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  • richardmitnick 1:58 PM on August 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Avant-garde, Brooks Frederickson, ,   

    From New Amsterdam Records: Brooks Frederickson’s “Small Works” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam Records

    NOW AVAILABLE:

    Brooks Frederickson’s
    Small Works
    available exclusively through
    New Amsterdam’s Bandcamp Subscription
    as part of new Windmill Series

    1
    Artwork by Katrina Neumann

    Small Works is the new album from Durham-based composer Brooks Frederickson. The record is available exclusively through New Amsterdam’s Bandcamp subscription as part of the Windmill Series, a new digitally-focused set of releases for subscribers in addition to our existing release schedule. Subscribe today to receive the album, which will be released on all other platforms on November 16.

    Composer Brooks Frederickson’s debut album Small Works is a snapshot of the community of collaborators Brooks lived and worked with in Brooklyn. The community includes some of the leading contemporary music interpreters of today: Ashley Bathgate (Bang on a Can All Stars), Eliza Bagg (Pavo Pavo), all three members of Bearthoven (Matt Evans, Karl Larson, Pat Swoboda), Exceptet, Longleash, and Brendon Randall-Myers (Invisible Anatomy / Marateck). Small Works comes from not only the small forces needed for each piece, but also from the small amount of material that acts as the germ for each piece.

    The album includes premiere recordings of four of Brooks’ chamber works written between 2014-2017. This group of pieces, some of which have been presented by MATA, premiered at Le Poisson Rouge and presented as a part of Sō Percussion’s Brooklyn Bound series, show Brooks’ interest in building musical worlds out of limited materials.

    The works were recorded at Oktaven Audio by Ryan Streber and Guilford Sound by Dave Snyder. The recordings have been edited, mixed and mastered by Ryan Streber at Oktaven Audio.

    In all of our presenting and recording activities, NewAm holds firmly to its mission to support artists whose work lies outside of traditional music industry infrastructure – whether that be classical, pop/rock/indie, jazz, world, or experimental. In pursuit of this calling, NewAm often collaborates with like-minded organizations. Our past and ongoing partnerships with the River to River Festival, Ecstatic Music Festival, Art of Elan, the Indianapolis Symphony (multi-year residency), MoMA PS 1, Liquid Music, Galapagos Artspace and National Sawdust have yielded high-profile opportunities for our artists to present their work. On the records side, we often partner with other labels in order to offer our artists the best possible representation for their projects. Partner labels have included Bedroom Community (Iceland), Nonclassical (UK), One Little Indian (UK), Sono Luminus (USA), Cantaloupe (USA) and NNA Tapes (USA).

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 9:31 AM on August 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Avant-garde, , , ,   

    From Bard’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts: “2018–19 season on sale now!” 

    From Bard’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts

    Highlights

    Bard Fisher Center for the performing Arts

    1

    Join us for a new season of extraordinary concerts, dance, theater, and literary events.

    For ticketing please see the full article.

    Visit the Fisher Center website to explore the full 2018–19 season and order your tickets online.

    Choose three or more new season events and save 25%.

    2
    Photo by David DeNee
    Classical
    The Orchestra Now
    This group of vibrant young musicians presents its fourth season at the Fisher Center, with works by Johannes Brahms, Giuseppe Verdi, Aaron Copland, Richard Wagner, Richard Strauss, and many more.

    2
    Janet Leigh in “Psycho” (1960); Paramount Pictures and Photofest NYC

    The Bard Conservatory of Music

    This season, Conservatory highlights include an evening honoring Joan Tower, a screening of the Hitchcock classic Psycho with live orchestra, the premiere of the China Now Music Festival, the Winter Songfest, and an evening with soprano Dawn Upshaw.

    3
    Photo by Hector Perez

    Fisher Center presents
    Meshell Ndegeocello
    Saturday, October 20 at 8 pm

    The music of Meshell Ndegeocello sparked a new movement in soul music, and has earned her 10 Grammy nominations over her astounding career. Ndegeocello makes her Fisher Center debut, offering a fresh perspective and a musical refuge during these uncertain times.

    4
    “Zurich, September 2014” by Teju Cole

    Fisher Center presents
    Vijay Iyer and Teju Cole
    Blind Spot
    Friday, October 26 at 8 pm

    Vanguard jazz composer and pianist Vijay Iyer and Nigerian American writer and photographer (and Bard faculty member) Teju Cole present a powerful new collaboration. With images and text from Cole’s newly released book of the same title alongside Iyer’s live score, Blind Spot investigates humanity’s blindness to tragedy and injustice throughout history.

    4
    Photo by Brigitte Lacombe

    Fisher Center presents
    Isabella Rossellini: Link Link Circus
    Saturday, November 17 at 7:30 pm

    Award-winning actress and filmmaker Isabella Rossellini takes inspiration from the natural world in her new theatrical lecture, a vivid monologue about the brilliance of the animal kingdom.

    More at the full article.

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    About Us
    The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, designed by Frank Gehry, illustrates the College’s commitment to the performing arts as a cultural and educational necessity. The Center’s adventurous programs and world-class facilities provide an outstanding environment in which to create, perform, learn, and experience. The Center bears the name of Richard B. Fisher, the former chair of Bard’s Board of Trustees. This magnificent building and the extraordinary arts experiences that take place within it are a tribute to his vision, generosity, and leadership.

    The mission of the Fisher Center is to:

    bring leading artists to the Hudson Valley to engage with the public and the College;
    produce and present adventurous and in-depth programs, including new, rare, and undiscovered works;
    support the development of new work by artists at all stages of their careers; and
    provide a home for Bard student and faculty work in the performing arts.

    Bard College seeks to inspire curiosity, a love of learning, idealism, and a commitment to the link between higher education and civic participation. The undergraduate curriculum is designed to address central, enduring questions facing succeeding generations of students. Academic disciplines are interconnected through multidisciplinary programs; a balance in the curriculum is sought between general education and individual specialization. Students pursue a rigorous course of study reflecting diverse traditions of scholarship, research, speculation, and artistic expression. They engage philosophies of human existence, theories of human behavior and society, the making of art, and the study of the humanities, science, nature, and history.

    Bard’s approach to learning focuses on the individual, primarily through small group seminars. These are structured to encourage thoughtful, critical discourse in an inclusive environment. Faculty are active in their fields and stress the connection between the contemplative life of the mind and active engagement outside the classroom. They strive to foster rigorous and free inquiry, intellectual ambition, and creativity.

    Bard acts at the intersection of education and civil society, extending liberal arts and sciences education to communities in which it has been underdeveloped, inaccessible, or absent. Through its undergraduate college, distinctive graduate programs, commitment to the fine and performing arts, civic and public engagement programs, and network of international dual-degree partnerships, early colleges, and prison education initiatives, Bard offers unique opportunities for students and faculty to study, experience, and realize the principle that higher-education institutions can and should operate in the public interest.

    The Bard College of today reflects in many ways its varied past.
    Bard was founded as St. Stephen’s College in 1860, a time of national crisis. While there are no written records of the founders’ attitude toward the Civil War, a passage from the College’s catalogue of 1943 applies also to the time of the institution’s establishment:

    “While the immediate demands in education are for the training of men for the war effort, liberal education in America must be preserved as an important value in the civilization for which the War is being fought. . . . Since education, like life itself, is a continuous process of growth and effort, the student has to be trained to comprehend and foster his own growth and direct his own efforts.”

    This philosophy molded the College during its early years and continues to inform its academic aims.

    Bard College
    30 Campus Rd,
    Annandale-On-Hudson, NY 12504

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:17 PM on August 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , ,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “A Special Contemporary Evening of Fresh New Music from Boston & Colorado; More than Classical, 1st set, 2nd set Microtonal Guitar Magic” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    Friday, September 7, 2018
    at 8:00 PM

    The lilypad
    1253 Cambridge St
    Cambridge, MA 02139

    $0

    The Creative Music Series Presents

    A Special Contemporary Evening of Fresh New Music from Boston & Colorado;

    More than Classical, 1st set, 2nd set Microtonal Guitar Magic

    String Theory Trio: “A strange and splendid synthesis of sound.” Boston Phoenix

    “Bold and daring, Haverstick ventures into distant aural galaxies.” Guitar Player

    • From Boston and New Hampshire: The unique compositions, improvisations and concepts by

    Mimi Rabson and

    THE STRING THEORY TRIO

    Mimi Rabson, 5 String Violin-Composer-Author- Educator — Helen Sherrah Davies, 5 String Violin — Junko Fujiwara, Cello

    And, the 2nd set

    From Denver, Colorado: The adventurous, unique and stellar Microtonal Guitar playing of

    NEIL HAVERSTICK

    Composer, Author and Custom Guitars of alternative tunings: 19, 31, 34, 36-tone, including fretless, beyond western music’s 12-tone way.

    String Theory Trio: Led by founder Mimi Rabson, one of the Boston area’s most valuable musical resources, and a Berklee faculty professor and author, The String Theory Trio explores the fine lines between compositions and improvisation.

    “Great chops and attitude to match.” Washington Post

    “…dazzling, violin phenom.” Boston Globe

    “… aggressively eclectic and a master of every style she touches.” Bowed Radio

    The presence of a framework of improvisation and rhythmic drive suggest jazz, but the ostinato patterns evoke a post-modern minimalism. Many musical elements are set, but even more are left up to the individual musicians, which gives the performance a different kind of excitement from most classical pieces. And (but not surprisingly), Rabson says she is in great debt to the free improvisation community, particularly Lawrence D. Butch Morris. Ms. Rabson is the newest composer/member of the Jazz Composers Alliance.

    • Neil Havestick:

    “Haverstick nor Catler is just dabbling; they put microtones to more savvy uses than a lot of classical composers.” Village Voice

    “…musician, critics and listeners see Haverstick as either a masterful contributor of new music or an abrasive and it irritating noise that won’t go away.” Westword

    “Formidable fretboard chops and an affinity for the blues.” – International Musician

    “Neil has opened a door for students to go beyond the academics of playing into the purpose of music…to get the most out of themselves. A real book!” Joe Pass

    In his own words: “(Also) playing Fretless Guitar presents many challenges, but allows me to find new horizons as a composer, including many subtle microtonal shades of colour, unavailable on a tempered instrument. The harmonic series is not an invention of humans, it’s part of the universal structure”.

    The Creative Music Series (CMS) was established in January, 2015, to showcase the work of adventurous jazz musicians from out-of-state, presenting them in intimate venues in the Cambridge/Somerville area. My endeavor was a reaction to the apparent lack of invitations being extended to accomplished, new talent and even unknown musicians to the Boston area. CMS has now begun to zero in on Boston based musicians who are creating their own projects with these out-of-town guests, and taking these musical risks to find an expression and gain a wider appreciation.

    Participants: Alex Lemski

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:58 PM on July 31, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , Ecstatic Music Festival 2019, , , , ,   

    From Ecstatic Music Festival: 2019 at Kaufman 

    Ecstatic Music Festival

    Ecstatic Music Festival

    The 2019 edition of Ecstatic Music Festival runs from January 7 to March 21 at NYC’s The Kaufman Center, which annually brings together a diverse array of artists and composers from various genres for unique collaborative performances. This year’s fest includes a performance by Zola Jesus in collaboration with composer William Brittelle and chamber orchestral group Wild Up on January 7; politically-charged free jazz collective Irreversible Entanglements teaming up with pianist/vocalist Amina Claudine Myers and composer/flutist Nicole Mitchell on February 28; the annual Bang on a Can People’s Commissioning Fund Concert on March 6; string quartet ETHEL collaborating with youth ensemble Face the Music, topped with an appearance by Todd Rundgren on March 17; a special performance from Brooklyn Youth Chorus and Wye Oak (who have collaborated in the past) who will premiere a new work by Owen Pallett on March 21; with further artists TBA.

    Tickets for all these shows are on sale now. Passes for the whole festival are also on sale, along with two-show bundles. Many of these shows will be livestreamed from NewSounds.org. You can view the fest’s full schedule and more details about individual performances below.

    2019 ECSTATIC MUSIC FESTIVAL LINEUP/SCHEDULE
    Monday, January 07, 2019
    ZOLA JESUS, WILD UP & WILLIAM BRITTELLE
    A New Sounds Live co-presentation hosted by John Schaefer & streamed live on NewSounds.org
    Zola Jesus brings her unmistakably powerful, Gothic-electronic songwriting into dialogue with William Brittelle’s “silo-bombing music that is at once free-ranging, formally adventurous, unconventionally beautiful, and a joyful thrill to experience (The Nation), in a special collaboration with the “raucous, grungy, irresistibly exuberant” (New York Times) chamber orchestra, wild Up.

    Saturday, February 16, 2019
    ARTIST LINEUP TBA
    Stay tuned for the artist lineup announcement on Sep 4!

    Thursday, February 28, 2019
    IRREVERSIBLE ENTANGLEMENTS, AMINA CLAUDINE MYERS & NICOLE MITCHELL
    From Copenhagen to Brooklyn, the “revolutionary” (Shadowproof.com) free jazz collective Irreversible Entanglements has shared its message of liberation, starting with its first appearance at a Musicians March Against Police Brutality in New York City in early 2015. Comprised of mesmerizing vocalist Camae Ayewa (a.k.a. Moor Mother) – whose searing poetic narrations of Black trauma, survival and power drive each work, alto saxophonist Keir Neuringer, trumpeter Aquiles Navarro, double bassist Luke Stewart and Tcheser Holmes on drums, this quintet will join forces for a unique evening of music-making with two equally powerful artists: Legendary pianist/vocalist/improviser Amina Claudine Myers, a member of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM) since 1966; and the “furiously inventive” (Los Angeles Times) composer/flutist Nicole Mitchell. A member of the AACM since 1965, her influences are multi-dimensional, across generations and genres. She received a 2011 Herb Alpert Award in the Arts, and has been named “the most important jazz flutist of her generation” (Allaboutjazz.com).

    Wednesday, March 06, 2019
    2019 BANG ON A CAN PEOPLE’S COMMISSIONING FUND CONCERT
    A New Sounds Live co-presentation hosted by John Schaefer & streamed live on NewSounds.org
    Bang on a Can’s People’s Commissioning Fund (PCF) is a radical partnership between artists and audiences to commission works from adventurous composers. Founded in 1997, long before crowd-funding became the norm through Kickstarter and the like, Bang on a Can’s PCF has pooled contributions of all sizes from hundreds of friends and fans and since its inception has commissioned over 50 works of music for New York’s electric Bang on a Can All-Stars.

    Sunday, March 17, 2019
    ETHEL & FACE THE MUSIC
    Special guest appearance by Todd Rundgren
    NYC’s “infectiously visceral” (Pitchfork), “vital and brilliant” (New Yorker) string quartet ETHEL teams up with the dynamic youth ensemble Face the Music for an afternoon of invigorating new music. The performance showcases repertoire commissioned for ETHEL and developed during the quartet’s 2018-19 residency with Face the Music at Kaufman Music Center.

    Thursday, March 21, 2019
    BROOKLYN YOUTH CHORUS & WYE OAK
    A New Sounds co-presentation hosted by John Schaefer
    The Brooklyn Youth Chorus presents a live collaboration with the beloved rock duo Wye Oak, plus the premiere of a new work by Owen Pallett plus other collaborators TBA. Acclaimed for their “enormous versatility and polish” (New York Times), the Brooklyn Youth Chorus has been praised for their “perfect intonation” (Classical Voices) and “astonishingly secure performances” (New Yorker).

    View the full article for links to the individual listings.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Kaufman Music Center

    Kaufman Music Center is a notable performing arts complex in New York City that houses Lucy Moses School, the Special Music School, and Merkin Concert Hall. Originally known as the Hebrew Arts School, it was founded in 1952 and is currently located on West 67th Street between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue. More than 75,000 people use the Center annually.[1]

    Kaufman Music Center was founded by Dr. Tzipora H. Jochsberger in 1952 as a community school for pre-conservatory music training. Located at 129 W. 67th St. on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, today’s Kaufman Music Center is home to Merkin Concert Hall; Lucy Moses School, New York’s largest community arts school; and Special Music School (PS 859), a K-8 public school for musically gifted children.

    First known as the Hebrew Arts School for Music and Dance, the school moved to its permanent home, the Goodman House, on W. 67th St. in 1978. Named after Abraham Goodman, the building was designed by Ashok Bhavnani in the Brutalist style and received the Albert S. Bard Trust Award for excellence in architecture. Merkin Concert Hall opened its doors in 1978, and in 1991 the organization was renamed the Elaine Kaufman Cultural Center in recognition of a major gift by Elaine and Henry Kaufman. At that time the Hebrew Arts School was renamed Lucy Moses School. In 1996, Kaufman Music Center partnered with the New York City Department of Education to open Special Music School/PS 859, a K-8 public school for musically gifted children. Major renovations by architect Robert A.M. Stern Architects (RAMSA) in 2007 significantly improved Merkin Concert Hall and the exterior of the building.

    During the early 1980s, the HAS benefited from a large influx of Jewish émigrés leaving the Soviet Union and arriving in New York City. Many music instructors were not allowed to take their credentials with them when they left, and having a difficult time finding equivalent positions in the United States, found a home at the Hebrew Arts School. Their former students came to the HAS to study, and the school made scholarships available for these students.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:51 AM on July 29, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , , , , ,   

    From New Sounds: “Dispatches From the Bang on a Can Summer Festival 2018: Part 2 

    From New Sounds
    Hand-picked music, genre free. 24/7 radio from New York City.

    1
    Eve Beglarian Photo credit: Carolyn Yarnell

    7/25/2018
    William Robin

    It isn’t surprising that each day at the Bang on a Can Summer Festival at Mass MoCA thus far has felt like a marathon, given the new-music collective’s reputation for curating concerts of extreme durations.

    MASS MoCA by Jessica Rinaldi-Globe

    But despite the long hours of rehearsals and concerts, John Schaefer and I haven’t felt all that tired. Perhaps it’s because we begin each morning by making a ruckus of uncanny sounds utilizing home-made instruments; or perhaps it’s because the conversations we’ve had with the four aspiring writers that we are coaching this week have been so energizing.

    Yesterday, our intrepid media Fellows attended two concerts, a seminar for composition Fellows led by the three Bang on a Can founding composers, and that aforementioned original instrument workshop guided by guitarist Mark Stewart. They also interviewed a slew of musicians, and somehow managed to fit in writing and discussing the essays you will read below. Maggie Molloy heard in Eve Beglarian’s music a subversive and compelling personality; Stan Tymorek saw the same all-Beglarian concert, but arrived at an entirely different take on the composer’s work. Sarah Lindmark sat down with three effusive flutist Fellows and discovered a bourgeoning friendship, and Lasse Hansen recognized the larger implications of a composer’s musings on instrumentation.

    It’s been just as fascinating to watch these events unfold as it has been to read such diverse takes on what they have meant.

    Eve Beglarian at Bang on a Can
    By Maggie Molloy

    There are 40,320 different ways to make music like a girl. Or at least, that’s how many ways you can perform Eve Beglarian’s piece Play Like a Girl. It’s comprised of eight variations on a Bulgarian women’s folk song that can be played in any combination, simultaneously or successively. The instrumentation is a mix of piano, toy piano, bells, celestas, and other “girly” instruments, according to the composer.

    We were treated to one lively iteration of the piece Tuesday evening during a concert of Beglarian’s works held at MASS MoCA, one of dozens of performances hosted at the museum over the course of Bang on a Can’s annual three-week summer music festival. Around 150 people (including the composer) filled the gallery where the concert took place, standing and sitting in rows on chairs, floors, and window sills along an audacious 146-foot wall mural by Joe Wardwell.

    This particular Beglarian piece featured a combination of faculty and student performers: Vicky Chow and Maire Carroll on piano four-hands, Karl Larson on synthesizer, and Adam Holmes on glockenspiel. The unusual collection of timbres made for a modern take on the distinctively close harmonies of Bulgarian folk music, with a restless stream of piano and glockenspiel melodies circling above a growling synth drone. While the driving rhythms propelled the piece closer to the world of minimalism, the more subtle modal ornaments embodied the emotive folk traditions of Eastern Europe. The title is of course subversive: Beglarian is forcing the audience to think critically about the language we use to describe music created by women.

    Also featured on the program was Beglarian’s heart-wrenching mixed chamber work Waiting for Billy Floyd, based on a short story by Eudora Welty about a vulnerable young woman who is raped at a fishing camp along the Mississippi River while waiting for her lover. Push the Dust, performed by Adam Holmes, featured the surrealist poetry of Henri Michaux spoken amid the meandering melodies of both live and pre-recorded vibraphone. The program, so wide-ranging in style and tone, ended with The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, a groove-driven setting of three proverbs by William Blake.

    From a Long Story to a Short Musical Gem
    Stan Tymorek

    This is a story about different ways of telling a story.

    At Bang On a Can’s Summer Music Festival at MASS MoCA on Tuesday, the prominent new music composer Eve Beglarian knew her piece Waiting For Billy Floyd required an introduction. She told the audience at the all-Beglarian recital that it was based on Eudora Welty’s short story At The Landing, about a young woman named Jenny who falls in love for the first time with Billy Floyd. While trying to find this wandering fisherman after he deserts her, she is raped repeatedly.

    Beglarian said she was inspired to write Waiting For Billy Floyd during a boat trip down the Mississippi to Rodney, Miss., where the story is set. She even camped out in Rodney’s town square to make a field recording of local sounds, mostly an unaccompanied chorus of barking dogs.

    Yet even with her own evocative score, five highly accomplished musicians (playing flute, clarinet, violin, cello, percussion and piano), and the field recording, it would be impossible for any composer to directly translate eighteen pages of Welty’s imagistic, dreamlike prose—which could take well over an hour to read—in a 10-minute piece of music. Instead, Beglarian’s approach is poetic, using the power of her music to focus on the emotional crux of the story, the rape scene.

    Waiting for Billy Floyd progressed from a soft piano and vibraphone duet to a full-blown love song when the rest of the sextet joined in. The violence of the assault was loudly announced when the piano turned dissonant, almost drowning out the other instruments. In a post-concert interview, Beglarian said she bluntly refers to this in rehearsals as “the rape music.” In discussing the piece with other musicians, she said, some have questioned her score for indicating that the piano be played so loudly in triple forte. “They say you can’t hear the other instruments,” she said. “I know that!” The pianist’s violent music rightly dominates the others’ “joyous music,” which, she pointed out, is all we hear at the quiet conclusion. That, and the barking dog, which Beglarian hears as a sign that Billy is coming back to Jenny. “The joyous music fucking wins that piece!” she said, proving her words can be as forceful as her music.

    Flutes of a Feather Flock Together
    Sarah Lindmark

    How often is the phrase “Flute party!” shouted into the summer breeze? Not enough, apparently, according to the three flutists at the Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival at MASS MoCA. Alexis Letourneau, Philip Snyder, and Jennifer Timmins shout the phrase at top volume whenever they run into each other in the seemingly endless halls of the contemporary art museum.

    Although frequent rehearsals can be tough for the festival’s performance Fellows, Jennifer Timmins smiled as she mentioned how much she’s gained from the experience. “We’re not here to learn to be flutists. We’re here to learn to be musicians and citizens of this community,” she said.

    Michael Gordon’s Yo Shakespeare, one of the pieces they’ve had to grapple with together, calls for the three of them to play sets of hand-made pan pipes. According to Jennifer, “the piece is a banger,” but it has a series of intricate rhythms that are hard to master on an instrument that is played so differently than the flutes they’re used to. She added, “it takes more air, and it takes longer for the air to produce a sound.”

    2
    hand-made pan pipes
    (John Schaefer/ NYPR)

    A sense of true camaraderie shone through as the conversation turned to their fast friendship, and Philip and Alexis laughed about playing orchestral excerpts together before rehearsals. Jennifer spoke to how easy it was “to naturally gravitate towards each other” upon meeting people who “just want to play music but just happen to play the flute.” “There are a lot of stereotypes about flute playing,” she continued, just as Alexis interrupted her to add, “which the three of us all defy.” At any other summer music festival, one might expect these three to viciously compete for top spot or principal chair, but it’s clear that these performance Fellows value community over competition.

    Putting it together: Brooks Frederickson at the Bang on a Can Summer Festival
    by Lasse D. Hansen

    Given the opportunity to work with noted conductor Brad Lubman, composer Brooks Frederickson did not think twice: This was the ensemble he was going to write a new piece for. It was in spring 2018, and the Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival asked him to choose one of three different instrumentations for the commission work he was about to write for the festival’s Musician Fellows.

    Giving the unusual instrumentation a second look it struck him: “Oh no! What am I going do with four percussionists and two singers?” Realizing that this configuration of instruments would probably never be accessible again, Frederickson decided to focus his attention on making the most out of this particular event by not worrying about usual concerns for a classical composer, such as whether the music would be suitable for every other hall or playable for every other musician. Instead he joined the Festival Ensemble on stage at the World Premiere Composer Concert this Monday – the only one of the nine Composition Fellows to do so.

    “I didn’t intend to write myself into the piece in the beginning,” Frederickson recalled in an interview at MASS MoCA Wednesday afternoon, “but as I was working on it I started to get really interested in vocoders. It’s an instrument that basically creates a new sound by taking two existing sounds and putting them together, and voices are really good for that.” Using the two singers as source material he wrote himself a vocoder part.

    3
    Brooks Frederickson (Julie Rooney)

    When he lived in New York, surrounded by highly skilled musicians for eight years, Frederickson didn’t perform much. Now, having just moved to Durham, NC, where there are fewer musicians around, he is getting more involved in the performance of his music.

    “I want to be a participant in my music rather than just write it, send it off, show up at the rehearsal, say ‘It’s good!’ and sit in the audience,” he said. “This piece is a continuation of that feeling. I’m still getting comfortable with being back on stage and I have to relearn how not to be afraid of it or to have stage fright again, and that feels good.”

    Stratus-embedded waves moving against mean flow received its world premiere performance by the 2018 Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival Ensemble and Brooks Frederickson this Monday evening at MASS MoCA.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    NewSounds.org infuses the eclectic spirit of the radio show into a full online and live event experience. Combining the New Sounds radio show, WNYC’s Soundcheck podcast and the adventurous spirit of WQXR’s Q2 Music, NewSounds.org will be a place for discovery, conversation, insights into the creative process, and of course 24/7 music.
    The centerpiece is New Sounds Radio, an online station hosted by New Sounds founder and long-running host John Schaefer, but infused with new, emerging voices including experimental musicians Kelly Moran, Eliza Bagg and Lora-Faye Åshuvud, and tastemakers Gamall Awad and Matt Werth, along with WQXR’s Helga Davis and Terrance McKnight, and composer-guitarist Phil Kline. The station will feature an array of styles and genres – from singer Courtney Barnett to contemporary classical music ensemble Kronos Quartet, from jazz icon Henry Threadgill to the Nordic folk music of Wardruna, from electronic composer and bandleader Anna Meredith to the stunning vocals of Puerto Rico’s Ileana Cabra.
    “With almost everything ever recorded anywhere now available online, where do you start? New Sounds might be the place,” said John Schaefer. “We try to be friendly and jargon free, and gleefully oblivious of genre. Our goal is to find the artists, the songs, and the sounds that you might love – if only you get a chance to hear them. And we believe that algorithms won’t give you the same experience as a set of recommendations from real people. A friendly guide is the best way to discover new music, or music that defies easy categorization; and some of that music just might change your life.”
    “For three decades, New Sounds was one of the last bastions of free form FM programming; completely genre-free and dictated solely by the impeccable and irresistible tastes of its host,” said Alex Ambrose, Senior Producer, New Sounds. “NewSounds.org will usher that sense of discovery and unpredictability into the digital age, drawing on the best of New York’s curatorial and taste-making power.”

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:31 PM on July 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , Jasper String Quartet, Michael Brown- piano,   

    From Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts: Michael Brown, piano, Jasper String Quartet 

    Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts

    From Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts

    1
    Michael Brown, piano
    Thursday July 12 7:00pm
    Classical, New Music, Recital Spanish Courtyard
    $25, $30, $35, $40
    Buy Tickets

    Michael Brown is a pianist on the rise. Recently named an Emerging Artist of 2018 by Lincoln Center, Brown is not only “a young piano visionary” (The New York Times) but an exceptional composer as well. In his Caramoor recital, he celebrates Leonard Bernstein’s centennial with a composition of his own titled 100 Chords for Bernstein alongside selections from West Side Story. Also on the program are pieces by Haydn, Medtner, and Copland.

    “One of the leading figures in the current renaissance of performer-composers” — The New York Times

    Program

    Haydn Fantasia in C Major, H. XVII: 4, Capriccio
    Medtner Second Improvisation for Piano, Op. 47
    Michael Brown 100 Chords for Bernstein
    Bernstein Four Movements from West Side Story (arr. L. Smit)
    Copland El salón México (arr. L. Bernstein)

    Champagne Toast with Caramoor’s CEO for Members at the Composer’s Circle Level and above

    2
    Jasper String Quartet
    Friday July 6 8:00pm
    Chamber, Classical, New Music Spanish Courtyard
    There is no ticketing information on the web page. S, if you are interested, call 914.232.1252

    Hailed by The Strad as “sonically delightful and expressively compelling” and “powerful” by The New York Times, the Jasper String Quartet bring their passion for performing emotionally personal and significant pieces to Caramoor. Presenting two contemporary pieces alongside classic works from Beethoven and Mendelssohn, the Jasper String Quartet — an alumni quartet of our Ernst Stiefel String Quartet-in-Residence program — are the perfect centrepiece for a Friday evening in the Spanish Courtyard.

    “The [Jasper String Quartet] displayed joie de vivre and athleticism — and perhaps most tellingly, grins all around.” — The Strad

    Program

    Beethoven String Quartet No. 2 in G Major, Op. 18, No. 2
    Ted Hearne Law of Mosaics: 1. Excerpts from the middle of something
    Missy Mazzoli Death Valley Junction
    — Intermission —
    Mendelssohn String Quartet No. 4 in E Minor, Op. 44, No. 2

    149 Girdle Ridge Road
    PO Box 816
    Katonah, NY 10536
    p: 914.232.5035 f: 914.232.5521 e: info@caramoor.org

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts is a destination for exceptional music, captivating programs, spectacular gardens and grounds, and wonderful moments with friends and family. It enriches the lives of its audiences through innovative and diverse musical performances of the highest quality. Its mission also includes mentoring young professional musicians and providing educational programs for young children centered around music.

    Audiences are invited to explore the lush grounds, tour the historic Rosen House, enjoy a pre-concert picnic, and discover beautiful music in the relaxed settings of the Venetian Theater, Spanish Courtyard, Music Room of the Rosen House, and the magnificent gardens.

    The story of Caramoor, the Rosens, Lucie’s Theremin, the Art Collections and our History is rich and diverse.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:04 PM on June 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Avant-garde, Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, , Folk-Rock,   

    From LPR: “LPR X: Clap Your Hands Say Yeah with Ensemble LPR (String Quartet)” 

    From LPR

    1
    Wed June 27th, 2018

    8:00PM

    Main Space

    Minimum Age: 18+

    Doors Open: 7:00PM

    Show Time: 8:00PM

    Event Ticket: $20

    Day of Show: $25
    Tickets

    2
    Clap Your Hands Say Yeah

    Like previous Clap Your Hands Say Yeah records, The Tourist nods to Ounsworth’s musical heroes—a group that includes artists such as John Cale, Robert Wyatt, Tom Waits and Nick Cave. However, this album also shows a natural progression from previous records. Better Off and The Vanity Of Trying are lush, keyboard-augmented songs, while A Chance To Cure and Ambulance Chaser are rhythmically askew, and the sighing Loose Ends is delicate, acoustic-based folk-rock.

    The Tourist emerged from a period where Ounsworth was doing a lot of intense soul-searching, and processing personal events that irrevocably shaped his life and future. But although most of these songs came together during this time of reflection, he considers the record to be cathartic—an exhale of sorts, rather than a collection of songs where he was indulging in self-pity or letting things stagnate or fester.

    Appropriately, The Tourist’s lyrics reflect how complex upheaval can be (“We can beat around this bush together/Sometimes it’s all I think of/Other times I can forget”) and explore the imperfect nature of blame (“The car left the road and was found without its mirrors/You play the victim/And I’ll play the blind man”). Other songs try to make sense of the present time (“Now that the past is on fire/How can I look around and find I can’t remember who I was”) or employ clever wordplay— “Black cat let’s not split hairs/I’m tethered to the weather/I assure I don’t care about no lucky streak”—for effect.

    Ounsworth spent about a week recording The Tourist at Dr. Dog’s Philadelphia-based studio with a drummer and bassist. After that, he and engineer Nick Krill spent a few months “tidying things up” and recording additional embellishments: backup vocals, keyboards, guitars and more percussion. That gives The Tourist more of a band feel than the last album, and contributes to why the record possesses a musical lightness. The dreamy opening track The Pilot especially has a lilting edge, courtesy of Smiths-reminiscent acoustic guitars strums and Ounsworth’s hiccupping, conspiratorial vocals.

    The Tourist was then mixed by Dave Fridmann, who also worked on two previous Clap Your Hands Say Yeah albums, 2007’s Some Loud Thunder and 2014’s Only Run. Ounsworth says he and Fridmann are on the same musical wavelength, which makes their long-time working relationship an anchor of sorts. “Dave and I don’t necessarily stick with what’s easiest which is fine and anxiety-inducing, in a good way,” he says. “He challenges me to do something a little bit different.”

    “I am a relatively solitary person and seem to work best alone,” he says. “I do count on others to help the project as the process of making and releasing an album moves forward, but if it doesn’t match what I have in mind, it’s hard for me to really be there for it. I guess this is one reason why the project has been independent all this time. Trust me, I understand that thinking this way is both an asset and a liability.”

    3
    Ensemble LPR

    Named after and headquartered at the acclaimed New York City venue Le Poisson Rouge, Ensemble LPR is an assemblage of New York’s finest musicians. The group personifies the venue’s commitment to aesthetic diversity and artistic excellence.

    Ensemble LPR performs an eclectic spectrum of music—from works by the finest living composers, to compelling interpretations of the standard repertoire—and collaborates with distinguished artists from classical and non-classical backgrounds: Timo Andres, Simone Dinnerstein, San Fermin, Daniel Hope, Taka Kigawa, Jennifer Koh, Mica Levi, David Longstreth (of Dirty Projectors), John Lurie, Ursula Oppens, Max Richter, André de Ridder, Christopher Rountree and Fred Sherry, to name a few.

    In January 2015 Ensemble LPR made its Deutsche Grammophon debut with Follow, Poet, featuring the music of Mohammed Fairouz and the words of Seamus Heaney and John F. Kennedy. Ensemble LPR’s acclaimed Central Park performance last June, part of the 110th Anniversary of the Naumburg Orchestral Concerts.

    In 2008 Le Poisson Rouge changed the classical music landscape, creating a new environment in which to experience art music. In doing so, Le Poisson Rouge expanded classical music listenership. The New York Times has heralded Le Poisson Rouge as “[a] forward-thinking venue that seeks to showcase disparate musical styles under one roof” and “[the] coolest place to hear contemporary music.” The Los Angeles Times raves, “[The] place isn’t merely cool…the venue is a downright musical marvel.” Le Poisson Rouge Co-Founder David Handler brings this same ethos to Ensemble LPR, of which he is Founding Executive & Artistic Director.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings


    Stem Education Coalition

    (le) poisson rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    LPR

    LPR is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of LPR

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:18 PM on June 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , , , ,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA and LPR: “LPR X: Taka Kigawa” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA
    and

    From (le) poisson rouge

    1

    Monday, August 27, 2018
    at 7:00 PM

    (le) poisson rouge
    158 Bleecker Street
    New York, NY 10012

    $20—30
    Tickets

    Table Seating: $25 advance, $30 day of show
    Standing Room: $20 advance, $25 day of show

    6:30pm doors | 7:00pm show | all ages

    PROGRAM:
    I.
    Illuminated Baby (2015), Akiki Yamane (b. 1982)
    II.
    Piano Sonata (2001), Luciano Berio (1925-2003)
    III.
    Three Etudes (2014), Matt Aucoin (b. 1990)
    1. rondo which devours itself
    2. currents
    3. a sounding
    IV.
    Phasma (2002), Beat Furrer (b. 1954)

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    (le) poisson rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    (le) poisson rouge

    (le) poisson rouge is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of (Le) Poisson Rouge.

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:13 PM on June 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 2018 Mizzou International Composers Festival: Alarm Will Sound, Avant-garde, , , ,   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “2018 Mizzou International Composers Festival: Alarm Will Sound” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1

    Alarm Will Sound Courtesy of the artists

    Thursday, July 26, 2018
    at 8:30 PM Eastern

    stream this event

    Missouri Theatre
    203 S. 9th St.
    Columbia, MO 65211

    $10—18
    Tickets

    Participants: Mizzou New Music Initiative, Alarm Will Sound, Alex Mincek, Matt Marks [ZT”L], Christopher Stark, Yi Chen, Stefan Freund

    Alarm Will Sound, “One of the most vital and original ensembles on the American music scene” (The New York Times), returns to the Mizzou International Composers Festival for the ninth time. For the opening concert of the 2018 Festival, AWS will perform music by the festival guest composers Chen Yi and Alex Mincek, as well as works by Matt Marks[ZT”L]/Stefan Freund.

    This program includes:

    Chen Yi, Sparkle (arr. by Stefan Freund)
    Alex Mincek, Chimeras*
    Matt Marks [ZT”L] and Stefan Freund, kinda asleep
    King Britt, The Intention (arr. by Christopher Stark)

    • world premiere, commissioned by Alarm Will Sound

    Alarm Will Sound was founded in 2001 by composers and performers who met as students at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY. ASCAP recognized their contributions to new music with a 2006 Concert Music Award for “the virtuosity, passion and commitment with which they perform and champion the repertory for the 21st century.”

    The versatility of Alarm Will Sound allows it to take on music from a wide variety of styles. Its repertoire ranges from European to American works, from the arch-modernist to the pop-influenced. The group fosters close relationships with contemporary composers and has commissioned and premiered pieces by Steve Reich, David Lang, Anthony Gatto, Cenk Ergün, Aaron Jay Kernis, Michael Gordon, Augusta Read Thomas, Stefan Freund, Wolfgang Rihm, Payton MacDonald, John Orfe, Gavin Chuck, Dennis DeSantis and Caleb Burhans.

    As the resident ensemble of the Mizzou International Composers Festival in Columbia, Missouri, we premiere and record the works of eight emerging composers each summer. Our Alarm System initiative has expanded the new music repertoire by inviting artists from various backgrounds, such as Mira Calix, Brian Reitzell, Matt Rogers, Medeski, Martin and Wood, to make music with Alarm Will Sound.

    Alarm Will Sound may be heard on ten recordings, including our most recent, Splitting Adams, released by Cantaloupe in April 2017, and the premiere recording of Steve Reich’s Radio Rewrite. Our genre-bending, critically acclaimed Acoustica features live-performance arrangements of music by electronica guru Aphex Twin.

    In 2016, Alarm Will Sound in a co-production with Opera Theatre of St. Louis, presented the world premiere of the staged version of Donnacha Dennehy’s The Hunger at the BAM Next Wave Festival and the Touhill Performing Arts Center.

    In 2013-14, Alarm Will Sound served as artists-in-residence at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, presenting four large ensemble performances at the Met, including two site-specific productions staged in museum galleries, as well as several smaller events in collaboration with the Museum’s educational programs.

    In 2011, at Carnegie Hall, the group presented 1969, a multimedia event that uses music, images, text, and staging to tell the compelling story of great musicians—John Lennon, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Luciano Berio, and Leonard Bernstein—striving for a new music and a new world amidst the turmoil of the late 1960s.

    In 2010, the group developed and performed the Dirty Projectors’ The Getty Address in its new identity as a live performance piece at Lincoln Center, Disney Hall and the Barbican. Music that Dirty Projectors front-man David Longstreth created on a computer by meticulous and complicated sampling, looping and layering is translated and arranged for 23 musicians of both bands.

    Alarm Will Sound has been presented by Carnegie Hall, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Lincoln Center, (le) Poisson Rouge, Miller Theatre, the Kitchen, the Bang on a Can Marathon, Disney Hall, Kimmel Center, Library of Congress, the Walker Arts Center, Cal Performances, Stanford Lively Arts, Duke Performances, and the Warhol Museum. International tours include the Holland Festival, Sacrum Profanum, Moscow’s Art November, St. Petersburg’s Pro Arte Festival, and the Barbican.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.
    Our Values

    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:55 PM on June 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Avant-garde, , , ,   

    From Alarm Will Sound: Matt Marks 

    From Alarm Will Sound

    Contribute to the Matt Marks Impact Fund to support artistic risk-takers and artists who have been historically excluded from our field.

    http://www.alarmwillsound.com/support/

    By mail, if you prefer, as I do:

    Alarm Will Sound
    c/o Tracy Mendez,
    Development Manager
    124 W 109th Street, Suite 5A
    New York, NY 10025

    About a year ago, Alarm Will Sound started conceiving a special fund to increase our impact on today’s culture. Two aspects of our work call for the special attention of a dedicated fund: building on our success as artistic risk-takers through performances that are even more forward-thinking; and diversifying the pool of composers and artists with whom we collaborate.

    Our original name for the fund was the Artistic Risk and Impact Fund, but we are now renaming it in memory of Matt Marks, one of our founding members, who passed away suddenly on May 11.

    1
    Taylor Dixson/Alarm Will Sound

    Matt was passionate about expanding the boundaries of classical music through stylistic diversity and the inclusion of artists who have been historically excluded from our field. He was integral to the formation of Alarm Will Sound’s identity, and his work as a performer, composer, and community organizer extended his impact.

    The Matt Marks Impact Fund will be a living memorial that embodies his values and continues to push Alarm Will Sound — and the entire field of classical music — to be more innovative, diverse, and inclusive.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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