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  • richardmitnick 5:36 PM on April 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , This week's #SōSelection is from Adam Sliwinski!   

    From Sō Percussion: “This week’s #SōSelection is from Adam Sliwinski!” 

    So Percussion in performance

    Sō Percussion

    4.16.18
    This week’s #SōSelection3 is from Adam Sliwinski!

    “On April 26th, I’m playing in a concert produced by Legacy Arts International and the Americas Society/Council of the Americas in New York City of the music of the Cuban composer Guido Lopéz-Gavilán. My wife Cristina Altamura, founder of Legacy Arts International, had the idea of bringing Gavilan to New York for a portrait concert. She met him in 2004 while performing a piano recital in Havana, and later met his son Ilmar in New York.

    His music reminds me of other Latin American composers who studied European classical music but habitually incorporated folk idioms: Piazzolla, Roldan, Villa-Lobos. Being from Cuba, Gavilan’s only real option for study as a young man was in the Soviet Union, and his music often seems to me to oscillate back and forth between those two poles. There is both magical shimmer and sturdy architecture in his music.

    Gavilan is an eminence in Cuba. He is a celebrated conductor, composer, and teacher. Although some of his work is known and performed beyond that country, my sense is that it would be better known if the political situation between our countries hadn’t been so icy all these years. I absolutely love this performance of his choral piece El Guayaboso by Cantores de Cienfuegos — and I think you will too!

    The “artist”

    Adam Sliwinski has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2002. Adam is particularly interested in keyboard instruments, especially marimba and piano.

    Eric Cha-Beach has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2007-A consummate percussionist he loves to learn new instruments like the musical saw integrating them into diverse setups

    Jason Treuting is a founding member of Sō Percussion- Jason has pioneered an innovative drum set practice within the new music sphere. He is also a composer.

    Josh Quillen has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2006- Josh is an expert Steel Drum artist having studied in Trinidad and immersed himself in Steel Band culture.

    Our Mission:

    Sō Percussion is a percussion-based music organization that creates and presents new collaborative works to adventurous and curious audiences and educational initiatives to engaged students, while providing meaningful service to its communities, in order to exemplify the power of music to unite people and forge deep social bonds.
    Our Vision:

    To create a new model of egalitarian artistic collaboration that respects history, champions innovation and curiosity, and creates an essential social bond through service to our audiences and our communities.
    Ensemble Bio:

    Sō is: Eric Cha-Beach, Josh Quillen, Adam Sliwinski, and Jason Treuting

    With innovative multi-genre original productions, sensational interpretations of modern classics, and an “exhilarating blend of precision and anarchy, rigor and bedlam,” (The New Yorker), Sō Percussion has redefined the scope and vital role of the modern percussion ensemble.

    Sō’s repertoire ranges from “classics” of the 20th century, by John Cage, Steve Reich, and Iannis Xenakis, et al, to commissioning and advocating works by contemporary composers such as Caroline Shaw, David Lang, Steve Mackey, and Paul Lansky, to distinctively modern collaborations with artists who work outside the classical concert hall, including vocalist Shara Nova, electronic duo Matmos, the groundbreaking Dan Deacon, legendary drummer Bobby Previte, jam band kings Medeski, Martin, and Wood, Wilco’s Glenn Kotche, choreographer Shen Wei, and composer and leader of The National, Bryce Dessner, among many others.

    Sō Percussion also composes and performs their own works, ranging from standard concert pieces to immersive multi-genre programs – including Imaginary City, Where (we) Live, and A Gun Show, which was presented in a multi-performance presentation as part of BAM’s 2016 Next Wave Festival. In these concert-length programs, Sō Percussion employs a distinctively 21st century synthesis of original music, artistic collaboration, theatrical production values and visual art, into a powerful exploration of their own unique and personal creative experiences.

    Rooted in the belief that music is an essential facet of human life, a social bond, and an effective tool in creating agency and citizenship, Sō Percussion enthusiastically pursues a growing range of social and community outreach. Examples include their Brooklyn Bound presentations of younger composers; commitments to purchasing offsets to compensate for carbon-heavy activities such as touring travel; and leading their SōSI students in an annual food-packing drive, yielding up to 25,000 meals, for the Crisis Center of Mercer County through the organization EndHungerNE.

    Sō Percussion is the Edward T. Cone Ensemble-in-Residence at Princeton University, where they offer educational work and present an annual series of concerts. They are also Co-Directors of the percussion department at the Bard College-Conservatory of Music, and run the annual Sō Percussion Summer Institute (SōSI, now in its ninth year), providing college-age composers and percussionists an immersive exposure to collaboration and project development.

    One of the first things any group needs is a name. When our group was founded in 1999, we cast far and wide among our friends and family for suggestions. The winner was this simple, short word offered by Jenise Treuting, Jason’s sister.

    Jenise has been living and working in Japan as an English-Japanese translator for 20 years. The word “Sō” was punchy, enigmatic, and memorable.

    “The Sō in Sō Percussion comes from 奏, the second character in the compound Japanese word 演奏 (ensou), to perform music. By itself, so means “to play an instrument.” But it can also mean “to be successful,” “to determine a direction and move forward,” and “to present to the gods or ruler.” Scholars have suggested that the latter comes from the character’s etymology, which included the element “to offer with both hands.” 奏 is a bold, straightforward character, but lends itself to calligraphy with a certain energy that gives so a springy, delicate look.”

    – Jenise Treuting

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 1:37 PM on April 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , Doctor Nerve, Ereia iget it for $5.00, Follow the link props, , Sirius String Quartet   

    From Cuneiform Records This Week-ends $5.00 deal: “Eriea by Doctor Nerve with the Sirius String Quartet” 

    Cuneiform Records

    This Weekend Save 50% on an
    Amazing Album and
    Get It For Just $5!

    You Now Have A Great Opportunity
    For One WEEKEND Only
    to
    Buy a Brilliant Album
    from the Cuneiform Catalog for Only $5!

    This sale ends 11:59pm UTC on 4/15/2018
    Use this list to find when this sale ends in your time zone:
    UTC = Coordinated Universal Time, or Zulu
    PST = Pacific Standard Time (UTC – 8 hours)
    ALDT = Alaskan Daylight Time (UTC – 8 hours)
    PDT = Pacific Daylight Time (UTC – 7 hours)
    MST = Mountain Standard Time (UTC – 7 hours)
    MDT = Mountain Daylight Time (UTC – 6 hours)
    CST = Central Standard Time (UTC – 6 hours)
    CDT = Central Daylight Time (UTC – 5 hours)
    EST = Eastern Standard Time (UTC – 5 hours)
    EDT = Eastern Daylight Time (UTC – 4 hours)
    AST = Atlantic Standard Time (UTC – 4 hours)
    ALST = Alaskan Standard Time (UTC – 9 hours)
    HST = Hawaiian Standard Time (UTC – 10 hours)

    THIS WEEK’S ALBUM
    Eriea by
    Doctor Nerve with the Sirius String Quartet

    HOW IT WORKS:

    1) Click the link below which will take you to the above album on Bandcamp

    2) Click “Buy Digital Album”

    3) Type “10” into the Name your price field (The discount comes next! 😉 )

    4) Type the word “FIVE” into the Discount code field.

    5) Click “apply”.

    6) Click “Check out now” or “Add to Cart”.

    That’s it! Easy, right?
    Click Here To Get ‘Ereia’ For Only $5!

    Hello!
    As you know this weekly email is our way of offering Cuneiform fans (you) a way to personally own and easily discover great titles from our back catalog for an amazing price!

    This weekend’s Five Dollar album is Eriea by Doctor Nerve.

    Doctor Nerve is a rock band that has been annihilating the boundaries between rock, metal, improvisation, jazz, and experimental music since 1983. Eriea, recorded with The Sirius String Quartet was the group’s fifth studio album.

    A large work in three movements that spans intimate composition for solo viola, tightly reigned composition for full ensemble, explosive conducted improvisation of orchestral scope, and incendiary solos over rock grooves. It includes a no-holds-barred live performance of the second movement, recorded at Ereia’s premiere at the FIMAV ’97 Festival.

    “Four years of hard labor & 14 musicians with a commitment to total annihilation; painstaking compositions & apocalyptic deconstructions burned into a single laser-guided CD projectile.”
    -Nick Didkovsky

    “Using deconstructed phrasing, computer-generated scores, and intuitive improvisation techniques, the Nerve is one of the most fluent ensembles currently nestled in the Big Apple.
    Ereia is a long form, commissioned work featuring the Sirius String Quartet (joining Doctor Nerve). Divided into three distinct movements (including an incendiary, 20 minute in-concert portion), [leader, guitarist Nick Didkovsky] mixes searing Stravinsky-like chording with inexplicable avant-rock moves.
    With its abundance of classical discipline (though hardly letting the ink dry on the scores), cyber treatments and free skronk execution, Ereia is the first major work of 2K, poised to be measured against by composers and musicians of the future. Exceptional.”
    Focus

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:12 PM on April 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , Lesley Flanigan, , Red Bull Music Festival, Tristan Perich   

    From Bang On a Can via Red Bull Music Festival: “Tristan Perich: Drift Multiply, Lesley Flanigan” 

    Bang On a Can is the original DIY New Music Organization

    Red Bull Music Festival New York 2018
    3
    Thursday 3 May- Friday 25 May, 2018

    Various Venues, New York

    May 09, 2018

    The Cathedral of St. John the Divine
    1047 Amsterdam Ave
    New York, NY 10025
    Find Tickets

    Tristan Perich
    Lesley Flanigan

    As part of Red Bull Music Festival New York, renowned modern classical composer and sound artist Tristan Perich will premiere his most ambitious project yet: A piece for 50 violins and 50 self-built 1-bit speakers. Perich investigates the spaces where the physical world meets the abstract world of computational electronics, writing intricate arrangements that blend lo-fi 1-bit sound – the lowest possible digital representation of audio – with cascading melodies performed by classically trained musicians. Also performing will be Lesley Flanigan, the experimental electronic musician known for her work with handmade speaker feedback instruments and voice. Flanigan takes a sculptural approach to sound design, and will present a new project for subwoofers and solo voice.

    1
    Tristan Perich 1 Bit Symphony 2010 Credit D Yee.

    1
    An ambitious, experimental piece for 50 violins and 50 speakers.

    Tristan Perich (born 1982)is a contemporary composer and sound artist from New York City who focuses on electronic one bit sound.

    Perich composed a series of compositions as well as sound art installations with 1 bit electronics, which Perich describes as being music that never has more than one bit of information being played at any given time. In Denmark he was an artist in residence, where he built a series of sculptures called Interval Studies consisting of large amounts of small speakers all sending out their own frequency. The blending of all of these independent frequencies caused a white noise, or other forms of colored noise. Other works by him include Machine Drawings and 1-bit Video.

    Together with Kunal Gupta and Katie Shima he forms the group Loud Objects. This group performs electronic music by soldering.

    Perich has performed on Blip Festival and SxSW. Works by Perich have been commissioned for Bang on a Can festival held at Lincoln Center in New York City.

    In February 2010 he won, with his Loud Objects collective, third prize in the Guthman Instrument Competition at Georgia Tech with a circuit bent electronic system. Works of Perich have been performed by the Bang on a Can-ensemble, Calder Quartet and Meehan/Perkins. His work has been reviewed by The Wire. He received the Prix Ars Electronica in 2009 and was a featured artist at Sónar 2010 in Barcelona.

    Perich was the Edward E. Elson Artist-in-Residence of the Addison Gallery of American Art at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, serving as a composer, musician and visual artist.

    In 2013, Perich was artist-in-residence at MIT’s Center for Art, Science & Technology (CAST), presenting public performances and lectures.

    Lesley Flannigan

    Lesley Flanigan, an experimental electronic musician, is performing her new piece Hedera at the venue National Sawdust in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, NY. First, there is a repetitive scratching, like an analog camera advancing at 110 beats per minute. Within this beat are hints of other sounds: the simultaneous striking of many drums, slowed down machine gun fire, children’s noisemakers. Flanigan sits on the floor behind MIDI controllers and sings into a mic, turning her loops on and off.

    “Hedera” transforms slowly over its 20-minute duration, but its beat never fully lets up, even when Flanigan’s layers of vocals nearly wash it away. This beat is the scaffolding of the piece: a distorted clicking noise which Flanigan held onto for months, adjusting the frequencies and precisely placing the wordless vocals that weave around it. Its pace feels like a panic attack, a racing heartbeat.

    This work is the result of a big new presence in Flanigan’s life – her first child. After years of making work centered around speaker feedback created with her homemade instruments, Flanigan says that, after the birth of her daughter, those reliable noises just didn’t sound right. “My ears just didn’t want to listen to those sounds,” she says, sitting in the studio in Williamsburg where she works with her husband. “But I was singing a lot to my daughter. I was thinking a lot about voice.”

    Voice, to Flanigan, can mean many things. Growing up in Tampa, Florida, she sang in a church choir before attending art school for sculpture. Though she was untrained, she’d always been interested in creating music, whether with her high school band or the group she started after moving to Denver to escape her hometown. That brief stint in Colorado ended as soon as Flanigan saved enough money to make it to New York City, in 2002.

    After spending four years working as a video editor, Flanigan decided she needed to get back to working with her hands. “On some level I always pictured myself on a ladder in my future,” she says. “I never really enjoyed sitting behind a computer.” Still, unsure of what she was interested in, Flanigan applied to the Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) at New York University, a two year program that allows students to explore new creative applications for technology. There, she discovered physical computing and spent her time building simple circuits. ITP also gave her access to their wood shop, renewing a love of carpentry from when she was in school for sculpture. When she realized that she could build a simple speaker that amplified a sound circuit, something clicked. Or rather, screeched.

    Flanigan still has that first speaker. She brings it over to where we’re sitting and flips the switch. The attached contact mic elicits a small explosion of noises, squeals, drones and thrums. “I heard a sound like that,” she says, “and I was like, ‘Holy shit, that’s beautiful!’”

    See the full article here.

    Bang On A Can David Lang- Michael Gordon- Julia Wolfe © Peter Serling

    Bang On A Can All-Stars Members Ashley Bathgate, cello
    Robert Black, bass
    Vicky Chow, piano
    David Cossin, percussion
    Mark Stewart, guitars
    Ken Thomson, clarinet

    Formed in 1992, the Bang on a Can All-Stars are recognized worldwide for their ultra-dynamic live performances and recordings of today’s most innovative music. Freely crossing the boundaries between classical, jazz, rock, world and experimental music, this six-member amplified ensemble has consistently forged a distinct category-defying identity, taking music into uncharted territories. Performing each year throughout the U.S. and internationally, the All-Stars have shattered the definition of what concert music is today.

    Together, the All-Stars have worked in unprecedented close collaboration with some of the most important and inspiring musicians of our time, including Steve Reich, Ornette Coleman, Burmese circle drum master Kyaw Kyaw Naing, Tan Dun, DJ Spooky, and many more. The group’s celebrated projects include their landmark recordings of Brian Eno’s ambient classic Music for Airports and Terry Riley’s In C, as well as live performances with Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Don Byron, Iva Bittova, Thurston Moore, Owen Pallett and others. The All-Stars were awarded Musical America’s Ensemble of the Year and have been heralded as “the country’s most important vehicle for contemporary music” by the San Francisco Chronicle.

    Current and recent project highlights include the touring performances and recording of Julia Wolfe’s Pulitzer Prize winning Anthracite Fields for the All-Stars and guest choir, the record release of Wolfe’s acclaimed Steel Hammer, featuring Trio Mediaeval, plus a moving theatrically staged collaboration with SITI Company and director Anne Bogart; Field Recordings, a major multi-media project and CD/DVD now featuring 30 commissioned works by Tyondai Braxton, Mira Calix, Anna Clyne, Bryce Dessner, Florent Ghys, Michael Gordon, Jóhann Jóhannsson, David Lang, Christian Marclay, Steve Reich, Todd Reynolds, Julia Wolfe, and more; the Lincoln Center Festival 2017 world premiere of Cloud River Mountain, a new collaboration featuring Chinese superstar singer Gong Linna; the world premiere performance and recording of Steve Reich’s 2×5 including a sold-out performance at Carnegie Hall, and much more. With a massive repertoire of works written specifically for the group’s distinctive instrumentation and style of performance, the All-Stars have become a genre in their own right. The All-Stars record on Cantaloupe Music and have released past recordings on Sony, Universal and Nonesuch.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:43 AM on April 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , Events,   

    From ICE: Coming Events and Some Photos 

    International Contemporary Ensemble

    Works of New York University and Columbia Composers at Abrons This Week!

    1

    WORKS OF NEW YORK UNIVERSITY COMPOSERS
    Thursday, April 12, 7:00pm (note time)
    FREE TICKET RESERVATION LINK

    WORKS OF COLUMBIA COMPOSERS
    Saturday, April 14, 7:00pm (note time)
    FREE TICKET RESERVATION LINK
    Abrons Arts Center, Underground Theater
    466 Grand St.
    New York, NY 10002

    Come join ICE for our final free events at Abrons Arts Center for the spring season! Capping a year of collaborative workshops, ICE presents brand-new works by the star composers at New York University and Columbia University. A large ICE band takes on these ambitious programs!

    Thursday night’s concert features premieres by Sofy Yuditskaya, Viola Yip, Michael Rose, Merche Blasco, Bernardo Barros, Vasiliki Krimitza, and Joel Rust.

    Saturday’s event features more premieres by Stylianos Dimou, Katherine Balch, David Bird, Taylor Brook, Finola Merivale, John Rot, and Onur Yildrim.

    ICE Returns to Contempo at the University of Chicago!

    2

    Sunday, April 22, 2:00pm
    Logan Center at University of Chicago
    915 E. 60th Street
    Chicago, IL 60637
    TICKET LINK

    In a program titled Echoes of the Earth, ICE explores avant-garde musical depictions of ecological landscapes and natural processes.

    Pauline Oliveros: Earth Ears
    Mario Davidovsky: Synchronisms No. 3
    Harrison Birtwistle: Some Petals from my Twickenham Herbarium
    Toru Takemitsu: Rain Spell
    George Crumb: Eleven Echoes of Autumn

    Rachel Beetz, flute
    Campbell MacDonald, clarinet
    Ross Karre, percussion
    Jordan Thomas, harp
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    Jennifer Curtis, violin
    Michael Nicolas, cello

    Not Art Records Joins OpenICE at Abrons This Sunday!

    Not Art Records: Piano Music
    Sunday, April 15, 7:00pm
    Abrons Arts Center, Underground Theater
    466 Grand St.
    New York, NY 10002
    FREE TICKET RESERVATION LINK

    A contradiction in and of itself, Not Art Records and OpenICE present a concert of piano music for non-pianos. Featuring works by Conlon Nancarrow, Steve Reich, and Heather Stebbins, the instruments used will include analog synthesizers, repurposed piano wiring & components, and B. Toys Meowsic keyboards.

    Photos from ICE’s Travels in Omaha and Ann Arbor!

    3
    4

    If you think a friend might enjoy updates from ICE, forward them this email!
    They can sign up for our newsletter here.

    See the full article here .

    The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) is an artist collective that is transforming the way music is created and experienced. As performer, curator, and educator, ICE explores how new music intersects with communities across the world. The ensemble’s 35 members are featured as soloists, chamber musicians, commissioners, and collaborators with the foremost musical artists of our time. Works by emerging composers have anchored ICE’s programming since its founding in 2001, and the group’s recordings and digital platforms highlight the many voices that weave music’s present.

    A recipient of the American Music Center’s Trailblazer Award and the Chamber Music America/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, ICE was also named the 2014 Musical America Ensemble of the Year. The group currently serves as artists-in-residence at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Mostly Mozart Festival, and previously led a five-year residency at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. ICE was featured at the Ojai Music Festival from 2015 to 2017, and at recent festivals abroad such as gmem-CNCM-marseille and Vértice at Cultura UNAM, Mexico City. Other performance stages have included the Park Avenue Armory, The Stone, ice floes at Greenland’s Diskotek Sessions, and boats on the Amazon River.

    New initiatives include OpenICE, made possible with lead funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which offers free concerts and related programming wherever ICE performs, and enables a working process with composers to unfold in public settings. DigitICE, a free online library of over 350 streaming videos, catalogues the ensemble’s performances. ICE’s First Page program is a commissioning consortium that fosters close collaborations between performers, composers, and listeners as new music is developed. EntICE, a side-by-side education program, places ICE musicians within youth orchestras as they premiere new commissioned works together; inaugural EntICE partners include Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and The People’s Music School in Chicago. Summer activities include Ensemble Evolution at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, in which young professionals perform with ICE and attend workshops on topics from interpretation to concert production. Yamaha Artist Services New York is the exclusive piano provider for ICE. Read more at iceorg.org.
    Staff

    Claire Chase, Founder*

    William McDaniel, Executive Director
    Rebekah Heller, co-Artistic Director*
    Ross Karre, co-Artistic Director and Director of digitICE.org*
    Jacob Greenberg, Director of Recordings and Digital Outreach*
    Levy Lorenzo, Engineer and Technical Director*
    Ryan Muncy, Director of Institutional Giving and co-Director, OpenICE*
    Joshua Rubin, Artistic Director Emeritus*
    Karla Brom, General Manager
    Maciej Lewandowski, Director of Production
    Bridgid Bergin, Development Associate

    • ICE musician

    Artists

    Alice Teyssier, flute
    Bridget Kibbey, harp
    Campbell MacDonald, clarinet
    Claire Chase, flute
    Cory Smythe, piano
    Dan Peck, tuba
    Daniel Lippel, guitar
    David Bowlin, violin
    David Byrd-Marrow, horn
    Erik Carlson, violin
    Gareth Flowers, trumpet
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    James Austin Smith, oboe
    Jennifer Curtis, violin
    Josh Modney, violin and viola
    Joshua Rubin, clarinet
    Katinka Kleijn, cello
    Kivie Cahn-Lipman, cello
    Kyle Armbrust, viola
    Levy Lorenzo, percussion
    Maiya Papach, viola
    Michael Nicolas, cello
    Mike Lormand, trombone
    Nathan Davis, percussion
    Nicholas Houfek, lighting designer
    Nicholas Masterson, oboe
    Nuiko Wadden, harp
    Peter Evans, trumpet
    Peter Tantsits, tenor
    Phyllis Chen, piano
    Randall Zigler, bass
    Rebekah Heller, bassoon
    Ross Karre, percussion
    Ryan Muncy, saxophone
    Steven Schick, Artist-in-Residence
    Tony Arnold, soprano
    Wendy Richman, viola

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 4:22 PM on April 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , , , The Hands Free   

    From New Amsterdam Records: The Hands Free 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    New Amsterdam Records

    ANNOUNCING:

    self-titled debut album from

    The Hands Free

    New acoustic band featuring composer/performers

    1
    James Moore (guitar/banjo)


    Caroline Shaw (violin)

    3
    Nathan Koci (accordion)

    4
    Eleonore Oppenheim (bass)

    Album Release Show:

    featuring The Hands Free +
    performances by Mary Halvorson and Robbie Lee

    Wednesday, May 30 – 8:00pm
    The Kitchen
    New York, NY
    MORE INFO & TICKETS

    Out May 25
    pre-order/stream debut track via Bandcamp

    4

    The Hands Free draws on ideas and material from folk music, the contemporary classical world, jazz and free improv, a natural arrival point for a group of musicians with a variety of experiences and interests. Caroline Shaw is a multi-instrumentalist, Pulitzer Prize-winning composer and vocalist for Roomful of Teeth; bassist Eleonore Oppenheim performs regularly with adventurous groups such as Glasser, Victoire, and Big Dog Little Dog; multi-instrumentalist Nathan Koci cruises the worlds of chamber music, folk sessions, and musical theater; and Moore is a founding member of the praised electric guitar quartet Dither, and a frequent collaborator with John Zorn. The four performers became friends while collaborating in different contexts for 10-12 years, but found the most joy performing together in scrappy late-night folk jams, which is how The Hands Free came to be.

    The music for The Hands Free began with Moore’s discovery of sketches inspired by a 1937 collaboration in which the surrealist writer Paul Éluard poetically illustrated line drawings by Man Ray. Éluard and Man Ray assembled their work in a 1937 book Les Mains Libres, or Hands Free, a term they used to describe the free play of the imagination. Moore sought to illustrate these beautiful and eccentric pieces further with music, enlisting his trusted friends Shaw, Oppenheim, and Koci. The Hands Free and its repertoire evolved as the group developed these pieces together, bringing new ideas and traditional folk songs to the table. The result is an eclectic collection of music that has taken on a life of its own through the hearts and minds of the players.

    Virtually all of The Hands Free’s music incorporates elements of improvisation, making every performance unique, and the group’s favorite way to play is unamplified and in the round, so that their energy abounds. The album was recorded entirely to analog tape in a converted church in Hudson, NY, helping capture the spirit of the group’s live performance.

    The Hands Free album was produced by James Moore and The Hands Free, and recorded by Patrick Higgins at Future-Past Studios in Hudson, NY. It was mixed by Andrew McKenna Lee at Sill Sound Audio in Brooklyn, NY, and mastered by Joe Lambert. Artwork is by Holly Mulder-Wollan, and album design is by Alexandra Washkin. “Lovely Jenny” was written by Helena Torpy, all other songs written by The Hands Free. Kellam’s Reel/Rusty Gully incorporates a traditional English hornpipe.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:31 PM on April 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , , , Yo-Yo Ma’s Silkroad Ensemble returns to McCarter   

    From McCarter Theatre Center: “Silkroad Ensemble” 


    McCarter Theatre Center

    Yo-Yo Ma’s Silkroad Ensemble returns to McCarter. The renowned cellist serves as its Artistic Director, directly overseeing the engagement of its participants and the details of every program. While its members change from year to year, they hail from more than 20 countries along the routes of the ancient Silk Road, a series of land and sea trade routes crisscrossing Eurasia from Japan to the Mediterranean Sea. Most are musicians, but there are also storytellers and visual artists among them; their voices and their instruments (kamancheh, gaita, shakuhachi, pipa, sheng, and bawu), which all support Yo-Yo Ma’s goal: to maintain the integrity of art rooted in authentic traditions while nourishing global connections.

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    Kinan Azmeh, clarinet
    Jeffrey Beecher, bass
    Nicholas Cords, viola
    Sandeep Das, tabla
    Joseph Gramley, percussion
    Christina Pato, Galician bagpipes, piano
    Shane Shanahan, percussion
    Kojiro Umezaki, shakuhachi
    Wu Man, pipa
    TBA – violin
    TBA – cello

    Venue Matthews Theatre

    Monday, April 9 7:30pm Silkroad Ensemble Buy Tickets

    See the full article here .

    McCarter Theatre Center

    McCarter Theatre Center is recognized as one of this country’s leading theaters, and is the only organization in this country that is both a professional producing theater and a major presenter of the performing arts. With this identity comes a unique commitment to creating, developing and producing new work for the stage, reinvestigating classical theatrical repertoire, and bringing the best of the world’s performing artists to Central New Jersey. McCarter demonstrates an unwavering commitment to engaging, educating and cultivating a broad range of audiences, making the arts accessible to all people, and presenting an unparalleled variety of bold, stimulating, diverse and provocative programs across disciplines.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:05 PM on April 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, Brooklyn Raga Massive, , , Outside (In)dia: Martha Redbone   

    From Lincoln Center: “Outside (In)dia: Martha Redbone” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    Lincoln Center

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    Fri, Apr 13 7:30 pm Free
    Location – David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center

    Appalachian and Native American song is at the root of American music. Today, their song and struggle is particularly relevant and Martha Redbone is a clear and beautiful voice that represents these deep musical traditions. Her music flows equally from her own unique, award-winning blend of Native American elements with funk and her deep roots in Appalachian folk and Piedmont blues favored by the matriarchy that raised her on a rich sojourn from Clinch Mountain, Virginia, to Harlan County, Kentucky, and beyond to Brooklyn’s Dodge City-esque mean streets.

    Tonight (Apr 13), Martha’s ensemble joins with Brooklyn Raga Massive’s community of Indian music–inspired artists to highlight both the roots and contemporary interpretations of these traditions.

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    This evening’s (Apr 13)performance will feature a visual score by artist Nitin Mukul. Nitin Mukul (born in Lawrence, Massachusetts) has lived and worked in New Delhi, New York, D.C., and Los Angeles. He currently shows and curates with Aicon Gallery in New York. His interdisciplinary work bridges the mediums of painting, video, sound, photography, and printmaking.

    With Martha Redbone, vocals; Aaron Whitby, keyboards and piano; Marvin Sewell, guitar; Charlie Burnham, violin; Tony Mason, drums; Fred Cash, bass; Sameer Gupta, tabla; Pawan Benjamin, bansuri; Neel Murgai, sitar

    Special guests Soni Moreno, vocals; Michael Gam, sarod and percussion

    Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Martha Redbone

    About the Series

    Outside (In)dia is a four-part concert series produced by The India Center Foundation and curated by Brooklyn Raga Massive that pushes the boundaries and conceptions of Indian classical music. With commissions of new works bringing raga into play with musical traditions spanning Cuba to Iraq, the series will position Indian classical music as a space for inclusion, collaboration, and conversation in a revolutionary new way.

    Presented in collaboration with The India Center Foundation and Brooklyn Raga Massive

    Martha Redbone and The Art of Remembrance
    Interview by Michael Gam April 4, 2018

    Michael Gam: How did this collaboration come about?

    Martha Redbone: Sameer [Gupta] got in touch because he liked the idea of “India and Indian,” and finding some musical connections with that. Where I come from, a lot of the music is American mountain music, and when we were comparing it to mountain music from India, a lot of those stringed instruments are very similar—made of different materials, but the overall sound and execution of it and the stories of mountain tribal people seem very similar.

    MG: Your music is referred to as Americana. What does that mean to you?

    MR: Americana starts with the first people. It starts with the land, and then from there it starts with the people brought here, and who have been here. In many ways what we think of as Americana is actually Native and Black, and that’s why I’m here. This is why I do it. That’s where it begins. The foundation is in the land and the people who were connected to this land. And Americana is also the sound of the colonizers. That’s included in it as well.

    I call our music “mountain music” because I’m all these things, I’m not just Black and Native, I’m also Irish and English, and that’s also there in those mountains. I’m made of all those people in those mountains.

    It’s interesting how the music began and then morphed and kind of got claimed—blues became Black and country music became White, and it didn’t used to be that. They used to just call them string bands. But because of Jim Crow things got segregated, and the music got segregated. There became a knee-jerk reaction to this mountain music because it’s connected to colonization and slave ownership, so of course to Black people today it immediately feels like racist and KKK music. But it isn’t. Bluegrass, for example, actually comes from African music. The banjo’s African. And I think that people of color need to claim this instrument that came from our people, to claim it and make it our own.

    MG: Can you speak a little bit more about the similarities you found as you were working with BRM?

    MR: With regard to India, the music of the mountains has huge similarities musically, and there’s also music for every function: work songs, songs for healing, songs for prayer, songs for death, for mourning, all of that. When you hear these kind of bowed instruments, when you hear percussive instruments, they are different yet very similar in their use and their sound. For indigenous people around the world, that’s always been a form of communication. We also have nature that we’re trying to sound like—trees, wind, water, birds. These things are intrinsic to all people, no matter where they are. I mean, when you listen to Irish folk music or Klezmer music, or any Middle Eastern music, or Nomadic music, you hear that connection. I personally feel that all of it goes together because it’s everyone bringing something to the table.

    The show with BRM is going to be good fun. It’s going to be really beautiful. We were listening to how we were going to put the songs together and I think it’ll be really, really glorious.

    _______________________________________________________
    “Everybody has a different journey, everybody has a different path, but all you can do to learn about each other is to hear what someone’s individual story is and then you share yours.” _______________________________________________________

    MG: Do you feel that there’s a role that we play as artists in trying to show connections between cultures, or creating this new American identity of people from all over?

    MR: Part of the history of this country has been a kind of propaganda that was put forward for people to find an ideal of what America is, and in a way almost forget where they come from. That kind of mindset can serve some people well, if you know what I’m saying, but for other people, where there are particular laws in place absolutely equivalent to apartheid, it’s a different story. So, for musicians I think—especially musicians of different cultures—it’s part of our own personal journey that we want to try to share with people. There are plenty of musicians who don’t want to touch on culture at all, they just want to play some really great music that turns them on and has nothing to do with any cultural connection or spiritual journey.

    MG: What about for you?

    MR: For me, it’s everything. My journey is one where I feel like the older I get the more I want to just go back home and be a part of my home culture and to celebrate these people, these elders who I’ve learned everything from in a place that is now under imminent threat of the land being taken away, or the land disappearing. For me it’s my own sense of urgency for the fear of losing a homeland.

    What people forget is that this has been happening for centuries. People have been from everywhere coming here for centuries now. Colonization is in great effect for like 500 years. This is nothing new, but all we can do is tell our own stories. We can only share our own family story because that’s all we know. Everybody has a different journey, everybody has a different path, but all you can do to learn about each other is to hear what someone’s individual story is and then you share yours.

    MG: Your individual story is something that can be explored on a macro level for many people.

    MR: Yeah, and it can touch other people who have something similar.

    Both Native and Black people have a long history of survival here. Enslaved people, oppressed people—we’ve survived it to the point where it’s almost like we have to be careful that we don’t end up bumping heads. You also have to understand that there’s been a lot of brainwashing over the years. And the oppressed start oppressing others. It’s like the whole cycle of abuse. So, there’s a lot of that that has to be worked out, there’s a lot of healing, there’s a huge healing process.

    In my experience, for the most part Black people are always very proud to claim their Native heritage. I do not see it the other way around, and that’s a huge problem. Most of the Native people that I know who are part Black don’t want to acknowledge it, and I think that’s because there was a time in American history where if you had any degree of Black blood, or African blood, it was considered tainted.

    My friend wrote this recently: “Racism in this country did not start with slavery. There was systemic oppression and genocide before slaves were brought here. Where do you think they got the land and wealth that they used to oppress others by forcibly bringing them here to increase that wealth? It wasn’t by treating the nations already here as equal to themselves. I guess what really makes me tired is the erasure of indigenous history on Turtle Island by others and by ourselves.”

    MG: So many of our imbalances today are about the erasure of what’s happened before.

    MR: Exactly. And that’s why I have a big mouth today, musically, creatively, because I think it’s important. And this is why I say, “I am Black, I am Native, I am Southeastern, I am Choctaw, I am Shawnee.” I was raised by my mother, who is indigenous, and I refuse to take sides. I refuse anyone else trying to classify me, and, most important, I refuse to be a participant in my own people’s genocide. There’s no way that I will ever negate a huge part of my family. I will never, ever negate that. Then I’m contributing to the erasure. I will not just wipe everything away, nor do I think any White person should just say “I’m White.” Right, but from where, you know?

    _______________________________________________________
    “You always have to be careful when there’s a society who’s trying to make you forget who you are.”
    _______________________________________________________

    MG: Why is that remembrance so important?

    MR: Because it’s who we are. It’s not even remembering, it’s who we are. We’re here today. It’s not just celebrating the past—we’re living, we are alive. We’re here.

    I’m sharing this in my music expression not because I’ve lost it but because I know that over the years it’s opened the conversation for other people to find out who they are. So, when that conversation is opened up, it’s like other people are wanting to learn more about themselves. If my music can inspire people to look within themselves to find some peace and some answers and open a dialogue and reconnect with their families and all of that, then I feel like the music is touching someone on a really spiritual level, and that’s what makes me happy.

    MG: Other than the BRM collaboration, are there similar projects you’re working on?

    MR: This spring and summer, my partner and I are going to Sichuan, China. We’ve been asked to compose music for a project over there working with one of the mountain tribes. So, we’re doing an East meets West mountain tribal music for a theater piece. And again, like the project with BRM, the tribe in China, they’re mountain people as well, they’re the Yi people, and they’re at the foot of the Himalayas. Their instruments are extremely similar to our mountain instruments, like the equivalent to a dulcimer, banjo, jaw’s harp, just made with different materials but used exactly the same way. So, we’re playing around with that. And also, their work songs, their fishing songs, their celebration songs, they sound the same, just in a different language. I mean, it’s absolutely remarkable. We’re really thankful to be able to play in this project.

    MG: What do you feel like you’ve learned from these types of things?

    MR: What I’ve learned is, like the Lakota saying, Mitákuye Oyás’iŋ, “We are all related.” And I think we’re more alike than we give ourselves credit for. We really have to remind ourselves not to get caught up in the politics of race because those politics change with every administration. And these are social constructs that exist to serve a particular purpose, like government control. You always have to be careful when there’s a society who’s trying to make you forget who you are.

    When people look at Black people and say, “Why are you guys always so angry? Why do you have a chip on your shoulder?” Think about their path. Think about what happened 500 years ago. Think about being taken away and sold from your parents. Think about the horrors that your ancestors watched. Think about not knowing where your tribe is or where your home is. Think about that legacy. Think about your name, not even knowing your original name, your family name. Every Black person in this country has the name of whoever owned them, and almost every Native person has exactly the same thing. So, when you think about those things, when you look at Black and Native people, just think about that.

    We need to understand who we are, where we came from, respect our journey, respect our survival, and respect the time that we need to heal from the bullshit brought on everyone in this country. And it’s the same thing for new people who are coming in who are trying to hold onto who they are and where they come from. They have to hold onto that, and it’s up to us to respect that.
    _______________________________________________________________
    Michael Gam is a bass player and percussionist in New York City and is a member of Brooklyn Raga Massive, a collective of musicians rooted in and inspired by Indian classical music.

    See the full article here .

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:14 PM on April 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , ,   

    From Bang On a Can: “Bang on a Can Marathon!” 

    Bang On a Can is the original DIY New Music Organization

    Bang on a Can Marathon!

    Sunday, May 13, 2018 – 12:00pm – 10:00pm
    NYU Skirball Center
    New York, NY

    Bang on a Can returns to downtown Manhattan with its annual incomparable super-mix of boundary-busting music from around the corner and around the world! The 2018 Bang on a Can Marathon will feature 10 hours of rare performances by some of the most innovative musicians of our time side-by-side with some of today’s most pioneering young artists.

    Its FREE!!!

    Music By:
    Jeffrey Brooks, Tom Chiu, Fjola Evans, Michael Gordon, David Lang, Nicole Lizee, Dylan Mattingly, Jessie Montgomery, Brendon Randall-Myers, Terry Riley, Frederic Rzewski, Gabriella Smith, Galina Ustvolskaya, Aleksandra Vrebalov, Alex Weiser, Julia Wolfe

    Performances by:
    Terry Riley, Bang on a Can All-Stars with special guests Eric Berryman, Todd Reynolds, and Gyan Riley, Contemporaneous, David Friend, Ethel, FLUX Quartet, Maya Beiser and Kate Valk, Mazz Swift and Therese Workman, NYU Contemporary Ensemble/Jonathan Haas, Robert Osborne, So Percussion, Stephin Merritt (Magnetic Fields) and Sam Davol, Val Jeanty and Ravish Momin, Vicky Chow, Xenia Rubinos, and MORE!

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    Sun, May 13 @ 12:00pm Get Tickets

    Sign up to get more information about Bang on a Can Marathon! This is a FREE event.

    The Bang on a Can Marathon comes to NYU Skirball for the first time! This incomparable super-mix of boundary-busting music from around the corner and around the world features ten hours of rare performances by some of the most innovative musicians of our time, side-by-side with some of today’s most pioneering young artists.

    Highlights include the electric Bang on a Can All-Stars and the legendary and inspirational composer Terry Riley performing Autodreamographical Tales, an intimate and whimsical set of “dream narratives” featuring settings of stories and dreams narrated by Riley and orchestrated specifically for the All-Stars, also featuring special guest guitarist Gyan Riley; the soulful and ecstatic Xenia Rubinos performing a rare duo set with Marco Buccelli; the ever-creative New York native violinist Mazz Swift combining forces with Brooklyn-based song-maker Therese Workman (Oh My Goodness); Soviet-era Russian composer Galina Ustvolskaya’s Symphony No. 2 – a glacial and maniacal monument to her deep spiritual faith – performed by NYU Contemporary Ensemble, directed by Jonathan Haas with pianist David Friend and vocalist Robert Osborne; Ever inventive songsmith Stephin Merritt of Magnetic Fields performs a set with longtime collaborator Sam Davol on cello; composer Michael Gordon’s impossible solo piano work Sonatra, performed by Bang on a Can All-Star pianist Vicky Chow; the all new Turning Jewels Into Water, a duo featuring Haitian-born composer, percussionist and turntablist Val Jeanty with composer-drummer Ravish Momin; New York’s pioneering string quartet ETHEL performing music of Julia Wolfe, Jessie Montgomery, and Aleksandra Vrebalov; composer David Lang’s the day, an emotional chronicle of remembered moments performed by the breathtaking cellist Maya Beiser and actor Kate Valk, recently released on Cantaloupe Music; a triple-threat New York premiere set of commissioned works by Minneapolis composer Jeffrey Brooks performed by Bang on a Can All-Stars and Contemporaneous; Frederic Rzewski’s Coming Together, the explosive and still poignant setting of letters by Sam Melville, an Attica State prisoner during the time of the famous riots there, performed by Bang on a Can All-Stars and actor Eric Berryman; Canadian composer and “musical scientist” Nicole Lizee’s White Label Experiment honoring avant-garde pioneer John Cage, performed by New York’s unparalleled drumming masters So Percussion; composer Alex Weiser’s wonderfully imaginative musical settings of Yiddish poems; Contemporaneous, directed by David Bloom performing a special excerpt of Act I of Dylan Mattingly’s visceral (6-hour) opera Stranger Love and Fjola Evans’ shimmering and ambient Eroding; NYC veteran Flux Quartet in the New York premiere of Tom Chiu’s sonic perfect storm Retrocon; the Bang on a Can All-Stars in the New York premiere of composer Brendon Randall-Myers’ intricate Changes, Stops, and Swells and Gabriella Smith’s Brazilian-rainforest odyssey Panitao and more!

    “We started Bang on a Can as a way toward realizing the world we wanted to live in. It would be a kind of utopia for music: all the boundaries between composers would come down, all the boundaries between genres would come down, all the boundaries between musicians and audience would come down. Then we started trying to build it. Building a utopia is a political act – it pushes people to change. It is also an act of resistance to the things that keep us apart, and it is an act of love, bringing ideas and sounds and people together. This year we are returning to downtown NYC, home first of Charles Ives and Edgard Varese and Elliott Carter and then Steve Reich and Meredith Monk and Thelonious Monk and Philip Glass and Henry Threadgill and La Monte Young and Ornette Coleman and Laurie Anderson – where American experimental music was born. It happened right here. And it’s still happening here. Please join us, in a 10-hour marathon concert of radical creativity.” – Bang on a Can co-founders Michael Gordon, David Lang, and Julia Wolfe

    MUSIC BY Jeffrey Brooks, Tom Chiu, Fjola Evans, Michael Gordon, David Lang, Nicole Lizee, Dylan Mattingly, Jessie Montgomery, Brendon Randall-Myers, Terry Riley, Frederic Rzewski, Gabriella Smith, Galina Ustvolskaya, Alex Weiser, Julia Wolfe, Aleksandra Vrebalov and MORE!

    PERFORMANCES BY Terry Riley, Bang on a Can All-Stars with special guests Eric Berryman, Todd Reynolds, and Gyan Riley, Contemporaneous, Eliza Bagg, David Friend, ETHEL, Stephin Merritt (Magnetic Fields) and Sam Davol, Flux Quartet, Maya Beiser and Kate Valk, Mazz Swift and Therese Workman, NYU Contemporary Ensemble/Jonathan Haas, Robert Osborne, Val Jeanty and Ravish Momin, Vicky Chow, Xenia Rubinos, So Percussion and MORE!

    See the full article here.

    Bang On A Can David Lang- Michael Gordon- Julia Wolfe © Peter Serling

    Bang On A Can All-Stars Members Ashley Bathgate, cello
    Robert Black, bass
    Vicky Chow, piano
    David Cossin, percussion
    Mark Stewart, guitars
    Ken Thomson, clarinet

    Formed in 1992, the Bang on a Can All-Stars are recognized worldwide for their ultra-dynamic live performances and recordings of today’s most innovative music. Freely crossing the boundaries between classical, jazz, rock, world and experimental music, this six-member amplified ensemble has consistently forged a distinct category-defying identity, taking music into uncharted territories. Performing each year throughout the U.S. and internationally, the All-Stars have shattered the definition of what concert music is today.

    Together, the All-Stars have worked in unprecedented close collaboration with some of the most important and inspiring musicians of our time, including Steve Reich, Ornette Coleman, Burmese circle drum master Kyaw Kyaw Naing, Tan Dun, DJ Spooky, and many more. The group’s celebrated projects include their landmark recordings of Brian Eno’s ambient classic Music for Airports and Terry Riley’s In C, as well as live performances with Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Don Byron, Iva Bittova, Thurston Moore, Owen Pallett and others. The All-Stars were awarded Musical America’s Ensemble of the Year and have been heralded as “the country’s most important vehicle for contemporary music” by the San Francisco Chronicle.

    Current and recent project highlights include the touring performances and recording of Julia Wolfe’s Pulitzer Prize winning Anthracite Fields for the All-Stars and guest choir, the record release of Wolfe’s acclaimed Steel Hammer, featuring Trio Mediaeval, plus a moving theatrically staged collaboration with SITI Company and director Anne Bogart; Field Recordings, a major multi-media project and CD/DVD now featuring 30 commissioned works by Tyondai Braxton, Mira Calix, Anna Clyne, Bryce Dessner, Florent Ghys, Michael Gordon, Jóhann Jóhannsson, David Lang, Christian Marclay, Steve Reich, Todd Reynolds, Julia Wolfe, and more; the Lincoln Center Festival 2017 world premiere of Cloud River Mountain, a new collaboration featuring Chinese superstar singer Gong Linna; the world premiere performance and recording of Steve Reich’s 2×5 including a sold-out performance at Carnegie Hall, and much more. With a massive repertoire of works written specifically for the group’s distinctive instrumentation and style of performance, the All-Stars have become a genre in their own right. The All-Stars record on Cantaloupe Music and have released past recordings on Sony, Universal and Nonesuch.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:14 PM on April 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Avant-garde, , ,   

    From MATA: Coming Events 

    MATA

    MATA Festival

    A Room of One’s Own: Nadia Botello’s Sono / Aqua

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    On Saturday evening, April 21, MATA’s 20th Anniversary Festival will come to a spectacular close with an unmissable new music event at Tribeca’s Imagine Swimming. A Room of One’s Own: Nadia Botello’s Sono/Aqua, part of MATA’s unique and vital initiative devoted to female-identifying composer-performers, will be a truly immersive event. The audience, having passed through stages of listening from the audible to the vibrational, will be invited to enter a sonified pool to become one with sound: generating, altering, and ultimately becoming sound incarnate.

    Imagine Swimming
    40 Harrison St., New York

    6:30pm – 9:30pm

    $25
    Tickets will allow entry to the space for the duration of the event and for timed entry to the pool itself

    Tickets Available

    Visitors will be required to sign a waiver in order to enter the pool.

    Questions about the event? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions!

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    Contemporaneous: Stop Motion
    1

    On Saturday, April 14th, Contemporaneous brings the 20th MATA Festival’s mainstage series to a close with a celebration of the future directions of new music, from the theatrical fantasy of Lasse D. Hansen’s (Denmark) Face the Music, the choreographic precision of Andreas Eduardo Frank’s (Germany/Switzerland) Samouraï Progressif, the recontextualized folk music of David Kirkland Garner’s (USA) DwnByThRckyMntns to the placid beauty of William Dougherty’s (USA) a stillness of zero sensation. The evening also features the world premiere of a new arrangement of MATA alumna Jennifer Higdon’s (USA) (MATA 1998) DASH, as well as a newly-commissioned work by Jenna Lyle (USA), whose choreography combines performers gestures and interactions with sound-emitting fans.

    Saturday, April 14

    8PM at the The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, NYC
    $25

    Tickets available at The Kitchen

    Andreas Eduardo Frank (Germany / Switzerland): Samürai Progressive (2016) WP
    Lasse D. Hansen (Denmark): Face the Music (2016)
    David Kirkland Garner (USA): DwnByThRckyMntns (2016) NYP
    William Dougherty (USA): a stillness of zero sensation (2015) AP
    Jennifer Higdon (USA): DASH (2018) WP new arrangement MATA Alumni Commission
    Jenna Lyle (USA): New Work (2018) WP MATA Commission

    Contemporaneous
    David Bloom, conductor
    Ashley Tata, stage director

    MATA’s Greatest Hits
    7
    Past meets present on Friday, April 13th as the 20th MATA Festival presents MATA’s Greatest Hits. The evening will celebrate the festival’s most meaningful pieces, selected by some of those who have shaped MATA’s 20-year history, including Du Yun (artistic director, 2015-2018), Yotam Haber (artistic director, 2011-2015), Missy Mazzoli (executive director, 2007-2010), David T. Little (executive director, 2010-2012) and Lisa Bielawa and Eleonor Sandresky (founders and directors, 1998-2005). The evening will center around a reconstruction, featuring Sandbox Percussion, of experimental composer Randy Hostetler’s P(l)aces, a work which received its world premiere in MATA’s inaugural season, following the composer’s premature death. Also on the program Bolivian composer Carlos Gutierrez Quiroga’s (MATA 2015) Jintili, will be performed by Face the Music together with members of La Paz’s Orquiestra Experimental de Instrumentos Nativos (OEIN). The program will also feature encores of Australian/Dutch composer Kate Moore’s (MATA 2008) hauntingly beautiful Sensitive Spot, performed by Vicky Chow and Eric Wubbels’s (MATA 2012) vibrantly compelling Viola Quartet (IJVER).

    Friday, April 13

    8PM at the The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, NYC
    $25

    Tickets available at The Kitchen

    Carlos Gutierrez Quiroga (Bolivia): Jintili (2012)
    Kate Moore (Australia / The Netherlands): Sensitive Spot (2007)
    Eric Wubbels (USA): Viola Quartet (IJVER) (2006-7)
    Randy Hostetler (USA): P(l)aces (1994)

    Sandbox Percussion
    Face the Music
    Members of the Orquestra Experimental de Instrumentos Nativos
    The Friends of MATA
    Carl Christian Bettendorf, conductor

    with
    Vicky Chow, piano
    Colin Brookes, Carrie Frey, Sam Kelder, Miranda Sielaff, violas

    Much more. Visit MATA here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Music at the Anthology’s (MATA) mission is to present, support, and commission the music of early career composers, regardless of their stylistic views or aesthetic inclinations. Founded by Philip Glass, Eleonor Sandresky, and Lisa Bielawa in 1996 as a way to address the lack of presentation opportunities for unaffiliated composers, MATA has since developed into the world’s most sought-after performance opportunity for young and emerging composers: for its 2017 Festival, MATA received the music of 1159 composers, from 72 countries.

    MATA presents an internationally-recognized festival, now celebrating its twentieth anniversary, each spring in New York City of new music by early career composers selected from a free global call for submissions; MATA Presents, an acclaimed series of occasional concerts held at venues throughout New York, now in its eleventh season; and MATA Jr., currently entering its third season: an evening of music by pre-college composers, mentored by emerging composers, and performed by an ensemble of their peers.

    In addition to these regular offerings, over the years MATA has presented numerous other events and activities open to the general public, included among them: public sound art installations, (2003, 2008-10, 2015); lectures and panel discussions (2002-04, 2007-09); workshops related to the business of composing (2011-present); a “Composer’s School” (2014-15); public art events (Composer’s Petting Zoo, 2005; Super Critical Mass’s Swelter, 2011; David Bird’s Fields, 2014); Interactive apps (MATA Walk With Me, 2015); composer reading sessions (2002-04, 2013-14); and showcases (MATA at the Atlantic, 2015).

    MATA’s festivals and events are critically acclaimed and broadly respected: The New Yorker has hailed MATA as “the most exciting showcase for outstanding young composers from around the world.” The New York Times has called it “nondogmatic, even antidogmatic;” The Wall Street Journal said that it “tells us a lot about how composers are thinking now.” Composers that have been presented by MATA early in their careers include future Rome, Alpert, Takemitsu, Siemens, and Pulitzer Prize-winners, Guggenheim Fellows, and MacArthur “Geniuses.” In 2010 MATA was awarded ASCAP’s prestigious Aaron Copland award in recognition of its work.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:26 PM on April 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 20th Birthday Gala, Avant-garde, ,   

    MATA : “20th Birthday Gala” 

    MATA

    MATA Festival

    MATA’s 20th Birthday Gala

    2
    On Monday, April 9th, MATA will mark its birthday with a gala celebrating 20 years of cutting edge music at the legendary Paula Cooper Gallery. Soloists from Liminar and the Friends of MATA will pay tribute to MATA’s founders Lisa Bielawa, Philip Glass, and Eleonor Sandresky, through performances of their work, capped off by a performance by Liminar’s Alexander Bruck of Samuel Cedillo’s (Mexico) face-meltingly virtuosic Monologo III, last heard at the 2017 MATA Festival.

    Monday, April 9

    7PM at Paula Cooper Gallery, 534 West 21st Street, NYC
    Members Only Event
    For more information, please contact loren@matafestival.org

    Philip Glass (USA): 1 + 1 (1967)
    Eleonor Sandresky (USA): Contemplation 1 (2007) WP
    Lisa Bielawa (USA): Vireo Caprice (2015)
    Samuel Cedillo (Mexico): Monólogo III (2009)

    Liminar
    Alexander Bruck Santos, viola
    Diego Espinosa, percussion

    Nadav Lev, guitar
    Joshua Modney, violin

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Music at the Anthology’s (MATA) mission is to present, support, and commission the music of early career composers, regardless of their stylistic views or aesthetic inclinations. Founded by Philip Glass, Eleonor Sandresky, and Lisa Bielawa in 1996 as a way to address the lack of presentation opportunities for unaffiliated composers, MATA has since developed into the world’s most sought-after performance opportunity for young and emerging composers: for its 2017 Festival, MATA received the music of 1159 composers, from 72 countries.

    MATA presents an internationally-recognized festival, now celebrating its twentieth anniversary, each spring in New York City of new music by early career composers selected from a free global call for submissions; MATA Presents, an acclaimed series of occasional concerts held at venues throughout New York, now in its eleventh season; and MATA Jr., currently entering its third season: an evening of music by pre-college composers, mentored by emerging composers, and performed by an ensemble of their peers.

    In addition to these regular offerings, over the years MATA has presented numerous other events and activities open to the general public, included among them: public sound art installations, (2003, 2008-10, 2015); lectures and panel discussions (2002-04, 2007-09); workshops related to the business of composing (2011-present); a “Composer’s School” (2014-15); public art events (Composer’s Petting Zoo, 2005; Super Critical Mass’s Swelter, 2011; David Bird’s Fields, 2014); Interactive apps (MATA Walk With Me, 2015); composer reading sessions (2002-04, 2013-14); and showcases (MATA at the Atlantic, 2015).

    MATA’s festivals and events are critically acclaimed and broadly respected: The New Yorker has hailed MATA as “the most exciting showcase for outstanding young composers from around the world.” The New York Times has called it “nondogmatic, even antidogmatic;” The Wall Street Journal said that it “tells us a lot about how composers are thinking now.” Composers that have been presented by MATA early in their careers include future Rome, Alpert, Takemitsu, Siemens, and Pulitzer Prize-winners, Guggenheim Fellows, and MacArthur “Geniuses.” In 2010 MATA was awarded ASCAP’s prestigious Aaron Copland award in recognition of its work.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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