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  • richardmitnick 10:49 AM on November 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply  

    From JAZZCORNER: “‘Jazz Batá 2’ Chucho Valdes” 

    From JAZZCORNER

    1
    Jazz Batá 2, composer, pianist and bandleader Chucho Valdés’ first album for Mack Avenue Records, marks a new peak of creativity for the artist, even as it revisits the small-group concept of his 1972 Cuban album Jazz Batá. That album upon release was originally considered experimental at the time, but the trio project – featuring no drum set and two virtuosi who would subsequently be charter members of Irakere: Carlos del Puerto (bass) and Oscar Valdés (batâ: the sacred, hourglass shaped drums of the Yoruba religion in Cuba) – would now be considered contemporary.

    The six-hand complexity of the batá repertoire – the deep classical music of West Africa – permeates Valdés’ piano solos throughout the album. “I applied to my solos the different rhythms of the batá,” he says. “The piano is of course a harmonic instrument, but it’s percussive too, and you can play percussion with it.”

    It’s an exceptionally tight band. All of the three supporting musicians – Yaroldy Abreu Robles, Dreiser Durruthy Bombalé, and Yelsy Heredia – are from the Guantánamo region and have deep roots in Cuban musical culture as well as being conservatory-trained. Yelsy and Dreiser grew up together, went through music school together, graduated together, and have been playing music side-by-side literally all their lives. Yaroldy, who plays a wide variety of drums – congas, batá, bongó, orchestral percussion – has been working with Valdés for twenty years. “He always knows what I’m going to want to do,” says Valdés.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    http://www.jazzcorner.com/ is the largest portal for the official websites of hundreds of jazz musicians and organizations. New features on JazzCorner include the jazz video share where you can upload and share jazz and blues videos, JazzCorner Jukebox, surf the net with Jazz always on, submit your latest jazz news, and check out what’s hot at JazzCorner’s Speakeasy, the busiest bulletin board for jazz. Be the first to know where Jazz artists are performing in our gigs section, and be sure to listen to our podcasts with established and up and coming jazz musicians in our Innerviews section.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 3:20 PM on November 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , L.A. Philharmonic, , No classical institution in the world rivals the L.A. Phil in breadth of vision   

    From The Rest is Noise: “The Radical Splendor of the L.A. Phil” 

    From The Rest is Noise

    Alex Ross, by E.H Jan 17th 2013

    November 26, 2018 Issue

    1
    Susanna Mälkki, the principal guest conductor, plays a formidable role. Illustration by Mikkel Sommer

    Season of the Century” is the slogan that the Los Angeles Philharmonic is using to tout its centennial season. The phrase is emblazoned on a sign outside Disney Hall and on street banners across the city. The double meaning is apparent: not only is this season intended to celebrate the orchestra’s past hundred years; it aims to make history itself. Ordinarily, such marketing effusions don’t withstand scrutiny, but the L.A. Phil’s 2018-19 season invites superlatives. The ensemble has commissioned pieces from more than fifty composers, ranging from such venerable figures as Philip Glass and Steve Reich to young radicals on the fringes. It is launching a slew of theatrical events and collaborations with pop and jazz artists. It is honoring African-American traditions and exploring the experimental legacy of the Fluxus movement. Gustavo Dudamel, the orchestra’s music director, is leading new works by John Adams and Thomas Adès. Esa-Pekka Salonen, the orchestra’s previous director, is presenting a nine-day Stravinsky festival. Meredith Monk’s opera “ATLAS,” from 1991, will receive a long-awaited revival. And so on. No classical institution in the world rivals the L.A. Phil in breadth of vision.

    Conductor Gustavo Dudamel (Los Angeles Times)

    Esa-Pekka Salonen MulPix.com

    Two months in, the centennial program has already brought three fairly staggering events, any one of which would have counted as the highlight of an ordinary season. First was the première of Andrew Norman’s “Sustain,” a forty-minute, single-movement piece that may become a modern American classic. Dudamel introduced it on a program that included Beethoven’s Triple Concerto and Salonen’s “LA Variations.” In an inversion of the usual orchestral priorities, the Norman came last, and elicited the most excitement. In Los Angeles, decades of promotion of living composers have eroded the skepticism that so often greets new music.

    Norman, who is thirty-nine and lives in L.A., made his name as a composer of kinetic, frenetic music that mirrors the distracted habits of the digital age. The outer movements of “Play,” a three-part symphonic work that Dudamel conducted at the Phil in 2016, evoke the ricocheting, try-and-try-again tempo of video games. Having mined that vein enough, Norman slows things down in “Sustain.” The opening pages of the score consist largely of gorgeous smears of string sound, hypnotically gliding from one instrument to the next. These ethereal atmospheres turn hazy and rough, then give way to intertwining vines of melody in the winds. Rapid-fire patterns course through the orchestra, first chattering and then hammering. That energy subsides into near-silence, with strings producing whispers of tone rather than clear pitches. The sequence undergoes a series of repetitions, with deviations, disruptions, and accelerations. The final iteration ends in glorious chaos: the conductor cedes control, the players fall into an ad-libitum frenzy, and percussionists scrape slabs of plywood. The score is punctuated by a kind of signal: two pianos, tuned a quarter tone apart, arpeggiating upward into silence. With that gesture, the piece also ends.

    Norman has always been a deft orchestrator, but in “Sustain” he reveals himself as a magician of the art. He has spent enough time in Disney Hall that he understands its secret resonances: I was often unsure whether I was hearing tones or overtones, pitches or their ghosts. Even the heaviest textures have an immaterial glow—a counterpart to Frank Gehry’s whorling architecture, which Norman has studied closely. Above all, the composer succeeds in maintaining tension and cohesion across a huge span—“one long unbroken musical thought,” as he writes in his notes. It is thrilling to see a composer tackling a big canvas with such confidence and skill. It is no less thrilling to see a composer being given the opportunity to do so. The orchestra performed expertly and fervently under Dudamel’s direction.

    When I returned two weeks later, the L.A. Phil was playing Prokofiev’s ballet “Romeo and Juliet,” again with Dudamel on the podium. His full-throttle, rhythmically vital interpretation would have been enough to hold the attention, but Benjamin Millepied was on hand to choreograph select scenes, working with performers from the L.A. Dance Project. When a large orchestra occupies Disney’s stage, there is little room for dancers. So Millepied had the idea of sending them into spaces elsewhere in the Gehry complex and following them with a video camera. Images were streamed on a screen in the auditorium. Romeo killed Tybalt in the orchestra’s administrative offices, next to a filing cabinet. The Balcony Scene took place in Disney’s outdoor garden. The crypt scenes were set in an industrial-looking room below the stage. Millepied, holding the camera, was effectively dancing with his performers, weaving around them or running after them.

    The choreographer made a point of casting the lead roles in unconventional fashion. Each night, a different pair performed: first, an interracial straight couple; then two women; and, finally, two men. I saw the last duo, Aaron Carr and Mario Gonzalez. The dance scenes were not only dazzling to the eyes but also wrenchingly expressive: balletic moves alternated with naturalistic gestures of ardor or sorrow. As Prokofiev’s love music was reaching its peak, Carr and Gonzalez lay side by side in the garden, looking up into orchid and coral trees. I found myself wishing that more of the score had been choreographed—Millepied will eventually make a full-length film in this style—but the impact was all the greater for being interspersed with purely orchestral surges of passion and lament.

    Come early November, the L.A. Phil was dividing its attention between two radically different presentations: a staging of portions of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest,” with Sibelius’s incidental music as accompaniment; and John Cage’s “Europeras 1 and 2,” a chance-controlled collage of familiar operatic arias and orchestral parts. The instigator of the latter was Yuval Sharon, the L.A.-based director and the founder of the indie opera company the Industry, which, three years ago, presented the opera “Hopscotch” in locations across the city. The venue for “Europeras,” a co-production of the Industry and the L.A. Phil, was a spacious soundstage at Sony Studios. Sharon and his collaborators repurposed old film props—hand-painted backdrops, B-movie costumes, and the like—to create visual counterpoints to Cage’s operatic kaleidoscope. Thus we saw an Asiatic warrior singing “Non più andrai,” from “The Marriage of Figaro”; an astronaut in a hospital bed belting Wagner’s Song to the Evening Star; and a chef, on skis, essaying “Now the Great Bear and Pleiades,” from “Peter Grimes.”

    The orchestra, meanwhile, tootled unrelated instrumental parts; lighting changed at random; and the backdrops, going up and down on squeaky pulleys, added inapt settings. An excellent cast of singers performed heroically under taxing conditions. Babatunde Akinboboye, for example, gave a secure rendition of the Toreador’s Song while dressed as an infomercial host demonstrating hair-care products. A spirit of joyous absurdity reigned, yet the show had a poignant undertow. Attempting to sing one’s song above the din is a general condition these days.

    Sibelius wrote music for “The Tempest” in the mid-nineteen-twenties, toward the end of his mysteriously abbreviated composing career. The L.A. Phil, under the baton of Susanna Mälkki, its principal guest conductor, gave a brilliant account of the score, but the staging failed to do justice to Sibelius’s mercurially shifting moods, which range from kitschy sweetness to explosions of dissonance. The director was Barry Edelstein, who brought with him actors from the Old Globe theatre in San Diego, and their overmiked voices dominated the sound picture, pushing the orchestra and assisting vocal forces into the background. Still, the production unfolded with the smoothness of a long-running show—this in a week when the orchestra was mounting an equally complex spectacle across town.

    The L.A. Phil’s offbeat ventures are well and good, you sometimes hear people in the classical world mutter, but how’s its Beethoven? Isn’t the programming better than the playing? That put-down is unconvincing: an organization that can bring “Sustain” into the world is more valuable than one that executes yet another hyper-polished Beethoven Seventh. Still, the L.A. Phil has sometimes come up short in mainstream repertory, lagging behind the Cleveland Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, or the best European groups.

    A raft of new players have added depth to the ensemble. Ramón Ortega, who started as principal oboe this season, has a characterful, pungent timbre and arresting phrasing. His Old World style complements the purer, silkier styles of the clarinettist Boris Allakhverdyan and the flutist Denis Bouriakov, both of them recent additions to the ranks. In the brass, Andrew Bain, the principal horn, and Thomas Hooten, the principal trumpet, have solidified a section that was erratic a decade ago. In the strings, Dudamel has pressed for a fuller, richer sound.

    Before “The Tempest,” Mälkki led a virtuosic, vibrant performance of Mahler’s Fifth Symphony. She is best known for her advocacy of new music—she conducted Kaija Saariaho’s “L’Amour de Loin” at the Met in 2016—but she has quietly emerged as a formidable interpreter of the Romantic and early-modern repertory. Last season at the L.A. Phil, she made Strauss’s “Alpine Symphony” sound like a towering masterpiece, which it is not. Her Mahler felt less like a moment-to-moment drama than like a vast landscape undergoing spectacular geological upheavals. The L.A. players’ immersion in new music, far from hindering their work in standard repertory, surely helped them to deliver a fresh account of a familiar score; before intermission, they had given the première of Reich’s Music for Ensemble and Orchestra, a vista of shimmering desert stillness. If the orchestra has a future, it is here.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century is a voyage into the labyrinth of modern music, which remains an obscure world for most people. While paintings of Picasso and Jackson Pollock sell for a hundred million dollars or more, and lines from T. S. Eliot are quoted on the yearbook pages of alienated teenagers across the land, twentieth-century classical music still sends ripples of unease through audiences. At the same time, its influence can be felt everywhere. Atonal chords crop up in jazz. Avant-garde sounds populate the soundtracks of Hollywood thrillers. Minimalism has had a huge effect on rock, pop, and dance music from the Velvet Underground onward.

    The Rest Is Noise shows why twentieth-century composers felt compelled to create a famously bewildering variety of sounds, from the purest beauty to the purest noise. It tells of a remarkable array of maverick personalities who resisted the cult of the classical past, struggled against the indifference of a wide public, and defied the will of dictators. Whether they have charmed audiences with sweet sounds or battered them with dissonance, composers have always been exuberantly of the present, defying the stereotype of classical music as a dying art. The narrative goes from Vienna before the First World War to Paris in the twenties, from Hitler’s Germany and Stalin’s Russia to downtown New York in the sixties and seventies. We follow the rise of mass culture and mass politics, of dramatic new technologies, of hot and cold wars, of experiments, revolutions, riots, and friendships forged and broken. The end result is not so much a history of twentieth-century music as a history of the twentieth century through its music.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:52 PM on November 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Small Works   

    From LPR and New Amsterdam Records: “Brooks Frederickson’s ‘Small Works’ (Album Release)” 

    From LPR

    and

    New Amsterdam Records

    3

    1
    Tue November 20th, 2018

    8:00PM

    Main Space

    Minimum Age: 18+

    Doors Open: 7:00PM

    Show Time: 8:00PM

    Event Ticket: $17 / $20
    Tickets

    Composer Brooks Frederickson’s debut album Small Works is a snapshot of the community of collaborators Brooks lived and worked with in Brooklyn. Small Works comes from not only the small forces needed for each piece, but also from the small amount of material that acts as the germ for each piece.

    Performers includes some of the leading contemporary music interpreters of today: Ashley Bathgate (Bang on a Can All Stars), Eliza Bagg (Pavo Pavo), all three members of Bearthoven (Matt Evans, Karl Larson, Pat Swoboda), Exceptet, Longleash, and Brendon Randall-Myers (Invisible Anatomy / Marateck).

    Composer Brooks Frederickson writes patient music that is grounded in long lines of slowly evolving textures with understated rhythmic drive. As an active participant in Brooklyn’s vibrant contemporary music scene, he has worked with leading new music ensembles Sō Percussion, JACK Quartet, Bearthoven, Ensemble mise-en and with performers such as Vicky Chow, Nathan Schram, and Grace Fong. His music has been present as part of the Bang On A Can Marathon (2014), and the Contagious Sounds and Columbus // New York Exchange series. Interested in the interaction of movement and sound, he has also collaborated with the Spark Movement Collective and choreographer Annette Herwander. This season includes the premiere of Song Cycle performed by Eliza Bagg, Ashley Bathgate, Karl Larson, and Brendon Randall-Myers

    Upcoming recording projects include a his “steroidally hard-driving, rock-influenced” (NY Times) piece Undertoad on Cantaloupe Records. Brooks’ music can also be heard on Consortium5’s recording “Tangled Pipes” out on the Nonclassical record label.

    As an advocate for education and community, Brooks is on the faculty at the Special Music School where he teaches both theory and composition. In addition, he facilitates the annual Composer-Performer Speed Dating session at the New Music Gathering.

    Brooks has had the opportunity to work with many excellent teachers and composers including: Michael Gordon, Julia Wolfe, Justin Dello Joio, Michael Schelle, Frank Felice, James Aikman, and Alison Kay. Brooks holds degrees in composition from from Butler University (BM), and NYU Steinhardt (MM).

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings


    Stem Education Coalition

    (le) poisson rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    LPR

    LPR is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of LPR

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:29 PM on November 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Review: 10 Glimpses of Twyla Tharp the Minimalist   

    From The New York Times: “Review: 10 Glimpses of Twyla Tharp the Minimalist” 

    New York Times

    From The New York Times

    1
    Matthew Dibble, center, with other members of Twyla Tharp Dance in “Eight Jelly Rolls” at the Joyce Theater. Credit Andrea Mohin/The New York Times

    Nov. 15, 2018
    Alastair Macaulay

    Twyla Tharp by Ruven Afanador-Courtesy of Ellen Jacobs Associates

    The choreographer Twyla Tharp has been a classicist, a modernist, a postmodernist — often at the same time — and maybe now and then a feminist and a Romantic, too. She also has a strong streak of the clown: tough, solemn-deadpan, with crazy timing, making a joke of how impossible things can be.

    Now, in “Minimalism and Me,” a production that began life last year in Chicago, and which is currently at the Joyce for four weeks — with six Tharp dancers, some old films and photographs, and 10 other people playing onstage audience members — Tharp reminds us that she was once a minimalist. It’s evident that this was just an early phase: Minimalism wasn’t big enough to contain a temperament with her streaks of rococo excess and genre crossover, but she wryly tells us that her work from then on had to do with “less is more,” as she takes us through 10 works she made from 1965 to ’71.

    Increasingly since the 1980s, Ms. Tharp has become a memoirist, too — in writing, on TV (using film of her earlier work) and in live performance. Reading from a lectern onstage, she narrates the first half of this show, a retrospective of her first seven years of making dances. In her earliest work, “Tank Dive” (1965), she stayed in motionless dance positions for whole minutes while Petula Clark’s “Downtown” played; she now connects this to the painters Barnett Newman and Frank Stella, whose studios were close to the loft where she lived at the time, on Franklin Street in New York.

    2
    Martha Graham, center, with clockwise from left: Merce Cunningham, Erick Hawkins, Paul Taylor, Yvonne Rainer, Don Redlich, José Limón and Twyla Tharp. Credit Jack Mitchell/Getty Images

    Minimalism is her starting point; “Me” (or at least her work) is her main fascination. Yet she is our most obvious problem here: Her way of talking mixes seriousness and comedy in an awkward amalgam and in vocal tones that lack any spontaneity. Both her vocal delivery and her dances get laughs at some unlikely moments, while some of her funniest lines elicit no reaction. And, though she’s keen to demonstrate the creative sophistication she quickly built up in the 1960s, she seems to be rewatching her early work impatiently, with the fast-forward button. The excerpts are fascinating but, until we reach 1970, too brief.

    By 1968, she was famous enough to be included in what has become an often-reproduced Jack Mitchell photograph of eight modern-dance artists of several generations: Martha Graham at its center, and featuring José Limón, Erick Hawkins, Merce Cunningham, Paul Taylor, Don Redlich, Yvonne Rainer and the youngest, Ms. Tharp. In excerpts from the late-1960s — there are snippets of original-cast film, too — you see the emergence of Tharpian style. This included the shrug, the shimmy, the wriggle. When I first experienced her work, in 1980, it was the most kinesthetically intoxicating dance style I’d ever experienced.

    It is not Ms. Tharp’s task to make connections between herself and other choreographers of her time, but that photograph is not the only reason many of us will do so. Taylor’s 1950s experimental pieces, not least “3 Epitaphs” (1956), seem to have been an influence, and when we see the different solos coinciding in one space, we’re likely to think of Cunningham. These early works, and that Tharpian style itself, all have a pronounced kinship to Ms. Rainer’s development of “democratic dance” (non-virtuoso movement related to the everyday).

    We see only half of the 20-minute work “The Fugue” (1970) at the Joyce, but that’s enough to show why she considers it her real Opus 1. (It’s the earliest work she has regularly revived.) An arrangement of 20th-century tap-related movement sequences in baroque-type musical structures — less a single fugue than a series of mini-fugues, with no music than the sound made by the dancers’ hands and shoes — it made her the formal classicist of her generation. But its blend of seeming informality and objectivity has always looked related to other dances from her generation, like Ms. Rainer’s “Trio A” (1966) and Trisha Brown’s “Opal Loop” (1980).

    3
    Twyla Tharp, being lifted at left, and Kara Chan, right, with members of Twyla Tharp Dance at the Joyce Theater. Credit Andrea Mohin/The New York Times

    Its first cast was made up of three women. (Viewers saw it as women’s liberation onstage.) B y the time I first saw it in 1980, it had three men, but other combinations have been used. On Wednesday, it was danced by Kara Chan, Kellie Drobnick and Reed Tankersley — elegantly, exactly, charmingly. I find these dancers somewhat slick when I compare them to the Tharp stylists I watched in the 1980s, but that’s not a new complaint: Today’s Tharp dancers, almost too accomplished in lines and rhythms, lack the juicy, weighty texture that emanated from their predecessors’ whole body language.

    That’s true also of the one full piece shown here, “Eight Jelly Rolls” (1971), the first piece she made to fit its musical accompaniment (old jazz recordings by Jelly Roll Morton and Charles Luke), and one of her greatest comedies. Since Ms. Tharp has staged this with the assistance of Sara Rudner, the greatest of Ms. Tharp’s collaborators — I was lucky to see them both in this work and others — trouble has certainly been taken.

    Here, too, men now have some of the originally female roles. There are marvelously right moments, as when Ron Todorowski suddenly suspends a gesture of both arms in midair; Ms. Tharp’s drastic contrasts of dynamics are often brilliant. This “Eight Jelly Rolls” — its dancers dressed in white, replacing the previous black — is alive, if lightweight. I’m glad today’s audience can see it.

    It’s immediately followed by a new encore that Ms. Tharp has added: a Jelly Roll sequel of sorts in which she dances, too, in her consciously eccentric way. The main joke is that she’s chasing to keep up. I’d like to join in the applause for this flimsy footnote: She’s in good shape, and it ought to be fun to see her back in clown mode. Perhaps the comedy will click into focus as the Joyce run continues.

    Twyla Tharp Dance
    Through Dec. 9 at the Joyce Theater, Manhattan; 212-242-0800, http://www.joyce.org.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:58 AM on November 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Acoustic and electronic music, , , PGM 1198 : 'LITTLE ETERNITIES'   

    From Hearts of Space: “PGM 1198 : ‘LITTLE ETERNITIES'” 

    Music From the Hearts of Space

    From Hearts of Space


    Stephen Hill

    About this program from Hearts of Space Stephen Hill tells us:
    You may be surprised to learn that in philosophy, there are two kinds of eternity: one exists outside of time; the other exists within time but is of indefinite duration. That kind of eternal is called sempiternity or everlastingness.

    Whichever kind of eternity you prefer, the idea of something that goes on forever, endless and infinite, has a powerful psychological appeal in an age of rapid, constant, disorienting change. It’s a radical absolute—one of the few concepts religion, science and philosophy share; and more therapeutically, a place where our overburdened minds can go to rest.

    Inspired by these heady speculations, contemporary composers have sought to create a kind of timeless music. Whether acoustic or electronic or both, it creates a sense of unlimited time in musical space. On this transmission of Hearts of Space, we seek the timeless…on a program called LITTLE ETERNITIES.

    JOHANN JOHANNSSON
    Eg Heyrthi Allt an Thess ath Hlusta (A Winged Victory For The Sullen rework) 05:27 >
    : ENGLABORN & VARIATIONS ; Deutsche Gramophon 00289 479 9841; 2018
    : Info: http://www.deutschegrammophon.com

    CHAD LAWSON
    Towards the Sun 10:28 >
    : RE:PIANO ; Hillset 2018
    : Info: http://www.chadlawson.com

    TALE OF US
    Definizione dell’Impossibile 14:54 >
    : ENDLESS ; Deutsche Gramophon 00289 479 7050; 2017
    : Info: http://www.deutschegrammophon.com

    TOM CAUFIELD
    Warszawa 19:55 >
    : DEEP CUTS FROM THE MORAL WILDERNESS ; Bohemian Embassy BE332018; 2018
    : Info: http://www.caufieldmusic.com

    KEVIN KELLER
    Sobrante 24:06 >
    : NOCTURNES ; Kevin Keller Productions ZMCD-109; 2013
    : Info: http://www.kevinkeller.com

    OLAFUR ARNALDS
    Brot 27:05 >
    : RE:MEMBER ; Mercury KX 00602567660057; 2018
    : Info: http://www.mercurykx.com

    A WINGED VICTORY FOR THE SULLEN
    Steep Hills of Vicodin Tears 31:30 >
    : A WINGED VICTORY FOR THE SULLEN ; Kranky KRANK157; 2011
    : Info: http://www.kranky.net

    JOHANN JOHANNSSON
    Krokodill 34:10 >
    : ENGLABORN & VARIATIONS ; Deutsche Gramophon 00289 479 9841; 2018
    : Info: http://www.deutschegrammophon.com

    JEFF GREINKE
    Night Watch 38:25 >
    : BEFORE SUNRISE ; Spotted Peccary SPM-3701; 2018
    : Info: http://www.spottedpeccary.com

    –segue–

    JOHANN JOHANNSSON
    Salfraethingur Deyr (Hildur Guthnadottir rework) 42:13 >
    : ENGLABORN & VARIATIONS ; Deutsche Gramophon 00289 479 9841; 2018
    : Info: http://www.deutschegrammophon.com

    JEFF GREINKE
    Before Sunrise 54:06 >
    : BEFORE SUNRISE ; Spotted Peccary SPM-3701; 2018
    : Info: http://www.spottedpeccary.com

    OLAFUR ARNALDS
    Nyepi 58:59 >
    : RE:MEMBER ; Mercury KX 00602567660057; 2018
    : Info: http://www.mercurykx.com

    PRODUCED BY : Steve Davis and Stephen Hill

    From the program:
    1

    The weekly program is FREE on Sundays

    Enjoy Hearts of Space in a variety of ways on your iPhone and many phones in the ANDROID system

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    [caption id="attachment_7638" align="alignnone" width="300"] John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:09 PM on November 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , 'le creature nel giardino di Lady Walton', , , ,   

    From New Amsterdam Records: “NOW AVAILABLE: ‘The Vanity of trees’ and ‘le creature nel giardino di Lady Walton'” 

    New Amsterdam Records is at the heart of the New Music environment

    SUPPORT NEWAM

    From New Amsterdam Records

    Padma Newsome from New Amsterdam Records

    New Amsterdam is excited to announce the release of
    The Vanity of trees and le creature nel giardino di Lady Walton, the latest releases from Padma Newsome — acclaimed Australia-based composer, multi-instrumentalist, vocalist, conductor, arranger, and frequent collaborator of bands such as The National and Clogs. Out today, The Vanity of trees is available in digital and CD formats, and le creature nel giardino di Lady Walton is available exclusively through New Amsterdam’s Windmill Series.

    2
    The Vanity of trees

    The Vanity of trees is a sonic essay inspired by the landscape of Padma Newsome’s home of the past 14 years, Mallacoota, Australia. The small town of about 1000 people sits along an inlet of the Tasman Sea in the far eastern corner of Victoria, along the edge of wild sea and forest. “Beauty and a stifling harshness exudes: a seeming wonderland of internal rarefied struggle,” Newsome says of the landscape, where he lives a lifestyle of reflection and seclusion.

    Newsome constructs a warm sonic world that explores the woods that envelope his life in the country, including the character-filled trees that have become his closest neighbors and the life they support — Koalas, Lyrebirds, King Parrots, Wombats, Possums, Goannas, and sporadic humans and households. In addition, the record looks at the isolationism and toughness in remote country, the desolation that emerges and destroys families and lives.

    1
    le creature nel giardino di Lady Walton

    le creature nel giardino di Lady Walton is the inspiration behind Clogs’ release, The Creatures in the Garden of Lady Walton (Brassland, 2010). Scored for six bass clarinets, the music features performances by his sister Sue Newsome, and is available through New Amsterdam’s digital-only, subscription-based Windmill Series, with full release forthcoming.

    In all of our presenting and recording activities, NewAm holds firmly to its mission to support artists whose work lies outside of traditional music industry infrastructure – whether that be classical, pop/rock/indie, jazz, world, or experimental. In pursuit of this calling, NewAm often collaborates with like-minded organizations. Our past and ongoing partnerships with the River to River Festival, Ecstatic Music Festival, Art of Elan, the Indianapolis Symphony (multi-year residency), MoMA PS 1, Liquid Music, Galapagos Artspace and National Sawdust have yielded high-profile opportunities for our artists to present their work. On the records side, we often partner with other labels in order to offer our artists the best possible representation for their projects. Partner labels have included Bedroom Community (Iceland), Nonclassical (UK), One Little Indian (UK), Sono Luminus (USA), Cantaloupe (USA) and NNA Tapes (USA).

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:28 PM on November 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Classical Music for piano, Dénes Várjon "De la nuit", , Jörg Widmann "Arche", Music for Double Bass, Oratorio, Stefano Scodanibbio "Alisei"   

    From ECM: “OUT NOW ON ECM NEW SERIES” 

    New from From ECM

    From ECM which might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    1
    Jörg Widmann
    Arche

    Marlis Petersen: soprano; Thomas E. Bauer: baritone; Gabriel Böer: boy soprano; Jonna Plathe, Baris Özden: narrators; Iveta Apkalna: organ
    Chor der Hamburgischen Staatsoper / Audi Jugendchorakademie / Hamburger Alsterspatzen / Philharmonisches Staatsorchester Hamburg / Kent Nagano conductor

    Arche, an Oratorio for soloists, choirs, organ and orchestra, is a compendious work embracing the course of history in the west with a collaged libretto drawing upon a range of writers. Widmann looks at the tradition of the oratorio and transforms it, and Kent Nagano directs the massed musical forces with aplomb in this concert recording from the premiere performance. As the liner notes say, “Everything happens at once, everything interlocks. Every moment transports us into another world.”
    LISTEN / BUY

    2
    Stefano Scodanibbio
    Alisei

    Daniele Roccato: double bass; Ludus Gravis Ensemble; Tonino Battista: conductor

    Stefano Scodanibbio (1956-2012) created extraordinary music for double bass. Alisei (Trade Winds) features his compositions for solo bass, for two basses, and for bass ensemble, two of which are world premiere recordings, including Otetto which can be seen as Scodannibbio’s great spiritual legacy. The pieces are an often breathtaking compendium of extended techniques that he invented or developed throughout his life and which challenge the musicians to push virtuosity to its limits.
    LISTEN / BUY

    3
    Dénes Várjon
    De la nuit
    Schumann, Ravel, Bartók

    Dénes Várjon: piano

    “Negotiating dynamic shifts of emphasis,” The Independent has noted,”Dénes Várjon displays that most valuable of gifts: the ability to play in a way which makes you listen anew to the familiar.” This capacity is to the fore here in the Hungarian pianist’s sensitive exploration of Schumann, Ravel, Bartók, a journey through three worlds of poetic imagination which, as Jürg Stenzl writes in the liner notes, “ require pianists for whom transcendent virtuosity is second nature. ”
    LISTEN / BUY

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:43 PM on November 15, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    From Toledo Museum of Art: Music at the Museum 

    From Toledo Museum of Art

    1
    Great Performances:
    Formosa Quartet with Solungga Liu
    Nov. 18: 3 p.m., Great Gallery, FREE
    This dynamic, young string quartet performs with pianist Solungga Liu of Bowling Green State University. The program includes Tchaikovsky’s Quartet No. 1 in D Major and Schnittke’s Piano Quintet. Great Performances is supported in part by the Dorothy MacKenzie Price Fund.

    2
    It’s Friday! Music:
    Larry Fuller Trio
    Dec. 7: 6:30 p.m., GlasSalon
    FREE
    This dynamic, young string quartet performs with pianist Solungga Liu of Bowling Green State University. The program includes Tchaikovsky’s Quartet No. 1 in D Major and Schnittke’s Piano Quintet. Great Performances is supported in part by the Dorothy MacKenzie Price Fund.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Since its founding in 1901, the Toledo Museum of Art has earned a global reputation for the quality of our collection, our innovative and extensive education programs, and our architecturally significant campus.
    And thanks to the benevolence of its founders, as well as the continued support of its members, TMA remains a privately endowed, non-profit institution and opens its collection to the public, free of charge.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 5:25 PM on November 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , David Krakauer Megan Schubert and Tomás Cruz, Judd Greenstein, , New chamber music, NOW Ensemble   

    From LPR: “NOW Ensemble Presents the Music of Judd Greenstein” 

    From LPR

    1

    with with special guests David Krakauer, Megan Schubert, and Tomás Cruz

    Wed November 28th, 2018 8:00PM

    Main Space
    Minimum Age: 18+
    Doors Open: 7:00PM
    Show Time: 8:00PM
    Event Ticket: $15 / $20
    Day of Show: $20 / $25
    Tickets

    NOW Ensemble Presents the Music of Judd Greenstein

    NOW Ensemble is a dynamic group of performers and composers dedicated to making new chamber music for the 21st century. With a unique instrumentation of flute, clarinet, electric guitar, double bass, and piano, the ensemble brings a fresh sound and a new perspective to the classical tradition, infused with the musical influences that reflect the diverse backgrounds of its members. Having recently celebrated ten years together as an ensemble, they have brought some of the most exciting composers of their generation to national and international recognition. In recent seasons, NOW has performed at Lincoln Center, the Apples and Olives Festival in Zurich, Switzerland, Town Hall Seattle, Da Camera Houston, and in Carnegie Hall’s Neighborhood Concert Series. From 2016-2018 they were the inaugural ensemble in residence at San Diego’s Art of Élan. Highlights of the 2018-19 season include a major collaboration with Sarasota Contemporary Dance, premieres of new works by composers Sean Friar and Michi Wiancko, and the recording of NOW Ensemble’s sixth album, due out by New Amsterdam Records in 2020.

    Judd Greenstein is a composer of structurally complex, viscerally engaging works for varied instrumentation. A passionate advocate for the independent new music community across the United States, much of Judd’s work is written for the virtuosic ensembles and solo performers who make up that community and is tailored to their specific talents and abilities.

    Judd’s philosophy as both a composer and a curator involves music that is an organic blend of multiple styles, sounds, and instruments, open to all influences. Standout groups that reflect this polyglot sensibility, including yMusic, Roomful of Teeth, and NOW Ensemble, all counted Judd among their earliest commissions and continue to perform his work to this day. As a national and international audience has taken notice of these and other like-minded artists, Judd has been increasingly in demand as a composer for the orchestra and the stage, with recent commissions from the Minnesota Orchestra, the Lucerne Festival, and the North Carolina Symphony, among many others. Recent projects attest to the diversity of Judd’s output: an orchestral song cycle for indie rock vocalist DM Stith, an opera about Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs, a ballet score for Isabella Boylston and choreographer Gemma Bond, and a flute concerto for Alex Sopp and the Knights. In 2020, Judd will be re-launching The Yehudim, an ensemble of singers, percussionists, keyboards and guitars that explores Biblical subjects through a contemporary lens.

    In addition to his work as a composer, Judd is active as a promoter of new music in New York and around the world. He is the co-director of New Amsterdam Records, an artists’ service organization that supports post-genre musicians in developing their most personal new projects. He is the curator of the Ecstatic Music Festival in New York’s Merkin Hall, an annual showcase of new collaborative concerts between artists from different musical worlds, and he is a founding member of NOW Ensemble, the composer/performer collective that develops new chamber music for their idiosyncratic instrumentation. He also co-curates the Apples & Olives festival in Zurich, Switzerland, helping to bring to Europe the post-genre ethos of the Ecstatic Music Festival and New Amsterdam.

    Judd has received degrees from Williams College, the Yale School of Music, and Princeton University, and has received Fellowships from the Tanglewood Music Center, the Bang on a Can Summer Institute, the Six Points Fellowship for Emerging Jewish Artists, and the Sundance New Frontier Story Lab.

    With special guests David Krakauer, Megan Schubert, and Tomás Cruz
    3
    Only a select few artists have the ability to convey their message to the back row, to galvanize an audience with a visceral power that connects on a universal level. David Krakauer is such an artist.

    Widely considered one of the greatest clarinetists on the planet, he has been praised internationally as a key innovator in modern klezmer as well as a major voice in classical music. In 2015 he received a Grammy nomination in the Chamber Music/Small Ensemble category as soloist with the conductorless orchestra A Far Cry, and a Juno nomination for the CD Akoka with cellist Matt Haimovitz.

    Over the past decade Krakauer has emerged as an electrifying symphonic soloist who brings his singular sound and powerful approach to the concert stage. He has appeared with the world’s finest orchestras including the Amsterdam Sinfonietta, Baltimore Symphony, Brooklyn Philharmonic, Detroit Symphony, the Weimar Staatskapelle, the Orchestre de Lyon, the Phoenix Symphony, the Dresdener Philharmonie, and the Seattle Symphony.

    Highlights of Krakauer’s lauded career include performances with the Kronos, Emerson, Tokyo, Orion, and Miro String Quartets; performing during the inaugural season of Carnegie Hall’s Zankel Hall with renowned jazz pianist Uri Caine; an eight-­year tenure with the Naumburg Award-­winning Aspen Wind Quintet tours and recordings with Abraham Inc which he co-­leads with Socalled and Fred Wesley and performing in the International Emmy Award-­winning BBC documentary Holocaust, A Music Memorial from Auschwitz.

    Krakauer’s discography contains some of the most important clarinet recordings of recent decades. Among them are The Dreams and Prayers of Isaac the Blind (Osvaldo Golijov and the Kronos Quartet/Nonesuch), which received the Diapason D’Or in France, The Twelve Tribes (Label Bleu) which was designated album of the year in the jazz category for the Preis der Deutschen Schallplattenkritik, and Paul Moravec’s Pulitzer Prize-winning composition Tempest Fantasy (Naxos). He has also recorded with violinist Itzhak Perlman/The Klezmatics (Angel) and Dawn Upshaw/Osvaldo Golijov (Deutsche Gramophon). His unique sound can be heard in Danny Elfman’s score for the Ang Lee film Taking Woodstock and throughout Sally Potter’s The Tango Lesson. New releases include his 2015 album Checkpoint with his band Ancestral Groove (Label Bleu), Paul Moravec’s Clarinet Concerto with The Boston Modern Orchestra Project (BMOP sound), and The Big Picture on his own label, Table Pounding Records in 2014.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings


    Stem Education Coalition

    (le) poisson rouge

    (Le) Poisson Rouge Event Tortoise at Le Poisson Rouge, 3-16-2016

    LPR

    LPR is a multimedia art cabaret founded by musicians on the site of the historic Village Gate. Dedicated to the fusion of popular and art cultures in music, film, theater, dance, and fine art, the venue’s mission is to revive the symbiotic relationship between art and revelry; to establish a creative asylum for both artists and audiences.

    LPR prides itself in offering the highest quality eclectic programming, impeccable acoustics, and bold design. The state-of-the art performance space, engineered by the legendary John Storyk/WSDG, offers full flexibility in multiple configurations: seated, standing, in-the-round, and numerous alternative arrangements. The adjoining gallery space — The Gallery at LPR — functions as an art gallery, secondary bar, and event space. A work of art itself, the physical facilities are the embodiment of the experimental philosophy that drives the venue.

    LPR is a source you can trust for exposure to visionary work, people of character, and a consistently dynamic environment. We invite you to immerse yourself in a nightlife of true substance and vitality.

    Venue Highlights

    flexible event space fits 250 fully seated, 700 fully standing, or any combination
    138-capacity soundproof Gallery Bar adjacent to the main space
    28’ x 21’ fixed corner stage
    16’ dia. portable, trundled round stage comprised of 3 individual staging sections
    23’ dia. hardwood sprung dance floor
    engineering by John Storyk/WSDG (Electric Lady Studios, Jazz @ Lincoln Center)
    1 downstage cinema-scale projection screen w/ 5.1 Meyer Surround Sound
    2 upstage movable projection screens
    Yamaha S6B 7’ concert grand piano
    elevated VIP Box & 2 private entrances
    full catering kitchen & planning services
    furnished Green Room w/ en suite restroom

    Previous LPR Artists

    Anna Netrebko • Amon Tobin • Anthony Braxton • The Antlers • Arditti Quartet • Atoms for Peace • Battles • Beck • Bela Fleck • Bill Frisell • Brad Mehldau • Broadcast • Caroline Shaw • Cat Power • Chris Thile • Cut Copy • Dan Deacon • Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra • David Byrne • Dean & Britta • Death • Debbie Harry • Deerhoof • Deerhunter • Destroyer • Don DeLillo • Emanuel Ax • Erykah Badu • Fiery Furnaces • Florence & The Machine • Flying Lotus • Four Tet • Glen Hansard • Glenn Branca • Gregory Porter • Hélène Grimaud • Hilary Hahn • Hot Chip • Iggy Pop & the Stooges • J. Spaceman • Jeff Mangum • Jeremy Denk • John Adams • John Zorn • Juana Molina • Junip • Justin Vivian Bond • KD Lang • Kronos Quartet • Lady Gaga • Laurie Anderson • Liars • Little Dragon • Living Colour • Lorde • Lou Reed • Lydia Lunch • Lykke Li • Marc-André Hamelin • Marc Maron • Marc Ribot • Matt and Kim • Max Richter • Medeski Martin & Wood • Menahem Pressler • Mike Watt • Moby • Mono • Múm • Nico Muhly • No Age • Norah Jones • of Montreal • Os Mutantes • Patti Smith • Paul Simon • Philip Glass • Raekwon • Reggie Watts • Regina Spektor • RZA • Salman Rushdie • The Shins • Simone Dinnerstein • Sleigh Bells • So Percussion • Spoon • Squarepusher • Steve Reich • Terry Riley • They Might Be Giants • Throbbing Gristle • Tim Hecker • Tori Amos • Toumani Diabaté • Typhoon • Yo La Tengo • Yo-Yo Ma • Yoko Ono

    newsounds.org is an official radio partner of LPR

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:14 PM on November 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    From The Rest is Noise via the New Yorker: “Nico Muhly Escapes Hitchcock with a “Marnie” Opera” 

    From The Rest is Noise

    Alex Ross, by E.H Jan 17th 2013

    November 5, 2018
    Alex Ross

    1
    Illustration by Cynthia Kittler

    “Didone,” “Norma,” “Tosca,” “Salome,” “Elektra,” “Lulu”: the operatic repertory overflows with works that take their title from a doomed female character, one who is made to undergo a kind of ritual sacrifice. It is a pattern that goes far back: the genre began with Daphne turning into a laurel tree and with Eurydice being dragged back to Hades. Even so, opera’s dependence on the female voice had the effect of empowering singers, who attained unusual cultural authority during eras when women were generally consigned to the social periphery.

    Nico Muhly by Samantha West

    Nico Muhly’s new opera, “Marnie,” which was first seen at the English National Opera last year and is now at the Met, extends and revises that troubling history. The work is drawn from two eponymous sources: Winston Graham’s novel, from 1961, and Alfred Hitchcock’s film, from 1964. Marnie is a sociopathic young woman who routinely invents new identities, steals from her employers, and then vanishes. The story is, on its face, a stereotypical male fantasy of female neurosis: the Hitchcock version borders on misogynist hysteria. From this twisted material, Muhly fashions an absorbing, ambiguous, and haunting entertainment.

    The opera, which has a libretto by the British playwright Nicholas Wright, is based more on the novel than on the film, although the icy allure of the Hitchcock style is undoubtedly the reason “Marnie” has arrived at the Met. Graham was a prolific novelist who is best remembered for his “Poldark” series—historical romances that have been adapted by the BBC. His “Marnie” is told in the first person, and delivers its bizarre narrative with unexpected wit and flair. The protagonist at first finds a hardboiled thrill in pulling off her heists, but is eventually forced to confront the familial trauma that is said to drive her: it turns out that her mother fell into prostitution, became pregnant, and killed the baby to avoid shame.

    The most shocking moment in “Marnie”—book, film, and opera alike—is when Mark Rutland, the head of the printing company where Marnie is employed, attempts to rape her. Mark has seen through her latest scam but is in love with her all the same. He blackmails her into marrying him, then forces himself on her when she refuses his advances. In the novel, Marnie is allowed to speak of her “repulsion and horror”; Graham takes no sadistic pleasure in the situation. The same cannot be said of Hitchcock. It was apparently the rape scene that drew the director to the story, and he filmed it in a grotesquely detached, pseudo-artistic manner. The sequence is even more intolerable in light of the testimony of the actress Tippi Hedren, who played Marnie: in a 2016 memoir, she described how Hitchcock had sexually harassed her.

    In the opera, nothing mitigates the horror of Mark’s act. As Marnie fights him off, she asks, “Do you know what I mean when I say ‘No’?” The last word is drawn out in an anguished melisma. She escapes to the bathroom and attempts suicide by slitting her wrists. The orchestra flails and screams along with her. As a composer, Muhly is attracted to glittering sounds, elegantly intertwining lyrical lines, and austere polyphonic textures modelled on Renaissance and Anglican choral music. His uncharacteristic choice here of a harsh, brittle texture indicates that the violation is again being told from Marnie’s point of view.

    Throughout, Muhly’s chief concern is to show the individuation of the protagonist. At the beginning of the opera, Marnie inhabits a male-dominated world in which women are treated as interchangeable objects. An opening scene in a secretarial pool has female employees chanting in unison—“I enclose an invoice for our services,” “I like your nails”—as the orchestra chatters and pulses around them, with high winds predominating. Sustained tones in the lower brass suggest the weight of the male gaze. Marnie has a knack for manipulating the predictable behavior of male colleagues. She is shadowed by a quartet of look-alikes in candy-colored coats, who form a kind of madrigal ensemble, singing in cool tones without vibrato. Ingeniously, they represent both Marnie’s seductiveness and her internal confusion.

    Marnie’s game falls apart when two men become too curious about her: Mark, who is propelled by a murky mixture of aggression and sympathy; and Mark’s brother Terry, who is purely malevolent, seeking to destroy Marnie after she spurns him. Marnie’s own shell begins to crack after memories of her childhood resurface, partly through the mediation of a male psychoanalyst. In the end, though, she experiences an epiphany on her own. She gives herself up to the police, and it is not at all clear that she will go back to Mark when she is released.

    Muhly, who is thirty-seven, burst onto the musical scene a little over a decade ago. There has never been doubt about his prodigious talent, even if he has sometimes been too distracted by his myriad musical loves. “Two Boys” and “Dark Sisters,” his first two operas, offered magical set pieces but suffered from dramatic deficiencies. Parts of Act I of “Marnie” follow the same pattern, lacking momentum. Act II is another matter: Muhly assumes command, filtering the action through his restless lyric voice. The four central characters—Marnie, Mark, Terry, and Marnie’s mother—are beautifully differentiated, with melodic contours and instrumental timbres tailored for each. Marnie’s instrument is the oboe, and the opera’s trajectory is telegraphed in the first bars, where a sustained oboe note is drowned out by a shrill trumpet and by grunts of brass. By the end, as Marnie sings “I’m free!” in upward-vaulting intervals, she is accompanied by an intricate, vital new sonority of piccolos, celesta, harp, and bowed crotales.

    The Met marshalled an élite cast on opening night. Isabel Leonard, as Marnie, used her rich-hued mezzo to trace the character’s complicated layers. The baritone Christopher Maltman was similarly agile as Mark: he brought a vacant, self-involved air to his rapt Act II aria, in which he compares Marnie to a startled deer. The countertenor Iestyn Davies made for a chillingly incisive Terry; Denyce Graves lent a bracing tinge of Tennessee Williams melodrama to the role of Marnie’s mother. Robert Spano presided over a virtuosic orchestral and choral performance. The production, directed by Michael Mayer, is both chic and affecting. Fluid sets and projections, by Julian Crouch and 59 Productions, deftly cover more than twenty changes of scene. The costumes, by Arianne Phillips, play Marnie’s bright colors against a dull-gray background. The intrusion of the four doppelgängers and of a squad of fedora-wearing male dancers suggests that at least half of what we see is taking place in Marnie’s mind.

    What if a woman had taken on the task of composing “Marnie”? The Met has presented only two operas by women in its history: Ethel Smyth’s “Der Wald,” in 1903; and Kaija Saariaho’s “L’Amour de Loin,” in 2016. The company recently signalled that it will begin to correct this dismal record by commissioning operas from Missy Mazzoli and Jeanine Tesori. I was particularly excited to hear of the Mazzoli project—an adaptation of George Saunders’s novel “Lincoln in the Bardo.” Mazzoli is of Muhly’s generation, and has made her name with stories of gnashing Expressionist power. “Breaking the Waves,” her first evening-length opera, buffeted audiences at Opera Philadelphia two seasons ago. “Proving Up,” a smaller-scale but no less disconcerting piece, had its première earlier this year, and was staged in September at Columbia University’s Miller Theatre.

    Mazzoli’s favorite collaborator is the prolific librettist Royce Vavrek, who has shaken up the timid, backward-looking business of American opera. “Proving Up,” based on a story by Karen Russell, is set on the Nebraska plains in the late nineteenth century, but it is blunt, stark, and devoid of nostalgia. As in “Breaking the Waves,” Mazzoli wrings ferocious intensity from familiar-seeming materials: folkish ballads and wheezing harmonicas are blended into a gorgeously eerie orchestral fabric, one that includes dangling guitars brushed with whisks. Andrew Harris, a young Berlin-based singer with a striking black-toned bass, provided the stuff of nightmares with his turn as a supernatural apparition known as the Sodbuster. The unleashing of Mazzoli’s apocalyptic imagination on the huge Met stage is an occasion eagerly awaited. ♦

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century is a voyage into the labyrinth of modern music, which remains an obscure world for most people. While paintings of Picasso and Jackson Pollock sell for a hundred million dollars or more, and lines from T. S. Eliot are quoted on the yearbook pages of alienated teenagers across the land, twentieth-century classical music still sends ripples of unease through audiences. At the same time, its influence can be felt everywhere. Atonal chords crop up in jazz. Avant-garde sounds populate the soundtracks of Hollywood thrillers. Minimalism has had a huge effect on rock, pop, and dance music from the Velvet Underground onward.

    The Rest Is Noise shows why twentieth-century composers felt compelled to create a famously bewildering variety of sounds, from the purest beauty to the purest noise. It tells of a remarkable array of maverick personalities who resisted the cult of the classical past, struggled against the indifference of a wide public, and defied the will of dictators. Whether they have charmed audiences with sweet sounds or battered them with dissonance, composers have always been exuberantly of the present, defying the stereotype of classical music as a dying art. The narrative goes from Vienna before the First World War to Paris in the twenties, from Hitler’s Germany and Stalin’s Russia to downtown New York in the sixties and seventies. We follow the rise of mass culture and mass politics, of dramatic new technologies, of hot and cold wars, of experiments, revolutions, riots, and friendships forged and broken. The end result is not so much a history of twentieth-century music as a history of the twentieth century through its music.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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