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  • richardmitnick 2:07 PM on July 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Joshua Bell, ,   

    From Lincoln Center: Mostly Mozart – “Joshua Bell Plays Bruch” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    From Lincoln Center

    July 31–August 1, 2018 David Geffen Hall

    Joshua Bell Photo by Phil Knott

    Tuesday, July 31, 2018 at 7:30 pm
    Wednesday, August 1, 2018 at 7:30 pm

    Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra
    Louis Langrée, conductor
    Joshua Bell, violin

    Pre-concert recitals at 6:30 pm
    Stephen Waarts, violin
    Henry Kramer, piano
    Brahms: Violin Sonata No. 3 in D minor
    David Geffen Hall

    Program
    John Adams: Tromba Lontana
    Bruch: Violin Concerto No. 1
    Brahms: Symphony No. 2

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Artsis a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 2:31 PM on July 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Resident Alien   

    From NEWMUSICUSA: “Resident Alien” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    1
    Wednesday, August 1, 2018
    at 7:00 PM

    The Tank
    151 West 46th Street
    New York, NY 10036

    $10
    Tickets

    My desire to fully assimilate to my cultural surrounding stems from my desire to be adored. My sense of identity manifests as an ambivalent balancing act: my fatal differences must be compromised in order to thrive in unfamiliar group settings, but an appropriate amount of exotic barrier must be maintained for the sake of authenticity and for the group’s appreciation of diversity. Ideally, I would like to exist within Josh Kun’s principle of crossfades: “mix without erasing, combine without destroying, to juggle and sustain difference, to use what already exists to create something entirely new.” Yet in my practice, I find that my mind-body lets me down: as I gain adoration from one group, I am more alien to another because I forget how to reconnect.

    In Resident Alien, the audience will observe as performers are guided through a unique process of groupwork that I’ve named Group Listening*. The objective of Resident Alien is for the performers to transform a fixed electronic piece into a structured, live sound performance. One designated performer will play the role of the alien; they will be listening to a completely different electronic media piece on headphones while the other players are listening through speakers. Throughout their performance, the group will continuously shape their (re)constructed composition by alternating between attentive listening, improvising, and exchanging verbal feedback. They must reckon with the question of what it means to succeed as a group. In doing so, Resident Alien metaphorically facilitates a process of assimilation between the alien and the rest of the group via this performance practice.

    Resident Alien features:
    Andrew Koss, Alto Saxophone
    Erich Bargainer, Electronic Mandolin
    Leo Chang, composer/facilitator, Voice
    Oliver Hickman, Electric Guitar
    Sam Kaseta, Voice
    Samn Johnson, Electric Bass
    Peilin Wu, Violin
    Toshihisa Tsuruoka, Augmented Trumpet

    Directed by Helen Handelman

    *Read more about Group Listening here: http://www.listentoleo.com/group-listening/

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 2:07 PM on July 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , String Noise   

    From NEWMUSICUSA and Bang on a Can: “Artists at Noguchi | Bang on a Can: String Noise” 

    From NEWMUSICUSA

    and

    Bang On a Can the original DIY New Music Organization


    1
    Sunday, August 12, 2018
    at 3:00 PM

    The Noguchi Museum
    9-01 33rd Road
    Long Island City, NY 11106

    Free Event
    https://www.noguchi.org/programs/public/bang-on-a-can-string-noise-august-12-2018

    Bang on a Can and The Noguchi Museum continue their 2018 monthly summer concert series with String Noise, presented in the Museum’s outdoor sculpture garden. In case of rain, the concert will take place in the galleries.

    Blurring the lines of classical and avant-garde, String Noise (violinists Conrad Harris and Pauline Kim) will perform music by Georg Friedrich Haas, David Lang, Pauline Kim Harris, Jessie Cox, Paul Reller, and Richard Carrick. The performance also features punk covers and the title work of their debut album on Northern Spy Records, The Book of Strange Positions, by 2018 Guggenheim fellow Eric Lyon.

    String Noise
    New York City, NY

    “TRAILBLAZING DUO” – (TIME OUT NY)

    “THE ENTERPRISING DUO, STRING NOISE… LIGHTNING FAST REFLEXES AND WARMLY MATCHED SOUNDS” – (NEW YORK TIMES)

    “FORMIDABLE DISPLAY OF VIRTUOSITY”- (NEW MUSIC BOX)

    “THEY WERE GREETED WITH A THUNDERING OVATION, MORE COMMON FOR AMERICAN IDOLS” – (HUFFINGTON POST)

    “NEW YORK’s MOST DARING VIOLIN DUO” – (TIME OUT NY)

    String Noise is an “enterprising violin duo” in NYC comprised of “two of the most focused and lustrous-toned avant stalwarts.” Channeling “all the sweetness of Mantovani’s 1001 strings into just eight,” Conrad Harris and Pauline Kim Harris, who are married, break down barriers and expand the traditional boundaries of the two violin repertoire, redefining the possible.

    String Noise is a classical, avant-punk violin duo comprised of violinists Conrad Harris and Pauline Kim Harris. Since its inception in 2011 at Ostrava New Music Days, they have expanded the two violin repertoire in over 50 new works to include larger collaborations with multimedia art, electronics, video projections, opera and dance.

    Their first feature album The Book of Strange Positions was released on NORTHERN SPY RECORDS in November 2015. Tiny Mix Tapes describes this collection of original works and arrangements by Eric Lyon of punk covers by Bad Brains, Violent Femmes, Deerhoof, Radiohead, and Black Flag as a “mix of classic punk covers and ZERO APOLOGIES.” Their 7” inch EP Covers produced by Deerhoof drummer and composer Greg Saunier is also available on Northern Spy Records.

    String Noise was highlighted in Performa 2011 with artist Will Cotton and was the featured ensemble for the launch of composers collective Indexical (David Kant, Andrew Christopher Smith, Mustafa Walker and Beau Sievers). Premieres by String Noise include works by Christian Wolff, John King, Phill Niblock, Caleb Burhans, David Lang, Petr Kotik, Du Yun, Annie Gosfield, Bernhard Lang, Spencer Topel, Derek Hurst, Jerome Begin, Elizabeth Hoffman, John Zorn, Greg Saunier, Alex Mincek, Yoon-Ji Lee, Catherine Lamb, Petr Bakla, Richard Carrick and Alvin Lucier, to name some. String Noise has performed at Issue Project Room, Czech Center, Roulette, EXAPNO, Rockwood Music Hall and the Stone and has been heard on WNYC, WKCR and WFMU.

    Co-concertmasters of Wordless Music Orchestra, Ensemble LPR and the S.E.M. Ensemble, String Noise has collaborated in special projects with artists such as Jonny Greenwood (Radiohead), John Cale (Velvet Underground), Billy Martin (Martin, Medeski, Wood), Mica Levi (Micachu and the Shapes), Jon Brion, Laurie Anderson, Jason Moran, Roscoe Mitchell, Max Richter and and Rostam (Vampire Weekend).

    As curators, String Noise presented Drawing Sound: Part II at the Drawing Center – a three night mini-festival featuring artists Alvin Lucier, Greg Saunier and Jad Fair and is a co-curator for Carnegie Hill Concerts in New York.

    Static Strands and String Noise by Annie Gosfield

    Harvestworks, in partnership with Composers Now Festival presents Annie Gosfield – Jammed Radios, Flying Signals, and String Noise.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    Bang On A Can David Lang- Michael Gordon- Julia Wolfe © Peter Serling

    Bang On A Can All-Stars Members Ashley Bathgate, cello
    Robert Black, bass
    Vicky Chow, piano
    David Cossin, percussion
    Mark Stewart, guitars
    Ken Thomson, clarinet

    Bang on a Can is dedicated to making music new. Since its first Marathon concert in 1987, Bang on a Can has been creating an international community dedicated to innovative music, wherever it is found. With adventurous programs, it commissions new composers, performs, presents, and records new work, develops new audiences, and educates the musicians of the future. Bang on a Can is building a world in which powerful new musical ideas flow freely across all genres and borders. Bang on a Can plays “a central role in fostering a new kind of audience that doesn’t concern itself with boundaries. If music is made with originality and integrity, these listeners will come.” (The New York Times)
    Bang on a Can has grown from a one-day New York-based Marathon concert (on Mother’s Day in 1987 in a SoHo art gallery) to a multi-faceted performing arts organization with a broad range of year-round international activities. “When we started Bang on a Can, we never imagined that our 12-hour marathon festival of mostly unknown music would morph into a giant international organization dedicated to the support of experimental music, wherever we would find it,” write Bang on a Can Co-Founders Michael Gordon, David Lang and Julia Wolfe. “But it has, and we are so gratified to be still hard at work, all these years later. The reason is really clear to us – we started this organization because we believed that making new music is a utopian act – that people needed to hear this music and they needed to hear it presented in the most persuasive way, with the best players, with the best programs, for the best listeners, in the best context. Our commitment to changing the environment for this music has kept us busy and growing, and we are not done yet.”

    Formed in 1992, the Bang on a Can All-Stars are recognized worldwide for their ultra-dynamic live performances and recordings of today’s most innovative music. Freely crossing the boundaries between classical, jazz, rock, world and experimental music, this six-member amplified ensemble has consistently forged a distinct category-defying identity, taking music into uncharted territories. Performing each year throughout the U.S. and internationally, the All-Stars have shattered the definition of what concert music is today.

    Together, the All-Stars have worked in unprecedented close collaboration with some of the most important and inspiring musicians of our time, including Steve Reich, Ornette Coleman, Burmese circle drum master Kyaw Kyaw Naing, Tan Dun, DJ Spooky, and many more. The group’s celebrated projects include their landmark recordings of Brian Eno’s ambient classic Music for Airports and Terry Riley’s In C, as well as live performances with Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Don Byron, Iva Bittova, Thurston Moore, Owen Pallett and others. The All-Stars were awarded Musical America’s Ensemble of the Year and have been heralded as “the country’s most important vehicle for contemporary music” by the San Francisco Chronicle.

    Current and recent project highlights include the touring performances and recording of Julia Wolfe’s Pulitzer Prize winning Anthracite Fields for the All-Stars and guest choir, the record release of Wolfe’s acclaimed Steel Hammer, featuring Trio Mediaeval, plus a moving theatrically staged collaboration with SITI Company and director Anne Bogart; Field Recordings, a major multi-media project and CD/DVD now featuring 30 commissioned works by Tyondai Braxton, Mira Calix, Anna Clyne, Bryce Dessner, Florent Ghys, Michael Gordon, Jóhann Jóhannsson, David Lang, Christian Marclay, Steve Reich, Todd Reynolds, Julia Wolfe, and more; the Lincoln Center Festival 2017 world premiere of Cloud River Mountain, a new collaboration featuring Chinese superstar singer Gong Linna; the world premiere performance and recording of Steve Reich’s 2×5 including a sold-out performance at Carnegie Hall, and much more. With a massive repertoire of works written specifically for the group’s distinctive instrumentation and style of performance, the All-Stars have become a genre in their own right. The All-Stars record on Cantaloupe Music and have released past recordings on Sony, Universal and Nonesuch.

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    No matter how far ranging our networks, our focus is always solidly on what brings these many constituents and communities together in the first place: the music. When someone uses our platform to listen to something new, recommend a favorite to a friend, or to seek financial assistance or information to support the creation or performance of new work, the whole community is strengthened. Together we’re helping new music reach new ears every day.
    Our Vision

    We envision in the United States a thriving, interconnected new music community that is available to and impactful for a broad constituency of people.
    Our Mission

    New Music USA supports and promotes new music created in the United States. We use the power of virtual networks and people to foster connection, deepen knowledge, encourage appreciation, and provide financial support for a diverse constituency of practitioners and appreciators, both within the United States and beyond.

    Our Values
    We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work.
    We espouse a broad, inclusive understanding of the term “new music.”
    We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity and across our nation’s broadly diverse population in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status and artistic practice.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:42 AM on July 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "The Force of Things", , ,   

    From Lincoln Center- “MOSTLY MOZART FESTIVAL” and ICE 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    From Lincoln Center

    MOSTLY MOZART FESTIVAL

    1

    and


    International Contemporary Ensemble

    The Force of Things
    An Opera for Objects
    (New York premiere)

    August 6–8, 2018 Gelsey Kirkland Arts Center, Brooklyn

    Experience the Mostly Mozart Festival in Brooklyn.

    The Program
    Ashley Fure and Adam Fure: The Force of Things: An Opera for Objects (2016–17)

    How do we bear witness to a thing our bodies seem built to ignore? In Ashley Fure’s immersive music-theater piece, created with her architect brother Adam Fure and the International Contemporary Ensemble, 24 subwoofer speakers emit sound too low for humans to hear, creating a subsonic sense of ecological anxiety that ripples around the audience. Under a dense canopy of sculpted matter, tones are “made tactile, objects made audible, noise made beautiful” (New York Times). Drama is steered away from the human, time is stretched to a geologic scale, and seven live performers act as wordless harbingers of a consciousness not limited to the living.

    Related event:

    TALK | FREE

    Composers’ Forum

    Thursday, August 2, 6:00–6:45 pm

    Bruno Walter Auditorium, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts

    International Contemporary Ensemble

    Ashley Fure, composer and co-director

    Adam Fure, architectural design

    César Alvarez, co-director

    Lucy Dhegrae and Lisa E. Harris, voice

    Ross Karre, percussion and producer

    Levy Lorenzo, percussion and engineer

    Nick Houfek, lighting

    Lilleth Glimcher, associate director

    Please visit http://www.lincolncenter.org/mostly-mozart-festival/show/the-force-of-things
    To place a ticket order

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) is an artist collective that is transforming the way music is created and experienced. As performer, curator, and educator, ICE explores how new music intersects with communities across the world. The ensemble’s 35 members are featured as soloists, chamber musicians, commissioners, and collaborators with the foremost musical artists of our time. Works by emerging composers have anchored ICE’s programming since its founding in 2001, and the group’s recordings and digital platforms highlight the many voices that weave music’s present.

    A recipient of the American Music Center’s Trailblazer Award and the Chamber Music America/ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming, ICE was also named the 2014 Musical America Ensemble of the Year. The group currently serves as artists-in-residence at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Mostly Mozart Festival, and previously led a five-year residency at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. ICE was featured at the Ojai Music Festival from 2015 to 2017, and at recent festivals abroad such as gmem-CNCM-marseille and Vértice at Cultura UNAM, Mexico City. Other performance stages have included the Park Avenue Armory, The Stone, ice floes at Greenland’s Diskotek Sessions, and boats on the Amazon River.

    New initiatives include OpenICE, made possible with lead funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which offers free concerts and related programming wherever ICE performs, and enables a working process with composers to unfold in public settings. DigitICE, a free online library of over 350 streaming videos, catalogues the ensemble’s performances. ICE’s First Page program is a commissioning consortium that fosters close collaborations between performers, composers, and listeners as new music is developed. EntICE, a side-by-side education program, places ICE musicians within youth orchestras as they premiere new commissioned works together; inaugural EntICE partners include Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and The People’s Music School in Chicago. Summer activities include Ensemble Evolution at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, in which young professionals perform with ICE and attend workshops on topics from interpretation to concert production. Yamaha Artist Services New York is the exclusive piano provider for ICE. Read more at iceorg.org.
    Staff

    Claire Chase, Founder*

    William McDaniel, Executive Director
    Rebekah Heller, co-Artistic Director*
    Ross Karre, co-Artistic Director and Director of digitICE.org*
    Jacob Greenberg, Director of Recordings and Digital Outreach*
    Levy Lorenzo, Engineer and Technical Director*
    Ryan Muncy, Director of Institutional Giving and co-Director, OpenICE*
    Joshua Rubin, Artistic Director Emeritus*
    Karla Brom, General Manager
    Maciej Lewandowski, Director of Production
    Bridgid Bergin, Development Associate

    • ICE musician

    Artists

    Alice Teyssier, flute
    Bridget Kibbey, harp
    Campbell MacDonald, clarinet
    Claire Chase, flute
    Cory Smythe, piano
    Dan Peck, tuba
    Daniel Lippel, guitar
    David Bowlin, violin
    David Byrd-Marrow, horn
    Erik Carlson, violin
    Gareth Flowers, trumpet
    Jacob Greenberg, piano
    James Austin Smith, oboe
    Jennifer Curtis, violin
    Josh Modney, violin and viola
    Joshua Rubin, clarinet
    Katinka Kleijn, cello
    Kivie Cahn-Lipman, cello
    Kyle Armbrust, viola
    Levy Lorenzo, percussion
    Maiya Papach, viola
    Michael Nicolas, cello
    Mike Lormand, trombone
    Nathan Davis, percussion
    Nicholas Houfek, lighting designer
    Nicholas Masterson, oboe
    Nuiko Wadden, harp
    Peter Evans, trumpet
    Peter Tantsits, tenor
    Phyllis Chen, piano
    Randall Zigler, bass
    Rebekah Heller, bassoon
    Ross Karre, percussion
    Ryan Muncy, saxophone
    Steven Schick, Artist-in-Residence
    Tony Arnold, soprano
    Wendy Richman, viola

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Artsis a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:57 PM on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , TENTH Year of the Sō Percussion Summer Institute July 15-29 2018 Princeton NJ USA   

    From Sō Percussion: “Photos from our TENTH Year of the Sō Percussion Summer Institute, July 15-29, 2018 

    So Percussion in performance

    From Sō Percussion

    Photos from our TENTH Year of the Sō Percussion Summer Institute, July 15-29, 2018

    1
    SoSI students working with Director of Composition Andrea Mazzariello. Photo Andrea Tafelski
    Processed with VSCO with a4 preset — with Andrea Mazzariello in Princeton, New Jersey.

    2
    Photo Andrea Tafelski, Processed with VSCO with kk1 preset — in Princeton, New Jersey.

    3
    Photo Andrea Tafelski, Processed with VSCO with a9 preset — in Princeton, New Jersey.

    4
    SoSI Student Composer Lucy Hollier with Director of Composition Andrea Mazzariello

    Photo Andrea Tafelski, Processed with VSCO with a10 preset — with Andrea Mazzariello in Princeton, New Jersey.

    5
    Adam Sliwinski, seeking truth!
    Photo Andrea Tafelski, Processed with VSCO with e7 preset — with Adam Sliwinski in Princeton, New Jersey.

    6
    Eric Cha-Beach in a reflective moment.
    Photo Andrea Tafelski, Processed with VSCO with a10 preset — with Eric Bradley Cha-Beach in Princeton, New Jersey.

    7
    Sō working with SōSI composer Lucy Hollier.
    Photo Andrea Tafelski, Processed with VSCO with e7 preset — in Princeton, New Jersey.

    8
    Sō working with SōSI composer Margaret Kogos.
    Photo Andrea Tafelski, Processed with VSCO with e7 preset — in Princeton, New Jersey.

    9
    SōSI students in action, Day 3.
    Photo Andrea Tafelski, Processed with VSCO with h2 preset — in Princeton, New Jersey.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The “artist”

    Adam Sliwinski has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2002. Adam is particularly interested in keyboard instruments, especially marimba and piano.

    Eric Cha-Beach has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2007-A consummate percussionist he loves to learn new instruments like the musical saw integrating them into diverse setups

    Jason Treuting is a founding member of Sō Percussion- Jason has pioneered an innovative drum set practice within the new music sphere. He is also a composer.

    Josh Quillen has been a member of Sō Percussion since 2006- Josh is an expert Steel Drum artist having studied in Trinidad and immersed himself in Steel Band culture.

    Our Mission:

    Sō Percussion is a percussion-based music organization that creates and presents new collaborative works to adventurous and curious audiences and educational initiatives to engaged students, while providing meaningful service to its communities, in order to exemplify the power of music to unite people and forge deep social bonds.
    Our Vision:

    To create a new model of egalitarian artistic collaboration that respects history, champions innovation and curiosity, and creates an essential social bond through service to our audiences and our communities.
    Ensemble Bio:

    Sō is: Eric Cha-Beach, Josh Quillen, Adam Sliwinski, and Jason Treuting

    With innovative multi-genre original productions, sensational interpretations of modern classics, and an “exhilarating blend of precision and anarchy, rigor and bedlam,” (The New Yorker), Sō Percussion has redefined the scope and vital role of the modern percussion ensemble.

    Sō’s repertoire ranges from “classics” of the 20th century, by John Cage, Steve Reich, and Iannis Xenakis, et al, to commissioning and advocating works by contemporary composers such as Caroline Shaw, David Lang, Steve Mackey, and Paul Lansky, to distinctively modern collaborations with artists who work outside the classical concert hall, including vocalist Shara Nova, electronic duo Matmos, the groundbreaking Dan Deacon, legendary drummer Bobby Previte, jam band kings Medeski, Martin, and Wood, Wilco’s Glenn Kotche, choreographer Shen Wei, and composer and leader of The National, Bryce Dessner, among many others.

    Sō Percussion also composes and performs their own works, ranging from standard concert pieces to immersive multi-genre programs – including Imaginary City, Where (we) Live, and A Gun Show, which was presented in a multi-performance presentation as part of BAM’s 2016 Next Wave Festival. In these concert-length programs, Sō Percussion employs a distinctively 21st century synthesis of original music, artistic collaboration, theatrical production values and visual art, into a powerful exploration of their own unique and personal creative experiences.

    Rooted in the belief that music is an essential facet of human life, a social bond, and an effective tool in creating agency and citizenship, Sō Percussion enthusiastically pursues a growing range of social and community outreach. Examples include their Brooklyn Bound presentations of younger composers; commitments to purchasing offsets to compensate for carbon-heavy activities such as touring travel; and leading their SōSI students in an annual food-packing drive, yielding up to 25,000 meals, for the Crisis Center of Mercer County through the organization EndHungerNE.

    Sō Percussion is the Edward T. Cone Ensemble-in-Residence at Princeton University, where they offer educational work and present an annual series of concerts. They are also Co-Directors of the percussion department at the Bard College-Conservatory of Music, and run the annual Sō Percussion Summer Institute (SōSI, now in its ninth year), providing college-age composers and percussionists an immersive exposure to collaboration and project development.

    One of the first things any group needs is a name. When our group was founded in 1999, we cast far and wide among our friends and family for suggestions. The winner was this simple, short word offered by Jenise Treuting, Jason’s sister.

    Jenise has been living and working in Japan as an English-Japanese translator for 20 years. The word “Sō” was punchy, enigmatic, and memorable.

    “The Sō in Sō Percussion comes from 奏, the second character in the compound Japanese word 演奏 (ensou), to perform music. By itself, so means “to play an instrument.” But it can also mean “to be successful,” “to determine a direction and move forward,” and “to present to the gods or ruler.” Scholars have suggested that the latter comes from the character’s etymology, which included the element “to offer with both hands.” 奏 is a bold, straightforward character, but lends itself to calligraphy with a certain energy that gives so a springy, delicate look.”

    – Jenise Treuting

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:01 PM on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Pierre Boulez, Th Rest is Noise, The Dutch pianist Ralph van Raat   

    From The Rest is Noise: Ralph van Raat will play Boulez 

    From The Rest is Noise

    Alex Ross, by E.H Jan 17th 2013

    New article on The Dutch pianist Ralph van Raat and a previously unknown early work by Pierre Boulez: the Prélude, Toccata et Scherzo, from 1944.

    1
    Freer|Sackler – Smithsonian Institution

    See the full article. I do no poach other blogs.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century is a voyage into the labyrinth of modern music, which remains an obscure world for most people. While paintings of Picasso and Jackson Pollock sell for a hundred million dollars or more, and lines from T. S. Eliot are quoted on the yearbook pages of alienated teenagers across the land, twentieth-century classical music still sends ripples of unease through audiences. At the same time, its influence can be felt everywhere. Atonal chords crop up in jazz. Avant-garde sounds populate the soundtracks of Hollywood thrillers. Minimalism has had a huge effect on rock, pop, and dance music from the Velvet Underground onward.

    The Rest Is Noise shows why twentieth-century composers felt compelled to create a famously bewildering variety of sounds, from the purest beauty to the purest noise. It tells of a remarkable array of maverick personalities who resisted the cult of the classical past, struggled against the indifference of a wide public, and defied the will of dictators. Whether they have charmed audiences with sweet sounds or battered them with dissonance, composers have always been exuberantly of the present, defying the stereotype of classical music as a dying art. The narrative goes from Vienna before the First World War to Paris in the twenties, from Hitler’s Germany and Stalin’s Russia to downtown New York in the sixties and seventies. We follow the rise of mass culture and mass politics, of dramatic new technologies, of hot and cold wars, of experiments, revolutions, riots, and friendships forged and broken. The end result is not so much a history of twentieth-century music as a history of the twentieth century through its music.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 12:31 PM on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: July 18 2018 Shi-An Costello (世 安), ,   

    From NEWMUSICBOX: “Emotion, Through Music, As Weather” This is a Beautiful Article. Please do not Miss It. 

    New Music USA


    From NEWMUSICBOX

    July 18, 2018
    Shi-An Costello (世 安)

    In this article, I will leave emotion ungraspable; I do not wish to speak about it definitively. Rather, I would like to focus personally on the relationship, in my life, between music and emotion, blending these two unique realms into one cohabitating discussion. What is emotion? Singularly, I do not know, but combined with music, I do have some feelings…

    The secrets behind emotion have been long sought. In 1962, psychologist Robert Plutchik wrote about emotion that “there is serious question about the reliability and meaningfulness of the verbal report. In the history of psychology, it has been pointed out many times that introspecting about our own emotions often changes them.”[1] The emotional appeal of music has been equally enchanting. In ca. 397 C.E., Saint Augustine wrote, “I must testify for myself that when I am moved more by the music than by its meaning, I feel this offense should be punished, and wish I had not listened to the cantor […] But you, Lord my God, hear me, heed, look on with pity, and heal me, before whom I am made a riddle to myself, which is the symptom of my sins.”[2]

    And finally, in 2008, scientist Daniel Levitin embraced mystery in his explanation of music:

    “Scientists are in the business of wanting proof for everything, and I find myself caught somewhere in the metaphorical middle on this issue. As a musician, I’m reminded on a daily basis of the utterly ineffable, indescribable powers of music. […] Our scientific theories have to be able to reconcile this common experience and the strong intuition that music is—dare I say it?—magical.”[3]

    Emotion—a thing that Robert Plutchik found impossible to scientifically report—is expressed through music in a way that a daring Daniel Levitin called “magical,” and what a conflicted Saint Augustine called a “riddle.” Perhaps “magical” “riddle” is a good working definition for emotion in music. Like Levitin and Augustine, I am baffled too.

    In the 1970s, composer John Cage used the weather to describe artistic process, observing that “many composers no longer make musical structures. Instead, they set processes going. A structure is like a piece of furniture, whereas a process is like the weather.”[4] Like Cage’s use of this creative and non-technical definition, I will similarly use the weather as a way to discuss emotion expressed through music. This article will move like weather. And like a forecast, I hope to address what swirls around.[5]

    Swirling air represents the meeting of diverse parts. Robert Plutchik acknowledged that there is a difference between “laboratory studies of pure, momentary emotions” and the “persistent mixed emotions of clinical experience.”[6] That is to say, the real-world application of emotion deals primarily in mixtures of emotions, rather than single, pure ones. Weather on Earth is complex, too: a mixing of cold and warm fronts, rainy on some days, stormy on others, partially rainy, partially stormy, partially cloudy, or partially sunny on others still. And there is no piece of music that is all any one emotion either. Good memories can be rendered only partially good through the loss of innocence; many find a deep comfort and contentment in feeling sadness. Emotion in music is an array of moving parts.

    Like weather, emotions in music swirl wildly around. As disorienting as this whirlwind may be, we must never forget how fortunate we are to have the skies, the clouds, rain, thunder, lightning, and most importantly, the sun. The sustaining love of the sun is, after all, what makes all of this possible.

    Nebulous as my approach may be, I hope this discussion will enrich our understanding of music, emotion, and our own selves. While I do not claim to hold technical qualifications to discuss the weather or emotional psychology, I do intend to write from my own experience, with sincerity and imagination. In the following sections, I will attempt to bring emotions to life, expressed in music, and retold as weather.

    Clouds (Sadness)

    2
    Image: Mila Young

    Clouds can weigh you down, but they can also help you focus.

    Clouds can weigh you down: clouds can make you question the existence of the sun. When I was finishing grad school abroad, I received news from back home that my parents were divorcing. I went into a state of depression. I remember going to the practice room, taking scores out of my bag, placing them on the piano, closing the lid, resting head on my arm, and crying on my own shoulder. I would cry for hours, then pack up and leave, never touching a single key of the piano. I ended up having to reschedule my final degree recital, which in turn (through a string of incidents that would take too much space to describe), led me to an unexpected move back to the United States…

    …but clouds can also give you focus: clouds can give you a reason to not lay in the sun. When I moved back to the United States, I was left without a job, without a place to live, and without work. I was still paying rent for an apartment overseas that I was not living in, and I was struggling to maintain a long-distance relationship. I was deeply saddened by the circumstances. But, I met this dark time with fearless abandon, playing as many concerts as possible, and working tirelessly to rebuild my career in a new country. My own disenfranchisement fueled my desire to succeed.

    Clouds can weigh you down, but they can also help you focus.

    Rain (Tears)

    A cloud in the sky can lead to rain. But tears are not just a singular cause-effect; rather, it is the grand accumulation of weight that becomes simply too heavy for a cloud to hold.

    I remember the first time I heard my mother sing. She sang Across the Universe by the Beatles. I played the chords at the piano while she sang and played the melody with her right hand next to me. I was giving her a piano lesson, and I didn’t specifically ask her to sing, she just did it on her own. My mother brought me to tears because it was a rare joy to hear her shy, untrained voice sing without the least sense of self-consciousness. The song will never again be the same to me.

    Rain is a fundamental process to the recycling of the vital element of water. Although rain is the losing of something, we need it to live.

    Lightning (Shock)

    3
    Image: Elijah Hiett

    Often before rain is the initial shock of lightning. The electricity of a storm is stunning—when it strikes, we are unable to do anything to counter its intensity. We can’t run towards, nor away, from lightning. Shock is the arrestation of movement, it is a primal reaction to first contact with something mysterious, powerful, and possibly dangerous.

    The memory of a performance of a piece I wrote, called Accord, affected me deeply. At the first massive, crashing tone cluster that interrupts the sound of a tuning violin, I witnessed a gut reaction from an audience member in the front row. The listener’s arms, shoulders, and legs seized up, and the head pulled back as the neck tightened. The hands shot up reflexively towards the ears to cover them…

    I immediately felt guilt and remorse. I was responsible for this lightning strike. I wrote this gesture in hopes that it would grab people’s attention—and I succeeded—but at what cost? As an emerging composer, I had often strived to grab attention as quickly as possible, and at any cost. It is the treasure hunt for the loudest, fastest, most terrific possible sound. (Or similarly, the softest, slowest one.)

    But in this treasure hunt for the most shocking sound, I inadvertently flipped a sonic middle finger to the audience member. Did this terrifying and anxiety-inducing sound make this person into a fan of my music, or new music in general? It is doubtful.

    Shock is a powerful element, and it should be used wisely and cautiously. After seeing what my music had done to someone, I vowed to strive to genuinely affect listeners for the better, rather than to use shock as a ploy to garner attention at a most hollow, visceral level.

    Storm (Anger)

    4
    Image: Michal Mancewicz

    If lightning is the initial shock of potentially dangerous force, then the storm is the realization of that force. The storm is violent and intimidating. The storm is rain in excess.

    But there is little for me to say about storms in and of themselves: I have never used anger as a motivator in listening to or playing music. I personally find within me very little creativity that is fueled by anger. For me, anger is not a profound and sustaining enough emotion to fulfill me expressively as an artist. It is a fleeting sensation that can be understood and referenced, but not used as a building block. Anger is real, but for me, it must ultimately lead to something proud, hopeful, and ecstatic. This is the art I seek. The glorious arrival at The Great Gate of Kiev after Baba Yaga in Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. The Cheerful and Thankful Feelings After the Storm in the final movement of Beethoven’s Sixth Symphony. The way Nina Simone completes the second half of the song Ain’t Got No, I Got Life. Anger should not go unacknowledged, but it should also be overcome with something more hopeful, peaceful, and productive.

    Tornado (Disorientation)

    A tornado takes the land and blows it about. A tornado is disorienting, but it can also create bliss.

    I, in fact, take pleasure when I am unable to identify the key center, the meter, or the exact instrumentation of a piece of music: Since my career in music relies upon my ability to identify the aspects of music as quickly and efficiently as possible, the moments where I simply do not know give me great joy.

    On one occasion, I saw this same joy in a six-year-old student who was having trouble identifying the note A on the keyboard. The student, whom I will call Lance, started on C and counted out loud up the C major scale. “C, D, E, F, G…” And when Lance reached G, he would accidentally go on to “H” and then “I” and then “J.” I stopped him just before the note E became an “L” and told him that the notes on the keyboard reset at “G,” that the next note after “G” is “A.” Perhaps I explained it poorly the first time, because when Lance tried again, he made the same exact mistake, and again, I corrected him. I wanted to let him try as many times as he needed to get it right, but Lance would get it wrong over and over again, always going from “G” to “H” to “I” to “J.” After about 15 minutes of this, I became nervous that Lance would become frustrated with his failures. But he did not. Instead, he grew happier with each try. There was something comforting to his realizing that there were such mysteries that enchant the keyboard of the piano, that after “G” some “magical riddle” occurs, leaving him in a state of wonder. Eventually, I’m sure Lance will learn to not be disoriented by the challenge of moving from “G” back to “A.” And when he does, I hope he finds a new mystery from which to achieve bliss.

    Clear Skies (Innocent Love)
    7
    Image: Crawford Ifland

    I know now that the color blue in the sky is a refraction of the sun’s rays on the dust in our atmosphere. A clear day is really not clear at all—it never was. But I still have the memory of thinking how open and free the world is on a clear day.

    The version of Western music that I learned, both academically and casually, was rooted in the glorification of great men, and in my youth, I fell to this template’s allure. I idolized the music of Great Men, and truly, with all my heart, believed they were better-than-human: J.S. Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Schumann, Wagner, Prokofiev, Morton Feldman. But, upon closer examination, Bach sounded like a neglectful husband, Mozart seemed like a dysfunctional man-child, Chopin seemed like a caustic friend; Schumann seemed mentally ill, Wagner seemed anti-semitic, and Prokofiev seemed unnecessarily mean-spirited. And, based on some recent allegations, Morton Feldman seemed to be a sexual predator. Evidence shows that all of them were people, for better or worse.

    While not a note of their music has changed, the innocent love I once had for these brilliant musical minds can never be regained. My personal overcast—clouds saturated with the knowledge and wisdom of life—have now permanently shrouded the music, re-painting the images of these fallen heroes into a murkier, more realistic, shade of humanity. It is sobering to realize the skies are no longer clear, and that they perhaps never were.

    Certainly, Lance can be a lesson to us: While knowledge is power, there is still great bliss in not knowing. Ignorant, innocent love is indeed powerful. But ignorance and innocence are meant to be lost. My perspective on my innocent love is so different from the emotion as I remember it. Now, my past is viewed with the special lens a more informed perspective affords. But my pure feelings of love in the past were important, and they still travel with me.

    Innocent love is a type of love you can only have once, and I am thankful for the formative memories it gave me.

    The Sun (Sustaining Love)

    I love the sun. The warmth of the sun is essential, and we must always acknowledge this. No matter the weather, we rely on the warmth of the sun to survive. The sun is a sustaining love.

    My sustaining loves in music are only a handful of composers: J.S. Bach, Mozart, Beethoven and Chopin, Schumann, and just individual pieces of Schubert, Debussy, Ravel, Rachmaninoff, Shostakovich and a few others. Contemporary music sustains me in a different way: primarily, it fulfills my personal need for adventure.

    As I grow out of innocent love, I am starting to really see the true loves for who they are. Some innocent loves are not sustainable—a bright street light is no star. But, many of the musical loves that sustain me now were once innocent loves too: Not all innocent love is ignorant.

    The sun is the mightiest source of inspiration. No matter the weather, we can always say, “Thank goodness for the sun.” And thank goodness for emotions. And thank goodness for music.

    Rain (Tears) continued

    8
    Image: Rhendi Rukmana

    Briefly revisiting the rain, I would like to highlight some of the musical moments in my life that have brought me to tears—a necessary physical overload of emotion.

    There are so many more that have faded with time. But, at least the ones I remember can be recorded. There is a beautiful, sustaining love that runs through all of these memories—perhaps this is why I remember them, and perhaps this is why they made me cry.

    The first time I ever heard an orchestra live: An open rehearsal of Strauss’s Der Rosenkavalier
    The funeral service for my childhood friend, Shumie, who committed suicide. I do remember music, but I don’t remember what it was.
    I was taking a piano lesson with my teacher in grad school, and had just broken up with my significant other.
    I was in a practice room, playing a section of Jerome Kitzke’s Sunflower Sutra. It was the section titled Canticle for Mary.
    After finishing the first run-through of my debut album, Rounded Binary.
    The first time I heard my mother sing, singing Across the Universe by The Beatles.
    Later, in private, after playing for my fiancee’s mother who was dying of cancer. We played and sang Let It Be by The Beatles.

    …I have just said the unspeakable. I have shared my deepest emotions with a general public. Does this make you uncomfortable? Why? Are we, as a culture of humans, unable to plainly and unapologetically articulate our emotions with one another? Within the arts, the domain charged with expressing the beauty in humanity, why is this such a challenge? What is this barrier, and why is it there?

    Conclusion

    9
    Image: Dmitry Ermakov

    How and why were the sun and the stars in the sky created; how and why are emotions and music what they are? One cannot answer this without asking a more fundamental question about the origin and purpose of human existence. According to Aristotle, “the soul” is “one of the hardest things to gain any conviction about.”[7] Charles Darwin felt that in studying human expression, “close observation is forgotten or rendered almost impossible.”[8] To Oscar Wilde, “The final mystery is oneself.”[9] The list of brilliant people who were baffled by their own self is long…

    The further I discuss this, the more I am baffled by the mystery of emotion, and by humanity itself. There are really no words: while experientially known, these subjects are uniquely ungraspable through discourse. So then, we must be content with beauty that is imprecise—the beauty of weather, the beauty of emotion, and the beauty of the whole of humanity—and humbly appreciate that music can in some ways express it.

    1. The Emotions, by Robert Plutchik.

    2. Confessions, by Saint Augustine.

    3. The World in Six Songs, by Daniel Levitin.

    4. In Empty Words, John Cage writes, “Many composers no longer make musical structures. Instead they set processes going. A structure is like a piece of furniture, whereas a process is like the weather. In the case of a table, the beginning and end of the whole and each of its parts are known. In the case of weather, though we notice changes in it, we have no clear knowledge of its beginning or ending. At a given moment, we are where we are. The now moment.”

    5. In The Cultural Politics of Emotion, Sara Ahmed writes, “Emotions don’t make the world go round. But they do in some sense go round.”

    6. The Emotions.

    7. “In general, and in all ways, it is one of the hardest of things to gain any conviction about the soul.” –Aristotle, De Anima (On the Soul)

    8. In The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals, Charles Darwin writes, “The study of Expression is difficult […] When we witness any deep emotion, our sympathy is so strongly excited, that close observation is forgotten or rendered almost impossible.”

    9. De Profundis, by Oscar Wilde.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    At NEWMUSICUSA we see ourselves first and foremost as advocates. Our mission is to support and promote new music created in the United States. We do that in many ways, fostering connections, deepening knowledge, encouraging appreciation, and providing financial support. In recognition of the possibility and power inherent in the virtual world, we’ve worked to build a strong internet platform to serve our constituency. And that constituency is broad and diverse, from composers and performers to presenters and producers, casual listeners to die-hard fans. We’re truly committed to serving the WHOLE new music community.

    As we go about our work, we make a point of not defining too precisely what we mean by new music. To define is to limit. It’s a spectacular time for musical creativity in part because so much music is being made that isn’t bound by conventional limitations of style or genre or background. The music that we hear being created in such abundance all around us is definition enough. We simply want it to flourish.

    We’re fortunate to have as our legacy the history of previous decades of good works done by the American Music Center and Meet The Composer, the two great organizations that merged to form us in 2011. Their legacies have also brought a small financial endowment that mostly helps support our grantmaking. But we’re not a foundation. We depend decisively each year on the generosity of so many institutions and individuals around the country who are dedicated as we are to the advancement of new music and are devoted to supporting our work.

    New Music USA is part of an international community of advocates for the arts. We’re members of the Performing Arts Alliance, the International Association of Music Information Centres, and the International Society for Contemporary Music. Those partnerships help us represent the interests of our constituents at every level.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 11:51 AM on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    From Lincoln Center – Mostly Mozart Festival: “Americans in Paris” 

    Lincoln Center, NYC, USA

    From Lincoln Center

    1

    July 24–25, 2018 David Geffen Hall

    Tuesday, July 24, 2018 at 7:30 pm
    Wednesday, July 25, 2018 at 7:30 pm

    Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra

    3

    Louis Langrée, conductor. Photo Credit Jennifer Taylor

    Emanuel Ax by Lisa-Marie Mazzucco


    Emanuel Ax, piano

    Friedrich Heinrich Kern, glass harmonica (Mostly Mozart Festival debut)
    Philipp Marguerre, glass harmonica
    Jasmine Choi, flute
    Max Blair, oboe
    Shmuel Katz, viola
    Ilya Finkelshteyn, cello

    Pre-concert recitals at 6:30 pm
    Friedrich Heinrich Kern and Philipp Marguerre, glass harmonicas
    Works by Mozart, Naumann, and more
    David Geffen Hall

    The Program
    Bernstein: Overture to Candide
    Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 17 in G major, K.453
    Mozart: Adagio and Rondo in C minor for glass harmonica, flute, oboe, viola, and cello, K.617
    Gershwin: An American in Paris (New critical edition, edited by Mark Clague)

    For this exhilarating evening inspired by fable and the French-American connection, maestro Louis Langrée leads the Festival Orchestra in Bernstein’s Voltaire-inspired overture and a new edition of Gershwin’s score to An American in Paris. The ultimate American Mozart pianist Emanuel Ax ignites the famous melodies of one of Mozart’s finest piano concertos (also Bernstein’s favorite “party” piece). And a rarely performed Mozart chamber work showcases the glass harmonica, invented by another famous American in Paris: Benjamin Franklin.

    “Always thoughtful, lyrical, lustrous.”

    Washington Post on Emanuel Ax

    “There are few surer guarantees of quality in classical music than the combination of Mr. Ax and Mozart.”

    New York Times

    2018 Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra by by Richard Termine

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 16.3-acre (6.6-hectare) complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It hosts many notable performing arts organizations, which are nationally and internationally renowned, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:40 AM on July 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Jazz Festival 2018 with J.A.L.C.,   

    From Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts: “Jazz Festival 2018” 

    Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts

    From Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts

    1

    Presented in Collaboration with Jazz at Lincoln Center

    Jazz at Lincoln Center

    All Ages, Jazz, Kids & Families Multiple Locations, Venetian Theater
    $35, $40, $50, $60, $70, $80, $90, $100 Day Only: Adult $30, Child $15
    Ticketing

    4

    Overview

    Now in its 4th year in collaboration with Jazz at Lincoln Center, Caramoor’s annual Jazz Festival is back with exceptional talent and music for you to enjoy throughout the stunning gardens and historical venues within Caramoor. Join us for a full day of jazz, interactive activities for the kids, and evening headliner five-time Grammy winner, Dianne Reeves — we guarantee you will be talking about it for days to come.

    Artists

    Evening Performers 8:00pm
    Dianne Reeves
    Romero Lubambo
    Reginald Veal
    Terri Lyne Carrington
    Peter Martin

    Daytime Performers starting at noon
    Benny Green Trio with special guest Veronica Swift
    Stephane Wrembel
    Jane Bunnett and Maqueque
    Shenel Johns and Vuyo Sotashe — A Revolutionary Friendship: The Music of Miriam Makeba and Nina Simone
    Ulysses Owens, Jr. THREE
    Leonardo Sandoval and Eduardo Belo
    Paul Nedzela Quartet
    Sam Reider and the Human Hands
    Patrick Bartley Presents The Mighty Cannonball Adderley
    Andrew Renfroe/Luke Sellick Duo
    Anthony Hervey Trio
    Melissa Aldana and Lage Lund
    Mariel Bildsten Septet
    Jeffery Miller’s New Orleans Krewe
    Joel Ross and Immanuel Wilkins
    Giveton Gelin
    Josanne Francis
    Jazz Chat with Ben Young: Jazz Vocals Throughout History
    JALC Youth Orchestra Ensemble


    Dianne Reeves – Live @ Jazz à la Villette 2017
    1:40

    149 Girdle Ridge Road
    PO Box 816
    Katonah, NY 10536
    p: 914.232.5035 f: 914.232.5521 e: info@caramoor.org

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts is a destination for exceptional music, captivating programs, spectacular gardens and grounds, and wonderful moments with friends and family. It enriches the lives of its audiences through innovative and diverse musical performances of the highest quality. Its mission also includes mentoring young professional musicians and providing educational programs for young children centered around music.

    Audiences are invited to explore the lush grounds, tour the historic Rosen House, enjoy a pre-concert picnic, and discover beautiful music in the relaxed settings of the Venetian Theater, Spanish Courtyard, Music Room of the Rosen House, and the magnificent gardens.

    The story of Caramoor, the Rosens, Lucie’s Theremin, the Art Collections and our History is rich and diverse.

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 3:15 PM on July 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , The Compassion Project   

    From Innova: ” Edna Michell – The Compassion Project” 

    From Innova the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1

    Catalog Number: #971
    Genre: new classical

    Release Date:
    Nov 16, 2018

    Edna Michell, Yehudi Menuhin, and friends around the world dedicate their work to universal compassion through music

    Composers: John Tavener, Shulamit Ran, Chen Yi, Hans Werner Henze, Yinam Leef, Poul Ruders, Somei Satoh, Wolfgang Rihm, Iannis Xenakis, Lukas Foss, Karel Husa, Betty Olivero, Gyorgy Kurtag, Philip Glass, Steve Reich, Kaija Saariaho, Petr Eben, Oldrich F. Korte, Viktor Kalabis, Luciano Berio, Boris Tishchenko, Sean Hickey, Josef Tal, Gennady Banshchikov

    Performers: Edna Michell, Yehudi Menuhin, Cantilena Piano Quartet, Ulf Hoelscher, Susan Narucki, Czech Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra, Lukas Foss, Michal Kaňka, Nachum Erlich,
    Karlsruhe Ensemble, Andreas Weiss, Igor Ardašev, Shlomo Mintz, Ludmila Peterková, Patricia Rozario, Bohuslav Matoušek, Allen Ginsberg, Luyba Petrova, Frank Glazer, David Shifrin, Ettore Causa,
    Tara Helen O’Connor, Claire Brazeau, Elaine Bonazzi, Ole Akahoshi, Orson Welles

    At the invitation of Edna Michell and Yehudi Menuhin, distinguished composers and performers – friends around the world – dedicated their artistry to the theme of universal compassion through music. This is their tribute; a gift to the world in troubled times.

    In 1993, following recording sessions in the Czech Republic, Yehudi Menuhin and I were on the way to Vienna to catch flights to different destinations. Menuhin was despairing about the atrocities of the world. To change the mood, I came up with the idea of composers from around the world writing short works inspired by the theme of compassion. It struck a chord with Menuhin, and he remained immersed in the project for the rest of his life. — Edna Michell

    The Compassion Project is comprised of two albums. The first, entitled Compassion: A Journey of the Spirit, features 15 of the Compassion compositions and was released by EMI/Angel in 2001 to critical acclaim. This disc (available digitally under its original title) is packaged together with Innova’s release of the new second album that includes world premiere recordings of additional Compassion works and a piece written by Lukas Foss for the opening of the 1980 Winter Olympics performed by Yehudi Menuhin (among others) with Orson Welles narrating a poem by W. H. Auden.

    The 24 Compassion works were written for and dedicated to Menuhin and Michell. It comes as no surprise that the violin is central to almost all of the works. In their individual program notes, the composers mention such ideals as international understanding, or the power of music to bring spiritual strength, or elements of simplicity and innocence. All reflect different responses to the life and humanistic work of a single great man: “Twenty-four styles with a noble theme behind them,” as Michell puts it.

    Menuhin took great pleasure in this collaborative project, and had plans to record it and to continue performing it with Edna Michell in many parts of the world. She recalls that during a concert when they performed some of these pieces in London, only a month before he died, he turned to her as they walked off stage and said, “Edna, we must record these pieces now!” He believed the works should be performed together in one program because, as Michell says, “they create a very special ambiance.”

    Edna Michell began her distinguished career as a young protege – then colleague – of Yehudi Menuhin. As founder of the Cantilena Chamber Players, Cantilena Piano Quartet, and Cantilena Productions, Inc., she has championed the works of living composers and continues with numerous musical activities around the world.

    Liner Notes:
    View

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
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