

    Book Beri’ah 4 – Chesed – Julian Lage & Gyan Riley

    These are two of the greatest (and without hyperbole, may be THE greatest) guitarists out there and they compliment each other perfectly. This album is just the two of them, each on acoustic guitar. They have this ability to be playing two completely different things at the same time that find ways to sync up. I guess that’s common in Masada music (especially with original compositions featuring Zorn on sax and Dave Douglas on trumpet), but without other instruments it’s easy to tune into what each of them are doing individually as well as together. The music is light, but it’s also relentless in that it’s always moving. It’s heavily composed- it’s not like they take crazy solos here and go off. I think that’s what makes this one so great.

    Book Beri’ah 5 – Gevurah – Abraxas

    With this album we finally get to the first of four albums in the Book Beri’ah that has Shanir Ezra Blumenkranz on it; on this album he plays gimbri, bass, and percussion. This was one of the albums in the set that I was most looking forward to after catching Abraxas a couple of times at The Stone and the Village Vanguard in NYC. Abraxas is guitar heavy and in your face; Shanir on gimbri/bass and Kenny Grohowski on drums create this pulsating rhythm that Eyal Maoz and Aram Bajakian just slaughter with their guitars. Lots of overdrive and distortion here; this group is “jamming” friendly IMO- the guitar playing can rage and get out there. That being said, it never loses the Masada focus- the composition is what drives everything. What really makes this group unique is Shanir- the gimbri (which looks like someone made a three-string bass out of a bathmat) keeps coming at you, and in a few instances is what starts off a track, almost challenging the other players to find their space.

    Book Beri’ah 6 – Tiferet – Klezmersons

    The overdrive and urgency of Abraxas is somewhat gone here, swapped out for a large Klezmer band with (from what I can gather) South American / Mexican influences. One of the things that makes this box set great is the variedness of the artists, and no album has that more than this one. The composition was there, but felt more in the background than the other albums so far. There is big sound coming from a plethora of instruments, and in some ways may be the most “upbeat” of the Book Beri’ah so far.

    3

    Book Beri’ah 7 – Netzach – Gnostic Trio

    The Gnostic Trio album at points is deceptively mellow and it’s glorious. Bill Frisell on guitar, Kenny Wolleson on vibes, and Carol Emanuel on harp create some of the airiest music that I’ve heard. Kind of like a Dreamers “light” lineup, this album creates some space for your mind to relax with ease. Frisell is utilizing all his toys here to create a spacey feel. All three of them take lead; sometimes one at a time and sometimes simultaneously. If John Zorn opened a spa, this album would be playing while you’re receiving treatment. There is one track (Re’cha- track 6) that has Frisell turning on the effects to produce some crunch in his tone, but other than that everything is light and blissful. The Masada composition style really comes through. In fact, it’s almost all composed- very little (if any) solos here. Great album.

    Book Beri’ah 8 – Hod – Zion80

    In my opinion, this is the most accessible album in the Book Beri’ah for people who may not know Masada. Zion80’s album is like if a band such as Galactic or maybe Lettuce was asked to do a Masada album. Led by Jon Madof on guitar, this is a big band. Four piece horn section, two guitars, percussion, drums, bass (Shanir!), and keys (Brian Marsella!); this band is making big sound. At times incredibly funky, and always groove focused, this may be one of the more danceable Masada albums that I’m aware of. The Masada composition is mostly represented through the horns, but in contrast to some of the other albums where a lot of things may be happening at the same time, this album has a coalition to the theme that punches through. It also has the distinction of being the only album in the Book Beri’ah that has John Zorn playing on it; he appears on track 5 (Tahor) and his spot has become one of my favorite moments on this set. When Zorn is playing, you know it- that frenzied Masada pace that I mentioned before was created by him. What’s great is that Zion80 continues to be Zion80 while Zorn is being Zorn, and it works great. Every now and then I know Zion80 plays together in the city; I hope they can get in front of a crowd in a space with a big open floor.

    Book Beri’ah 9 – Yesod – Banquet of the Spirits

    We continue with more Brian Marsella and Shanir Blumenkranz for Cyro Batista’s Banquet of the Spirits (with Tim Keiper on drums). My “gripe” with this album is that you can’t see Cyro. This past April at the Book Beri’ah show on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, Cyro was a sight to behold. I’ve seen him in many groups doing his thing, but this was something else for me- he had his whole arsenal of sound producing devices into a 45 minute set. Equally enthralling was Brian Marsella on the other end of the stage, attacking the baby grand at a fever pace; the piano is pretty much the only “lead” instrument here. So despite not being able to see it when I listen to the album, I can imagine it- especially Cyro waving some tube over his head to create a wah sound that joins the rhythm. This is a great piano led album, and some of the later tracks have some real intense moments. Some of my favorite Masada moments are when the music has built to high levels of intensity that you get trapped in, and then abruptly stops…. like you’re Wile E. Coyote running off a cliff and you won’t fall until you realize there’s no ground underneath you. This album gets there- the track Dim Yoni in particular comes to mind. Shanir also gets some time on the double bass that is well worth your attention.

    4

    Book Beri’ah 10 – Malkhut – Secret Chiefs 3

    This album has everything. The first couple of tracks sound like they could be scoring an art house horror film. And then elements of Mahavishnu Orchestra creep in, with a heavy synth presence. At times it’s very prog rock. I don’t know if a more insane drums/percussion duo of Kenny Grohowski and Ches Smith exists- having one of them in a band is an embarrassment of riches; both is an attack on your senses. The other instruments are two guitars, violin (Eyvind Kang!), keys, and the least busy bassist in Masada-land, Shanir Blumenkranz. In some ways, this is like if Electric Masada had different instrumentation and tones. It’s a varied band of musicians, and before you can get too used to one thing you get hit in the face with something else. It’s almost made for people with ADD, as it’s rare one instrument or phrase gets more than 16 consecutive bars. The level of detail in this music is amazing.

    Book Beri’ah 11 – Da’at – Craig Taborn and Vadim Neselovskyi

    Technically a bonus disc, the final part of the third book of Masada are compositions that appear on the Sofia Rei & J.C. Maillard album (with the exception of one that’s on the Lage/Riley album). The first nine tracks are solo piano. either Craig Taborn or Vadim Neslovskyi playing the composition. This is as stripped down as you’re going to get- this is Masada classical piano. Not much to say beyond that…. it’s great, and deserves a listen, but I’m curious about the context of this one. Was it supposed to be the album that became Sofia Rei’s album, or was this just a good recording that Zorn decided to include as a bonus? After track nine there are a few jazzier tracks where there are bass and drums. At least online the personnel for these tracks are unlisted, so I’m guessing that it might be Vadim Neseloyvskyi with Dan Loomis and Ronen Itzik (this trio played during Masada week at the Vanguard last November). It’s interesting to hear the same tracks as classical piano and then in a piano jazz setting- one piece of music with countless ways to represent it.

    5

    Like the sound of The Book Beri’ah? Get your box set HERE

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:43 AM on September 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , Joe Hisaishi,   

    From Cantaloupe via Joe Hisaishi: “Dream Casts” 

    Cantaloupe Music is the recording arm of Bang On a Can, the original New Music DIY organization.


    From From Cantaloupe

    via

    1
    Joe Hisaishi(Photo courtesy of Studio Ghibli)

    Joe Hisaishi

    2
    3

    4

    5
    6
    Program

    David Lang:Increase

    David Lang:New piece for cello, vocal and chamber ensemble (Japanese premiere)

    Philip Glass/Recomposed by Joe Hisasishi:Two Pages

    Joe Hisaishi:New piece for chamber orchestra (World premiere)

    NEW YORK
    2018.11.11 (sun) Carnegie Hall – Judy and Arthur Zankel Hall
    Starting time and ticket information will be announced soon.

    TOKYO
    2018.11.21(wed)/11.22(thu)Yomiuri otemachi hall
    eplus lawson ticket

    2nd Young Composer’s Competition

    which produced by Joe Hisaishi
    is now recruiting the new original composition from
    young composers.
    A Selected piece would be performed by leading
    musicians in the concert as a world premiere.

    Click Here For More Info

    Joe Hisaishi

    Composer, Conductor, Pianist, Producer
    Joe Hisaishi was born in Nagano, Japan in 1950. He started to show his interest in minimal music when he was a student at Kunitachi College of Music, and started his career as a modern music composer. Presentation of “MKWAJU” in 1981 and the release of his first album “Information”(1982) was the kickoff of his career as a solo artist. Since his debut, he has released nearly 40 solo albums, including “Minima_Rhythm”series(2009/2015/2017), “Melodyphony”(2010) and “The End of the World”(2016). Starting with “Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind” (1984), Hisaishi has produced music for 10 Hayao Miyazaki films, including “My Neighbor Totoro”(1988) and “The Wind Rises”(2013). He also composed the music for “HANA-BI”(1998) directed by Takeshi Kitano, “Departures”(2008) directed by Yojiro Takita, “Villain”(2010) directed by Sang-il Lee, “The Tale of Princess Kaguya”(2013) directed by Isao Takahata, “The Little House”(2014) and “What a Wonderful Family!”series(2016/2017/2018) directed by Yoji Yamada. He has collaborated on the music production of nearly 80 films at home and abroad. His works have won many awards including several Outstanding Achievement in Music prizes of Japan Academy Film Prize, “Spirited Away” (won the Outstanding Music in an Animated Feature Production at the 30th Annie Awards), Korean film “Welcome to Dongmakgol” (won the Best Original Film Music Award of the 4th Korean Film Award) and Chinese film “The Postmodern Life of My Aunt” (won the Best Original Film Score of the 27th Hong Kong Film Award). In 2001, he made his debut as a film director with “Quartet”, taking charge of the theme music and co-writing the script. The film was officially invited for the World Competition section of the Montreal World Film Festival. Hisaishi also is well-reputed as a skilled performer, ranging from piano soloist to orchestra conductor. In July 2004, he assumed a post of first music director of New Japan Philharmonic “World Dream Orchestra (W.D.O.)”, newly formed orchestra project by New Japan Philharmonic. In 2014, he has been working as a producer and conductor, and holding contemporary music concerts called “JOE HISAISHI presents MUSIC FUTURE”, which concert series earned him enormous popularity and records as a live album. In recently years, he works as a classical music conductor and also composed new works in a contemporary music style including “Contrabass Concerto”(2015), “TRI-AD for Large Orchestra”(2016), “The East Land Symphony”(2016) and “Asian Symphony”(2017). Hisaishi serves as an Invited Professor at Kunitachi College of Music. In 2009, he received the Medal of Honor with Purple Ribbon by the government of Japan. His unique inputs to the concerts as a contemporary musical composer is highly appreciated and his continuous enthusiasm for musical activities that go beyond ordinary creative work is anticipated worldwide.

    David Lang, © Peter Serling

    David Lang
    David Lang is one of the most highly esteemed and performed American composers writing today. His works have been performed around the world in most of the great concert halls. Lang’s simple song #3, written as part of his score for Paolo Sorrentino’s acclaimed film Youth, received many honors in 2016, including Academy Award, Golden Globe, and Critics Choice nominations, among others. Lang’s the little match girl passion won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Music. Commissioned by Carnegie Hall and based on a fable by Hans Christian Andersen and Lang’s own rewriting of the libretto to Bach’s St. Matthew Passion, the recording of the piece was awarded a 2010 Grammy Award for Best Small Ensemble Performance. Lang has also been the recipient of the Rome Prize, Le Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, and Musical America’s 2013 Composer of the Year. Lang’s tenure as Carnegie Hall’s 2013–2014 Richard and Barbara Debs Composer’s Chair saw his critically acclaimed festival collected stories showcase different modes of storytelling in music. Recent premieres include his opera the loser, which opened the 2016 Next Wave Festival at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and for which Lang served as composer, librettist and stage director, the public domain for 1000 singers at Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival, his chamber opera anatomy theater at Los Angeles Opera and at the Prototype Festival in New York, and the concerto man made for the ensemble Sō Percussion and a consortium of orchestras, including the BBC Symphony and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. In addition to his work as a composer, Lang is Artist in Residence at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, and is a Professor of Composition at the Yale School of Music. Lang is co-founder and co-artistic director of New York’s legendary music collective Bang on a Can. His music is published by Red Poppy Music (ASCAP) and is distributed worldwide by G. Schirmer, Inc.

    Official Site https://davidlangmusic.com/

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:18 PM on August 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Avant-garde, , , , The Robert and Carol Morris Center for 21st Century Music   

    From Ensemble Signal: “Our 2018-2019 season is announced!” 

    From Ensemble Signal

    Signal is thrilled to announce our participation in many events in Buffalo this season. First up in October is an Oliver Knussen memorial concert including work by Knussen, Carter and Takemitsu. In May, a collaboration with Irvine Arditti on music of David Felder. Then, it’s June in Buffalo where we’re so excited to be playing music by Anna Clyne and working with her!

    3
    Our 2018-2019 season is announced!

    Ensemble Signal by by Ken Yatarola

    The Robert and Carol Morris Center for 21st Century Music

    Ensemble Signal, described by the New York Times as “one of the most vital groups of its kind,” is a NY-based ensemble dedicated to offering the broadest possible audience access to a diverse range of contemporary works through performance, commissioning, recording, and education. Since its debut in 2008, the Ensemble has performed over 150 concerts, has given the NY, world, or US premieres of over 20 works, and co-produced nine recordings.

    Signal was founded by Co-Artistic/Executive Director Lauren Radnofsky and Co-Artistic Director/Conductor Brad Lubman. Called a “new music dream team” (TimeOutNY), Signal regularly performs with Lubman and features a supergroup of independent artists from the modern music scene. Lubman, one of the foremost conductors of modern music and a leading figure in the field for over two decades, is a frequent guest with the world’s most distinguished orchestras and new music ensembles.

    Signal’s passion for the diverse range of music being written today is a driving force behind their projects. The Ensemble’s repertoire ranges from minimalism or pop-influenced to the iconoclastic European avant-garde. Signal’s projects are carefully conceived through close collaboration with cooperating presenting organizations, composers, and artists. Signal is flexible in size and instrumentation – everything from solo to large ensemble and opera, including film or multimedia, in any possible combination – enabling it to meet the ever-changing demands on the 21st century performing ensemble.

    The Ensemble is a frequent guest of the finest concert halls and international festivals including Lincoln Center Festival, the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Series at Walt Disney Concert Hall, BIG EARS Festival, Carnegie Hall’s Zankel Hall, Lincoln Center American Songbook, Cal Performances, Tanglewood Music Festival of Contemporary Music, Ojai Music Festival, the Guggenheim Museum (NY), the Wordless Music Series, and the Bang on a Can Marathon. They regularly work directly with nearly all the composers they perform in order to offer the most authentic interpretations, a list that includes Steve Reich, Helmut Lachenmann, Michael Gordon, David Lang, Julia Wolfe, and Hans Abrahamsen.

    Upcoming premieres include a new work by Steve Reich entitled Runner, for 19 musicians, which Signal premieres in the US beginning in 2017 at venues including Cal Performances, Washington Performing Arts and Carnegie Hall. Signal’s recording of Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians was released in May 2015 on harmonia mundi and received a Diapason d’or and appeared on the Billboard Classical Crossover Charts. Additional recordings include a CD & DVD of music by Lachenmann, with the composer as soloist in …Zwei Gefühle… (Mode) and Steve Reich’s Double Sextet & Radio Rewrite (harmonia mundi). Signal’s educational activities include community outreach programs in diverse settings as well as workshops with the next generation of composers and performers at institutions including the Eastman School of Music, and the June in Buffalo Festival at the University at Buffalo’s Center for 21st Century Music where they are a visiting resident ensemble.


    Lauren RadnofskyCo-Artistic/Executive Director
    Brad LubmanCo-Artistic Director/Music Director
    Tiffany ValvoArtistic Administrator and Operations
    Brett CopelandIntern
    ViolinLauren CauleyOlivia De PratoWill KnuthYuki Numata ResnickCourtney OrlandoChris OttoAri Streisfeld
    ViolaCaleb BurhansIsabel HagenVictor LowrieJohn Pickford Richards
    CelloKevin McFarlandLauren RadnofskyMariel Roberts
    Bass
Greg Chudzik
    FluteKelli KathmanJessica Schmitz
    OboeJacqueline LeclairChrista Robinson
    ClarinetAdrián SandíKen Thomson
    BassoonBrad Balliett
    TrumpetMike Gurfield
    TromboneSteven Parker
    Piano/KeyboardDavid FriendOliver HagenLisa MooreNing Yu
    PercussionMatt EvansAmy GarapicCarson MoodyDoug PerkinsBill Solomon
    Cimbalom/PercussionNick Tolle
    HarpNuiko Wadden
    Sound DirectorPaul Coleman
    Board of Directors
    Kristian BezuidenhoutPresident
    John McDonaldSecretary

    Barbara RadnofskyTreasurer
    Lena Saltos

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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