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  • richardmitnick 12:06 PM on September 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: DACA, , , OneBeat, OneBeat at Bronx Museum presented by Bronx Speaks   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “OneBeat at Bronx Museum presented by Bronx Speaks” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    Thursday, October 11, 2018
    at 7:00 PM

    Bronx Museum of the Arts
    1040 Grand Concourse
    Bronx, NY 10456

    Free Event

    This October, a group of musicians from around the globe will spend one week in the Bronx, NY, to work with local residents and businesses owners to create original music. A partnership with Bronx Speaks, a project aimed at giving voice to DACA recipients and immigrant-owned cultural anchors through art, an ensemble of OneBeat musicians will co-create and perform original musical works inspired by stories from the Bronx-based immigrant community.

    These stories will be gathered with and by our Bronx Speaks team, comprised of local DACA recipients and the owner of a Bronx-based African market – Eddie’s Place African Market. A celebration of the incredibly diverse and vibrant borough of the Bronx and its people, this special evening of poetry, storytelling and live performance takes place at the Bronx Museum on Thursday, October 11 at 7pm.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 3:24 PM on September 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: “Fantasy Creatures”, Benjamin Britten, , Nesin Cultural Arts Inc., , New Work Celebrates Seasons of the Catskill Mountains, , Sullivan County Chamber Orchestra   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “New Work Celebrates Seasons of the Catskill Mountains” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    Sullivan County Chamber Orchestra commissions new work, “Four Seasons of Sullivan County,” joining music and visual arts.

    __________________________________________
    Collaborative Visual Artist Laurie Kilgore is selected for the Hudson Valley Plein Air Festival
    Posted on September 20, 2018 by Andrew Trombley

    Fantastic news for our Visual Artist Laurie Kilgore for being selected for the Hudson Valley Plein Air Festival.

    This festival has been acclaimed by Hudson Valley Magazine & the Times Herald Record for it’s efforts to attract cultural tourism through the support professional artists and offering classes and apprenticeships to develop adult & child budding artists. The exhibit will be held October 14th at 3 PM in SUNY Orange at 24 Grandview Ave, Middletown, NY.

    The sketches have started and Nancy (our composer) and Laurie will be traveling around the county to find inspiration at the source. Can’t wait to see the results!

    For more information and Laurie and all of the artists selected for this exhibit go to.

    https://wallkillriverschool.com/events/hudson-valley-plein-air-festival/

    __________________________________________

    Overview

    Nesin Cultural Arts Inc. (NCA) requests $5260 from New Music USA for the commission of a new work by composer, Nancy Wegrzyn, titled “Four Seasons of Sullivan County.” The work will be premiered by our professional Sullivan County Chamber Orchestra (SCCO) in June 2019.

    NCA was founded in 2011 in Sullivan County, an underserved community. NCA believes the arts bring all facets of the community together and contribute to a viable renaissance. The SCCO, a NCA supported project, commissioned Nancy Wegrzyn to compose the four-movement work to be premiered by the 11-piece orchestra. The work will reflect the beauty of the seasonal landscape of Sullivan County. The project will include a collaboration with visual artist Laurie Kilgore who will create four paintings based on the new work. Nancy Wegrzyn and Laurie Kilgore are award-winning artists who live and work in our community. The composition and paintings will be premiered in two locations: June 8, 2019 at Nesin Theatre, Monticello and June 9, 2019 at Tusten Theater, Narrowsburg, NY. Locations will serve a diverse audience and increase accessibility. Performances are open to the public and expected to reach an audience of 300, inclusive of students who receive free tickets. The premiere performance will be recorded with a subsequent patch session by recording engineer, Peter Weitzner. The recording and paintings will be available for purchase and on loan to local venues.

    NCA & SCCO share the philosophy that all music should be performed, including standard repertoire by the early masters; works of the 20th & 21st century; and new compositions. SCCO Artistic Director, Andrew Trombley chose his former teacher, Nancy Wegrzyn for this commission because of her 35-year impact on the community as an educator and composer. Historically, seasonal changes and landscapes have inspired artists of all disciplines. The project will draw on this inspiration to execute the shared mission of NCA and the SCCO. The project will:

    Foster cultural awareness using the beauty of our community’s natural landscape.
    Develop partnerships with professional artists, Nancy Wegrzyn, composer and violist of Newburgh Symphony, Andrew Trombley (Artistic Director/bassist of SCCO) and Laurie Kilgore visual artist and community organizations (Tusten Theater)
    Inspire a renaissance through employment opportunities for professional artists and develop community pride through a focus on Sullivan County landscape.
    Elevate the quality of life by providing a high quality artistic experience that integrates music and visual arts.
    Make the arts accessible by providing multiple performances and a multi-media presentation.

    We need your financial assistance to fund our composer, Nancy Wegrzyn to compose “Four Seasons of Sullivan County” and recording engineer, Peter Weitzner. Our secured support from NYSCA, Sullivan County Legislators and the community will allow this work to be performed and available throughout our county and beyond.

    Project Media
    Fantasy Creatures, Movement III (SCORE) by Nancy Wegrzyn
    28598-Fantasy-Creatures-Mvt-3-by-Nancy-Wegrzyn.pdf
    Features: Nancy Wegrzyn

    Nancy Wegrzyn’s “Fantasy Creatures”a 3 movement work was commissioned by The Weekend of Chamber Music (WCM) for student interns & subsequently performed by WCM artists. A graduate of SUNY Fredonia, she studied music composition with Drs. Walter S. Hartley and Donald Bohlen. Past commissions include the Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Delaware Valley Opera, Monticello Central School District, Fallsburg Central School District & American Virtuosi. These commissions have included several “Meet the Composer” Grants from the NYS Council on the Arts.


    19 minutes

    Features: Marina Lombardi

    Benjamin Britten’s simple symphony is an early composition by one of the 20th century’s most influential composers. His infusion of styles and techniques from the old masters with his innovative voice parallels SCCO’s belief in pairing old master works with original compositions. This recording is from a live performance of the SCCO from January 2017 performed in Monticello and Callicoon, NY.

    Sullivan County Chamber Orchestra with soloist JP Jofre premiering his work, “Tangodromo”

    Features: Nesin Cultural Arts, Peter Weitzner, Andrew Trombley, Kathleen Lara, Marina Lombardi

    SCCO premiered “Tangodromo” by JP Jofre in June 2017. Jofre is an award winning bandoneon player and composer who has been repeatedly highlighted by the New York Times and praised as one of today’s leading artists by Great Performers at Lincoln Center. He expressed, “The SCCO is a top world class orchestra that features some of today’s leading performers and it was a pleasure collaborating with them on this world premiere.” This recording is from a live performance in Monticello, NY and a second performance followed in Narrowsburg, NY.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:46 PM on September 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 2018-2019, ,   

    From New Jersey Symphony Orchestra: “Events & Tickets” 2018-2019 

    From New Jersey Symphony Orchestra

    Oct 5, 2018
    2018-19 Season
    Special Event: Opening Night Celebration
    Includes the Beethoven’s Ninth concert!

    Raise your glass and join us for Xian Zhang’s third Opening Night Celebration with the NJSO. We will be celebrating the joys of giving, diversity and the remarkable community in which we live, while honoring two outstanding community members—Nariman Farvardin, President of Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, and Florence Johnson, NJSO Community Relations Liaison.

    Zhang Conducts Beethoven 9

    2018–19 Season

    XIAN ZHANG conductor (pictured)
    MARY ELIZABETH WILLIAMS soprano
    ELIZABETH BISHOP mezzo-soprano
    LORENZO DECARO tenor
    REGINALD D. SMITH JR. baritone
    MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY SINGERS
    MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY CHORALE
    NEWARK VOICES
    Heather J. Buchanan, conductor
    NEW JERSEY YOUTH CHORUSES Trish Joyce, artistic director
    NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

    KATE WHITLEY Speak Out (US Premiere)
    WALKER Lyric for Strings
    BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 9, “Choral”

    Performed in Newark and New Brunswick
    Buy Tickets

    3

    Oct 11 – 14, 2018
    2018-19 Season
    Seong-Jin Cho Plays Chopin
    2018–19 Season

    OTTO TAUSK conductor
    SEONG-JIN CHO piano
    NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

    LIGETI Romanian Concerto (NJSO Premiere)
    CHOPIN Piano Concerto No. 2
    DVOŘÁK Symphony No. 7

    Performed in Englewood, Morristown and Newark
    Buy Tickets

    4

    Oct 27, 2018
    2018-19 Season
    Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire™ in Concert
    2018–19 Season

    Grab your broom and get ready for the tasks ahead! The Triwizard Tournament comes to Hogwarts™ in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire™ in Concert. Relive the magic of Harry Potter™ soaring across the big screen in high-definition and experience the NJSO performing Patrick Doyle’s unforgettable score live.

    CONSTANTINE KITSOPOULOS conductor
    NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

    HARRY POTTER characters, names and related indicia are © & ™ Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. J.K. ROWLING`S WIZARDING WORLD™ J.K. Rowling and Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. Publishing Rights © JKR. (s18)
    Performed in Newark
    Buy Tickets

    5

    Nov 1 – 4, 2018
    2018-19 Season
    Augustin Hadelich Returns
    2018–19 Season

    CHRISTOPH KÖNIG conductor
    AUGUSTIN HADELICH violin
    NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

    STRAUSS Don Juan
    BRITTEN Violin Concerto
    SCHUMANN Symphony No. 3, “Rhenish”

    Performed in Newark, New Brunswick, Princeton and Red Bank
    Buy Tickets

    See much more at the full article.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    NJSO by by Aryeh Oron


    About your New Jersey Symphony Orchestra

    Named “a vital, artistically significant musical organization” by The Wall Street Journal, the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra embodies that vitality through its statewide presence and critically acclaimed performances, education partnerships and unparalleled access to music and the Orchestra’s superb musicians.

    Music Director Xian Zhang—a “dynamic podium presence” The New York Times has praised for her “technical abilities, musicianship and maturity”—continues her acclaimed leadership of the NJSO. The Orchestra presents classical, pops and family programs, as well as outdoor summer concerts and special events. Embracing its legacy as a statewide orchestra, the NJSO is the resident orchestra of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark and regularly performs at the State Theatre New Jersey in New Brunswick, Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank, Richardson Auditorium in Princeton, Mayo Performing Arts Center in Morristown and bergenPAC in Englewood. Partnerships with New Jersey arts organizations, universities and civic organizations remain a key element of the Orchestra’s statewide identity.

    In addition to its lauded artistic programming, the NJSO presents a suite of education and community engagement programs that promote meaningful, lifelong engagement with live music. Programs include school-time Concerts for Young People, NJSO Youth Orchestras family of student ensembles and El Sistema-inspired NJSO CHAMPS (Character, Achievement and Music Project). NJSO musicians annually perform original chamber music programs at community events in a variety of settings statewide.

    The New Jersey Symphony Orchestra’s programs are made possible in part by The New Jersey State Council on the Arts, along with many other foundations, corporations and individual donors.

    MISSION STATEMENT

    To enrich lives through a passion for musical excellence and a commitment to New Jersey, its people and its communities.

    A world-class orchestra with local roots, creative programming in concerts throughout the state and service to the community through education—these values have been the hallmark of the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra since its beginnings in 1922.

    Your NJSO Through the Years

    In 1922, the ensemble that would later be known as the NJSO gave its first concert at the Montclair Art Museum, a fittingly local venue for the beginning of an organization that has defined itself through its community connections. Philip James led this group of only 19 string players in a program that included music by Purcell, Saint-Saëns and Veracini, as well as the world premiere of The Dark Road by American composer Cecil Forsyth.

    An impressive roster of guest soloists graced the Orchestra’s stages in the late 1920s and 30s, including Percy Grainger, Pablo Casals, José Iturbi, Joseph Szigeti, Artur Schnabel and Efrem Zimbalist.

    Samuel Antek became the NJSO’s music director in 1946 and focused on expanding the NJSO’s role in its communities, beginning radio broadcasts on WNJR, creating the “Music for Fun” series of children’s concerts, introducing the first outdoor pops concert on the estate of Augustus C. Studer of Montclair and establishing the NJSO’s first youth orchestras. Antek stated the Orchestra’s mission was “to share with more communities the inspiration of the concerts given by the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra.”

    Under Music Director Henry Lewis (1968–76)—the first African-American music director of a major symphony orchestra—the NJSO entered a new era of high-profile musical activity. The Orchestra made its Carnegie Hall debut with famous soprano (and Lewis’ wife) Marilyn Horne, who became a regular guest with the Orchestra during the Lewis years, as soloist; performed three outdoor concerts led by Lewis in 1968 in a vacant lot on Prince St.—the site of the 1967 Newark Riots—and one in Untermann Field that Lewis dedicated to the memory of Martin Luther King; and gave a concert at Garden State Arts Center with Luciano Pavarotti. The Orchestra would perform with Pavarotti again in 1984, in the first classical music program ever performed at Madison Square Garden.

    The Orchestra gained even wider recognition under the direction of Hugh Wolff from 1985 until 1992. During this time, the Orchestra broadcast live concerts on PBS, performed The Rite of Spring at Carnegie Hall to great acclaim and presented a retrospective of the works of Bernstein at Carnegie Hall in a concert praised by the composer himself. Mstislav Rostropovich led the Orchestra in a Kennedy Center Concert, and the Orchestra made its first international tour to Ireland for the Adare Festival and a performance at Dublin’s National Concert Hall.

    The growth of the Orchestra’s reputation continued under Zdenek Macal, who increased the number of commissions and premieres the Orchestra performed, including works by Ellen Taaffe Zwilich, George Walker and Richard Danielpour. It was also under Macal that the NJSO stepped out as a major recording ensemble, releasing recordings of works by Dvořák, Mussorgsky and Glière on the Delos label.

    Neeme Järvi succeeded Macal in 2003. The esteemed Estonian conductor championed Scandinavian music during his tenure with the NJSO, introducing New Jersey audiences to new works and raising the Orchestra’s artistic profile.

    Since becoming the NJSO’s Music Director in October 2010, Jacques Lacombe has garnered praise from critics and audiences for his creative programming and his talents at the podium. Under his leadership, the NJSO has augmented select concerts with multimedia elements and daring new programs. Highlights of the NJSO’s “Man & Nature” Winter Festivals have included performances of Tan Dun’s Water Concerto, Scriabin’s Prometheus: The Poem of Fire—with a realization of the composer’s “color organ”—and the commissioning of the Francesca Harper Project to create original choreography for Beethoven’s ballet The Creatures of Prometheus. Lacombe has continued the Orchestra’s tradition of collaborating with other New Jersey arts institutions, including a multiyear partnership with The Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey that has become the centerpiece of the NJSO’s Sounds of Shakespeare Winter Festivals.

    Commissions from major composers have continued under Lacombe, including a new work by Steven Mackey and premieres of three works by Richard Danielpour, the latest of which will be the world premiere of Danielpour’s The Wounded Healer Concerto for Percussion and Orchestra in January 2016. Through the New Jersey Roots Project—which Lacombe conceived as a new affirmation of the organization’s commitment to artistic excellence in its own communities— the Orchestra explored overlooked repertoire and commissioned new works from New Jersey composers and composers whose artistic identity was influenced by the Garden State. The NJSO Edward T. Cone Composition Institute, an outgrowth of the New Jersey Roots Project, offers emerging composers an intensive, multifaceted laboratory experience including masterclasses, rehearsals and feedback sessions with the NJSO and career-enriching sessions with music-industry leaders, culminating in a live NJSO performance of the composers’ works. The Institute is presented in collaboration with the Princeton University Department of Music and generously funded in part by the Edward T. Cone Foundation, Princeton University and the National Endowment for the Arts.

    In November 2015, the NJSO announced that internationally renowned Chinese-American conductor Xian Zhang will become the Orchestra’s 14th music director, succeeding Lacombe effective September 1, 2016. Press have praised Zhang’s artistry and connection with the NJSO in the conductor’s guest appearances with the Orchestra. The Star-Ledger writes: “Zhang once again proved a thrilling leader who has already established a strong rapport with the orchestra. The program showed her interacting with the orchestra in a variety of contexts … In each one, her innate musicality and ability to communicate intention with clarity invested every gesture. Nothing seemed extraneous or glossed over, even as her whole body seemed to contract and release with explosive energy.”

    Since its inception in 1922, the NJSO has attracted some of the greatest international talent in the classical music world as guest soloists, including Pablo Casals, Joseph Szigeti and Percy Grainger among its earliest guests. The NJSO continues to present top-notch performers, including Yo-Yo Ma, Joshua Bell, Yefim Bronfman, André Watts and Marc-André Hamelin. The Orchestra has also been active in seeking out new and undiscovered talent. Pianists Lang Lang and Yuja Wang, both enjoying acclaimed international careers now, each performed with the NJSO when they were still students at the Curtis Institute.

    The NJSO today presents concerts featuring top-tier musical guests at six venues throughout the state—in addition to summer concerts at additional outdoor venues—and provides educational and community engagement opportunities through the Greater Newark Youth Orchestras and numerous other programs.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 1:18 PM on September 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , The Stone in Europe 2018-2019   

    From John Zorn: “The Stone in Europe 2018-19” 

    John Zorn

    John Zorn by Scott Irvine – Courtesy of the artist


    John Zorn at the Newport Jazz Festival, 2014 digboston (https://www.flickr.com/photos/weeklydig/)

    The Stone in Europe 2018-2019

    Friday, September 21, 2018

    September 2018 MARY HALVORSON QUARTET Mary Halvorson, Miles Okazaki, Drew Gress, Tomas Fujiwara MASADA (The Book of Angels) JZ@65

    October 2018 BRIAN MARSELLA TRIO Brian Marsella, Trevor Dunn, Kenny Wollesen MASADA (The Book of Angels)

    October-December 2018 AUTORYNO David Konopnicki, Bertrand Delorme, Cyril Grimaud MASADA (The Book of Angels)

    November 2018 SECRET CHIEFS 3 Trey Spruance, Jason Schimmel, Matt Lebofsky, Eyvind Kang, Shanir Blumenkranz, Ches Smith, Kenny Grohowski MASADA (The Book of Angels, The Book Beriah)

    February 2019 IKUE MORI

    March 2019 URI CAINE MASADA (The Book of Angels)

    April 2019 SOFIA REI & JC MAILLARD
    MASADA (The Book Beriah)
    October 2019 WENDY EISENBERG TRIO Wendy Eisenberg, Trevor Dunn, Ches Smith

    December 2019 NICOLE MITCHELL & CORY SMYTHE
    _________________________________________
    Curated by John Zorn
    Organized by Independent Touring Network

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Zorn is an American composer, arranger, record producer, saxophonist, and multi-instrumentalist with hundreds of album credits as performer, composer, and producer across a variety of genres including jazz, rock, hardcore, classical, surf, metal, soundtrack, ambient, and improvised music. Wikipedia

    John Zorn’s Tzadik Records

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:03 PM on September 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Camille Thurman with the Darrell Green Trio, , Evnin Rising Stars I Pamela Frank- Artistic Director,   

    From Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts: Upcoming events 

    Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts

    From Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts

    1
    Camille Thurman with the Darrell Green Trio
    Presented in Collaboration with Jazz at Lincoln Center
    Saturday October 20 8:00pm
    Jazz Music Room
    $25, $40, $55, $70
    Tickets

    Following her memorable performance at our 2017 Jazz Festival, acclaimed by Downbeat Magazine as a “rising star” singer with “soulful inflection and remarkable, Fitzgerald-esque scat prowess,” and hailed by All About Jazz as a “first-class saxophonist that blows the proverbial roof of the place,” Camille Thurman has been amazing audiences throughout the world with her impeccable sound, remarkable vocal virtuosity, and captivating artistry.

    “…first class saxophonist that blows the proverbial roof off the place and an accomplished stylist who uses her chords…with agility and sophistication” — Hrayr Attarian, All About Jazz


    54 minutes

    2
    Evnin Rising Stars I
    Pamela Frank, Artistic Director
    Saturday October 27 8:00pm
    Chamber, Classical Music Room
    $25, $40 Free tickets for students 18 and under!
    Tickets

    The Evnin Rising Stars program is an incubator for leaders in classical music performance. Along with Pamela Frank, distinguished artist/mentors cellist Timothy Eddy and pianist Gilbert Kalish work alongside a new generation of outstanding young instrumentalists on the great masterworks of the chamber music repertoire. The culmination of this week of intense collaboration and musical discovery is an opportunity for the public to witness musicians on their way to becoming legends themselves.

    Program

    Haydn String Quartet in G Major, Op. 76, No. 1, Hob.III:75
    Mendelssohn String Quartet No. 6 in F Minor, Op. 80
    — Intermission —
    Shostakovich Piano Quintet in G Minor, Op. 57

    Artists
    Distinguished Artists

    Pamela Frank, violin
    Timothy Eddy, cello
    Gilbert Kalish, piano
    Evnin Rising Stars

    Benjamin Baker, violin
    Rubén Rengel, violin
    Tatjana Roos, violin
    Zoë Martin-Doike, viola
    Zhanbo Zheng, viola
    Alexander Hersh, cello
    Coleman Itzkoff, cello

    For more events, please see the full article.

    149 Girdle Ridge Road
    PO Box 816
    Katonah, NY 10536
    p: 914.232.5035 f: 914.232.5521 e: info@caramoor.org

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts is a destination for exceptional music, captivating programs, spectacular gardens and grounds, and wonderful moments with friends and family. It enriches the lives of its audiences through innovative and diverse musical performances of the highest quality. Its mission also includes mentoring young professional musicians and providing educational programs for young children centered around music.

    Audiences are invited to explore the lush grounds, tour the historic Rosen House, enjoy a pre-concert picnic, and discover beautiful music in the relaxed settings of the Venetian Theater, Spanish Courtyard, Music Room of the Rosen House, and the magnificent gardens.

    The story of Caramoor, the Rosens, Lucie’s Theremin, the Art Collections and our History is rich and diverse.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:51 AM on September 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Andrew Olendzki, , Listening to the Music of the Mind, Meditation Practice and the Buddhist Understanding of the Mind   

    From Department of Music at Princeton: “Listening to the Music of the Mind” 

    From Department of Music at Princeton

    Workshop with Andrew Olendzki

    1

    Saturday, Sep. 29, 2018 10:00 am to 1:00 pm

    Lee Rehearsal Room, Lewis Arts complex

    Free, non-ticketed

    Program

    Listening to the Music of the Mind: Meditation Practice and the Buddhist Understanding of the Mind
    Event Info

    Andrew Olendzki, noted Buddhist scholar and teacher, will use musical practice as a metaphor for meditation practice and the Buddhist understanding of the mind. The workshop will include lecture, discussion, and periods of meditation (both guided and silent).

    Listening to music is a skill that can be learned and enhanced by practice. As one comes to understand certain formal structures of music, along with the unique features of specific genres of music, one’s ‘musical intelligence’ is enhanced and the experience of listening deepens.

    The same can be said of meditation, the activity of looking closely at—or, one might say, of listening carefully to—the rhythms and melodies of the mind. In this workshop we look closely at the basic structures of the five aggregates and the six sense spheres, observe the steady arising and falling away of mind moments, and discern the difference between harmonious (wholesome) and dissonant (unwholesome) mental and emotional states.

    The workshop demonstrates the basic principles of integrating study and practice, and helps develop enhanced skills of ‘phenomenological intelligence’. It consists of equal parts lecture and discussion, as well as sessions of both guided and silent meditation.

    The workshop is open to the public and is suitable for anyone with interests in Buddhism, meditation, and the workings of their own mind.

    The Saturday workshop is sponsored by Princeton Insight Meditation and the Princeton Dharma Practice Group. The Princeton University Office of Religious Life will sponsor a talk Friday evening, September 28, 7-9pm. More information at religiouslife.princeton.edu.
    About the Artist:

    Andrew Olendzki is a Buddhist scholar, teacher, and writer living in Amherst, Massachusetts. He has been the executive director of both the Insight Meditation Society and the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies, and has taught at numerous New England colleges. He is the author of Unlimiting Mind: The Radically Experiential Psychology of Buddhism (Wisdom 2010) and Untangling Self: A Buddhist Investigation of Who We Really Are (Wisdom 2016). He is the founder of the Integrated Dharma Institute, an online educational
    resource, and is currently a Visiting Associate Professor of Buddhist Studies at Hampshire College.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Princeton’s Department of Music is at the epicenter of a musical culture that is broad and deep, reaching from edge to edge of the campus, from the classroom to the concert hall, and from faculty-led groups to those run exclusively by students.

    There are several levels of involvement that students can have with the Department of Music: Graduate students can earn a Ph.D. in one of the two main areas of our Graduate program – composition or musicology – including opportunities to focus on theory or ethnomusicology. Undergraduate students can major in music, in a program with emphasis on writing music or writing about music. Undergraduates can also earn certificates in the Program in Musical Performance, both as Music Majors and as majors of other departments. Those who do not plan to pursue a degree or certificate in music are of course welcome to take courses with world-renowned composers and music historians, take instrumental or voice lessons in the private studios of top professionals, and audition to perform with our many ensembles: six jazz groups, three choruses, two orchestras, a wind ensemble, an opera theater, a musical comedy troupe, at least a dozen chamber music ensembles, a laptop orchestra, and almost twenty small a cappella singing groups.

    Community members can attend numerous concerts throughout the academic year. In addition to student performances, world-renowned artists appear on the Princeton University Concerts series; leading performers of contemporary music showcase compositions by faculty and graduate composers through the Princeton Sound Kitchen; Sō Percussion, the Edward T. Cone Artists-in-Residence, perform and engage with the community. The student-run radio station WPRB: 103.3 FM broadcasts many styles of music, often featuring Princeton student performances.

    An important feature hard to discern from a list of courses and ensembles is the Music Department’s emphasis on collaboration. This manifests not only within the department (graduate composers composing for the undergraduate orchestra, graduate musicologists making a performance edition for an undergraduate opera production), but in collaboration with other departments as well. Frequent interdisciplinary collaborators with the music department include students and faculty from Architecture, African American Studies, Computer Science, Irish Studies, and the programs in Theater, Dance, Visual Art, Music Theater, and Creative Writing all housed within the Lewis Center for Arts.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:19 AM on September 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ambient and electronic, ,   

    From Hearts of Space: “PGM 1193 : ‘FLOATING WORLDS 2′” 

    Music From the Hearts of Space

    From Hearts of Space

    i1
    Stephen Hill

    About this program from Hearts of Space Stephen Hill tells us:
    One of the core experiences of ambient and electronic spacemusic is the feeling of weightless floating. These subtle sounds seem to dematerialize us, expand our personal space, and slow our sense of time. It’s kind of magical — and for many of us, highly pleasurable, even addictive.

    Since the introduction of mass-produced electronic instruments in the 1970s, anyone can create floating textures, but even if you’re just a listener, the experience is widely enjoyed and often described in therapeutic terms as relaxing, healing, and transformative.

    On this transmission of Hearts of Space, another anti-gravity journey on electronic waves, on a program called FLOATING WORLDS 2.
    PAUL AVGERINOS
    Beginner’s Mind 06:27 >
    : MINDFULNESS ; Round Sky Music RSM 1023; 2018
    : Info: http://www.roundskymusic.com

    ERIK WOLLO
    Arches 12:27 >
    : THRESHOLD POINT ; Projekt PRO351; 2018
    : Info: http://www.projekt.com

    HOWARD GIVENS & CRAIG PADILLA
    Reflection and Metamorphosis 19:25 >
    : LIFE FLOWS WATER ; Spotted Peccary SPM-9091; 2015
    : Info: http://www.spottedpeccary.com

    PAUL AVGERINOS
    At Peace 29:32 >
    Expansive 37:33 >
    : MINDFULNESS ; Round Sky Music RSM 1023; 2018
    : Info: http://www.roundskymusic.com

    PHILLIP WILKERSON
    Awareness of Silence 44:05 >
    : REVERIES ; PhillipWilkerson.com 2018
    : Info: http://www.phillipwilkerson.com

    MAX CORBACHO
    Celistia 53:31 >
    : NOCTURNES II ; Silentsun mc005; 2018
    : Info: http://www.maxcorbacho.com

    PAUL AVGERINOS
    Still 58:59 >
    : MINDFULNESS ; Round Sky Music RSM 1023; 2018
    : Info: http://www.roundskymusic.com

    PRODUCED BY : Steve Davis and Stephen Hill

    From the program:
    1
    2
    3

    The weekly program is FREE on Sundays

    Enjoy Hearts of Space in a variety of ways on your iPhone and many phones in the ANDROID system

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:49 PM on September 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , PRISM 1   

    From ECM: New from Danish String Quartet-PRISM 1 

    New from From ECM

    From ECM which might just be the finest recording company in the world.

    1

    New release: PRISM 1 – Bach, Beethoven, Shostakovich’ by Danish String Quartet. Order and listen through this link: https://ecm.lnk.to/t09C_

    Danish String Quartet by Caroline Bitten

    This week we’re pleased to introduce the Danish String Quartet’s Prism series in which late Beethoven is brought into juxtaposition with other composers, in this first volume with Bach and Shostakovich. “There is probably no string quartet that I would rather hear play Beethoven at the moment than this foursome of three young Danes and their Norwegian cellist, who demonstrate unrivalled intensity, freedom in their playing and remarkable feel for the composer,” wrote David Allen in the New York Times.

    And: we look back at many great quartet albums on ECM New Series in this week’s special offer, featuring not only the Danish String Quartet, but also the Keller, Zehetmair, Arditti and Rosamunde quartets…wonderful recordings, all.

    For its third ECM release, the prize-winning Danish String Quartet inaugurates a series of five albums with the overarching title of Prism, in which the group will present one of Beethoven’s late string quartets in the context of a related fugue by J.S. Bach as well as a linked masterwork from the quartet literature. With Prism 1, it’s the first of Beethoven’s late quartets, op. 127 in E-flat Major, alongside Bach’s fugue in the same key (arranged by Mozart) and Dmitri Shostakovich’s final string quartet, the No. 15 in E-flat minor.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:02 AM on September 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Austin’s surprisingly robust video game music scene-rock bands who plug guitars into giant amps in bars and play video game music, Digital audio workstations, I did all of my film scoring work using sheet music, I’d never written music without a film to score, , , Surfing on a Constantly Shifting Bed of Earthquaking Sand Dunes, The Video Games Live orchestra   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Surfing on a Constantly Shifting Bed of Earthquaking Sand Dunes” 

    New Music USA


    From NEWMUSICBOX

    1
    On stage with The Returners. (Photo by Greg Fisher)

    September 20, 2018
    Michael Garrett Steele

    Last week, I talked about going to a school that changed my life. The thing is, you don’t get to just change one part of your life at once. That’s not what life is. Life is where you surf on a constantly shifting bed of earthquaking sand dunes and you try to grab what happiness you can as it floats by amidst the chaos.

    Or something.

    Here’s the recap:

    1. It starts with a bad job in Boston, and me hightailing it back to Arkansas to pursue music after a lifetime of pushing it away.

    2. Then it moves to a grad school in Vermont that fundamentally, completely blew my existence apart and reassembled it in the best way possible.

    Going back to undergrad was meant to refocus my attention towards music study. But after getting my second degree from my Arkansas alma mater, I sort of backslid a little bit on the creative front. I didn’t know much about recording. I’d grown a lot in my theory knowledge, but it wasn’t enough to compete in the modern media scoring landscape. I eventually just took a sales job for a tech company out of a need to stay afloat. That turned into an administrative job, contracted through the state. Once again, I’d wandered away from music. But there was one upside to the gig. For exactly one week a month, I had an enormous pile of work to do. For the other three weeks, my job was to frantically look busy – and I wasn’t allowed to take work off of anybody else’s plate. It wasn’t great, but nobody tried to stab me at work, either. And after my first gig, working in inpatient psych, that was sort of my metric for what a “good job” looked like. I never got stabbed, and I never took work home with me. In my mind, it was sort of a dream gig for a grad student. I could research and listen quietly at my desk in the off weeks. And whatever else happened, I knew I’d get out on time to go home and write. And that wouldn’t be too bad, right?

    But I was starting to get mired again. I felt depressed about not advancing any further musically. And ironically, that depression was about to pull me into chickening out of grad school. So, despite not having any prospects of my own lined up, I jumped at the chance to change things up when my wife Mae told me she’d landed a job in Austin, Texas. It was a job similar to the one she had—working in the marketing office of a small liberal arts school. But there was more room for advancement, and an exciting environment. We packed up and took off.

    So everything was in chaos at once. When I traveled out for my first week-long grad school residency at the Vermont College of Fine Arts, we were subletting a one-bedroom apartment filled with cardboard boxes that we weren’t even bothering to unpack. While I was at school, I was dealing with all of the glorious chaos mentioned in my previous post—constant workshops, concerts, masterclasses, lectures, and more. But I was simultaneously fielding emails, texts, photos, and forms as my wife tried to find us a place to live.

    When I came back, I started plugging along on my grad school work—and on our bills. I got work as a temp. That was a beautifully surreal stretch of time. Temping, I worked in a jewelry warehouse. I worked in a printing shop. I worked front desk jobs and go-fer gigs at an ad agency and a title company, and I directed traffic at football games. Whatever non-sequitur direction life took me on a given day, I came back home and tried to figure out new ways to write music. In the past, I’d always been a dots-on-lines person. But if I was going to be serious about scoring for media, I had to learn to write pieces that could exist self-contained in software.

    A lot of modern composition happens in programs called digital audio workstations. (You can say DAW, if you’re short on time). There are a few of them (Logic, Cakewalk, ProTools, Reaper), but they share common functions as well as a lot of complexities that I was going to have to figure out.

    As an undergrad, I did all of my film scoring work using sheet music. Frankly, it always went over better than I deserved. Scoring film demands precision. Programs like Logic will lay the movie out with the music under it, so that you can minutely adjust the way that every piece fits together. I didn’t have that. I had a stopwatch and a quick finger on the pause button of the films I was scoring. Somehow, it always worked out. I scored three student shorts that way. I’d write the music out on a student version of Finale from 2003, and I’d record it with my classmates. I blared a click track in my ear and became known for my wildly animated conducting. We recorded it all live, in classrooms that weren’t built for it at all, and we made it work as best we could. Looking back, I’m proud of what we did for a group of people feeling our way through the dark. We built a community around it. One director called the band my “army of kind strangers,” and the name stuck. It reminded me of how incredibly fortunate I was to be taking these steps, and working with these people.

    But my experience was fairly limited. I’d never written music without a film to score, or at least a story to tell in my own mind. (The academics refer to that as “programmatic music.”) And I’d never really used a DAW. I struggled along at both. In grad school I was given assignments to analyze, understand, and rescore—everyone from Bernard Herrmann to Tan Dun. I used gosh-awful MIDI instruments because it’s what I could afford and I had to keep going. Meanwhile, I wrote a non-programmatic piece and realized it was maybe my most complete summation of everything I loved. It had late-Romantic French sax quartet schmaltz, as well as nods to Japanese video game score harmonies and Stax Records vibes. It also had a fully realized form. (Scoring gives you a lot of opportunities to weasel out of doing that.)

    Meanwhile, my wife was getting to know her co-workers. Completely coincidentally, one of her new friends at the marketing office, Lauren, was heavily involved with Austin’s surprisingly robust video game music scene.

    When I say that, I don’t mean “composers who write music for video games,” though there is certainly a healthy number of those, many of whom I’m delighted to now call my friends. But in this case, I mean “rock bands who plug guitars into giant amps in bars and play video game music.” If you’ve never seen this happen, it’s incredible. Most of this music was written for computer playback. As the composers were writing wild arpeggios in parallel 3rds and 6ths, they weren’t actually counting on human hands ever playing this music. But people do it. They go to the woodshed and they learn these impossible melodies the way an aspiring sax player will work over a Charlie Parker solo. But at least Parker knew what suited his hands. This is like playing Parker melodies on a trombone.


    The Video Games Live orchestra, which features a few of my buds
    1hr 39 min

    Our friend Lauren’s band is called The Returners. They’re not the only band that does this in Austin. There’s also Gimmick!, Descendants of Erdrick, and a few others here and there. If you live in a city of any size at all, there’s probably at least one band doing this near you. (Or a string quartet, or a group of improvisatory jazz and new music nerds.) But it’s pretty unusual to have a whole web of them like we do in Austin.

    Every now and then, The Returners would need a vocalist for a piece, and I’d get to join them onstage. We played everything from writers’ retreats to bars to enormous video game conventions. But as fun as it was, it was just a portent of what we were about to get into.

    One day, Lauren sent me a message. Her friend Sebastian was doing a large-scale, licensed tribute album to a landmark Final Fantasy game. She wondered if I wanted to put a track together. I’d never done much arrangement, but I jumped at the chance. Older video game scores are ripe for re-interpretation. There are some fantastic musical ideas happening, but owing to the restrictions of the technology, there’s a lot of room to arrange and interpret. Some tracks are clearly emulating an orchestra or a jazz band. Some are more of a Rorschach test. All of them feed into a cover music scene infused with a vibrant, buzzing, anarchic fervor for a broad body of often-haunting, widely overlooked music. For my part of the album, I took one of the most gorgeous, haunting melodies that Nobuo Uematsu ever wrote, and turned it into a gleefully shambling P.D.Q. Bach-esque monstrosity full of Otamatone, whistling, and bassoon reeds.


    In case you’re curious to hear an Otamatone, this is Mklachu’s Otamatone cover of “Rainbow Road” from the console game Mario Kart: Double Dash!

    It was a blast, and the album took off in a way we weren’t expecting. That tribute album blossomed into a full-on record label called Materia Collective. They continue to release community-driven tribute albums on a regular basis, but they also put out original game scores now as well. It was a blast to get in on the ground floor. But most important (at least for me) are the friendships I’ve made through the organization and the scene at large. That’s grown to include not only performers, but composers, as well. Like any scene, there’s a lot of overlap in roles. It’s not at all uncommon for people to become favored session musicians for scoring after making a name for themselves as fan arrangers and performers.

    My most recent track for Materia includes a trumpet player from Chicago, a bassist from Connecticut, a guitar player from Portugal, and a flutist from Brazil. (Many of them are composers to some extent in their own rights.) At this point, I can hardly go anywhere without running into a friendly face—whether it’s someone I know from the Internet, or someone from a video game music conference. (I’ve been to two of them and can still scarcely believe such a wondrously niche thing exists on the scale that it does.) That interconnectedness is perhaps what defines the scene.

    In fact, it led me around the world and right back home. Several of my closest friends from the group are actually people from right here in Austin! They’ve become confidants, friends, and frequent collaborators. Some of my favorite music and greatest opportunities have spun out of it.

    4
    Stephen Robert Froeber, Brian Diamond, and myself at a game music festival. Froeber is currently in Germany and Diamond is an Irishman living in Scotland. We met up in National Harbor, Maryland.
    No photo credit.

    Our ability to write and record music around the globe relies on our ability to produce and deliver polished recordings, wherever we may be. Between my newfound technical acumen and the increasingly confident voice for orchestration I picked up at VCFA, I have been able to find—and have become an effective member of—a community of people as wildly committed to my most esoteric passion as I am. And the more I enmesh myself into all of my various spheres, the more they start overlapping. One of my VCFA friends is from Toronto. I asked him once, as a joke, whether he knew a game music friend who leads a jazz band in Toronto. It turned out he did. A Chicago VGM friend and a Chicago VCFA friend went to school together. And so it goes. The larger my world gets, the smaller it is. These convergences and connections are endlessly beautiful to me, and I feel more at home in more places than I ever dreamed that I would. I’ve even gotten to be the person to *make* those connections once or twice.

    Both of these musical worlds thrive on connection. VCFA, with its emphasis on distance learning with modern tools, and the video game music community, made of far-flung, passionate devotees who grew up embracing technology. In the end, I owe just about everything I have to these groups of people, and the connections that I’ve made among them.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA, we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 7:50 AM on September 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "These Wicked Things", Americana indie, Beat Circus, , ,   

    From Innova: “These Wicked Things” 

    From Innova the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1

    Beat Circus
    These Wicked Things
    Description:
    Weird American Gothic
    Composers: Brian Carpenter, Andrew Stern, Paul Dilley, Gavin McCarthy

    Performers: Beat Circus

    Brian Carpenter – vocals
    Andrew Stern – guitar
    Abigale Reisman – violin
    Emily Bookwalter – viola
    Dana Colley – bass saxophone
    Paul Dilley – double bass
    Gavin McCarthy – drums

    Catalog Number: #1 015
    Genre: new music
    Collection: Americana, indie
    singer-songwriter

    Release Date:
    Mar 22, 2019

    Liner Notes:
    View

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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