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  • richardmitnick 3:35 PM on June 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "The World of David Lang", , Cantaloupe Music, , Sound Streams   

    From Cantaloupe Music via Sound Streams: “The World of David Lang” 

    From Cantaloupe Music the recording arm of Bang On a Can, the original New Music DIY organization.

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    Sound Stream

    David Lang, © Peter Serling

    Sunday June 3, 2018 at 3:30 p.m. The Gladstone Hotel, 1214 Queen Street West, Toronto

    Schedule
    Doors Open 3 p.m.
    Discussion and Performance 3:30 P.M.

    TICKETS
    Save a Seat – $PWYC: Reserve a regular seat with a donation of any amount, so that you aren’t left standing.
    General Admission – Free: Free as always! Seating is first come, first served.
    Register now

    No list of pieces to be performed has been included.

    “Music always sounds better with a drink in your hand.” —David Lang

    Grab a drink and join David Lang as we dig into this Pulitzer Prize-winning composer’s unique sound world. Bring your adventurous spirit to our final Encounters of the season, Sunday, June 3, at the Gladstone Hotel Melody Bar.

    David Lang was the one-time enfant terrible of the new music community, beginning his career as a founding member of the ground-breaking Bang on a Can, (“the country’s most important vehicle for contemporary music,” San Francisco Chronicle) and is still its artistic director. Lang is also one of the mentors for the Soundstreams’ 2018 Emerging Composer Workshop. He joins us, days ahead of the opening of his The Little Match Girl Passion at Crow’s Theatre, for a late afternoon discussion, Q&A and musical interlude.

    Adanya Dunn, soprano and Stephanie Chua, keyboard, will be performing various David Lang compositions.

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    Adanya Dunn. No image credit

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    Stephanie Chua. No image credit

    Related Events

    The Little Match Girl Passion June 6 & 7, 2018, 8:00 PM Crow’s Theatre, Toronto
    3
    (Cory Weaver)

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

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    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 5:40 PM on April 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Cantaloupe Music, , , , Ted Hearn   

    From Cantaloupe Music- Pulitzer Finalist: “Sound from the Bench, by Ted Hearne” 

    Cantaloupe Music is the recording arm of Bang On a Can, the original New Music DIY organization.

    Recording released on March 24, 2017 by The Crossing, a five-movement cantata for chamber choir, electric guitar and percussion that raises oblique questions about the crosscurrents of power through excerpts from sources as diverse as Supreme Court rulings and ventriloquism textbooks.

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    Sound from the Bench
    By Ted Hearne

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    “Sound From the Bench” is a 35-minute cantata for chamber choir, two electric guitars and drums, with a libretto by Jena Osman. It was co-commissioned by Volti and The Crossing.

    why these texts?

    Sound From the Bench is a reaction to Jena Osman’s incredible book Corporate Relations, a collection of poems that follows the historical trajectory of corporate personhood in the United States. The five movements combine language taken from landmark Supreme Court Cases with words from ventriloquism textbooks.

    I was instantly drawn to Osman’s work because of its rich intertextuality: she appropriates a variety of texts from diverse sources and assembles them into a powerful bricolage. I strive toward a similar polyphony of oppositional voices and perspectives in my music, and to bring the chaotic forces of life into the work itself. It was this impulse, and the unabashedly political tone of Osman’s poetry, that made me want to set some part of “Corporate Relations” to music.

    why electric guitars?

    Sound From the Bench
    is built around the tension between the human voice and electric guitar. The electric guitar can sound like literally anything. Through circuitry, programming, and analog and digital manipulation, the pitches and rhythms a guitarist plays can be utterly transformed, erasing all human touch. It speaks through an amplifier and could easily drown out any voice. These cyborg-esque qualities contrast the human voice, both in its inescapable limitations and the complex differences found in every individual vocal timbre.

    what does “no mouth” mean?

    No mouth is Osman’s paraphrase of the central reasoning behind the majority in Bellotti v. First National Bank, the 1978 case upon which Citizens United is based: because corporations don’t have a literal mouth, they cannot literally speak, therefore advertising is their only available method of communication and must be considered speech (and is entitled to First Amendment protections as such).

    The phrase the very heart, also found in the second movement, is excerpted from Justice White’s dissent in this case: “It has long been recognized, however, that the special status of corporations has placed them in a position to control vast amounts of economic power which may, if not regulated, dominate not only the economy but the very heart of our democracy, the electoral process.”

    about the third movement

    The central movement sets words from the oral argument to Citizens United. My brain started firing when I realized this poem of Jena’s was a literal erasure of the Supreme Court document – every phrase appeared in order, and in a position approximating the horizontal spot it appeared on the page. When I printed out the full 83-page oral argument and blacked out every phrase that Jena hadn’t included, the remaining words jumped out at me and started to take on new meanings and inferences. That strange, new energy helped propel the decontextualized text into music.

    The time at which the phrases appear approximate and in some way preserve the place at which they appear in the original document. The music between Osman’s text, that which fills the “blank pages,” sometimes includes a quote from Thomas Tallis’s motet Loquebantur Variis Linguis (the text is: “The Apostles spoke in different tongues – Alleluia.”) Aside from loving this music, I liked the image of our Justices as apostles.

    “personhood”

    What could this word even mean when it is applied to non-human things? The courts have systematically granted constitutional rights to corporations since the Civil War – we concede that a corporation can “speak” even though it has no mouth – and these rights have come at the expense of both the private citizen and the government.

    a corporation is to a person as a person is to a machine

    friends of the court we know them as good and bad, they too are sheep
    and goats ventriloquizing the ghostly fiction

    a corporation is to a body as a body is to a puppet

    putting it in caricature, if there are natural persons then there are those
    who are not that, buying candidates. there are those who are strong on
    the ground and then weak in the air. weight shifts to the left leg while
    the propaganda arm extends.
    (Jena Osman, from Corporate Relations)

    • program notes by Ted Hearne, with passages after Eric Howerton’s review of Corporate Relations for The Volta Blog

    — from the composer’s website

    Biography

    Composer, singer and bandleader Ted Hearne (b.1982, Chicago) draws on a wide breadth of influences ranging across music’s full terrain, to create intense, personal and multi-dimensional works.

    The New York Times has praised Mr. Hearne for his “tough edge and wildness of spirit,” and “topical, politically sharp-edged works.” Pitchfork called Hearne’s work “some of the most expressive socially engaged music in recent memory — from any genre.”

    Hearne’s newest theatrical work, The Source, sets text from the Iraq and Afghanistan War Logs, along with words by Chelsea Manning (the U.S. Army private who leaked those classified documents to WikiLeaks), and was premiered to rave reviews last October at the BAM Next Wave Festival in Brooklyn. The New York Times called The Source “a 21st Century masterpiece,” and included it on its list of the best classical vocal performances of 2014 and best albums of 2015, noting that the work “offers a fresh model of how opera and musical theater can tackle contemporary issues: not with documentary realism, but with ambiguity, obliquity, and even sheer confusion.” During the 2016-17 season, the original production of The Source (directed by Daniel Fish) was presented by both the LA Opera and San Francisco Opera.

    Hearne’s piece Katrina Ballads, another modern-day oratorio with a primary source libretto, was awarded the 2009 Gaudeamus Prize in composition and was named one of the best classical albums of 2010 by Time Out Chicago and The Washington Post. A recent collaboration paired him with legendary musician Erykah Badu, for whom he wrote an evening-length work combining new music with arrangements of songs from her 2008 album New Amerykah: Part One.

    Law of Mosaics, Hearne’s 30-minute piece for string orchestra, will see performances this year by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and San Francisco Symphony. His album of the same name, with Andrew Norman and A Far Cry, was named one of The New Yorker’s notable albums of 2014 by Alex Ross.

    A charismatic vocalist, Hearne performs with Philip White as the vocal-electronics duo R WE WHO R WE, whose debut album (New Focus Recordings, 2013) was called “eminently, if weirdly, danceable and utterly gripping.” (Time Out Chicago). Two albums of vocal music, The Source and Outlanders, were recently released on New Amsterdam Records.

    Ted Hearne was awarded the 2014 New Voices Residency from Boosey and Hawkes, and recently joined the composition faculty at the University of Southern California. Recent and upcoming commissions include orchestral works for the San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, New World Symphony, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and A Far Cry, chamber works for eighth blackbird, Ensemble dal Niente and Alarm Will Sound, and vocal works for Volti, The Crossing and Roomful of Teeth.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 6:08 PM on March 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Cantaloupe Music, , , , , , , , , , , , , Writing on Water   

    From Cantaloupe Music: David Lang’s “writing on water” 

    Cantaloupe Music is the recording arm of Bang On a Can, the original New Music DIY organization.

    David Lang

    Compiling four pieces for four different ensembles, David Lang’s “writing on water” is a free-flowing recording that presents several unusual and rarely revealed facets of the composer who is perhaps most well-known for his monumental choral works (the Pulitzer-winning “the little match girl passion” and the more recent epic “the national anthems”), as well as his poignant song cycles (“death speaks” and “love fail”).

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    “writing on water”

    From the struggle between dissonance and melody portrayed in “pierced” to the sweeping, oceanic scope of the title piece, the music defines a path that can be as serpentine as it is rigid (“forced march”) or as minimal as it is immense. Riveting performances by Alarm Will Sound, Real Quiet, Crash Ensemble, the London Sinfonietta, Synergy Vocals and more make writing on water an electrifying, free-spirited and rambunctious addition to the Cantaloupe catalog

    Alarm Will Sound

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    Real Quiet

    2
    Crash Ensemble

    3
    London Sinfonietta

    4
    Synergy Vocals: From left to right: Michael Dore, Andrew Busher, Amanda Morrison, Rachel Weston

    Pre-order:

    Bandcamp – bit.ly/2pLGfji
    iTunes: apple.co/2pLxOnt

    See the full article here .


    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz


    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00AM-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 11:24 AM on March 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "the day", "world to come", , Cantaloupe Music, , , , , ,   

    From Cantaloupe: ” Maya Beiser and David Lang release new album ‘the day’ on Cantaloupe Music” 

    Cantaloupe Music is the recording arm of Bang On a Can, the original New Music DIY organization.

    1

    Maya Beiser and David Lang released a new album, the day, on January 26, 2018 on Cantaloupe Music. The album features Lang’s new work for Maya, the day, paired with a new recording of his previous work for her, world to come.

    the day (2016) was composed as prequel to world to come (2003). Where world to come chronicles the journey of the soul after life, the day chronicles an individual’s time on earth preceding that journey. Lang’s world to come was written for Maya in response to the events of September 11 at the World Trade Center (which shares the initials of the title of the piece, WTC). The two works are meditations on two journeys: the day on the mortal journey, and world to come on the eternal, post-mortal journey of the soul that follows.

    Beiser and Lang were in New York City, and had just begun working on their collaboration for a large multitrack cello piece, when the horrific events of September 11, 2001 occurred. In world to come, Maya’s cello and her voice become separated from each other, and they struggle to reunite in a post-apocalyptic spiritual environment. world to come is a kind of prayer – introspective and highly personal. It is a meditation on hope and hopelessness, asking fundamental questions about the death and life of the soul.

    Fifteen years later, Beiser asked Lang to create a “prequel” to world to come. In the day, they wanted to start earlier in the journey, exploring the ways we might review our lives, as they are running away from us. Lang wondered what we might discover if we cataloged the moments in our lives that we remember best, that seem like highlights in our memory of them. He imagined asking 300 very different people the question, “What was the most important day in your life?”


    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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  • richardmitnick 11:06 AM on March 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Cantaloupe Music, , , ,   

    From Cantaloupe: Bang on a Can All-Stars release new album More Field Recordings on Cantaloupe Music 

    Cantaloupe Music is the recording arm of Bang On a Can, the original New Music DIY organization.

    1

    Music by Richard Reed Parry, Dan Deacon, Ben Frost, Anna Thorvaldsdottir, Glenn Kotche, Caroline Shaw, Jace Clayton, Nico Muhly, Gabriella Smith, Paula Matthusen, Zhang Shouwang, Juan Felipe Waller, René Lussier.

    New York’s electric chamber supergroup, the Bang on a Can All-Stars (Ashley Bathgate, cello; Robert Black, bass; Vicky Chow, piano; David Cossin, percussion; Mark Stewart, electric guitar; Ken Thomson, clarinets), will release a new album, More Field Recordings, on Cantaloupe Music on October 27, 2017.

    This is the second installment in the All-Stars’ commissioned composer series, following 2015’s Field Recordings on Cantaloupe, which explores strange new terrain where found sound, samples, and archival audio collide with contemporary classical music, written by a wide range of artists. More Field Recordings was produced by All-Stars percussionist David Cossin and Rob Friedman.

    In keeping with the “ground rules” of the Field Recordings project, each composer was asked to go into the field of recorded sound itself — to find something old or record something new, and to respond with their own music, in dialogue with what they found.

    Featuring new works by thirteen artists including Richard Reed Parry (Arcade Fire), Caroline Shaw, Anna Thorvaldsdottir, Dan Deacon, Ben Frost, Glenn Kotche, Jace Clayton, Nico Muhly, Gabriella Smith, Paula Matthusen, Zhang Shouwang, Juan Felipe Waller, and René Lussier, this two-disc set embraces the classical and electronic influences of the first Field Recordings collection and extends its reach into futuristic worlds of ambient and ethereal sound.


    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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  • richardmitnick 5:33 PM on March 8, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A Physically Punishing Solo-Piano Masterpiece, , , Cantaloupe Music, , , , , Michael Gordon, , , , ,   

    From Cantaloupe Music and the New Yorker: “A Physically Punishing Solo-Piano Masterpiece” 

    Cantaloupe Music is the recording arm of Bang On a Can, the original New Music DIY organization.

    The New Yorker

    3.8.18
    Ethan Iverson [The strongest left hand in Jazz]

    Ethan Iverson, Pianist

    Vicky Chow, Pianist

    The pianist Vicky Chow says that playing “Sonatra” is a “traumatic physical experience.” Composed by Michael Gordon, in 2004, and released on Cantaloupe Music, in two versions, one in normal tuning and one in unsettling just intonation, “Sonatra” is a spectacular addition to the piano repertoire. In 1987, Gordon helped found Bang on a Can, a celebrated New York ensemble that has produced a long list of valuable premières from artists working in the terrain of post-minimalist and experimental sounds. Yet, few of the composers associated with that milieu have been noted for their solo-piano music. Indeed, Gordon says, “When I started writing ‘Sonatra,’ I decided . . . I would probably only ever write one piano piece in my entire life.”

    “Sonatra” is a fifteen-minute perpetual-motion study that may be the culmination of a tradition of pieces that place inhuman demands on concert pianists. It’s been exactly a century since Béla Bartók composed his fearsome Op. 18 Études, the second of which is in chain thirds, just like “Sonatra.” The composer Conlon Nancarrow created maniacal keyboard music in the forties and fifties, although most people didn’t hear his piano rolls until the Nancarrow recordings became available, in the sixties and seventies. György Ligeti was inspired by both Bartók and Nancarrow in a series of famous études that began with “Désordre,” in 1985.

    “Sonatra” is a milestone of composition, but the recording is also a milestone of pianism. With a score this difficult, the performer becomes an essential collaborator. The arpeggios begin in extremis and only get harder. Tossing off one glissando is easy, but, near the end of “Sonatra,” the hundreds of glissandos in a row must nearly rub the pianist raw. One might wonder how much studio magic is present in this recording. I can verify that Chow can play it live. At a terrific recital in October, 2016, at Roulette, in Brooklyn, Chow closed with “Sonatra.” It was my first exposure to the piece and I felt it land like an unfriendly tap on the shoulder from a heavyweight boxer.

    The athletic aspects of “Sonatra” are leavened by a breezy kind of American aesthetic. The title references the famous saloon singer. (When you google “Sonatra,” the search engine asks, “Did you mean Sinatra?”) The ear can follow the charming form on first listen. There’s a cheerfully experimental approach to tuning. (Perhaps we should now listen Bartok’s Op. 18 and the Ligeti études in just intonation.) Chow’s cover photo is like that of a sardonic action hero who doesn’t take herself too seriously.

    The looping streams in “Sonatra” suggest the endless flow of binary information, music for the computer age, but the limited edition offers heavy vinyl at 45 r.p.m. with normal and skewed versions, a copy of the score, and a large cover worthy of framing. Filing the LP on my shelf gave me a rare sense of satisfaction, especially when so much of my contemporary collection is stored in the cloud. At times, it feels like the era of undisputed masterpieces is over, but it turns out that there’s still work that deserves the old-fashioned phrase from the glory days of vinyl: “An essential library item.”

    Ethan Iverson is a pianist and composer based in Brooklyn, NY, USA.


    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 4:50 PM on March 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Cantaloupe Music, , , , ,   

    From Canteloupe Music: Ensemble Signal Play Michael Gordon and Julia Wolfe Friday and Saturday 

    Cantaloupe Music is the recording arm of Bang On a Can, the original New Music DIY organization.

    Ensemble Signal, led by Brad Lubman, performs Michael Gordon’s Weather and Julia Wolfe’s Cruel Sister. A concert talk with the performers and David Lang, Artist-in-Residence, will follow the Friday evening performance.

    Institute for Advanced Study – Friday & Saturday, 8pm

    Free event but tickets are required: http://bit.ly/2FoZLrV


    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 10:31 PM on March 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Cantaloupe Music,   

    From Bang On A Can: “Announcing the 2018 Bang on a Can Marathon at NYU Skirball” 

    Bang On a Can is the original DIY New Music Organization

    10 Hours of Live Music
    Sunday, May 13, 2018 from 12-10pm

    NYU Skirball | 566 LaGuardia Place | NYC | Admission: FREE
    Information: 718.852.7755 or http://www.bangonacan.org

    Stream the Bang on a Can Marathon Mixtape: http://bit.ly/BOACMarathonMixtape2018

    MUSIC BY Jeffrey Brooks, Tom Chiu, Fjola Evans, Michael Gordon, David Lang, Nicole Lizee, Dylan Mattingly, Jessie Montgomery, Brendon Randall-Myers, Terry Riley, Frederic Rzewski, Gabriella Smith, Galina Ustvolskaya, Alex Weiser, Julia Wolfe, and MORE!

    PERFORMANCES BY Terry Riley, Bang on a Can All-Stars with special guests Eric Berryman, Todd Reynolds, and Gyan Riley, Contemporaneous, Eliza Bagg, David Friend, ETHEL, Flux Quartet, Maya Beiser and Kate Valk, Mazz Swift and Therese Workman, NYU Contemporary Ensemble/Jonathan Haas, Robert Osborne, Stephin Merritt (Magnetic Fields) and Sam Davol, Val Jeanty and Ravish Momin, Vicky Chow, Xenia Rubinos, and MORE!

    New York, NY — Bang on a Can announces its 2018 Bang on a Can Marathon, presented for the first time at the NYU Skirball on Sunday, May 13, 2018 from 12-10pm. This incomparable super-mix of boundary-busting music from around the corner and around the world features ten hours of rare performances by some of the most innovative musicians of our time, side-by-side with some of today’s most pioneering young artists.

    Bang on a Can started as a one-day Marathon concert on Mother’s Day 1987 in a SoHo art gallery and has grown into a multi-faceted performing arts organization with a broad range of year-round international activities. In 2018, the Marathon falls once again on Mother’s Day and will take place only a few city blocks from where it began. Bang on a Can is thrilled to bring its trademark event back to downtown New York, where both American experimental music and the Bang on a Can Marathon were born.

    The New York Times reports, “A quarter-century later their impact has been profound and pervasive. The current universe of do-it-yourself concert series, genre-flouting festivals, composer-owned record labels and amplified, electric-guitar-driven compositional idioms would probably not exist without their pioneering example. The Bang on a Can Marathon, the organization’s sprawling, exuberant annual mixtape love letter to its many admirers, has been widely emulated…” The Village Voice recounted, “[one could] enjoy a world made a bit more habitable – something like an authentically felt home – thanks to all manner of cultural practices that get dissed out in the mainstream.”

    Bang on a Can co-founders and composers Michael Gordon, David Lang, and Julia Wolfe say, “We started Bang on a Can as a way toward realizing the world we wanted to live in. It would be a kind of utopia for music: all the boundaries between composers would come down, all the boundaries between genres would come down, all the boundaries between musicians and audience would come down. Then we started trying to build it. Building a utopia is a political act – it pushes people to change. It is also an act of resistance to the things that keep us apart, and it is an act of love, bringing ideas and sounds and people together. This year we are returning to downtown NYC, home first of Charles Ives and Edgard Varese and Elliott Carter and then Steve Reich and Meredith Monk and Thelonious Monk and Philip Glass and Henry Threadgill and La Monte Young and Ornette Coleman and Laurie Anderson – where American experimental music was born. It happened right here. And it’s still happening here. Please join us, in a 10-hour marathon concert of radical creativity.”

    Highlights of the 2018 Bang on a Can Marathon include:

    • The electric Bang on a Can All-Stars and the legendary and inspirational composer Terry Riley performing Autodreamographical Tales, an intimate and whimsical set of “dream narratives” featuring settings of stories and dreams narrated by Riley and orchestrated specifically for the All-Stars, also featuring special guest guitarist Gyan Riley

    • Soviet-era Russian composer Galina Ustvolskaya’s Symphony No. 2 – a glacial and maniacal monument to her deep spiritual faith – performed by NYU Contemporary Ensemble, directed by Jonathan Haas with pianist David Friend and vocalist Robert Osborne

    • Ever inventive songsmith Stephin Merritt of Magnetic Fields performing a set with longtime collaborator Sam Davol on cello

    • The soulful and ecstatic Xenia Rubinos performing a rare duo set with Marco Buccelli

    • The endlessly-creative New York native violinist Mazz Swift combining forces with Brooklyn-based song-maker Therese Workman (Oh My Goodness)

    • Composer Michael Gordon’s impossible solo piano work Sonatra, performed by Bang on a Can All-Star pianist Vicky Chow

    • The all new Turning Jewels Into Water, a duo featuring Haitian-born composer, percussionist and turntablist Val Jeanty with composer-drummer Ravish Momin

    • New York’s pioneering string quartet ETHEL performing music of Julia Wolfe, Jessie Montgomery, and more

    • Composer David Lang’s the day, an emotional chronicle of remembered moments performed by the breathtaking cellist Maya Beiser and actor Kate Valk, recently released on Cantaloupe Music

    • A triple-threat New York premiere set of commissioned works by Minneapolis composer Jeffrey Brooks performed by Bang on a Can All-Stars and Contemporaneous

    • Frederic Rzewski’s Coming Together, the explosive and still poignant setting of letters by Sam Melville, an Attica State prisoner during the time of the famous riots there, performed by Bang on a Can All-Stars and actor Eric Berryman

    • Canadian composer and “musical scientist” Nicole Lizee’s unique musical blend tapping Hitchcock, Kubrick, 1960s psychedelia, and more

    • Composer Alex Weiser’s wonderfully imaginative musical settings of Yiddish poems

    • Contemporaneous, directed by David Bloom performing a special excerpt of Act I of Dylan Mattingly’s visceral (6-hour) opera Stranger Love and Fjola Evans’ shimmering and ambient Eroding

    • NYC veteran Flux Quartet in the New York premiere of Tom Chiu’s sonic perfect storm Retrocon

    • Bang on a Can All-Stars in the New York premiere of composer Brendon Randall-Myers’ intricate Changes, Stops, and Swells and Gabriella Smith’s Brazilian-rainforest odyssey Panitao

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    Bang On A Can David Lang- Michael Gordon- Julia Wolfe © Peter Serling

    Bang On A Can All-Stars Members Ashley Bathgate, cello
    Robert Black, bass
    Vicky Chow, piano
    David Cossin, percussion
    Mark Stewart, guitars
    Ken Thomson, clarinet

    Formed in 1992, the Bang on a Can All-Stars are recognized worldwide for their ultra-dynamic live performances and recordings of today’s most innovative music. Freely crossing the boundaries between classical, jazz, rock, world and experimental music, this six-member amplified ensemble has consistently forged a distinct category-defying identity, taking music into uncharted territories. Performing each year throughout the U.S. and internationally, the All-Stars have shattered the definition of what concert music is today.

    Together, the All-Stars have worked in unprecedented close collaboration with some of the most important and inspiring musicians of our time, including Steve Reich, Ornette Coleman, Burmese circle drum master Kyaw Kyaw Naing, Tan Dun, DJ Spooky, and many more. The group’s celebrated projects include their landmark recordings of Brian Eno’s ambient classic Music for Airports and Terry Riley’s In C, as well as live performances with Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Don Byron, Iva Bittova, Thurston Moore, Owen Pallett and others. The All-Stars were awarded Musical America’s Ensemble of the Year and have been heralded as “the country’s most important vehicle for contemporary music” by the San Francisco Chronicle.

    Current and recent project highlights include the touring performances and recording of Julia Wolfe’s Pulitzer Prize winning Anthracite Fields for the All-Stars and guest choir, the record release of Wolfe’s acclaimed Steel Hammer, featuring Trio Mediaeval, plus a moving theatrically staged collaboration with SITI Company and director Anne Bogart; Field Recordings, a major multi-media project and CD/DVD now featuring 30 commissioned works by Tyondai Braxton, Mira Calix, Anna Clyne, Bryce Dessner, Florent Ghys, Michael Gordon, Jóhann Jóhannsson, David Lang, Christian Marclay, Steve Reich, Todd Reynolds, Julia Wolfe, and more; the Lincoln Center Festival 2017 world premiere of Cloud River Mountain, a new collaboration featuring Chinese superstar singer Gong Linna; the world premiere performance and recording of Steve Reich’s 2×5 including a sold-out performance at Carnegie Hall, and much more. With a massive repertoire of works written specifically for the group’s distinctive instrumentation and style of performance, the All-Stars have become a genre in their own right. The All-Stars record on Cantaloupe Music and have released past recordings on Sony, Universal and Nonesuch.

     
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