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  • richardmitnick 3:20 PM on November 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Avant-garde, , , , L.A. Philharmonic, , No classical institution in the world rivals the L.A. Phil in breadth of vision   

    From The Rest is Noise: “The Radical Splendor of the L.A. Phil” 

    From The Rest is Noise

    Alex Ross, by E.H Jan 17th 2013

    November 26, 2018 Issue

    1
    Susanna Mälkki, the principal guest conductor, plays a formidable role. Illustration by Mikkel Sommer

    Season of the Century” is the slogan that the Los Angeles Philharmonic is using to tout its centennial season. The phrase is emblazoned on a sign outside Disney Hall and on street banners across the city. The double meaning is apparent: not only is this season intended to celebrate the orchestra’s past hundred years; it aims to make history itself. Ordinarily, such marketing effusions don’t withstand scrutiny, but the L.A. Phil’s 2018-19 season invites superlatives. The ensemble has commissioned pieces from more than fifty composers, ranging from such venerable figures as Philip Glass and Steve Reich to young radicals on the fringes. It is launching a slew of theatrical events and collaborations with pop and jazz artists. It is honoring African-American traditions and exploring the experimental legacy of the Fluxus movement. Gustavo Dudamel, the orchestra’s music director, is leading new works by John Adams and Thomas Adès. Esa-Pekka Salonen, the orchestra’s previous director, is presenting a nine-day Stravinsky festival. Meredith Monk’s opera “ATLAS,” from 1991, will receive a long-awaited revival. And so on. No classical institution in the world rivals the L.A. Phil in breadth of vision.

    Conductor Gustavo Dudamel (Los Angeles Times)

    Esa-Pekka Salonen MulPix.com

    Two months in, the centennial program has already brought three fairly staggering events, any one of which would have counted as the highlight of an ordinary season. First was the première of Andrew Norman’s “Sustain,” a forty-minute, single-movement piece that may become a modern American classic. Dudamel introduced it on a program that included Beethoven’s Triple Concerto and Salonen’s “LA Variations.” In an inversion of the usual orchestral priorities, the Norman came last, and elicited the most excitement. In Los Angeles, decades of promotion of living composers have eroded the skepticism that so often greets new music.

    Norman, who is thirty-nine and lives in L.A., made his name as a composer of kinetic, frenetic music that mirrors the distracted habits of the digital age. The outer movements of “Play,” a three-part symphonic work that Dudamel conducted at the Phil in 2016, evoke the ricocheting, try-and-try-again tempo of video games. Having mined that vein enough, Norman slows things down in “Sustain.” The opening pages of the score consist largely of gorgeous smears of string sound, hypnotically gliding from one instrument to the next. These ethereal atmospheres turn hazy and rough, then give way to intertwining vines of melody in the winds. Rapid-fire patterns course through the orchestra, first chattering and then hammering. That energy subsides into near-silence, with strings producing whispers of tone rather than clear pitches. The sequence undergoes a series of repetitions, with deviations, disruptions, and accelerations. The final iteration ends in glorious chaos: the conductor cedes control, the players fall into an ad-libitum frenzy, and percussionists scrape slabs of plywood. The score is punctuated by a kind of signal: two pianos, tuned a quarter tone apart, arpeggiating upward into silence. With that gesture, the piece also ends.

    Norman has always been a deft orchestrator, but in “Sustain” he reveals himself as a magician of the art. He has spent enough time in Disney Hall that he understands its secret resonances: I was often unsure whether I was hearing tones or overtones, pitches or their ghosts. Even the heaviest textures have an immaterial glow—a counterpart to Frank Gehry’s whorling architecture, which Norman has studied closely. Above all, the composer succeeds in maintaining tension and cohesion across a huge span—“one long unbroken musical thought,” as he writes in his notes. It is thrilling to see a composer tackling a big canvas with such confidence and skill. It is no less thrilling to see a composer being given the opportunity to do so. The orchestra performed expertly and fervently under Dudamel’s direction.

    When I returned two weeks later, the L.A. Phil was playing Prokofiev’s ballet “Romeo and Juliet,” again with Dudamel on the podium. His full-throttle, rhythmically vital interpretation would have been enough to hold the attention, but Benjamin Millepied was on hand to choreograph select scenes, working with performers from the L.A. Dance Project. When a large orchestra occupies Disney’s stage, there is little room for dancers. So Millepied had the idea of sending them into spaces elsewhere in the Gehry complex and following them with a video camera. Images were streamed on a screen in the auditorium. Romeo killed Tybalt in the orchestra’s administrative offices, next to a filing cabinet. The Balcony Scene took place in Disney’s outdoor garden. The crypt scenes were set in an industrial-looking room below the stage. Millepied, holding the camera, was effectively dancing with his performers, weaving around them or running after them.

    The choreographer made a point of casting the lead roles in unconventional fashion. Each night, a different pair performed: first, an interracial straight couple; then two women; and, finally, two men. I saw the last duo, Aaron Carr and Mario Gonzalez. The dance scenes were not only dazzling to the eyes but also wrenchingly expressive: balletic moves alternated with naturalistic gestures of ardor or sorrow. As Prokofiev’s love music was reaching its peak, Carr and Gonzalez lay side by side in the garden, looking up into orchid and coral trees. I found myself wishing that more of the score had been choreographed—Millepied will eventually make a full-length film in this style—but the impact was all the greater for being interspersed with purely orchestral surges of passion and lament.

    Come early November, the L.A. Phil was dividing its attention between two radically different presentations: a staging of portions of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest,” with Sibelius’s incidental music as accompaniment; and John Cage’s “Europeras 1 and 2,” a chance-controlled collage of familiar operatic arias and orchestral parts. The instigator of the latter was Yuval Sharon, the L.A.-based director and the founder of the indie opera company the Industry, which, three years ago, presented the opera “Hopscotch” in locations across the city. The venue for “Europeras,” a co-production of the Industry and the L.A. Phil, was a spacious soundstage at Sony Studios. Sharon and his collaborators repurposed old film props—hand-painted backdrops, B-movie costumes, and the like—to create visual counterpoints to Cage’s operatic kaleidoscope. Thus we saw an Asiatic warrior singing “Non più andrai,” from “The Marriage of Figaro”; an astronaut in a hospital bed belting Wagner’s Song to the Evening Star; and a chef, on skis, essaying “Now the Great Bear and Pleiades,” from “Peter Grimes.”

    The orchestra, meanwhile, tootled unrelated instrumental parts; lighting changed at random; and the backdrops, going up and down on squeaky pulleys, added inapt settings. An excellent cast of singers performed heroically under taxing conditions. Babatunde Akinboboye, for example, gave a secure rendition of the Toreador’s Song while dressed as an infomercial host demonstrating hair-care products. A spirit of joyous absurdity reigned, yet the show had a poignant undertow. Attempting to sing one’s song above the din is a general condition these days.

    Sibelius wrote music for “The Tempest” in the mid-nineteen-twenties, toward the end of his mysteriously abbreviated composing career. The L.A. Phil, under the baton of Susanna Mälkki, its principal guest conductor, gave a brilliant account of the score, but the staging failed to do justice to Sibelius’s mercurially shifting moods, which range from kitschy sweetness to explosions of dissonance. The director was Barry Edelstein, who brought with him actors from the Old Globe theatre in San Diego, and their overmiked voices dominated the sound picture, pushing the orchestra and assisting vocal forces into the background. Still, the production unfolded with the smoothness of a long-running show—this in a week when the orchestra was mounting an equally complex spectacle across town.

    The L.A. Phil’s offbeat ventures are well and good, you sometimes hear people in the classical world mutter, but how’s its Beethoven? Isn’t the programming better than the playing? That put-down is unconvincing: an organization that can bring “Sustain” into the world is more valuable than one that executes yet another hyper-polished Beethoven Seventh. Still, the L.A. Phil has sometimes come up short in mainstream repertory, lagging behind the Cleveland Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, or the best European groups.

    A raft of new players have added depth to the ensemble. Ramón Ortega, who started as principal oboe this season, has a characterful, pungent timbre and arresting phrasing. His Old World style complements the purer, silkier styles of the clarinettist Boris Allakhverdyan and the flutist Denis Bouriakov, both of them recent additions to the ranks. In the brass, Andrew Bain, the principal horn, and Thomas Hooten, the principal trumpet, have solidified a section that was erratic a decade ago. In the strings, Dudamel has pressed for a fuller, richer sound.

    Before “The Tempest,” Mälkki led a virtuosic, vibrant performance of Mahler’s Fifth Symphony. She is best known for her advocacy of new music—she conducted Kaija Saariaho’s “L’Amour de Loin” at the Met in 2016—but she has quietly emerged as a formidable interpreter of the Romantic and early-modern repertory. Last season at the L.A. Phil, she made Strauss’s “Alpine Symphony” sound like a towering masterpiece, which it is not. Her Mahler felt less like a moment-to-moment drama than like a vast landscape undergoing spectacular geological upheavals. The L.A. players’ immersion in new music, far from hindering their work in standard repertory, surely helped them to deliver a fresh account of a familiar score; before intermission, they had given the première of Reich’s Music for Ensemble and Orchestra, a vista of shimmering desert stillness. If the orchestra has a future, it is here.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century is a voyage into the labyrinth of modern music, which remains an obscure world for most people. While paintings of Picasso and Jackson Pollock sell for a hundred million dollars or more, and lines from T. S. Eliot are quoted on the yearbook pages of alienated teenagers across the land, twentieth-century classical music still sends ripples of unease through audiences. At the same time, its influence can be felt everywhere. Atonal chords crop up in jazz. Avant-garde sounds populate the soundtracks of Hollywood thrillers. Minimalism has had a huge effect on rock, pop, and dance music from the Velvet Underground onward.

    The Rest Is Noise shows why twentieth-century composers felt compelled to create a famously bewildering variety of sounds, from the purest beauty to the purest noise. It tells of a remarkable array of maverick personalities who resisted the cult of the classical past, struggled against the indifference of a wide public, and defied the will of dictators. Whether they have charmed audiences with sweet sounds or battered them with dissonance, composers have always been exuberantly of the present, defying the stereotype of classical music as a dying art. The narrative goes from Vienna before the First World War to Paris in the twenties, from Hitler’s Germany and Stalin’s Russia to downtown New York in the sixties and seventies. We follow the rise of mass culture and mass politics, of dramatic new technologies, of hot and cold wars, of experiments, revolutions, riots, and friendships forged and broken. The end result is not so much a history of twentieth-century music as a history of the twentieth century through its music.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:01 PM on October 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, Bun Ching Lam // Tana Quartet, , Darius Jones, Elliott Sharp, , , , Roulette in November   

    From Roulette: “NOVEMBER AT ROULETTE” 

    Roulette Intermedium

    From Roulette

    1
    Elliott Sharp: IrRational Music
    Thursday • November 1
    Tickets: $18 online / $25 door

    Seminal composer and multi-instrumentalist Elliott Sharp returns to Roulette to mark two important forthcoming releases: IrRational Music, Sharp’s memoir and rumination on thought, music, and art published by Terra Nova Books with Found Sound Nation, and the release of his latest album Dispersion, a collaboration with the VENI ACADEMY on Mode Records.

    Tickets

    ___________________________________________________

    2
    Darius Jones:
    For The People
    Monday • November 5
    Tickets: $18 presale / $25 door

    ___________________________________________________

    ICE-International Contemporary music Ensemble – Photograph,SquareMoose New York

    International Contemporary Ensemble:
    100 for 100 Musical Decades of Freedom
    Sunday • November 11
    Tickets: $18 presale / $25 door

    ___________________________________________________
    3
    Interpretations: Bun Ching Lam // Tana Quartet
    Wednesday • November 16
    Tickets: $20

    ___________________________________________________

    More at the full article

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Mission

    Roulette’s mission is to support artists creating new and adventurous art in all disciplines by providing them with a venue and resources to realize their creative visions and to build an audience interested in the evolution of experimental art.

    History

    Roulette Intermedium was founded in 1978 at the height of the Downtown Experimental Arts revolution by three young composers: trombonist/composer Jim Staley, composer/producer David Weinstein, and Intermedia artist Dan Senn. The informal concerts they presented in a small loft space in TriBeCa in Manhattan soon attracted an audience and critical attention. The first donation – an unsolicited and unexpected check for $1,000 – arrived in the mail from the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, suggested by noted composer, John Cage. By the mid-1980s, Roulette had emerged as “a landmark for New York’s downtown new music composers.”

    Over the next three decades, Roulette attracted a steadily growing audience and worldwide reputation as a center for musical innovation. Seminal pioneering figures who have presented their work at Roulette, oftentimes early in their careers, include Maryanne Amacher, Robert Ashley, Anthony Braxton, Simone Forti, Bill Frisell, Philip Glass, Yusef Lateef, Christian Marclay, Meredith Monk, Ikue Mori, Pauline Oliveros, Zeena Parkins, Arthur Russell, Kaija Saariaho, Wadada Leo Smith, Henry Threadgill, and John Zorn. Roulette continues to make a mark as a venue where scores of promising avant-garde artists make their first professional statements. Representatives of the latest generation of composing artists who have recently developed and presented works at Roulette include Aaron Burnette, Maria Chavez, Phyllis Chen, Jennifer Choi, Mario Diaz de Leon, Mary Halvorson, Darius Jones, Mary Kouyoumdjian, Alfredo Marin, Tristan Perich, Matana Roberts, Tyshawn Sorey, Ben Stapp, C. Spencer Yeh and many more.

    As audiences grew and rents in lower Manhattan began to rise, the staff and Board members began the search for a larger, more flexible and affordable home. On September 15th, 2011, Roulette opened a new chapter in its history when it moved into the 1928 Memorial Hall in the Downtown Brooklyn Cultural District. The new 400-seat theater allows us to expand our presentations along with our services to artists and our community; each season, we now present more than 100 music, dance, and intermedia performances. Our annual attendance now tops 60,000.

    In recent years, Roulette has effected a major transition, expanding programs, audiences and community, but it is still an artist-driven space, valued for its payment of professional guaranteed fees, its insistence on the best presentation conditions, and the provision of other critical artists’ services. Our GENERATE Program, supported for more than 30 years by the Jerome Foundation and other private and public support, awards emerging and established composers commissions and/or monetary stipends along with extensive rehearsal time in Roulette’s theater, access to audio and lighting equipment and technical staff to help them with their experiments, and full production support for performances of the work created during the residency.

    Our programming has expanded globally through Roulette’s online and television broadcast programs where audiences all over the world can explore the treasures of our archives. Roulette TV features senior figures of the avant-garde movement and their young successors.

    Roulette is one of the few surviving organizations to maintain its identity as an Artists’ Space and its commitment to bring the experimental performing arts to a wider public; its history of performances (preserved in an archive that contains nearly 3,000 hours of recordings and videos), leaves a detailed and distinguished record of almost four decades of artistic development, experimentation, and achievement.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:07 PM on October 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , Music written by Tower and friends Jennifer Higdon Tania León and Julia Wolfe, ,   

    From National Sawdust: “Chris Grymes presents: Joan Tower and Friends” 

    From National Sawdust

    National Sawdust

    Featuring works by Jennifer Higdon, Tania León, Julia Wolfe, and Joan Tower
    Sunday 11 November 3pm doors • 4pm show

    Joan Tower by Keith Powers

    In the tradition of Philip Glass @80 and John Corigliano @80 concerts, National Sawdust will celebrate Joan Tower in honor of her 80th Birthday. “One of the most successful women composers of all time” (The New Yorker) and one of the most important American composers alive today, Joan Tower has made lasting contributions to musical life for the past half century. With her iconic Silver Ladders, she was the first woman to win the prestigious Grawemeyer Award, and the recording of her Made In America won three different Grammy awards. In honor of her 80th birthday, National Sawdust is hosting an exclusive celebration, featuring an afternoon of music curated by Tower herself and featuring music written by Tower and friends Jennifer Higdon, Tania León, and Julia Wolfe.

    Program:
    Joan Tower – Wild Summer for string quartet (The Jasper Quartet)
    Jennifer Higdon – Piano Trio (The Lysander Trio)
    Tania Leon – Ethos for piano quintet (The Cassatt Quartet with Ursula Oppens, piano)
    Julia Wolfe – Cha for saxophone quartet (PRISM quartet)

    Performers:
    PRISM Quartet
    Jasper Quartet
    Lysander Trio
    Cassatt Quartet
    Ursula Oppens, piano

    For tickets please visit the full article as there is no tickets link.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    National Sawdust is an unparalleled, artist-led, nonprofit venue, is a place for exploration and discovery. A place where emerging and established artists can share their music with serious music fans and casual listeners alike.

    In a city teeming with venues, National Sawdust is a singular space founded with an expansive vision: to provide composers and musicians across genres a home in which they can flourish, a setting where they are given unprecedented support and critical resources essential to create, and then share, their work.

    As a composer, I believe the role of an artist in the 21st century should be that of creator, educator, activist, and entrepreneur. I believe that 21st-century composers/artists need to be thinking about what impact they can have on their existing community, both locally and globally. At NS we believe in remaining flexible and true to the needs of artists. Our core mission is centered on the support of emerging artists, and on commissioning and supporting the seeds of ideas. Each year, we explore one large theme and construct programming and questions around that theme. This year, that theme is Origins. With this season, we are channeling the National Sawdust mission—empowering high-level artistry, regardless of training, genre, or fame—through multicultural artists who tell their stories through their music. Ultimately, Origins is a radical sharing of culture. We hope this cultural storytelling of the highest caliber will help bring our divided country closer together.

    We also believe the future of new art lives in education. To us, education is about giving young people and community members opportunities and tools to explore their potential for artistic and creative expression. But it is also about ensuring that artists themselves never stop learning – about their craft, about the work of their peers, about the business of the arts, about their own capacities to be educators and advocates. NS facilitates this kind of learning by bringing together artists from around the world in exciting composition- based projects, teaching opportunities, cultural exchanges, and hands-on management experience. Through this cultural synthesis artists leave lasting impressions on one another, become more versatile and resilient professionals, and create works that reflect a plural understanding of American society.

    –Paola Prestini, co-founder & Artist Director

    Space waiting

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:32 PM on October 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Avant-garde, , ,   

    From International Contemporary Ensemble: “The Stars at Night are Big and Bright…” Events 


    From International Contemporary Ensemble

    1
    Submit to ICEcommons

    Write music? Looking to program some freshly inked work? Check out ICEcommons, our open-source platform for collecting the works of today. It’s free, and you’ll be enriching the new-music community by adding to the ICEcommons database. Newly uploaded and previously submitted works will also be considered for our upcoming OpenICE show on December 2 at Constellation in Chicago, curated by Katinka Kleijn, Zach Good, and Ben Roidl-Ward. Upload your scores here!

    2

    The Fourth Biennial Rubin Institute for Music Criticism

    Friday, October 26, 2018, 8:00 PM
    Caroline H. Hume Concert Hall
    San Francisco Conservatory
    50 Oak Street
    San Francisco, CA 94012
    Free Ticket with Reservation

    Situated within the artistic and intellectual vibrancy of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, the Stephen and Cynthia Rubin Institute for Music Criticism brings together leading music journalists, renowned musicians, and aspiring young writers.

    A 7 PM pre-concert talk with The New Yorker’s Alex Ross highlights the role of the ICEcommons database in the selection of the program. At 8 PM, ICE will perform works by Mario Diaz de Leon, Wojtek Blecharz, and Anna Thorvaldsdottir, as well as world premieres from Seth Cluett and Michele Abondonado!

    From ICE:
    Isabel Gleicher, flute
    Joshua Rubin, clarinet
    Ryan Muncy, saxophone
    Rebekah Heller, bassoon
    Ross Karre, live sound

    3
    ICE at UNT Denton
    Friday, October 26, 2018

    11:00 AM, Panel Discussion
    ICE’s organizational model
    Merrill Ellis Intermedia Theatre
    College of Music building

    7:30 PM Concert
    Winspear Performance Hall,
    Murchinson Performing Arts Center
    RESERVE $5 TICKETS HERE

    Saturday, October 27, 2018

    8:00 PM, concert
    Voertman Hall
    College of Music Building
    FREE ADMISSION

    ICE visits the University of North Texas for a series of lectures, collaborative performances, readings of student works, and coachings with student ensembles. Performances will include the world premiere of UNT faculty Joseph Klein’s An Unaware Cosmos, as well as works by Zosha Di Castri, Karola Obermuller, Bryan Jacobs, and more.

    From ICE:
    Nathan Davis, percussion
    Nuiko Wadden, harp
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    Daniel Lippel, guitar
    Pala Garcia, violin
    Katinka Kleijn, cello

    4
    ICE at Southern Methodist University

    Sunday, October 28, 2018, 7:30 PM

    Caruth Auditorium
    SMU Meadows School of the Arts
    6101 Bishop Boulevard
    Dallas, TX, 75205
    FREE ADMISSION

    ICE’s residency at SMU is the ensemble’s Dallas debut! It includes activities with students and culminates in a concert of ICE’s repertoire favorites at Caruth Auditorium.

    5
    6

    MATA honors ICE Flutist and Founder Claire Chase at their annual Benefit Gala on November 2, 2018. Tickets can be purchased through MATA here and are tax-deductible.

    7
    Silent Voices III, our album with Brooklyn Youth Chorus, comes out this Friday, October 26. Check it out on Spotify or download it on iTunes.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) is an artist collective that is transforming the way music is created and experienced. As performer, curator, and educator, ICE explores how new music intersects with communities across the world. The ensemble’s 35 members are featured as soloists, chamber musicians, commissioners, and collaborators with the foremost musical artists of our time. Works by emerging composers have anchored ICE’s programming since its founding in 2001, and the group’s recordings and digital platforms highlight the many voices that weave music’s present.

    A recipient of the American Music Center’s Trailblazer Award and the Chamber Music America/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, ICE was also named the 2014 Musical America Ensemble of the Year. The group currently serves as artists-in-residence at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Mostly Mozart Festival, and previously led a five-year residency at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. ICE was featured at the Ojai Music Festival from 2015 to 2017, and at recent festivals abroad such as gmem-CNCM-marseille and Vértice at Cultura UNAM, Mexico City. Other performance stages have included the Park Avenue Armory, The Stone, ice floes at Greenland’s Diskotek Sessions, and boats on the Amazon River.

    New initiatives include OpenICE, made possible with lead funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which offers free concerts and related programming wherever ICE performs, and enables a working process with composers to unfold in public settings. DigitICE, a free online library of over 350 streaming videos, catalogues the ensemble’s performances. ICE’s First Page program is a commissioning consortium that fosters close collaborations between performers, composers, and listeners as new music is developed. EntICE, a side-by-side education program, places ICE musicians within youth orchestras as they premiere new commissioned works together; inaugural EntICE partners include Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and The People’s Music School in Chicago. Summer activities include Ensemble Evolution at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, in which young professionals perform with ICE and attend workshops on topics from interpretation to concert production. Yamaha Artist Services New York is the exclusive piano provider for ICE. Read more at iceorg.org.
    Staff

    Claire Chase, Founder*

    William McDaniel, Executive Director
    Rebekah Heller, co-Artistic Director*
    Ross Karre, co-Artistic Director and Director of digitICE.org*
    Jacob Greenberg, Director of Recordings and Digital Outreach*
    Levy Lorenzo, Engineer and Technical Director*
    Ryan Muncy, Director of Institutional Giving and co-Director, OpenICE*
    Joshua Rubin, Artistic Director Emeritus*
    Karla Brom, General Manager
    Maciej Lewandowski, Director of Production
    Bridgid Bergin, Development Associate
    Alice Teyssier, flute*

    • ICE musician

    Artists

    Bridget Kibbey, harp
    Campbell MacDonald, clarinet
    Claire Chase, flute
    Cory Smythe, piano
    Dan Peck, tuba
    Daniel Lippel, guitar
    David Bowlin, violin
    David Byrd-Marrow, horn
    Erik Carlson, violin
    Gareth Flowers, trumpet
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    James Austin Smith, oboe
    Jennifer Curtis, violin
    Josh Modney, violin and viola
    Joshua Rubin, clarinet
    Katinka Kleijn, cello
    Kivie Cahn-Lipman, cello
    Kyle Armbrust, viola
    Levy Lorenzo, percussion
    Maiya Papach, viola
    Michael Nicolas, cello
    Mike Lormand, trombone
    Nathan Davis, percussion
    Nicholas Houfek, lighting designer
    Nicholas Masterson, oboe
    Nuiko Wadden, harp
    Peter Evans, trumpet
    Peter Tantsits, tenor
    Phyllis Chen, piano
    Randall Zigler, bass
    Rebekah Heller, bassoon
    Ross Karre, percussion
    Ryan Muncy, saxophone
    Steven Schick, Artist-in-Residence
    Tony Arnold, soprano
    Wendy Richman, viola

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:35 PM on October 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, Diane Moser - piano, Hafez Modirzadeh – saxophone, , , Tyshawn Sorey – piano   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “HAFEZ MODIRZADEH: THE PULSIVITY/RESONANCE PROJECT: TONAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATIONS FOR RE-TUNED PIANO AND SAXOPHONE” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    Hafez Modirzadeh (Photo Credit Walter Wagner)

    Saturday, November 10, 2018
    at 7:30 PM

    The Jazz Gallery
    1160 Broadway, 5th Floor
    New York, NY 10001

    $10—35
    Tickets

    1st set – 7:30pm

    Hafez Modirzadeh – saxophone & compositions
    Diane Moser – piano

    Diane Moser by Dennis Connors

    2nd set – 9:30 pm

    Hafez Modirzadeh – saxophone & compositions
    Tyshawn Sorey – piano

    Tyshawn Sorey – piano from MacArthur Foundation

    // sets 7.30pm + 9.30pm //
    // each set: $25/$10 members; reserved table seating: $35/$20
    members

    The Pulsivity/Resonance Project explores a dual concept of time and temperament through a set of pieces for re-tuned piano and saxophone. In this regard, a second goal is realized: to inspire balance between fixed (periodic) and fluid (pulsivic) temporalities. In practice, this gets related to the elasticity of Persian poetic meter – formulas for improvisation are composed for each musical artist’s own pulse to accelerate/decelerate in synchronistic harmony, resulting in transient resolutions of unpredictable beauty.

    Each duo works from the same set of pieces that share a sonic palette of 8 re-tuned pitches. Exploring such resonances, from a variety of interlocking temperaments and temporalities, should expand harmonic empathy beyond the music itself.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:51 PM on October 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , Garlands for Steven Stucky, ,   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Garlands for Steven Stucky” 

    New Music USA


    From NEWMUSICBOX

    1

    Steven Stucky by Hoebermann Studio-Courtesy of the artist

    After the passing of Steven Stucky on Valentine’s Day of 2016, Christopher Rouse, Steve’s friend of 40 years, wrote on this website:

    “I don’t think I’m alone in seeing Steve as the sort of person we all wish we were. Even had he lacked the musical genius he did in fact possess, his way of living his life and treating all with kindness and respect would have been a model worth emulating for anyone. Loved by so many, we have lost not only a great composer, but the dearest of friends. I wonder how we will be able to go on without him.”

    Steve died much too soon—and for so many of us, unacceptably—at the age of 66. His unusually aggressive brain cancer had been diagnosed only three months earlier.

    I met Steve in 1988 upon his arrival at the Los Angeles Philharmonic, where I had been working steadily as an “extra” alongside the redoubtable principal keyboard player, Zita Carno. Steve’s tenure there as resident composer and new music advisor lasted for 21 years, the longest such affiliation between a composer and an American orchestra. I was a frequent participant during most of those years in much of the new music programming for the LA Phil’s orchestral series and Green Umbrella concerts. Steve, having largely determined much of that programming, was present at every rehearsal, always exuding his special combination of bemused, gracious, self-deprecating erudition. Over time we became friends, and his interests became my interests. As the foremost authority on the music of Witold Lutosławski, he was my guiding light as I prepared my CD Piano Music of Salonen, Stucky, and Lutosławski. The 2009 Grammy Award bestowed on me for that recording is an honor that I owe in no small part to Steve.

    The day after Steve died, Deborah Borda, then-President of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, phoned to tell me about an April tribute concert already being organized by the Philharmonic. Several of Steve’s friends and former students were being invited to write short piano pieces (one or two minutes each) in Steve’s memory, and she asked me to organize the pianists. There would ultimately be six works, by Fang Man, Anders Hillborg, Magnus Lindberg, James Matheson, Joseph Phibbs, and Esa-Pekka Salonen, interspersed with music by Steve and Lutosławski. The pianists, all associated with Piano Spheres, Los Angeles’ piano series devoted to new music, would be, respectively, Mark Robson, Susan Svrček, Steven Vanhauwaert, Nic Gerpe, Vicki Ray, and myself.

    Following the announcement of the upcoming program, I heard from a few of Steve’s countless composer friends who were expressing a wish to dedicate a piano homage of their own. Though I was not empowered to add them to the Philharmonic’s program, I knew that I couldn’t ignore their heartfelt offers, that I would be in touch afterwards, and that this had the makings of a very good idea that would embody all the goodness that Steve had brought to so many of our lives. Later that spring I began inviting them and others to contribute additional pieces to the initial set of six for a collection that would be called Garlands for Steven Stucky. With the original six pieces having been such powerful declarations of love and friendship, and knowing how many more of Steve’s eminent, emotionally devastated friends and students would want to honor him similarly, I felt that a CD would be the necessary endgame. Unsurprisingly, my wish list of essential invitees, compiled with the help of Christopher Rouse, Donald Crockett, and Steve’s widow, Kristen Stucky, grew very, very long. I had to limit the number to just 24 more composers who then wrote their hearts out to honor Steve in the way they do best.

    The Garlands

    Julia Adolphe: Snowprints
    Julian Anderson: Capriccio
    Charles Bodman Rae: Steven Stucky in memoriam
    Chen Yi: In Memory of Steve
    Louis Chiappetta: This is no less curious
    Donald Crockett: Nella Luce
    Brett Dean: Hommage à Lutosławski
    Fang Man: That raindrops have hastened the falling flowers: in memory of Steven Stucky
    Gabriela Frank: Harawi-cito de charanguista ciego
    Daniel S. Godfrey: Glas
    John Harbison: Waltz
    Anders Hillborg: Just a Minute
    Pierre Jalbert: Inscription
    Jesse Jones: Reverie
    William Kraft: Music for Gloria (In Memoriam Steven Stucky)
    Hannah Lash: November
    David Lefkowitz: In Memoriam: Steven Stucky
    Magnus Lindberg: Fratello
    David Liptak: Epitaph
    Steven Mackey: A Few Things, in memory of Steve
    James Matheson: CHAPTER I: In which our hero dies and encounters Palestrina, Brahms, Debussy, Ligeti, Lutosławski and other dead loves; looks out to see the entire universe before him, and prepares to visit all of the amazing shit therein
    Colin Matthews: some moths for Steve
    Harold Meltzer: Children’s Crusade
    Eric Nathan: In memoriam
    Joseph Phibbs: in memory of Steven Stucky
    Kay Rhie: Interlude
    Christopher Rouse: Muistomerkki
    Esa-Pekka Salonen: Iscrizione
    Michael Small: Debussy Window
    Stephen Andrew Taylor: Green Trees Are Bending
    Andrew Waggoner: …and Maura Brought Me Cookies (Remembering Steve)
    Judith Weir: Chorale, For Steve

    As the recording was shaping up to be a collective portrait of friendship, I invited two more of Steve’s trusted collaborators, Peabody Southwell (mezzo-soprano) and Carolyn Hove (oboe), to join me on the CD. Together, we close the recording with Steve’s Two Holy Sonnets of Donne (1982), based on John Donne’s defiant, mocking proclamations on the powerlessness of death.

    For the 32 composers, I imagine that it must have felt hardly possible to write a one- to two-minute piece that expressed all that they wanted to say about Steve. “How could I even begin to capture the depth and quiet intensity of this man?” asks Esa-Pekka Salonen in his liner note. For me, holding 32 such individual, deeply-felt relationships in my hands has been fulfilling beyond words. As reflections on Steve as a friend and teacher, the Garlands are by no means a compilation of mournful dirges. I note many cheery portrayals of him, such as in Julia Adolphe’s reimagining of his “giddy excitement” during composition lessons, Pierre Jalbert’s inclusion of a “fast rhythmic section (Steve’s wit and humor),” and Steven Mackey’s evocation of “the playful banter” that they shared. We also see Steve invoked several times in quotations of his music and of music that he loved, and in opening motives that seem to summon him with the pitches B-flat (si), E-flat (es), and G (sol), representing his initials.

    3
    Steven Stucky with Esa-Pekka Salonen and Gloria Cheng (photo by Carlos Rodriguez)

    Proceeds from our CD sales and royalties will be donated to the Steven Stucky Composer Fellowship Fund. The fund was established by the Los Angeles Philharmonic to honor Steve’s vision of engaging young composers in multi-year educational programs with the orchestra. The Composer Fellowship Program continues to flourish under Program Director Andrew Norman and Teaching Artist Sarah Gibson.

    4
    Garlands for Steven Stucky (Bridge 9509). Photo by Jeffrey Herman.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:22 PM on October 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , Peter Garland: The Landscape Scrolls, Starkland   

    From Starkland: “Peter Garland: The Landscape Scrolls” 

    From Starkland

    1
    Available October 19, 2018

    Peter Garland from NewMusicUSA


    Peter Garland:
    The Landscape Scrolls
    Available now
    Finally, the CD can be pre-ordered at Bandcamp and Amazon.

    John Luther Adams wrote the highly enthusiastic Introduction. The next issue of Gramophone will review the CD, and Vital Weekly has praised it as “a great release” and possibly Garland’s “best work.”

    Commissioned by and dedicated to percussionist John Lane, the composition depicts the 24-hour day cycle in five movements. Each movement is a monochromatic study, more about resonance and space than melody or harmony: mid-day (Chinese drums); afternoon (rice bowls); after dark (triangles); late (glockenspiel); early morning (tubular bells).

    “Employing just one musician and a limited array of instruments, Garland reminds us of the magic all around us, and the imperative to rediscover our proper place
    in the miraculous and mysterious
    dance of life on this earth.”
    – John Luther Adams.

    “Garland is an artist who knows what he’s doing, and then does it — repeatedly, each time out.
    He’s a marvelous artist;
    I admire his work a lot.”
    – Harold Budd

    “He has sometimes been classed as
    a minimalist, but Garland’s economy
    and radical consonance are manifestations
    of his own spatial sensitivity
    and clarity of attention.”
    Wire Magazine

    “An avatar of an experimental American tradition [and] a composer
    of mesmerizing music”
    – Kyle Gann

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Heard on Starkland

    Charles Amirkhanian
    Ashley Bathgate
    Phillip Bimstein
    Martin Bresnick
    Phyllis Chen
    Jay Cloidt
    Nathan Davis
    Tod Dockstader
    Paul Dolden
    Paul Dresher
    William Duckworth
    Robert Een
    Either/Or
    Ethel
    Fred Frith
    Ellen Fullman
    David Garland
    Peter Garland
    International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE)
    JACK Quartet
    Janáček Philharmonic Orchestra
    Aaron Jay Kernis
    John King
    Roger Kleier
    Phil Kline
    Guy Klucevsek
    Kronos Quartet
    Lukas Ligeti
    Jenny Lin
    Keeril Makan
    Ingram Marshall
    Merzbow
    Meredith Monk
    David Lee Myers
    Lisa Moore
    Pauline Oliveros
    Todd Reynolds
    Frederic Rzewski
    Elliott Sharp
    Carl Stone
    Lois V Vierk
    Randall Woolf
    Pamela Z
    John Zorn
    and more

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:35 AM on September 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , , , ,   

    From Lincoln Center: “White Lights Festival” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    From Lincoln Center

    Sutra October 16–18, 2018

    Film: Silent Light Wednesday, October 17, 2018

    Poetry for Strings Thursday, October 18, 2018

    Film: Dreyer’s Ordet Thursday, October 18, 2018

    Borderline October 19–20, 2018

    Solo Flight Tuesday, October 23, 2018

    White Light Conversation: Community Saturday, October 27, 2018

    XENOS October 31–November 1, 2018

    Framing Time November 1–2, 2018

    Waiting for Godot November 2–13, 2018

    The Distant LightTuesday, November 13, 2018

    The Creation Thursday, November 15, 2018

    Blak Whyte Gray November 16–17, 2018

    Only the Sound Remains November 17–18, 2018

    See the full article here For more information and ticketing.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Artsis a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:58 AM on September 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, , , , Strange Beautiful Music 2018   

    From New Amsterdam Records: ‘Detroit Symphony Orchestra” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam Records

    1

    Strange Beautiful Music 2018
    2

    3

    Friday September 14 and Saturday, September 15 | 3 p.m. – 11 p.m.
    New Music Detroit brings their 11th annual marathon music festival to The Cube, the DIA and The Wright Museum! The avant-garde production features experimental and far-reaching sounds ranging from contemporary chamber music and European folk to experimental electronics and noise improvisation.

    Pricing
    General Admission – Single Day (Advance) – $10
    General Admission – Single Day (Door) – $20
    General Admission 2-day Weekend Pass (Advance) – $20*
    General Admission 2-day Weekend Pass (Door) – $30
    VIP 2-day Weekend Pass $125*

    VIP Weekend Pass holders will receive:
    • One reserved seat throughout the entire festival (The Cube, DIA, The Wright Museum)
    • One complimentary drink, with access to cash bar thereafter
    • One New Music Detroit T-shirt
    • One New Music Detroit CD
    General admission and VIP weekend passes can be purchased by calling the DSO Box Office at 313.576.5111.

    Lineup:

    Friday, September 14 | 3 p.m. – 11 p.m.
    Charles Wright Museum (315 E. Warren Ave, Detroit, MI 48201)

    3:00 PM – Dave Sharp Worlds Quartet
    4:00 PM – Akropolis Reed Quintet
    5:00 PM – Tia Imani Hanna Ensemble
    5:50 PM – Maria Chavez

    Friday, September 14 | 7 p.m. -10 p.m.
    Detroit Institute of Arts** (5200 Woodward Ave, Detroit, MI 48202)

    7:00 PM – James Cornish Ensemble Opera
    8:00 PM – Marcus Elliot’s Beyond Rebellious Ensemble
    **General admission is free for residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties – seats are based on first-come, first-served basis. VIP 2-day Weekend Pass holders will have a reserved seat.

    Saturday, September 15 | 2 p.m. – 11 p.m.
    The Cube (3711 Woodward Ave, Detroit, MI 48201)
    2:00 PM – Betsy Soukup
    3:00 PM – Detroit Composers Project
    4:00 PM – Whoopknox
    5:00 PM – Contemporary Directions Ensemble
    6:00 PM – ONO
    7:00 PM – Subtle Degrees
    8:00 PM – Synergistic Mythologies
    9:00 PM – New Music Detroit
    10:00 PM – Saajtak

    Detroit Symphony Orchestra
    Max M. & Marjorie S. Fisher Music Center
    3711 Woodward Avenue
    Detroit, MI 48201

    Box Office
    313.576.5111
    Summer Hours: Monday-Friday, 11am-5pm
    Plus 2 hours prior to concerts *

    Dates, times, prices, programs, and artists are subject to change.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    In all of our presenting and recording activities, NewAm holds firmly to its mission to support artists whose work lies outside of traditional music industry infrastructure – whether that be classical, pop/rock/indie, jazz, world, or experimental. In pursuit of this calling, NewAm often collaborates with like-minded organizations. Our past and ongoing partnerships with the River to River Festival, Ecstatic Music Festival, Art of Elan, the Indianapolis Symphony (multi-year residency), MoMA PS 1, Liquid Music, Galapagos Artspace and National Sawdust have yielded high-profile opportunities for our artists to present their work. On the records side, we often partner with other labels in order to offer our artists the best possible representation for their projects. Partner labels have included Bedroom Community (Iceland), Nonclassical (UK), One Little Indian (UK), Sono Luminus (USA), Cantaloupe (USA) and NNA Tapes (USA).

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:52 PM on September 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , Kneebody with Becca Stevens & Michael Mayo, ,   

    From LPR: “Kneebody with Becca Stevens & Michael Mayo” 

    From LPR

    1

    Sun September 16th, 2018

    8:00PM

    Main Space

    Minimum Age: 18+

    Doors Open: 7:00PM

    Show Time: 8:00PM

    Event Ticket: $18

    Day of Show: $25

    Tickets

    Kneebody
    2
    Photo Credit: Tarona

    Kneebody’s sound is… explosive rock energy paralleled with high-level nuanced chamber ensemble playing, with highly wrought compositions that are balanced with adventurous no-holds-barred improvising. All “sounds-like” references can be set aside; this band has created a genre and style all its own.

    Kneebody bassist Kaveh Rastegar thinks of their sound this way, “Personally, I think calling Kneebody ‘jazz’ or ‘electric jazz’ is fantastic because then we can move on from that hang up and play our music – and alter expectations of what ‘jazz’ is.”

    Kneebody is keyboardist Adam Benjamin, trumpeter Shane Endsley, electric bassist Kaveh Rastegar, saxophonist Ben Wendel and drummer Nate Wood. The band has no leader or rather, each member is the leader; they’ve developed their own musical language, inventing a unique cueing system that allows them each to change the tempo, key, style, and more in an instant.

    Kneebody draws upon influences spanning D’Angelo’s Voodoo to music by Elliot Smith, Bill Frisell, and Miles Davis. Their live shows are known for intense sonic landscapes of the Radiohead ilk, for the rhythmic bombast of a Squarepusher or Queens of the Stone Age show, and the harmonic depth and improvisational freedom experienced at a Brad Mehldau concert.

    In 2005, Kneebody released their debut self-titled album Kneebody on Dave Douglas’ Greenleaf Music Label. Low Electrical Worker followed in 2007 on the Colortone Label. A collection of 13 original songs, Low Electrical Worker was hailed by saxophonist Joshua Redman as one of his “favorite albums of 2007.” In the spring of 2009, Kneebody and vocalist Theo Bleckmann released 12 Songs of Charles Ives on the Winter & Winter label and received a Grammy Award nomination in the “classical crossover” category. 2013 saw the release of The Line for ConcordRecords. In 2015, Kneebody’s groundbreaking collaboration with electronic musician Daedelus on Kneedelus was released on Flying Lotus’ imprint Brainfeeder records to praise from critics and audiences alike. Kneebody made their Motéma Music debut album Anti-Hero in March of 2017.

    Becca Stevens
    3
    © Harald Krichel / CC BY-SA 3.0 (via Wikimedia Commons)

    Becca Stevens is an American singer, songwriter, and guitarist who draws upon elements of jazz, chamber-pop, indie-rock, and folk. She has collaborated with artists including Jacob Collier, Laura Mvula, Billy Childs, David Crosby, and many others.

    Michael Mayo
    4

    Michael Mayo began forging his musical identity long before he hit the stage. The son of two successful musicians, the Los Angeles native grew up just a little more than 20 feet from the likes of Diana Ross, Luther Vandross, Earth Wind and Fire and Stevie Wonder. This proximity helped Mayo create a musical path centered around the innovative elements of jazz.

    After receiving his Bachelors from the New England Conservatory of Music, Mayo attended the acclaimed Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance, only the third vocalist to be accepted into the 20-year-old program, where he learned from Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, and Luciana Souza, among many others. Mayo, who recently moved to New York City, is a veteran international performer. His highlights include singing at the White House for First Lady Michelle Obama on International Jazz Day 2016, the Kennedy Center for both the Betty Carter Jazz Ahead program and Renée Fleming’s American Voices Festival in 2013, as well as the Panama Jazz Festival. Whether he is performing with a full big band, a rhythm section or alone with a looper pedal, Mayo’s classic vocal style commands the attention of listeners worldwide.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings


    Stem Education Coalition

    (le) poisson rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    LPR

    LPR is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of LPR

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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