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  • richardmitnick 4:27 PM on June 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Innova, , Robert Gibson - Flux and Fire   

    From Innova: ” Robert Gibson – Flux and Fire” 

    From Innova the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1

    Description:
    Strings meet poetry
    Composers: Robert Gibson
    Performers: James Stern, Audrey Andrist, Robert Oppelt, Richard Barber, Jeffrey Weisner, Ali Kian Yazdanfar, Eric Kutz, Aeolus Quartet, Katherine Murdock

    Robert Gibson

    Flux and Fire

    Innova 993

    Release Date:
    Jul 27, 2018

    Twelve Poems (2004)
    James Stern, violin
    Audrey Andrist, piano

    1 Aura 1:27

    2 Wind Chime 1:10

    3 Cloudburst 0:57

    4 Reflection 2:21

    5 2:3 0:40

    6 Waves 1:04

    7 Hommage 1:14

    8 Entropy 1:05

    9 Barcarolle 1:24

    10 Shoal 0:48

    11 Quatrain 1:23

    12 Octave 1:41

    Soundings (2001)

    Robert Oppelt, Richard Barber,

    Jeffrey Weisner, Ali Kian Yazdanfar, double bass

    13 Tenuous 2:23

    14 Diaphanous 3:01

    15 Nebulous 2:45

    16 Luminous 3:03

    17 Capricious 2:33

    18 Night Music (2002) 3:53

    Eric Kutz, violoncello

    19 Flux and Fire (2006) 11:13

    Aeolus Quartet:

    Nicholas Tavani, Rachel Shapiro, violin

    Gregory Luce, viola

    Alan Richardson, violoncello

    20 Night Music (2002) 3:52

    Katherine Murdock, viola

    21 Offrande (1996) 9:11

    Aeolus Quartet

    22 Night Music (2002) 3:48

    James Stern, violin

    Total: 60:54

    C.P. Robert Gibson. All Rights Reserved, 2018.

    innova Recordings is the label of the

    American Composers Forum.

    http://www.robertgibsonmusic.com

    “Luxury, impulse! I draft a phrase
    and believe it protects me from this icy world,
    that goes through my body like a shoal of sardines.”
    —Alain Bosquet “Regrets” (excerpt) from No Matter No Fact
    translation by Edouard Roditi

    My music has often been guided by imagery and emotion from poems that I have come to know and love. The boundaries between the arts are fluid, and the metaphor that for me most aptly illuminates this relationship—and the process of composition—is the act of translation. Matthew Reynolds posits that languages are not separated from each other “like islands in a sea,” but “are more like the undulations of a desert” where usages can accumulate into dunes and then trail off into other forms and variations. Poetry uses language in a way that speaks beyond the meaning and syntax of words. Transforming mental images, whether originally from an internal or external source, into physical sound is to explore the continuum of connections that embody creative activity.

    Paul Muldoon’s poem The Briefcase was the initial inspiration for my Twelve Poems. In this short poem, he reflects, while waiting for a bus, on the possibility of “the first inkling” of this poem (inside his briefcase) being swept from his side on a city street in Manhattan by the rushing water of a sudden cloudburst and further to “strike out along the East River/ for the sea. By which I mean the ‘open’ sea.”

    In writing these short movements for violin and piano, I was seeking an analogue for the ability of the poet to capture a particular moment and, further, an idea—more or less abstract—about the materials of the art and its forms. As with poetry, the focus is on sound as much as structure: “Cloudburst” is after Muldoon’s wonderful poem; both contemplation and the physical image of a mirror are implied in “Reflection,” which is a palindrome. The harmonic relationship of the perfect fifth in the overtone series is 2:3, a relationship that can also be expressed rhythmically. “Hommage” is my miniature tribute to Claude Debussy, the composer who has most influenced my conception of musical form. His last work, the sonata for violin and piano, is, for me, music that approaches perfection, and a suggestion of the piece appears in this movement.

    The preferred, although perhaps less known definition of “shoal” refers to a school of fish. This word always reminds me of my favorite lines from Alain Bosquet’s poem Regrets that appear above. Quatrain and Octave, poetic terms for the number of lines in a stanza or poem, relate to the number of phrases (four and eight respectively) in these movements. In addition, the harmonic interval of the octave is ubiquitous in the concluding movement. Twelve Poems was written for James Stern and Audrey Andrist, to whom the work is affectionately dedicated.

    My identity as a composer is deeply connected to my experience as a performer. The physical, mental and emotional aspects of creating sound on a musical instrument are deeply intertwined with my compositional impulses. Most of my music has been written for colleagues and friends, and their musical voices and personalities are an integral part of the images that form, and inform, my creative work.

    I began piano lessons at age five and also played the trombone in middle and high school band until my junior year. My first experience of the bass as the instrument I wanted to play was hearing recordings of Eugene Wright with the Dave Brubeck Quartet and Ron Carter with the Miles Davis Quintet. The warmth, depth, richness, the long resonance and decay of plucked sounds, and the unusual intensity of the high register of the double bass are among the distinctive characteristics that attracted me to the instrument at the age of fifteen.

    The title of my double bass quartet, Soundings, is a reference in part to the nautical term for measuring the depth of water. This term has an obvious connection to the double bass as the “deepest” sounding string instrument of the orchestra. The sound of the double bass results in part from the fact that, while it is the largest of orchestral stringed instruments, it should be larger to sound as low as it does. Because of its size, the double bass is a physically demanding instrument to play with facility, although each generation of “modern” bassists has advanced the technique to the astounding level that one can hear today from soloists, jazz and pop artists, and orchestral bassists.

    The five movements of my bass quartet are a personal exploration of the instrument that is closest to me in my life as a musician. Soundings is dedicated to Robert Oppelt, Richard Barber, Jeffrey Weisner and Ali Kian Yazdanfar, who commissioned this work, and who were all members of the National Symphony Orchestra at the time of this commission.

    Night Music was commissioned by the Friday Morning Music Club of Washington, D.C. as the required work for the Third Triennial Johansen International Competition for Young String Players (2003). This prestigious competition is for young performers ages 13–17, and in 2003 the judges were James Buswell, Heidi Castleman and Aldo Parisot. The requirements for the commissioned work were related to duration (short) and that the work be suitable for performance on violin, viola or violoncello without any instrument-specific editing to the piece (other than transposition). To my mind, the unique timbral qualities of each of these three instruments are so pronounced that the piece is heard anew with each of the distinguished performers on this disc. I wanted to capture a fleeting glimpse of lyricism and technical virtuosity arising from a soloist inspired by the mystery and poetry of the night.

    “All things change to fire,
    and fire exhausted
    falls back into things”
    —Heraclitus
    No 22 (excerpt) from Fragments
    translation by Brooks Haxton

    My second string quartet, Flux and Fire, was commissioned by The Stony Brook Contemporary Chamber Players for their 19th Annual Premieres Concert (November 2006) on campus and in New York City. The title of the work is related to a “fragment” of Heraclitus in Brooks Haxton’s luminous translation above. Heraclitus (sixth century, BC) was prescient in his understanding of the nature of energy in the universe.

    While writing this piece I began listening to Paul Rusesabagina’s extraordinary account of his personal experience during the Rwandan genocide of 1994 (An Ordinary Man as an audiobook on CD). Listening to a story being told is an ancient and visceral experience, and the rhythm and cadence of the reading made the goodness and evil in the account palpable. While there is no specific program to my piece, the turbulent and sometimes feverish imagery from this memoir accounts for the substantial presence of these qualities in my quartet.

    The dark but transcendent imagery of the last stanza from Alain Bosquet’s poem Regrets quoted above has often been very close to me, but never more than in 1996 with the loss of my sister-in-law after a four-year struggle with cancer. I was also quite saddened at this time by the news of Toru Takemitsu’s death, since his music has been a profound influence in my own development as a composer. My “offering” (after Varèse’s beautiful pieces of the same name) is in honor, and in celebration, of these two lives—one in my family, and one whose musical path I have found most compelling. Those familiar with Takemitsu’s Garden Rain of 1974 (for brass ensemble) will perhaps recognize the quotation of the haunting melody (solo muted trumpet) which occurs near the end of his piece, and in my quartet (in the second violin) also near the conclusion, following an extended ensemble passage in harmonics. Offrande is dedicated to the memory of Karen van Rossum (1949–96).

    The structure of my music is often based on images of transformation since it is in the transience of sound that music’s deepest beauty is revealed. The poet Stanley Kunitz captured the ultimate experience of transformation in the opening sentence of his “Reflections” from The Collected Poems: “Years ago I came to the realization that the most poignant of all lyric tensions stems from the awareness that we are living and dying at once.” Indeed, the poignance of this awareness is singular. It also intensifies the experience and mystery of living on this beautiful planet. Kunitz concludes his “Reflections” with an artistic aspiration: “I dream of an art so transparent that you can look through and see the world.” This dream evokes for me the ineffable in nature—the feeling of distant thunder offshore; the smell of the rain that strikes your face with the approaching squall; flux and fire incarnate. I want to drink from the storm.

    —Robert Gibson

    SOURCES
    Bosquet, Alain. No Matter No Fact. New York: New Directions Publishing Corporation, 1988.
    Heraclitus. Fragments. Translated by Brooks Haxton. New York: Penguin Books, 2001.
    Kunitz, Stanley. The Collected Poems. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2000.
    Muldoon, Paul. Poems 1968–1998. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2001.
    Reynolds, Matthew. Translation: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.

    Robert Gibson (b. 1950, Atlanta, GA) has had performances of his compositions throughout the United States and in Europe, China and South America. His music has also been presented on National Public Radio and by noted performers and ensembles, including bassists Lucas Drew and Bertram Turetzky; clarinetists Esther Lamneck and Nathan Williams; pianists Santiago Rodriguez, Marilyn Nonken and Audrey Andrist; the Stern/Andrist Duo, the Clarion Wind Quintet, Prism Brass Quintet, the Contemporary Music Forum, VERGE Ensemble, the 21st Century Consort, the Meridian String Quartet, the Aeolus Quartet, the Romanian State Orchestra under guest conductor Jeffrey Silberschlag, and the University of Maryland Symphony Orchestra under James Ross.

    Mr. Gibson has been a composer member of the Contemporary Music Forum of Washington, D.C. (1987–2001). As a jazz bassist he performed with many international artists in the early ’80s, including Mose Allison, Tom Harrell, Bob Berg, Marc Copland, and Barney Kessel. Mr. Gibson’s compositions have been recorded on Golden Crest (The American Music Project, Clarion Wind Quintet, 1979) and Spectrum Records (Soundscapes, 1982; Music of Robert Gibson, 1986). Chamber Music (1995) , a Capstone compact disc of his chamber works appeared on Fanfare magazine’s Want List as one of critic William Zagorski’s five notable recordings of the year. Mr. Gibson has been a resident composer at the Alba (Italy) Music Festival (2011–13). He is Professor and former Director (2005–16) of the School of Music at the University of Maryland, College Park. He lives with his wife, Barbara, in Olney, Maryland and Birch Harbor, Maine.

    Hailed by the Washington Post for “virtuosity and penetrating intelligence,” violinist James Stern has performed at the National Gallery, Smithsonian Museums, Phillips Collection, the Library of Congress, and the White House with the Smithsonian Chamber Players and VERGE Ensemble, with whom he has also toured internationally. He has performed at the Marlboro and Ravinia festivals. His solo Bach CD is available on Albany Records. He tours nationally with the trio Strata (with pianist Audrey Andrist and clarinetist Nathan Williams). A former faculty member at the Cleveland Institute, he is now Professor at the University of Maryland. He coaches ensembles and conducts the strings at the National Orchestral Institute.

    Canadian pianist Audrey Andrist grew up in Saskatchewan, and while in high school, traveled three hours one-way for lessons with William Moore, himself a former student of famed musicians Cécile Genhart and Rosina Lhévinne. She studied at the Juilliard School with Herbert Stessin, winning the Mozart International, San Antonio International, and Juilliard Concerto Competitions. A member of the Stern/Andrist Duo with her husband, violinist James Stern, and Strata, a trio with Stern and clarinetist Nathan Williams, Ms. Andrist can be heard on over a dozen recordings, including a critically acclaimed solo Schumann CD for Centaur Records. She teaches at UMBC and the Washington Conservatory.

    Katherine Murdock has performed throughout the world with the Mendelssohn String Quartet, Music from Marlboro, Boston Chamber Music Society, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Boston Symphony, and Boston Musica Viva. She has been a guest of the Guarneri, Emerson, and Vermeer quartets, and has performed live for West German Radio, BBC, NPR Performance Today, St. Paul Sunday and NBC’s Today Show. Currently Associate Professor at the University of Maryland, Ms. Murdock has served on the faculties of Boston Conservatory, Longy School, the Hartt School, SUNY Stony Brook, Artist-in-Residence at Harvard University, and the Yellow Barn and Kneisel Hall summer festivals. She is a member of the Left Bank Quartet and for twenty-one years was violist of the Los Angeles Piano Quartet.

    Cellist Eric Kutz has captivated audiences across North America, Asia and Europe. He is on the faculty of the University of Maryland School of Music, where he holds the Barbara K. Steppel Memorial Faculty Fellowship in cello. He is active as a teacher, a chamber musician, an orchestral musician and a concerto soloist. His diverse collaborations cut across musical styles, and have ranged from cellist Yo-Yo Ma to jazz great Ornette Coleman. Mr. Kutz is a member of the Murasaki Duo, a cello and piano ensemble that has released three commercial CDs and regularly performs on chamber music series throughout the nation. He holds degrees from the Juilliard School and Rice University.

    Robert Oppelt joined the National Symphony Orchestra bass section in 1982 at the invitation of Music Director Mstislav Rostropovich, and he has since served as Assistant and Principal Bass. With the NSO he has performed Mozart’s Per queste bella mano, Paganini’s Moses Fantasy and Koussevitsky’s Concerto for Double Bass. Chamber music collaborators include Yo-Yo Ma, Hilary Hahn, Guarneri String Quartet and Kennedy Center Chamber Players. He is a 1982 graduate of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, with additional studies at Brevard and Tanglewood music centers. Currently a teacher at the University of Maryland, he is also an avid sailor.

    Richard Barber was born into a family of musicians and educators. While also cultivating a love of science, he ultimately decided that music was his primary passion. After attending Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore, he began his orchestral career with the Phoenix Symphony. Three years later he was appointed Assistant Principal Bass of the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, D.C. He is also active as a member of the Grand Teton Music Festival, the Eclipse Chamber Orchestra and the 21st Century Consort. He teaches both privately and at the University of Maryland. He plays an Italian bass made c. 1620 in Italy by the Brescian master Giovanni Paolo Maggini. He lives in Maryland with his wife, mezzo-soprano Marta Kirilloff Barber, and their children.

    Jeffrey Weisner joined the National Symphony Orchestra bass section in 1995. He is active in venues around the region and the country as a performer and teacher. From 1991 to 1993, Mr. Weisner was a member of the New World Symphony in Miami, and from 1993 to 1995, he was a member of the Delaware Symphony. From 2005-2017, he was on the double bass faculty of the Peabody Conservatory. Mr. Weisner is dedicated to creating and supporting new music. His solo album Neomonology, released in 2012 on Innova Records, features three works which he commissioned and premiered. He also supported the creation of nine new multi-bass pieces by Peabody student composers during his tenure at the school.

    One of the most prominent double bassists of his generation, Ali Kian Yazdanfar maintains an active career not only as an orchestral double bassist, but also as a soloist, chamber musician and pedagogue. Although he started playing the bass at 7 years old, his science and mathematics background led to a physics degree from The Johns Hopkins University, and, directly upon graduating, he won his first audition to become a member of the Houston Symphony. He went on to win his next three auditions, for the National Symphony in Washington, D.C., for principal bass with the San Francisco Symphony, and for principal bass with the Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal, his current position.

    Praised by the Baltimore Sun for combining “smoothly meshed technique with a sense of spontaneity and discovery,” the Aeolus Quartet is committed to presenting time-seasoned masterworks and new cutting-edge works to widely diverse audiences with equal freshness, dedication and fervor. Violinists Nicholas Tavani and Rachel Shapiro, violist Gregory Luce, and cellist Alan Richardson formed the Aeolus Quartet in 2008 at the Cleveland Institute of Music. Since its inception, the all-American quartet has been awarded prizes at nearly every major competition in the United States and performed across the globe with showings “worthy of a major-league quartet” (Scott Cantrell, ­Dallas Morning News). Mark Satola of the Cleveland Plain Dealer writes, “A rich and warm tone combined with precise ensemble playing (that managed also to come across as fluid and natural), and an impressive musical intelligence guided every technical and dramatic turn.” The Aeolus Quartet was the 2013–15 Graduate Resident String Quartet at the Juilliard School, and the quartet members currently make their home in New York City.

    The Quartet has performed across North America, Europe and Asia in venues such as Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center, Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, Reinberger Recital Hall at Severance Hall, Merkin Hall, the Library of Congress, Renwick Gallery, St. Martin-in-the-Fields and the Shanghai Oriental Arts Center. The Aeolus Quartet has released two critically acclaimed albums of classical and contemporary works through the Longhorn/Naxos label which are available on iTunes, Amazon, and major retailers worldwide.

    CREDITS

    Producers: Robert Gibson and Antonino D’Urzo
    Engineering and mastering: Antonino D’Urzo
    Photography: Astrid Riecken (composer’s hand/bass and portrait);
    Robert Gibson (Schoodic Peninsula)
    Design: Barbara and Robert Gibson
    Album cover photos and tray background: iStock.com

    Innova Director: Philip Blackburn
    Operations Director: Chris Campbell
    Publicist: Tim Igel
    Innova is supported by an endowment from the McKnight Foundation.

    Recording Dates: Soundings, 12/3/01; Twelve Poems, 7/10/04; Flux and Fire, 5/14/13; Offrande, 5/15/13; Night Music (vln), 5/25/14; Night Music (vla) and Night Music (vc), 5/14/16

    All works recorded in Dekelboum Concert Hall, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    My deepest thanks to the artists—friends and colleagues all—who perform on this project for the pleasure of working together and the beauty of your recordings. My collaboration with Astrid Riecken for this project was an inspiration, and I am honored to have her work and artistic vision on these pages. I am grateful to Antonino D’Urzo, whose impeccable ears and technical abilities are an integral part of this project, and to Gina Genova, Executive Director of the American Composers Alliance, for her advocacy and support.

    The composer gratefully acknowledges an Individual Artist Award (2017) from the Maryland State Arts Council which contributed support to this project.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 1:50 PM on May 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Innova, ,   

    From innova: “innova’s Inn-fest 2018 in Minneapolis-St. Paul: Delightfully Adventurous” 

    Innova is the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    Do you know those musical events in which you practically know all of the sounds you’ll hear even before you show up… even if it’s new music™… and even if it’s improvised? Happily, Inn-fest is not one of those. Co-presented with Zeitgeist, Inn-fest was a three-day celebration tied to brand new and recently released albums on innova, which featured the wide array of original composed and improvised music on the label. In the last decade, the label’s catalog has grown from 70 to over 550 titles, with innova producing 24-30 releases a year. This year’s celebration began with an April 24th album release event and then continued in the Lowertown district of St. Paul in Studio Z with a relay of music on April 27-28th.

    Last year’s Inn-fest took place at in Brooklyn.

    National Sawdust


    Space waiting

    innova director Philip Blackburn and publicist Tim Igel mentioned that the label moves the fete across the country from year to year to highlight their diverse artists regardless of geographic location. While there are many organizations in the musical world clamoring to claim diversity in their work, innova proves their philosophy with action. innova is dedicated to progressive work because the label’s releases are less dictated by “record-bin-constraints or typical notions of marketability,” but by the integrity of the work and its originality. This work that is unlikely to find a home in the mainstream record industry is exactly what made Inn-fest so surprising and delightful.

    The audience was treated to a shift in the performing artists every 20 minutes or so, and a full cycle through all of the artists represented lasted approximately two hours. Over Friday night and Saturday day/evening, the performers played roughly five or six sets. This musical relay had an added benefit of taking place during the biannual St. Paul Art Crawl, which ensured some culture enthusiasts wandering in to listen to a few of the performers before continuing their art rovings.

    2
    Issam Rafea and Gao Hong. No image credit.

    Those that made their way to the second floor location of Studio Z were treated to alluring solo sets from Nirmala Rajasekar (veena and vocals), Dana Jessen (bassoon), Nick Zoulek (saxophone), Patti Cudd (percussion), and Pat O’Keefe (reeds). There were also ensemble sets featuring: Maithree: the Music of Friendship–Nirmala Rajasekar (veena), Pat O’Keefe (clarinet), Tim O’Keefe (percussion), Thanjavur Muruga Boopathi (mrdangam), Michelle Kinney (cello); Gao Hong (pipa) and Issam Rafea (oud); and Zeitgeist–Heather Barringer (percussion), Patti Cudd (percussion), Pat O’Keefe (woodwinds), and Nicola Melville (piano).

    Inspired by their parent organization, the American Composers Forum, innova is part business and part service. Even sitting through Inn-fest gives the impression that there is an immense amount of dedication to the artists on the label—almost like a musical family. The artists demonstrated an incredibly high artistic calibre and a propensity to be musically adventurous. Maithree provided a beautiful example of four musicians from wildly different backgrounds fusing musical and improvisational styles. In fact, they told a humorous story about discovering two years into playing together that they didn’t even count the same way.

    Zoulek showed off some of his new compositions for bass saxophone and Jessen created an enveloping sound world through Peter Swendsen’s Fireflies and Winter. However, both of these artists took moments in their sets to explore new avenues, like Zoulek singing (in addition to his circular breathing and vocal techniques through his horn) or Jessen cupping a reed between her hands and creating evocative, intense bird call cries while performing Paula Matthusen’s of an implacable subtraction.

    3
    Zeitgeist. No image credit found.

    It was also a pleasure to hear Zeitgeist performing in advance of their big 40th Anniversary shindig on May 4-6th. One of the longest established new music groups in the country, Zeitgeist’s past four decades have included commissioning more than 400 works. They demonstrated their steadfastness to beguiling repertoire with Jerome Kitzke’s In Bone-Colored Light. Cudd and O’Keefe also shone in their solo sets–Cudd’s performance of Cort Lippe’s Music for Cajon and Computer was engrossing, and O’Keefe even gave the listeners a little blast from the past with a fine performance of Steve Reich’s New York Counterpoint. Another example of that peculiar and delightful conceptual richness and technical quality among these artists was Gao Hong playing the pipa and Issam Rafea playing oud. Their sensitivity and openness to each other while performing was a masterclass in subtle ensemble congruence.

    It is always a treat to be musically surprised. innova recordings seems to be in the business of musical surprise and delight, and their Inn-fest 2018 was no departure. If you’re looking for someone who is really doing it right in the world of new music recording, you’ve found it.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    stem

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:27 PM on April 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Innova,   

    From INNOVA: “NOTUS” 

    Innova is the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1
    NOTUS
    Of Radiance & Refraction
    #1 002
    Artist: NOTUS
    Composers: Claude Baker, Sven-David Sandström, Aaron Travers
    Performers: NOTUS,
    Zora String Quartet
    Description
    A shining debut, Difficult to label…

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 8:46 PM on April 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ah Young- Hong A Breath Upwards, Innova, Michael Hersch,   

    From INNOVA: ” Ah Young- Hong A Breath Upwards” 

    Innova is the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1
    Breathing life into myth, and myth into life
    Composers:

    Milton Babbit


    Michael Hersch

    Performers:

    Ah Young Hong

    ,

    Miranda Cuckson

    Gleb Kanasevich

    Jamie Hersch

    Catalog Number: #986
    Genre: new classical
    Collection: solo voice, analog

    1. Milton Babbitt

    Philomel 18:57

    Michael Hersch

    a breath upwards

    2. I 1:46

    3. II 2:29

    4. III 0:36

    5. IV 2:32

    6. V 3:07

    7. VI 2:40

    8. VII 1:05

    9. VIII 4:47

    10. IX 0:57

    11. X 3:49

    12. XI 6:13

    13. XII 1:57

    50:58

    Ah Young Hong, soprano

    Miranda Cuckson, viola

    Gleb Kanasevich, clarinet

    Jamie Hersch, horn

    Release Date:
    Mar 23, 2018

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 9:26 PM on March 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Henry Brant, Innova, Spatial Music, The Henry Brant Collection - Volume 1   

    From INNOVA via MusicWeb International : “Innova is the proud home of The Henry Brant Collection” 

    Innova is the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1

    MusicWeb International

    2

    Henry BRANT (1913-2008)
    The Henry Brant Collection – Volume 1

    Northern Lights over the Twin Cities: A Spatial Assembly of Auroral Echoes (1985) [96:00]
    A Plan of the Air (1975) [24:34]
    rec. 1975, Kleinpell Fine Arts Building Recital Hall, University of Wisconsin (Plan);
    1985, Macalester College Field House, St. Paul, Minnesota (Lights)
    INNOVA 408 [2 CDs: 120:34]

    Can you remember when CD was first introduced? Almost buried by all the hype about veils being drawn aside and “perfect sound – forever”, and overshadowed by Luddite grumblings about “digital edge”, a small, critical voice complained that it would take more or less “forever” to replicate on CD the vinyl LP format’s vast repertoire of recordings. Sometimes I wonder, if the owner of that critical voice is still with us, whether he’s made a hearty breakfast of his words. For not only has that vast repertoire already been replicated, but also it has been expanded in all directions almost beyond belief. Even as the “classical music industry” crumbles to dust around our ears, we are drowning in an unprecedented surfeit of recorded riches.

    One minor consequence of this is that, with the numbers of “unheard-of” composers now apparently far exceeding the “heard-ofs” that accounted for the bulk of that vast repertoire, openers like “Has anyone heard of Henry Brant?” don’t have quite the clout that they used to. However, I can – and will – say that, for several reasons, the name of Henry Brant doesn’t trip off the tongue quite as freely as it should. One reason is that his discography is relatively meagre; of some 30 issues, only about a dozen are devoted solely to Brant, and nine of those comprise Innova’s The Henry Brant Collection. This review looks at Volume 1, and – if my synapses can stay the course – reviews of the remaining eight will follow in (slow) succession.

    Well, then – have you heard of Henry Brant? Another reason for the lack of widespread public recognition could be that his case is mildly similar to that of Harry Partch: what they both did, militated against their music becoming widely disseminated. As it happens, Brant played in the first public performances of Partch’s US Highball, song-settings of Joyce, and Barstow. Brant’s name might have been more familiar (or less unfamiliar) than Partch’s, if his work on music for feature films (movies) hadn’t been entirely uncredited. Brant orchestrated several of the scores of Virgil Thompson, his friend Alex North, and the likes of Antheil and Copland. In fact, his main claim to any sort of fame was also an orchestration, that of Ives’s Concord Sonata – and an astonishing achievement it was, too (The Henry Brant Collection, Volume 7 is devoted to it).

    Biography, if you want it, is easily enough obtained from the web; I’ll merely cherry-pick what’s necessary, as and when. Up front, there is but one thing we need to keep firmly in mind: until 1950, Brant’s output was fairly conventional in relation to its time, but thereafter things changed with a vengeance. Brant’s interest had been gradually piqued by numerous seminal experiences, such as hearing Berlioz’s Grande Messe des Morts, reading Ives’s expositions on “spatial” techniques and studying his practical examples, notably Central Park in the Dark.

    The clincher came when one of his own students, Teo Macero, asked him if there’d be any mileage in writing a piece for five jazz groups, each playing its own materials and all playing independently. Brant, ever an encouraging teacher, thought it was a wild idea, but nevertheless suggested that Macero should give it a whirl and see what happened. He did, and when Brant heard the practical “test” of the piece, it came as a revelation – it had given him his true purpose in life. Through a succession of well over a hundred works he developed the concept of “spatial music” into a fine art – and, mind, he was already well on his way by the time Stockhausen got around to writing Gruppen.

    But what was the Big Deal about spatial music? Let’s see. Through his early researches, Brant learnt that during the Venetian “golden age”, antiphony was the rule rather than the exception, but that it had waned rapidly as the Baroque dawned, and thereafter resurfaced at best fitfully, typically as a special effect (as in the Berlioz, though we will all have our pet examples – mine would be Vaughan Williams’s Tallis Fantasia). Prior to Brant, the only person to have taken it at all seriously, as a valid musical resource, had been Ives – and apart from Brant, precious few have done so, and none so thoroughly.

    Picking up where Ives had left off, Brant regarded “space” as a grossly under-used “dimension”, additional to music’s supposed three dimensions of pitch, time and timbre (don’t these strike you as a bit cockeyed? Isn’t timbre merely mixtures of pitches? And, anyway, what about amplitude?). Extending Ives’s reasoning and building on his own thoughts and experience, Brant concluded that what would sound an unseemly mess in a conventional “concert platform” arrangement could be made abundantly clear and intelligible by suitable spatial arrangements of the performers, widely separated both laterally and vertically throughout the performing space. The acid test is easy: just take a recording of a spatial work and play it back in mono.

    It followed that such spatial arrangements would equally allow the composer heaps of elbow room to say much more complicated things (for instance, by giving each group its own independent materials), which, as far as Brant was concerned was just what the doctor ordered. OK, so there’s more – quite a lot more – to it than that, but this much will have to do for now, except to mention (and here I may be making up a word or two) that Brant proved that “spatialism” is a real, meaningful and functional extension to the “dimensionality” of music – and that it can also be lots of fun.

    Being scored on the Grand Scale, Volume 1’s main work, Northern Lights, will do nicely as an example of a spatial layout. Scattered, but by no means at random, around the large hall are Macalester College’s entire performing resources, a good ten groups of performers (plus, somewhere in and amongst, an audience). Listening through headphones, which are definitely recommended, the impression I get of the layout is as follows.

    We appear to be seated somewhere near the back. The symphony orchestra is spread before us, in the middle distance, fitting into the stereo sound-field with a bit to spare. The two choirs are behind and seemingly raised above the orchestra, spread on either side of centre. The remaining performers seem nearer to us than the orchestra.

    The vocal soloists are dotted around, widely separated and not entirely in the foreground; I’m starting to feel that the male soloists are less close than the females. The concert band is on the extreme left and fairly close to us, whilst the bagpipes are on the extreme right, and a little further off. The jazz band is split “half-left” and “half-right”, and nearer to us than the concert band. The percussion group is split left and right at about the same distance as the concert band. Thus, the left-hand group is apparently right next to the concert band – and the group of five pianos (presumably half of the Ten-Piano Ensemble in the list of performers?) is also very close at hand.

    Now, given that Brant’s spatialism specifically requires wide spacing, why are three groups so bunched up? Even if it turns out (which is more than likely) that the left-hand percussion are actually part of the concert band, we still have the piano group to consider. The most probable answer is that it’s a “trick” of the recording. As this is a two-channel stereo recording, there’s no way of telling whether any given group is in front of us, or behind – it’s entirely possible that the sounds of jazz groups could be coming from that quarter. Obviously, in such situations stereo, although a huge step up from mono, is not really adequate; at the very least you need some sort of surround sound and ideally something like an 8.1 configuration (to be replayed through speakers in all eight corners of the room). All it needs is for somebody to mount new performances that can be recorded with state-of-the-art kit – any takers?

    How accurate my guesstimates are, can be checked against the layout plan – which singularly useful diagram Innova unfortunately didn’t include in the booklet. Notwithstanding the spatial spread, a casual observer could be forgiven for thinking that this all seems like a fairly good recipe for musical mayhem – so it’s only fair to point out that, like Mahler before him, Brant rarely if ever throws the lot at you in one almighty lump.

    Unfortunately for me, Innova’s nine volumes arrange Brant’s pieces economically (even “spatially”) rather than chronologically, so, unless I review each piece separately, I won’t be able even to attempt to illuminate the development of his intriguing art. Never mind; if you do invest in this collection, you’ll have endless hours of fun winkling it out for yourself. And with that, let’s get down to the main business –

    As its name implies, Northern Lights over the Twin Cities: A Spatial Assembly of Auroral Echoes is a long work, its fourteen mostly slow movements occupying our attention for no less than 96 minutes. It was written in 1985 for Macalester College’s centennial celebration. The texts were taken from encyclopœdias and the likes of National Geographic and astronomy magazines, and cover all aspects of the Aurora, from primitive superstitions to scientific explanations (hence the subtitle). Brant believed that if scientific texts are made singable, they can sound every bit as poetic as pukka poetry – although I reckon that (a) the same is probably true for any text, and (b) it probably doesn’t matter either way, since in most musical settings (Partch’s always excepted) words are generally unintelligible.

    Brant’s music comes across as basically tonal, but rarely tuneful. There’s plenty of eruptive angularity in the best late 20th. Century manner, albeit less grating on the listener’s nerves than most. Betwixt and between, his melodic lines are occasionally curvaceous, more often declamatory, the latter being like recitative, or a kind of modernist take on psalm-singing. However, the “variations” on these are at worst imaginative, and at best positively eyebrow-raising (there are some huge vocal swoops and slides that’ll have your eyebrows filling in your bald spot). Primarily, this music stresses colour, rhythm and, for want of a better term, “atmosphere” – on numerous occasions, I even get whiffs of Messiaen, though whether this is deliberate is not for me to say.

    The spatially-separated performing groups mostly have their own materials, and need half a dozen conductors to guide them through the spatial maze, which varies across the full range from single strands to complex polyphonies (in the spatial context, I use the term “polyphony” as also including the layering of quasi-independent materials). However, there is no aleatory in this music, although (I gather) there is a degree of what we might term “controlled independence”. One thing is certain: it is all-encompassing, exceedingly powerful stuff – and, by George, it does grow on you. The first time I played it, I floundered; the second found me feeling decidedly intrigued; coming to the third I was just itching to get the CD spinning. If at this point you’re wondering what I think you are wondering, you’ll be absolutely right – for me this review is a voyage of discovery, just as the remaining eight volumes will be.

    The music may be predominantly slow, but if you’ve any preconceptions about the Aurora being portrayed through mystical mists and æthereal shimmerings, you should ditch them pronto. The texts, both ancient and modern, open up all sorts of possibilities. For instance, the opening movement, Battles of Gods, comparing an ancient belief that the Aurora reflected warring gods with the modern one of “warring” high-energy particles and atoms, is a thrillingly noisy affair, notable for booming brasses redolent of a decidedly disgruntled Fafner. The latter belief is elaborated in the second movement, Ionized Atoms, which bristles with pianos and vigorous, variegated percussion – including sizzling spasms of manic drumming that leave Nielsen’s tympanists sounding as if they’re tapping out Chopsticks.

    At the other extreme, the twelfth movement is entitled Silence. To all intents and purposes, this is an arrangement of John Cage’s 4’33” reduced to twelve seconds’ duration and re-scored for rather larger forces. I have no idea why it’s there, unless, seeing as the work otherwise runs continuously, it’s simply a brief breathing-space. Incidentally, on the recording it’s an absolute silence, other than any noise your equipment generates. Presumably, at the event lots of folk took the opportunity to clear their throats? Slightly less extreme than that, there are many “contemplative” passages to counter-balance the rousing ructions – and yes, there are occasions for mystical mists of a sort: for example, the tenth movement, Pulsating Arcs, features passages of really quite luminous, even celestial beauty.

    This recording is of the first and – as far as I am able to ascertain – the only performance (even assembling the requisite forces would be a logistical nightmare). Moreover, it’s a proper “live” recording, with no retakes and no patching-in to tidy up its bloopers, of which, considering the work’s sheer size and complexity, there are surprisingly few. So, I have to take my hat off to all those players and singers, most of whom were “only” students, because the overall performance strikes me as nothing short of stupendous. There’s a palpable sense of occasion, of indomitable determination, of concentration, and of disciplined enthusiasm.

    The five vocal soloists, firm, even-toned and accurate, with vibrato (my personal bug-bear) entirely within reasonable bounds, seem utterly fearless, particularly in their more gymnastic passages, where Brant had made no concessions either to “youth” or “inexperience”. Thus it’s slightly reluctantly that I single out for mention the coloratura soprano, Sarita Roche, who soars through the vocal stratosphere like a lark, nailing every one of her exceedingly high top notes – and there are a lot of them, sometimes in fairly quick succession.

    Brant gives the two choirs, who are never less than impeccably unanimous and sound wonderfully smooth and fresh-voiced, almost as many gymnastic excursions as the soloists. All these they tackle fearlessly and to breathtaking effect – at the work’s conclusion, their spectacular swoops and slides are positively spine-tingling. Yet, in repose, they simply ooze an appropriately timeless serenity. In the fifth movement (Aksanialo!), focusing on auroral myths and legends, the limelight is shared by the soloists and choirs in an astonishing, virtuosic display of vocal gymnastics, reflecting, I gather, the fear and panic felt by the ancients.

    The players of the concert band are a lusty crew, responsible for much more than that “Fafner” impression. If I admit feeling that they are sometimes a bit undisciplined, I have to temper it by adding that they tackle an awful lot of rowdy passages with considerable gusto, and on balance I much prefer it this way. Initially, it seemed to me that the symphony orchestra doesn’t have much to do. This is partly because, relative to the foreground concert band, percussion and jazz groups, it is fairly recessed; but with repeated listenings you do become increasingly aware of its contributions – and its undoubted merits. This highlights another aspect of spatial music: the performance you hear varies considerably, depending on where you’re sitting.

    The jazz groups are the “stars” of the fourth movement, Rarefied Air. I couldn’t tell you what sort of jazz it was, but it sounded something like a cross between “swing” and 1960s’ “modern”. Whatever, it was dispatched with raucous brio, even – or particularly – when the two groups were completely at “crossed purposes” (a classic bit of Ivesian layering). The pipe band’s contribution was, I suppose, necessarily limited by what bagpipes can do – and, in the ninth movement, Curtains of Light, what they do is to provide an ear-tickling contrast.

    The percussion and pianos I’ve already mentioned, in relation to Ionized Atoms, from which you’ll gather that the percussion playing is of a very high order, and they aren’t at all shy about coming out of their shells – and even “in” their shells they produce some nape-tingling atmospheres. Generally speaking, the piano group seems allied (possibly by that stereo limitation) to the percussion, although they do mount an impressive “solo spot” in Ionized Atoms, and make telling contributions elsewhere – sometimes quite literally “elsewhere” since, possibly due to a bit of fader-fiddling, they don’t always seem to be in quite the same place.

    Because they are included in the booklet list, I feel obliged to mention the dance ensemble, which features in two choreographed movements, Flaming Horizons and Curtains of Light. Sadly, no-one thought to include a photograph of them in action.

    Following the thirteenth movement’s maddeningly insistent choral processions (overlooking chronology, these felt like Brant’s answer to the Epôde for umpteen solo strings of Messiaen’s Chronochromie), the finale, Earth’s Upper Atmosphere, comes as something of a shock – it’s an outrageously jolly, jazzy knees-up, the entire cast joining in what seems like the happy ending to a musical comedy – until, that is, the two choirs cap it all with their prodigious slides. And, yes – by the end of the third hearing I was thoroughly hooked by this enthralling music.

    Now, what about that filler, which at 25 minutes long is hardly a “lollipop”. A Plan of the Air was written ten years before Northern Lights, to a commission by the University of Wisconsin for its centenary. Scored for “standard” S-A-T-B solo singers and a symphonic band, and needing only two conductors, it’s an altogether more modest undertaking. The text is a poem by Patricia Gorman Brant (his then wife), based on – of all things – an inventory from the notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci.

    The symphonic band is divided into several separate groups, of which the booklet identifies only two – a trumpet-trombone group and an indefinite-pitch percussion group. Listening, I think I can recognise a woodwind group, a tuned percussion group, and possibly a horns-tubas group. I say “think”, because the recording is much less helpful than that of Northern Lights. It sounded rather like an off-centre mono signal with some added “ambient stereo” (which hadn’t been invented back then).

    Given the inherent limitations of stereo for spatial music, this is a serious defect, which I felt duty-bound to investigate. I hoicked the track off the CD and opened it in an audio editor. The recording certainly is biased towards the right. In addition, looking at the frequency analysis of the entire waveform, up to about 500 Hz. the two channels are closely matched, but then the LHC starts to weaken relative to the right, levelling off at about -9 dB. from 7 KHz. onwards. However, it is stereo, because widening the image considerably improved its intelligibility. Thus, although as it stands it’s not good, it’s nevertheless far from irretrievable – Innova please note!

    After hearing Northern Lights, the spatiality of A Plan of the Air seems comparatively constricted. In fact, listening, even to my experimentally “opened out” edition, there is no sense of the groups being widely separated; the instrumentalists seem to be deployed on a normal concert platform, with the four singers behind them, like a minimalist choir. Personally, I think that I’d have preferred a seat just a bit nearer the singers.

    Very broadly speaking, Brant lays his score out in several “verses”, each starting on very quiet indefinite-pitched percussion, continuing with the text being sung, in the same “modernist psalm-singing” style that was used in Northern Lights, over a continuous polyphony of burbling woodwind, each verse climaxing in loud interjections from the other groups. With no perceptible variations of tempo, this pattern evolves until, finally, the work culminates in a lengthy, noisy peroration. An interesting feature is that Brant generally plays his indefinite-pitched percussion section like a xylophone, creating a sort of “tune” by using each instrument as a “note”. That this reminds me of the primitive, percussive “music lessons” that I endured at junior school many (too many!) years ago in no way detracts from how it sounds when Brant does it.

    The performance, also a live event, is very good (and certainly outstrips the opposition!). Where A Plan of the Air suffers is, mainly, from being on the same issue as Northern Lights. It seems not only much less ambitious and lacking in variety, but also less spatial, which detracts from Brant’s underlying scheme of polyphonic collisions. Maybe, if the recording were properly opened out, the missing spaces – which, surely, Brant would have insisted on – might be drawn out of hiding. It would be a job worth doing because, in spite of everything I’ve said, I am getting to like it.

    Finally, a word about the presentation. As is usual with Innova, the graphic design is imaginatively off-beat – just look at the cunning booklet front. However, I’m glad to say, this comes without detriment to readability. The CDs are almost entirely anonymous; each bears a silver geometric pattern on a black background, a tiny copyright notice, and an equally tiny catalogue number suffixed with “A” for disc 1 and “B” for disc 2, with the “A” and “B” also embedded in the figure – and that’s about it: no title or composer name, no “Volume 1”, so you may need to be careful about putting the discs away properly.

    There is a bonus in the form of a 160 kbps MP3 file on CD “A”, accessible by popping the disc into your PC. This contains a 42-minute talk by Henry Brant, entitled A Handbook for the Spatial Composer. The composer is heard speaking, more or less, “off the cuff”; there’s a lot of background noise, and many hesitations as Brant gropes for the right words – but it is an invaluable “document” of a maverick composer talking about his “outlandish” (i.e. unusual) ideas, but talking from experience rather than just spouting pretentious theory, which makes it all the more fascinating. In quite a real sense, it’s rather like listening to Partch talking, because both of them are “carpenters” who’ve got their hands dirty in pursuit of their dreams, and have been the authors of truly astonishing achievements.

    Paul Serotsky

    Performers
    Northern Lights
    Sarita Roche (coloratura soprano)
    Cindy Lambert (soprano)
    Rick Penning (ten.)
    Alvin King (high baritone)
    Wayne Dalton (baritone)
    Macalester Festival Chorale / Amy Snyder
    Macalester Concert Choir / Kathy Romey
    Macalester Symphonic Band / Henry Brant
    Macalester Symphony Orchestra / Edouard Forner
    Mac Jazz / Carleton Macey
    Macalester Pipe Band / Andrew Hoag
    Macalester Special Percussion Group
    Ten-Piano Ensemble
    Macalester Dance Ensemble
    Plan of the Air
    Sandra Cross (soprano)
    Jody Bartholomew (alto)
    Robert Hanson (ten.)
    James Bohn (bass-baritone)
    University of Wisconsin Symphony Band / W. Larry Brentzel, Henry Brant

    See the full article here .

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    John Schaefer


    For new music by living composers

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio


    https://www.wnyc.org/
    93.9FM
    https://www.wqxr.org/
    105.9FM
    http://www.thegreenespace.org/

    For great Jazz

    88.3FM http://wbgo.org/

    WPRB 103.3FM

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

     
  • richardmitnick 10:38 PM on March 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Flux and Fire", , , Innova, , , , , , , , ,   

    From INNOVA: “Flux and Fire” 

    Innova is the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1
    Composers:
    Robert Gibson

    Performers:
    James Stern
    Audrey Andrist
    Robert Oppelt
    Richard Barber
    Jeffrey Weisner
    Ali Kian Yazdanfar
    Eric Kutz
    Aeolus Quartet
    Katherine Murdock

    Catalog Number: #993
    Genre: new classical

    Release Date:
    Jul 27, 2018

    Liner notes

    Robert Gibson

    Flux and Fire

    Innova 993

    Twelve Poems (2004)

    James Stern, violin

    Audrey Andrist, piano

    1 Aura 1:27

    2 Wind Chime 1:10

    3 Cloudburst 0:57

    4 Reflection 2:21

    5 2:3 0:40

    6 Waves 1:04

    7 Hommage 1:14

    8 Entropy 1:05

    9 Barcarolle 1:24

    10 Shoal 0:48

    11 Quatrain 1:23

    12 Octave 1:41

    Soundings (2001)

    Robert Oppelt, Richard Barber,

    Jeffrey Weisner, Ali Kian Yazdanfar, double bass

    13 Tenuous 2:23

    14 Diaphanous 3:01

    15 Nebulous 2:45

    16 Luminous 3:03

    17 Capricious 2:33

    18 Night Music (2002) 3:53

    Eric Kutz, violoncello

    19 Flux and Fire (2006) 11:13

    Aeolus Quartet:

    Nicholas Tavani, Rachel Shapiro, violin

    Gregory Luce, viola

    Alan Richardson, violoncello

    20 Night Music (2002) 3:52

    Katherine Murdock, viola

    21 Offrande (1996) 9:11

    Aeolus Quartet

    22 Night Music (2002) 3:48

    James Stern, violin

    Total: 60:54

    C.P. Robert Gibson. All Rights Reserved, 2018.

    innova Recordings is the label of the

    American Composers Forum.

    http://www.robertgibsonmusic.com

    Luxury, impulse! I draft a phrase

    and believe it protects me from this icy world,

    that goes through my body like a shoal of sardines.

    —Alain Bosquet

    “Regrets” (excerpt) from No Matter No Fact

    translation by Edouard Roditi

    My music has often been guided by imagery and emotion from poems that I have come to know and love. The boundaries between the arts are fluid, and the metaphor that for me most aptly illuminates this relationship—and the process of composition—is the act of translation. Matthew Reynolds posits that languages are not separated from each other “like islands in a sea,” but “are more like the undulations of a desert” where usages can accumulate into dunes and then trail off into other forms and variations. Poetry uses language in a way that speaks beyond the meaning and syntax of words. Transforming mental images, whether originally from an internal or external source, into physical sound is to explore the continuum of connections that embody creative activity.

    Paul Muldoon’s poem “The Briefcase” was the initial inspiration for my Twelve Poems. In this short poem, he reflects, while waiting for a bus, on the possibility of “the first inkling” of this poem (inside his briefcase) being swept from his side on a city street in Manhattan by the rushing water of a sudden cloudburst and further to “strike out along the East River/ for the sea. By which I mean the ‘open’ sea.”

    In writing these short movements for violin and piano, I was seeking an analogue for the ability of the poet to capture a particular moment and, further, an idea—more or less abstract—about the materials of the art and its forms. As with poetry, the focus is on sound as much as structure: “Cloudburst” is after Muldoon’s wonderful poem; both contemplation and the physical image of a mirror are implied in “Reflection,” which is a palindrome. The harmonic relationship of the perfect fifth in the overtone series is 2:3, a relationship that can also be expressed rhythmically. “Hommage” is my miniature tribute to Claude Debussy, the composer who has most influenced my conception of musical form. His last work, the sonata for violin and piano, is, for me, music that approaches perfection, and a suggestion of the piece appears in this movement.

    The preferred, although perhaps less known definition of “shoal” refers to a school of fish. This word always reminds me of my favorite lines from Alain Bosquet’s poem “Regrets” that appear above. “Quatrain” and “Octave,” poetic terms for the number of lines in a stanza or poem, relate to the number of phrases (four and eight respectively) in these movements. In addition, the harmonic interval of the octave is ubiquitous in the concluding movement. Twelve Poems was written for James Stern and Audrey Andrist, to whom the work is affectionately dedicated.

    My identity as a composer is deeply connected to my experience as a performer. The physical, mental and emotional aspects of creating sound on a musical instrument are deeply intertwined with my compositional impulses. Most of my music has been written for colleagues and friends, and their musical voices and personalities are an integral part of the images that form, and inform, my creative work.

    I began piano lessons at age five and also played the trombone in middle and high school band until my junior year. My first experience of the bass as the instrument I wanted to play was hearing recordings of Eugene Wright with the Dave Brubeck Quartet and Ron Carter with the Miles Davis Quintet. The warmth, depth, richness, the long resonance and decay of plucked sounds, and the unusual intensity of the high register of the double bass are among the distinctive characteristics that attracted me to the instrument at the age of fifteen.

    The title of my double bass quartet, Soundings, is a reference in part to the nautical term for measuring the depth of water. This term has an obvious connection to the double bass as the “deepest” sounding string instrument of the orchestra. The sound of the double bass results in part from the fact that, while it is the largest of orchestral stringed instruments, it should be larger to sound as low as it does. Because of its size, the double bass is a physically demanding instrument to play with facility, although each generation of “modern” bassists has advanced the technique to the astounding level that one can hear today from soloists, jazz and pop artists, and orchestral bassists.

    The five movements of my bass quartet are a personal exploration of the instrument that is closest to me in my life as a musician. Soundings is dedicated to Robert Oppelt, Richard Barber, Jeffrey Weisner and Ali Kian Yazdanfar, who commissioned this work, and who were all members of the National Symphony Orchestra at the time of this commission.

    Night Music was commissioned by the Friday Morning Music Club of Washington, D.C. as the required work for the Third Triennial Johansen International Competition for Young String Players (2003). This prestigious competition is for young performers ages 13–17, and in 2003 the judges were James Buswell, Heidi Castleman and Aldo Parisot. The requirements for the commissioned work were related to duration (short) and that the work be suitable for performance on violin, viola or violoncello without any instrument-specific editing to the piece (other than transposition). To my mind, the unique timbral qualities of each of these three instruments are so pronounced that the piece is heard anew with each of the distinguished performers on this disc. I wanted to capture a fleeting glimpse of lyricism and technical virtuosity arising from a soloist inspired by the mystery and poetry of the night.

    All things change to fire,

    and fire exhausted

    falls back into things

    —Heraclitus

    No 22 (excerpt) from Fragments

    translation by Brooks Haxton

    My second string quartet, Flux and Fire, was commissioned by The Stony Brook Contemporary Chamber Players for their 19th Annual Premieres Concert (November 2006) on campus and in New York City. The title of the work is related to a “fragment” of Heraclitus in Brooks Haxton’s luminous translation above. Heraclitus (sixth century, BC) was prescient in his understanding of the nature of energy in the universe.

    While writing this piece I began listening to Paul Rusesabagina’s extraordinary account of his personal experience during the Rwandan genocide of 1994 (An Ordinary Man as an audiobook on CD). Listening to a story being told is an ancient and visceral experience, and the rhythm and cadence of the reading made the goodness and evil in the account palpable. While there is no specific program to my piece, the turbulent and sometimes feverish imagery from this novel accounts for the substantial presence of these qualities in my quartet.

    The dark but transcendent imagery of the last stanza from Alain Bosquet’s poem “Regrets” quoted above has often been very close to me, but never more than in 1996 with the loss of my sister-in-law after a four-year struggle with cancer. I was also quite saddened at this time by the news of Toru Takemitsu’s death, since his music has been a profound influence in my own development as a composer. My “offering” (after Varèse’s beautiful pieces of the same name) is in honor, and in celebration, of these two lives—one in my family, and one whose musical path I have found most compelling. Those familiar with Takemitsu’s Garden Rain of 1974 (for brass ensemble) will perhaps recognize the quotation of the haunting melody (solo muted trumpet) which occurs near the end of his piece, and in my quartet (in the second violin) also near the conclusion, following an extended ensemble passage in harmonics. Offrande is dedicated to the memory of Karen van Rossum (1949–96).

    The structure of my music is often based on images of transformation since it is in the transience of sound that music’s deepest beauty is revealed. The poet Stanley Kunitz captured the ultimate experience of transformation in the opening sentence of his “Reflections” from The Collected Poems: “Years ago I came to the realization that the most poignant of all lyric tensions stems from the awareness that we are living and dying at once.” Indeed, the poignance of this awareness is singular. It also intensifies the experience and mystery of living on this beautiful planet. Kunitz concludes his “Reflections” with an artistic aspiration: “I dream of an art so transparent that you can look through and see the world.” This dream evokes for me the ineffable in nature—the feeling of distant thunder offshore; the smell of the rain that strikes your face with the approaching squall; flux and fire incarnate. I want to drink from the storm.

    —Robert Gibson

    SOURCES

    Bosquet, Alain. No Matter No Fact. New York: New Directions Publishing Corporation, 1988.

    Heraclitus. Fragments. Translated by Brooks Haxton. New York: Penguin Books, 2001.

    Kunitz, Stanley. The Collected Poems. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2000.

    Muldoon, Paul. Poems 1968–1998. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2001.

    Reynolds, Matthew. Translation: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.

    Robert Gibson (b. 1950, Atlanta, GA) has had performances of his compositions throughout the United States and in Europe, China and South America. His music has also been presented on National Public Radio and by noted performers and ensembles, including bassists Lucas Drew and Bertram Turetzky; clarinetists Esther Lamneck and Nathan Williams; pianists Santiago Rodriguez, Marilyn Nonken and Audrey Andrist; the Stern/Andrist Duo, the Clarion Wind Quintet, Prism Brass Quintet, the Contemporary Music Forum, VERGE Ensemble, the 21st Century Consort, the Meridian String Quartet, the Aeolus Quartet, the Romanian State Orchestra under guest conductor Jeffrey Silberschlag, and the University of Maryland Symphony Orchestra under James Ross.

    Mr. Gibson has been a composer member of the Contemporary Music Forum of Washington, D.C. (1987–2001). As a jazz bassist he performed with many international artists in the early ’80s, including Mose Allison, Tom Harrell, Bob Berg, Marc Copland, and Barney Kessel. Mr. Gibson’s compositions have been recorded on Golden Crest (The American Music Project, Clarion Wind Quintet, 1979) and Spectrum Records (Soundscapes, 1982; Music of Robert Gibson, 1986). Chamber Music (1995) , a Capstone compact disc of his chamber works appeared on Fanfare magazine’s Want List as one of critic William Zagorski’s five notable recordings of the year. Mr. Gibson has been a resident composer at the Alba (Italy) Music Festival (2011–13). He is Professor and former Director (2005–16) of the School of Music at the University of Maryland, College Park. He lives with his wife, Barbara, in Olney, Maryland and Birch Harbor, Maine.

    Hailed by the Washington Post for “virtuosity and penetrating intelligence,” violinist James Stern has performed at the National Gallery, Smithsonian Museums, Phillips Collection, the Library of Congress, and the White House with the Smithsonian Chamber Players and VERGE Ensemble, with whom he has also toured internationally. He has performed at the Marlboro and Ravinia festivals. His solo Bach CD is available on Albany Records. He tours nationally with the trio Strata (with pianist Audrey Andrist and clarinetist Nathan Williams). A former faculty member at the Cleveland Institute, he is now Professor at the University of Maryland. He coaches ensembles and conducts the strings at the National Orchestral Institute.

    Canadian pianist Audrey Andrist grew up in Saskatchewan, and while in high school, traveled three hours one-way for lessons with William Moore, himself a former student of famed musicians Cécile Genhart and Rosina Lhévinne. She studied at the Juilliard School with Herbert Stessin, winning the Mozart International, San Antonio International, and Juilliard Concerto Competitions. A member of the Stern/Andrist Duo with her husband, violinist James Stern, and Strata, a trio with Stern and clarinetist Nathan Williams, Ms. Andrist can be heard on over a dozen recordings, including a critically acclaimed solo Schumann CD for Centaur Records. She teaches at UMBC and the Washington Conservatory.

    Katherine Murdock has performed throughout the world with the Mendelssohn String Quartet, Music from Marlboro, Boston Chamber Music Society, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Boston Symphony, and Boston Musica Viva. She has been a guest of the Guarneri, Emerson, and Vermeer quartets, and has performed live for West German Radio, BBC, NPR Performance Today, St. Paul Sunday and NBC’s Today Show. Currently Associate Professor at the University of Maryland, Ms. Murdock has served on the faculties of Boston Conservatory, Longy School, the Hartt School, SUNY Stony Brook, Artist-in-Residence at Harvard University, and the Yellow Barn and Kneisel Hall summer festivals. She is a member of the Left Bank Quartet and for twenty-one years was violist of the Los Angeles Piano Quartet.

    Cellist Eric Kutz has captivated audiences across North America, Asia and Europe. He is on the faculty of the University of Maryland School of Music, where he holds the Barbara K. Steppel Memorial Faculty Fellowship in cello. He is active as a teacher, a chamber musician, an orchestral musician and a concerto soloist. His diverse collaborations cut across musical styles, and have ranged from cellist Yo-Yo Ma to jazz great Ornette Coleman. Mr. Kutz is a member of the Murasaki Duo, a cello and piano ensemble that has released three commercial CDs and regularly performs on chamber music series throughout the nation. He holds degrees from the Juilliard School and Rice University.

    Robert Oppelt joined the National Symphony Orchestra bass section in 1982 at the invitation of Music Director Mstislav Rostropovich, and he has since served as Assistant and Principal Bass. With the NSO he has performed Mozart’s Per queste bella mano, Paganini’s Moses Fantasy and Koussevitsky’s Concerto for Double Bass. Chamber music collaborators include Yo-Yo Ma, Hilary Hahn, Guarneri String Quartet and Kennedy Center Chamber Players. He is a 1982 graduate of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, with additional studies at Brevard and Tanglewood music centers. Currently a teacher at the University of Maryland, he is also an avid sailor.

    Richard Barber was born into a family of musicians and educators. While also cultivating a love of science, he ultimately decided that music was his primary passion. After attending Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore, he began his orchestral career with the Phoenix Symphony. Three years later he was appointed Assistant Principal Bass of the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, D.C. He is also active as a member of the Grand Teton Music Festival, the Eclipse Chamber Orchestra and the 21st Century Consort. He teaches both privately and at the University of Maryland. He plays an Italian bass made c. 1620 in Italy by the Brescian master Giovanni Paolo Maggini. He lives in Maryland with his wife, mezzo-soprano Marta Kirilloff Barber, and their children.

    Jeffrey Weisner joined the National Symphony Orchestra bass section in 1995. He is active in venues around the region and the country as a performer and teacher. From 1991 to 1993, Mr. Weisner was a member of the New World Symphony in Miami, and from 1993 to 1995, he was a member of the Delaware Symphony. From 2005-2017, he was on the double bass faculty of the Peabody Conservatory. Mr. Weisner is dedicated to creating and supporting new music. His solo album Neomonology, released in 2012 on Innova Records, features three works which he commissioned and premiered. He also supported the creation of nine new multi-bass pieces by Peabody student composers during his tenure at the school.

    One of the most prominent double bassists of his generation, Ali Kian Yazdanfar maintains an active career not only as an orchestral double bassist, but also as a soloist, chamber musician and pedagogue. Although he started playing the bass at 7 years old, his science and mathematics background led to a physics degree from The Johns Hopkins University, and, directly upon graduating, he won his first audition to become a member of the Houston Symphony. He went on to win his next three auditions, for the National Symphony in Washington, D.C., for principal bass with the San Francisco Symphony, and for principal bass with the Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal, his current position.

    Praised by the Baltimore Sun for combining “smoothly meshed technique with a sense of spontaneity and discovery,” the Aeolus Quartet is committed to presenting time-seasoned masterworks and new cutting-edge works to widely diverse audiences with equal freshness, dedication and fervor. Violinists Nicholas Tavani and Rachel Shapiro, violist Gregory Luce, and cellist Alan Richardson formed the Aeolus Quartet in 2008 at the Cleveland Institute of Music. Since its inception, the all-American quartet has been awarded prizes at nearly every major competition in the United States and performed across the globe with showings “worthy of a major-league quartet” (Scott Cantrell, ­Dallas Morning News). Mark Satola of the Cleveland Plain Dealer writes, “A rich and warm tone combined with precise ensemble playing (that managed also to come across as fluid and natural), and an impressive musical intelligence guided every technical and dramatic turn.” The Aeolus Quartet was the 2013–15 Graduate Resident String Quartet at the Juilliard School, and the quartet members currently make their home in New York City.

    The Quartet has performed across North America, Europe and Asia in venues such as Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center, Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, Reinberger Recital Hall at Severance Hall, Merkin Hall, the Library of Congress, Renwick Gallery, St. Martin-in-the-Fields and the Shanghai Oriental Arts Center. The Aeolus Quartet has released two critically acclaimed albums of classical and contemporary works through the Longhorn/Naxos label which are available on iTunes, Amazon, and major retailers worldwide.

    CREDITS

    Producers: Robert Gibson and Antonino D’Urzo

    Engineering and mastering: Antonino D’Urzo

    Photography: Astrid Riecken (composer’s hand/bass and portrait);

    Robert Gibson (Schoodic Peninsula)

    Design: Barbara and Robert Gibson

    Album cover photos and tray background: iStock.com

    Innova Director: Philip Blackburn

    Operations Director: Chris Campbell

    Publicist: Tim Igel

    Innova is supported by an endowment from the McKnight Foundation.

    See the full article here .

    For new music by living composers

    John Schaefer

    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00AM-2:00PM featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Fridays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00PM


    Please visit The Jazz Loft Project based on the work of Sam Stephenson
    Please visit The Jazz Loft Radio project from New York Public Radio

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  • richardmitnick 5:00 PM on March 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Innova, ,   

    From INNOVA: “‘Smoke’: Music of Marc Mellits” 

    Innova is the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    1
    Composers: Marc Mellits
    Performers: New Music Detroit
    Shannon Orme: bass clarinet
    Erik Rönmark: saxophones
    Gina DiBello: violin
    Adrienne Rönmark: violin
    Samuel Bergman: viola
    Úna O’Riordan: cello
    Gyan Riley: guitar
    Vicky Chow: piano
    Ian Ding: drum set, marimba, & percussion
    Daniel Bauch: marimba

    Catalog Number: #1 004
    Genre: new classical new music

    Recorded at: Orchestra Hall, Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Music Center (Detroit, MI); Brown Hall, New England Conservatory (Boston, MA); and Dover Studios (Chicago, IL).

    Release Date:
    Jun 22, 2018

    See the full article here .

    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

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  • richardmitnick 4:59 PM on March 9, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Gapplegate Classical-Modern Music Review, Innova, Millikan Symphony, , ,   

    From INNOVA: “Millikan Symphony” 

    Innova is the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    1
    Millikan Symphony
    For, about, and of Robert Millikan

    Composers: Ann Millikan
    Performers: Boston Modern Orchestra Project
    Gil Rose, Jennifer Curtis

    TITLE TIME
    Millikan Symphony: I. Science
    Jennifer Curtis, Boston Modern Orchestra Project & Gil Rose
    12:48
    Millikan Symphony: II. Animals
    Jennifer Curtis, Boston Modern Orchestra Project & Gil Rose
    13:13
    Millikan Symphony: III. Rowing
    Jennifer Curtis, Boston Modern Orchestra Project & Gil Rose
    6:10
    Millikan Symphony: IV. Violin
    Jennifer Curtis, Boston Modern Orchestra Project & Gil Rose
    14:40

    2017 Innova

    From Gapplegate Classical-Modern Music Review

    “The excellent Boston Modern Music Project under Gil Rose returns for the music of a New American Composer of note, namely Ann Millikan and her full-length Millikan Symphony (Innova 981).

    In the case of Ann Millikan and her Millikan Symphony, what she does with some Modern traits is much more important than the newness or oldness of the traits themselves. Listening to Millikan Symphony it is supremely important to hear the work closely, more than once. Otherwise the traits themselves will be the main apprehension and the special putting together might totally pass you by. A reasoned, considered judgement on New Music is a complex give and take of content and structure.

    So I would venture to say that the structuring of the content of Millikan Symphony is the critical aspect that sets it apart. Sure if you look at each piece as a piece you might identify Copland pastoral tenderness, Stravinskian Neo-Classical heroic regality, maybe some of the orchestral dynamics of some of the most celebrated big orchestrators (I won’t say Richard Strauss here because it is not quite that), maybe the Harrisonian delicious articulation of flute and strings, the moody mystery of Post-Tone Poetry, and more.

    Yet thanks to the very gradated excellence of the BMOP performance and what the score calls for, there is a kind of inner organicism of spirit and a narrative thrust that is a story in itself.

    This is a work of hommage, of Ann to her brother Robert, dead at the age of 55 in 2012, a brilliant epidemiologist, a pioneer on the incidence of breast cancer, a dedicated veterinarian, a lover of nature and a profoundly musical soul. The five movements of the work unravel and reveal a special aspect of Robert the human. There is the “Science” movement, one for “Animals,” “Rowing,” and “Violin.” Polyrhythmic and tonally expanded, the music is at once beholden to the legacy of High Modernism and also too to the grand narrative style of the most revered orchestral masters. The music comes out of a collaborative venture planned over the years between Robert and Ann. Some of the music was dictated by Ann to Robert; the principal”Violin” movement theme has Robert’s compositional hand upon it. Milliken Symphony is the triumphant result of the two in their musical closeness, yet also stunningly a backward view of Robert’s many tiered life via the hindsight of its passing.

    It is hard to imagine a more moving tribute. Even though we may know next to nothing about Robert’s life, something very strong of its essence comes through throughout.

    After very many listens I come away from the work feeling like I have heard something of real significance. All those superficial traits at the first listen have become enigmatically original along with the flow and pacing and structure. It is not a work you put on first time and give a loud “wow!” to in response. The wow effect builds. Then, you know. Or I knew, anyway. Wow.

    You would do well to venture upon this music and its very satisfying performance by BMOP. It is subtle in the beginning of your interaction, then the it becomes more and more clearly, identifiably special. I do recommend you spend some serious time with this. Ann Millikan is a living treasure!”

    Posted by Grego Applegate Edwards

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    See the full article here .

    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

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  • richardmitnick 1:54 PM on March 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 4 Of INNOVA's women composers, , , Innova, , ,   

    From INNOVA: Women composers at INNOVA 

    Innova is the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    http://www.innova.mu/
    http://composersforum.org/

    INNOVA Recordings is proud to publish dozens upon dozens of works by female composers. Here are some our catalog to the breadth, depth, and diversity of those sounds. From Hildegard to Gosfield, Beglarian to Bielawa, Larsen to Oliveros, to Monk to Matthusen to Mazzoli.

    Received via email.

    For new music by living composers
    newsounds.org from New York Public Radio

    For great Jazz
    WPRB

    Dan Buskirk Spinning Jazz Mondays 11:00AM-1:00PM
    Will Constantine Jr, Blues Bop and Beyond Thursdays 11:00-2:00 featuring Latin Jazz
    Jerry Gordon Serenade to a Cookoo Frdays 11:00AM-2:00PM with Jerry’s Room at 1:00Pm
    Jeannie Becker Sunday Jazz 10:00AM-1:00Pm

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  • richardmitnick 10:57 AM on March 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Glissando, Innova,   

    From Innova: Glissando-Episode 1.7 – Anna Thorvaldsdottir 

    1

    Innova is the home for New Music in America

    Innova is the recording arm of American Composers Forum, St Paul Mn.

    2

    On episode 1.7 we talk to composer Anna Thorvaldsdottir about her work In the Light of Air, which will be performed by the International Contemporary Ensemble at the upcoming Big Ears Festival. We also discuss the music scene in her homeland of Iceland.

    Our Deep Cut is Rued Langgaard‘s Music of the Spheres, a stunning work for orchestra and choir that was about fifty years ahead of its time.

    Episode 1.7 Sponsor – Innova Recordings

    Our sponsor for this episode is Innova Recordings, founded in 1982 by what is now the American Composers Forum. Innova is based out of St Paul, Minnesota, and they specialize in the music of innovative contemporary composers; in fact, they released the debut album from our guest, Anna Thorvaldsdottir, which is titled Rhizoma. Visit innova.mu to learn more about Innova and their catalog, and also check out the American Composers Forum at composersforum.org.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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